The Making of a Supply Chain Leader

What are the key skills  supply chain professionals should be developing in an AI-enabled future?

Ekaterina_Minaeva / Shutterstock

“I’m a great believer in great passion,” says Ron Castro, Vice President, IBM Supply Chain. And it’s just as well given that Ron is responsible for all strategy, execution, and transformation of IBM’s US$70Bn global end-to-end supply chain, delivering to clients across more than 170 countries.

“Always be as bold and as fast as you can,” he says. “I’ve never looked back in a transformation and thought ‘Darn it! I wish I had gone slower.’ There’s always room to be bolder and to go faster.”

On Day Two of Career Boot Camp, Ron speaks to us about the greatest challenges and complexities of his role, the importance of leadership, and the key skills that supply chain professionals should be developing in an AI-enabled future.

Building a cognitive supply chain

“We’re at a point when new technologies are truly enabling us to take advantage of all kinds of data and giving us actionable insights close to real time,” Ron says.

“In our case, it all started several years ago when we built our transparent supply chain across [all] processes and systems, which gave us an excellent platform to apply advanced analytics and manage our business by exceptions. We set a very clear goal to become the first cognitive supply chain. This is based on our strong belief that with machine and human interaction we can truly augment supply chain professionals’ daily decision-making,” he says.

Ron points to several emerging technologies that provide incredible opportunity – AI (Watson, in IBM’s case), machine learning, blockchain, the Internet of Things, virtual reality, and 3D printing.

“Humans and machines always get a better answer than machine alone or human alone. With that principal we’re training Watson with our best supply chain experts [and] letting it observe our decision-making in digital resolution rooms,” Ron says. “Watson is learning in real time with us so it can help us to identify risks, predict issues and, as a trusted advisor, suggest our best course of action. How were similar problems tackled in the past? What are the risks or alternatives? Who should be involved or advise us on what actions we should be taking to manage the situation better and faster?”

“As we map the future of our supply chain it is crystal clear that we are getting the most value of our capabilities as we start to stack technologies together,” he says.

The challenge that’s keeping supply chain leaders up at night

“I have the pleasure of leading one of the most talented supply chain teams in the world,” Ron says. “I really love the adrenaline and all the variables that you need to be able to optimise it and the challenge of ensuring the right balance between demand and supply while [delivering] the highest quality and [focusing] on managing revenue cost.

“We are sensing and responding fast in the most intelligent way to any changes in the supply and demand equation, whether it be the introduction of new products, reacting to a natural disaster, geopolitical issues or supplier constraints,” he says.

But Ron also acknowledges that the tech industry is changing by the minute.

“[T]he challenge that keeps me up at night is are we transforming, are we moving fast enough and, more importantly, are we giving our team the tools they need to be successful?” he asks. “At the end of the day [are we building] an organisational culture that’s primed to leverage new technologies, unleash innovation, and challenge the status quo? Do we truly have the skills for the future?”

The making of a supply chain leader

 Ron always sees the need for strong leaders. “Some of the fundamentals [of leadership] don’t change; passion, perseverance, global and holistic thinking, collaboration and the value of diversity, [and] building a culture of feedback and continuous improvement,” he says.

Ron believes all these factors, indicative of a high-performance culture, will become even more critical in an AI-enabled future.

“We need leaders that take risks and drive a clear vision around digital supply chain and the need to be innovators; leaders that value experimentation over perfection [and] are willing to try new things and correct fast as needed,” he says.

Ron believes that leaders need a deep understanding of technology and where the trends are heading.“Disruptions are coming and they will hit us faster than ever so the ability to react becomes essential,” he says.

Ron advises aspiring supply chain professionals to take a step back and ensure that they are holistic, global, and horizontal thinkers. He encourages them to embrace new ways of working and collaborating with one another in order to become agile thinkers.

“In this new world the basics of supply chain are still critical so you can optimise a supply chain holistically from an end-to-end perspective. But you also need to be technically savvy,” he says. “The machine-human interaction will continue to increase and all these technologies will continue to become even more critical in supply chain.”

Data scientists will also be highly valuable, Ron says, as the ability to gather insights and ask the right questions will become critical for supply chain professionals.

Ron Castro is speaking on Day Two of Career Boot Camp 2018. Sign up here (it’s free) to listen to his podcast now.

Supply Chain Management – Much More Than Just The Wire Between Switch And Light…

Sometimes supply chain is viewed as an abstract part of the business – we’re the wire between switch and the light. But that wire is not always fully understood…

Career Boot Camp 2018 kicks off this week! And this year’s series, Your Supply Chain Career: Accelerated, has been designed to help you sprint outside of your comfort zone and get into the best career shape of your life!

On Day 1, we catch up with Rick Blasgen President and CEO of CSCMP who has a lot of hope for the future of the supply chain profession.

“I think our professions have come such a long way already and have such a long way to go. Procurement and supply chain management will be an embedded feature of every competive global company around the world because they see so much of what goes on.

“[At CSCMP] we see it really growing into the fabric of successful companies. There is so much opportunity before us as our global economies kick in and we use technology and productivity processes to improve our ability to serve customers in markets that are yet to be conquered.”

The value in professional certifications

The debate rages on over the true value in professional supply chain certifications. But Rick is pretty sure they’re here to stay!

“This profession changes so rapidly –  think about risk management or about deliveries by drones or autonomous vehicles. These types of systems or technologies were not even part of our lexicon ten years ago and so certifications allow us to keep fresh, allow us to continue to demonstrate that we have a mastery of the supply chain and procurement professions by being on the forefront of what’s coming down the line that we might be able to use in our professions.

“One of the things important to CSCMP is to advance the logistics, supply chain and procurement professions and the careers of those working in them. The only way we do that is by being thought leaders and thinking about using the new technologies and tools that have never before existed. Our certifications will educate you on these things and then test that you have the understanding and can utilise the complexity within them.

“So I think [professional certifications] are a normal course of continuing to educate yourself and continuing to be knowledgeable about such a dynamic and ever-changing field.”

Upskilling your supply chain team

How does Rick feel about experienced hires versus the value in up-skilling talented professionals from diverse backgrounds?

“There is no reason that someone with a lot of experience in a different field can’t be very successful working in supply chain. If you have the ability to analyse data or if you’re an engineer – those types of talents and skills play a very important role within the supply chain world.

“Sometimes supply chain is viewed as an abstract part [of the business] – we’re the wire between switch and the light. You flick the  switch and the light goes on you don’t call your power company and thank them because you expect the light to go on.

“Well that wire is sometimes not truly understood – supply chain and procurement professions struggle a little bit with awareness.

“But there’s so much opportunity and different types of jobs that folks can come into. If you have a set of skills like great interpersonal skills or great managerial and leadership skills you’re going to do just fine in a supply chain position as long as you can analyse data and think logically about this flow of inventory and information.

“We’ve seen folks come from the medical industry, consumer products, consumer electronics or even different types of functions such as English or History majors who have come and done a wonderful job.

“Is it great to get supply chain education? Sure it is!  Universities these days are doing a great job of explaining modern day supply chain theory. But you can certainly be successful as you fly into this profession with a set of skills that really make a difference.”

Rick’s parting words to any aspiring supply chain professionals?

“Young folks have a great opportunity – I have never seen a hiring market like it is now. If youre looking for a job on another continent I can’t think of another field where you can go ahead move to another part of the world If you so desire and have a very fruitful experience. If you have a global experience or a global mindset  you’ll do very well in supply chain because it is such a global field.”

Rick Blasgen is speaking on Day 1 of Career Boot Camp 2018. Sign up here (it’s free) to listen now! 

The Rise of The Contingent Workforce… And How to Manage It!

Contingent Labour represents an ever-increasing proportion of our workforce, and it’s not hard to understand why. What is challenging for procurement teams, however, is effective management of their organisation’s contingent workforce… 

kurhan/ Shutterstock

“Depending on whose data you believe, the contingent workforce now makes up from 20 per cent [1] to 40 per cent [2] of the global workforce, with some analysts estimating that it will reach 50 per cent by the year 2020,” says Doug Leeby, CEO – Beeline.

Procurious caught up with Doug ahead of his keynote presentation at Big Ideas Summit Chicago to learn more about the state of contingent labour in the workplace today and to pick his brains on how procurement teams can best manage, and leverage, their ever-evolving workforce.

The rise of the contingent workforce

“It’s easy to understand why contingent labour is growing,” explains Doug.  “Most companies are under intense pressure to improve their bottom line and usage of contingent staff, contractors, freelancers, and consultants is an excellent economic model that can be deployed to both accomplish discrete projects and assist an organisation during surge periods of work.”

“There is an enormous economic benefit in being able to ramp up key areas of the workforce during heavy times and down in lighter times.  Additionally, the enterprise can complete important project work by hiring external experts rather than having to bring highly specialised skills into the organisation.  The short-term costs may appear high but the total cost to production can, in fact, be much lower.”

“Traditionally, companies have looked to the contingent labor population for work that is less strategic, saving that for FTEs.  However, more and more, we are seeing a hybrid approach.  Successful companies in which HR and Procurement are working together have figured this out.  Most of us can’t afford a team of data scientists but we can contract a team for a specific goal.  That’s a very strategic example whereas the contingent workforce can produce extraordinary value.”

The challenges of contingent labour

Employing a large proportion of contingent labour to your organisations presents a whole new set of challenges for both procurement teams and HR. But, as Doug advises, it is specifically in-effective management of contingent talent that will lead to enormous problems and risks for your organisation.

“Companies may be operating out of compliance, exposing themselves to severe penalties.  Additionally, improperly managing this talent can lead to overpayment or under-delivery of results. Metrics and KPIs are critical to ensure that the program is properly managed. Everyone has heard about the now-infamous ‘war on talent.’  It isn’t subsiding.  Not having a smooth-running program to manage contingent labor invariably leads to losing great talent to those who do have solid programs.”

Part of the difficulty with managing contingent labour is procurement’s failure to work constructively and efficiently alongside HR departments.

“Asking the two departments to take time to think about optimising their workforce is a tough ask,” explains Doug.

“This is not a small undertaking nor is it something that can be accomplished in one meeting, or even a series of meetings. It is transformational, which means it requires a significant investment of time and resources, but I believe it will happen as the focus on talent comes into greater view at the C-suite. HR has an outstanding opportunity to look at talent holistically and work with Procurement to ensure that it is sourced and managed properly. This will deliver tremendous value to the organisation.”

Using tech to manage contingent labour

“Technology today is an enabler,” Doug explains.  “However, with the progress being made in AI and machine learning, it will soon become far more than just an enabler – it will become an advisor.

“Technology shouldn’t just be about workflow and reporting.  Rather, it should act more as a subject matter expert or concierge helping procurement and HR to analyse their workforce and make strategic decisions.

“The challenge with this transformation is that it depends on organisations getting all their data into the technology and most still have a way to go. At a minimum, they need get all of the contingent labor into the system – complex, statement-of-work (SOW) based, milestone-based services as well as contingent staff.

“VMS technology can manage not only who the contingent workers are, where they are, what they are doing, and what facilities and data they have access to, but also how well they perform their assignments.”

The future of the workforce

“The workplace and workforce model that has been in place since the Industrial Revolution, designed for stable markets and long-term business planning, is giving way to a new model based on constant change and adaptability,” Doug believes.  We asked Doug to outline what he believes will be the key features of the workforce of the future…

1. Talent first

Over time, I believe organisations will adopt a “Talent First” approach that will be led by HR.  Procurement will remain a solid partner, but HR will need to lead the initiative within the organisation. They will work, proactively, with department heads and finance to figure out the best way to achieve desired outcomes.

2. The human touch

Some outcomes will be handled via artificial intelligence and robotic process automation, but much will still depend on people.  Competitive organisations will focus on optimising their workforce.  They will then focus on how to source this talent holistically.

3. Talent pools

Talent sourcing won’t be done in silos anymore.  Organizations will establish private talent pools and work to attract talent, both FTE and non-FTE, to their pools.  Then, they will be able to hire/engage known talent which leads to a higher propensity for success.

4. Self-sourcing

Companies will make use of functionality like our Self-Sourcing.  In other words, they will go directly to the contingent talent rather than through intermediaries.  This is already being done with freelancers, but we will see more of this with contractors and consultants.

Doug Leeby will be speaking at Big Ideas Chicago on 27th September. To  hear more from him and to follow the action LIVE from wherever you are in the world, register as a digital delegate (it’s free!)

Continue reading The Rise of The Contingent Workforce… And How to Manage It!

Making Sustainable Procurement Work

Now, more than ever, it’s important for the profession to put sustainable procurement at the front and center of business.

AYA images/ Shutterstock

Daniel Perry, Global Alliances Director – Ecovadis believes that the role of procurement is evolving. Evolving from being “primarily focused on cost savings and operational efficiency, to a more strategic and central player in risk management and value creation.”

Now, more than ever, it’s important for the profession to put sustainable procurement at the front and center of business.

“Stakeholders, including end consumers, B2B customers, shareholders etc. are demanding that businesses take responsibility for practices all the way into their value chain. They’re driving transparency and, ultimately, a positive impact by working with high-integrity partners. And it’s procurement teams that are in the ideal place to meet these higher stakeholder demands.”

“The power of the spend that procurement controls (often between 50-70 per cent of turnover) puts procurement at the crossroads of not only risk management and brand protection, but also as internal partners for driving value creation. Of course they want the value chain to be resilient – to avoid interruptions or damage to their company’s reputation – but they also want to provide supplier-driven innovation and support for transformative business models and offerings. –

“Procurement teams focused on sustainability do this by selecting and working with the best suppliers in a way that goes far beyond price, quality and delivery, to include performance around environmental, social and labor and ethics practices.”

The value-add of sustainability programs

It’s all too common to hear an organisation defend their lack of commitment and lack effort in this space. “It’s too expensive”, “it’s too difficult”, “it’s too time consuming” or “we’re just not ready” are typical refrains.

The benefits and ROI of sustainability include not only operational savings, but strategic outcomes. A well-developed Sustainability and Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) program that is integrated into the company values, and is driven with executive support, can drive key business performance metrics such as:

  • Sales and reputation: A burgeoning wave of consumer sentiment is cresting. More and more customers are comparing the sustainability details of products and services, and it is changing their purchase decisions. Companies making the right sustainability investments can realise a possible increase in revenue of up to 20 per cent.
  • Employee morale and productivity: Sustainability programs can do wonders to improve employee satisfaction, reducing a company’s staff turnover rate by up to 50 per cent and increasing employee productivity by up to 13 per cent. Integrating CSR practices in your company and brand also has a hugely positive impact on recruiting.  If your company has a better sustainability reputation, it often generates more interest from applicants, allowing you to be more selective and choose higher quality candidates.
  • Increased market value: Sustainability programs can increase a company’s market value by up to 6 per cent.
  • Innovation: With more power comes more responsibility…and more options. Many companies are pursuing sustainable procurement strategies in order to find innovative suppliers that will help them differentiate their product or service offering.

Dupont, for example, changed its innovation strategy to embrace a “sustainable growth” mission, saying “If we bring the solutions to the market sooner than our competitors do, we will be more successful in continuing to grow the company.”

Making sustainable procurement work

“One of the biggest challenges companies face in sustainable procurement is measuring and understanding current performance within their supply base, in the context of global standards and benchmarks. It can also be challenging to engage suppliers as collaborators in their mission. And to get there requires a mix of expertise, the right technology, change management and process integration backed by executive commitment.

“First, the organisation needs a clear mandate from the executive team, which makes the sustainable procurement program an integral part of the function’s mission and values. This is embodied by investing in change management and communication programs and taking steps towards implementation and company-wide adoption.

“Success also requires reliable, agreed-upon indicators for sustainability performance that both buyers and suppliers can understand, and that are actionable. Many companies collect lots of unvalidated data, but buyers rarely have the CSR expertise or time to validate or interpret it – and this is where a standardised, evidence-based, and analyst-generated rating – like EcoVadis provides – comes into play.

“Additionally, CSR criteria and performance indicators must be integrated across the procurement function and include the use of clear and enforceable codes of conduct, contract clauses and tender criteria. Buyers need to believe in and leverage these criteria in their supplier development and sourcing activities.,  And, procurement groups should agree on, measure and reward on the critical CSR / sustainability KPIs in the same way they track cost savings or other key metrics. These all drive adoption in the organisation and make sustainability inherent to the procurement role.

“Increasing the benefits to a single company, a mutualised platform can make it much easier for suppliers to share the same scorecard results with all their customers, enhancing transparency and collaboration to drive network effects for maximum improvement and impact.”

Daniel Perry will be speaking at Big Ideas Chicago on 27th September. To  hear more from him and to follow the action LIVE from wherever you are in the world, register as a digital delegate (it’s free!)

Read more on this subject from EcoVadis in  Beyond Compliance – The 5 Pillars of sustainable procurement value creation

Procurement with Purpose – Not All Rainbows and Fairytales

Procurement with purpose is often perceived as rainbows and fairytales. But it only sounds that way when we fail to connect purpose with real business results.

Most procurement and supply chain professionals initially gravitated towards their profession because they like to understand how things work; they like to figure out how to make things work better and because they like taking the complex and making it simpler.

Perhaps comparatively few professionals embarked on these careers thinking that they would change the world.

But times have changed. As digital technologies reshape the world around us procurement has brand new opportunities to make the world a better place and many procurement teams are seizing these opportunities.

Indeed, procurement and supply chain pros are starting to ask more of their suppliers:

  • Does my supplier have the governance structures in place necessary to root out forced labour from the supply chain?
  • Does my supplier follow an ethical, sustainable approach to the environment? Is it a good neighbour? Is it responsible in its stewardship of natural resources?
  • Can my supplier verify the provenance of conflict-free minerals?
  • What steps does my supplier take to embrace diversity and inclusion in its workforce and supply chain?

These questions, and hundreds more like them, are now so much easier to answer thanks to digital networks, transparency and accountability. And this is important because shareholders, analysts and customers are increasingly demanding that the brands they support, and invest in, actually stand for something.

How Technology Can Democratise Procurement

Digital networks offer the breadth and scale necessary to monitor these things adequately, helping us to get our arms around ethical business practices from all the organisations that we do business with.

For most organisations, keeping track of the first-line suppliers is difficult enough. Tracking the full supply chain of their suppliers, and their suppliers’ suppliers,  would naturally seem impossible. But technology has changed all this.

Take the following example scenario as an example. Imagine you’re a category manager and you want to know if there is a high risk of forced labor anywhere in your supply chain. You log into your dashboard and can see all of your suppliers globally and where you might be exposed.

If you wanted to look specifically at North America you might zoom in and see that Carbo Ceramics, a critical supplier, has risk exposure.

Further investigation would reveal that two of the categories you source are indeed at high risk for forced labour: electronic fuse and electronic display unit. The proximity of forced labor to your source of supply is high, and there is also a high likelihood of exposure to the supplier you source them from.

So now you’ve got the insights and the transparency you need to take action. You can ask further questions of the supplier, make a site visits and even consider finding an alternative partner.

In less than two minutes, you’ve gained all the information you need to detect and mitigate slavery in your supply chain and make a major impact; not only in your supply chain and business, but to the lives of others. There’s incredible peace of mind in that.

Digital procurement also extends opportunity to historical underrepresented groups of business owners. On a network, you size up a supplier based on the data, based on the value it can lend your supply chain, not based on gender, race, national origin or sexual preference.

Technology can be incredibly democratising. It democratises opportunity and extends it outward from the few to the many.

Journey from Chief Procurement Officer to Chief Purpose Officer

It used to be that CPOs who embraced purpose-led procurement as a core part of their job description were the exception. Now we’re seeing the role of the Chief Procurement Officer evolving into the role of the Chief Purpose Officer.

Procurement with purpose is often perceived as rainbows and fairytales. But it only sounds that way when we fail to connect purpose with real business results. It happens when we neglect to point out the measurable outcomes for our customers.

We need to do a better job of explaining procurement with purpose, of spreading awareness that, through transparency and accountability, supply chains can meaningfully improve people’s lives. Procurement professionals can markedly improve people’s lives.

Thanks to digital networks, procurement professionals are spending less time chasing down data, and more time acting on it. We can let go of the traditional tactical tasks to focus instead on creating value for our organisations and propelling them forward.

That reality, that authenticity, aided by AI, blockchain and other emerging cloud based technologies reinforces what an organisation stands for. It deepens an organisation’s positioning and it widens an organisation’s visibility and sharpens its competitive advantage.

This is what digital procurement is capable of.

Pat McCarthy will be speaking at Big Ideas Chicago on 27th September. To  hear more from him and to follow the action LIVE from wherever you are in the world, register as a digital delegate (it’s free!)

Procurement 2030: Preparing For The Revolution

Only 7 per cent  of procurement functions are perceived as ‘maturing’ in terms of digital transformation and a mere 38 per cent of teams have the capability to meet the challenges of Industry 4.0. Find out how to address these challenges in our latest report: Procurement 2030: Level 2.

Without careful preparation, revolutions fail.

From Spartacus’ slave rebellion in Ancient Rome, to the Satsuma Samurai uprising in Imperial Japan, to the Boxer rebellion in colonial China, history has shown that a revolution cannot be powered by enthusiasm alone. Successfully landing a change of any significant scale requires strategy, planning, and no small amount of determination to see it through.

The Fourth Industrial Revolution (Industry 4.0) is now upon us, and its effects can be seen in the assembly lines and offices of companies around the globe. Game-changing technology such as 3D printing, the Internet of Things (IoT), and Blockchain will super-charge the supply chains of many organisations, but need to be implemented with care.

Level One of the four-part “Procurement 2030” series by Procurious and Michael Page UK examined the forecast for procurement and the threats and opportunities facing the profession. The latest report, Level Two, shifts the focus to the practicalities of procurement and supply chain management’s evolution – against the backdrop of a technological revolution.

Our survey of 590 global professionals revealed that there is a great deal of preparation to be done before the majority of procurement functions will be equipped to take full advantage of Industry 4.0, particularly in the areas of strategic planning, creating a roadmap that gives priority to the most impactful elements of the digital revolution, and (crucially) having the right talent on board.

Download Procurement 2030: Level 2.

Low Maturity

Our survey revealed that only 7 per cent regard their procurement functions as ‘maturing’ in terms of digital transformation. The factor holding back this maturity would appear to be a lack of support from the wider business, with comments such as:

  • “Management is not interested in a digital transformation journey.”
  • “Our desire to transform is not matched by the business, who do not see the value.”
  • “Digital transformation of procurement is not even on the agenda.”

Some steps that might be taken to improve this situation include:

  • Do your homework and build a rock-solid business case that supports digital transformation. Alarmingly, 43% of survey respondents indicated they do not have a formal digital transformation strategy.
  • Ensure you align each step of your digital transformation journey to an enterprise-level objective.
  • Find a sponsor (a senior person in the organisation) to support your proposal.
  • Have the courage to take a risk – have confidence behind your ideas and be prepared to stand up for them.

Procurement’s Kryptonite

What do you regard as procurement’s greatest weakness? This research reveals that a narrow focus on cost savings and a lack of influence in the wider organisation are two stand-out factors that are holding procurement back.

HSBC CPO Jan Fokke Van Den Bosch shared his opinion of procurement’s greatest weakness in this video interview.

What’s Your Priority?

Moving systems into the cloud and leveraging big data analytics are by far the two most likely technologies to be implemented within the next 24 months by surveyed organisations.

Although AI and cognitive procurement are perceived as two of the most difficult-to-implement technologies, they are also expected to have the greatest impact on organisations. Other high-impact technologies include big data, cloud computing, and robotic process automation.

When prioritising these technologies to create a digital transformation roadmap, take the following factors into account:

  • Enablers – which technologies need to be implemented first to enable others to work successfully?
  • Impact – which technology will make the greatest positive impact on your wider organisation’s goals?
  • Costs and benefits – what is the long-term ROI on this investment? What are the benefits beyond cost savings?

The Right Team For The Job

Our survey-takers believe that on average, only 38% of their colleagues heave the capability required to meet the challenges of Industry 4.0.

For procurement functions on the cusp of a major digital transformation, now is the time to examine the team’s attributes and capabilities and, if necessary, bring in fresh talent with the ability to drive change and reap the full benefit of enabling technology.

While digital skills are a must, candidates should be screened for attributes such as a willingness to embrace change, agility, and the flexibility to make use of new behaviours and technologies.

Another solution to the perceived capability gap is to embrace the gig economy. The future of work will be project-based and outcome-focused. From the employer’s perspective, it will become increasingly important to bring in the right team for the right project.

A higher percentage of contractors in procurement will enable project managers to scale up and down as necessary, with results revealing that employment of contractors is expected to nearly double by 2030.

Interested In Learning More?

This content-packed report also contains links to relevant thought-leadership from Procurious and Michael Page UK,  including videos, blog articles, podcasts and webinars.

And don’t forget … parts 3 to 4 of the Procurement 2030 report will be released in the coming months!

  • Part 3: Human vs AI Skill Sets: October 2018
  • Part 4: Procurement Makeover: November 2018

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD PROCUREMENT 2030: LEVEL 2.

Procurement’s Missing Puzzle Piece

How can the missing puzzle piece make it easier for procurement teams to operate sustainably, improve supply chain transparency and eliminate corruption?

As procurement professionals we’re always talking about how leveraging innovative technology can add value to our organisations.

But less frequently addressed is how technology can make it easier for procurement teams to operate sustainably, improve supply chain transparency and eliminate corruption. 

In our latest Procure with Purpose webinar we’ll be exploring how the latest and greatest in technology innovations can not only help procurement pros deliver business value but also drive and enable purpose-led practice.

Join us on October 10th when we’ll discuss the tech that’s helping procurement  teams to collaborate with their suppliers and  improve transparency; how to communicate the importance of using tech to improve purpose-led procurement and why businesses must integrate tech-led purpose-driven practice into all of their decision making.

How do I register for the webinar?

Registering for The Missing Puzzle Piece: How Technology Can Empower You To Procure With Purpose couldn’t be easier (and, of course, it’s FREE!)

Click here to enter your details and confirm your attendance. We’ll send you a email with a link to the webinar platform in the run up to the event.

I’m already a member of Procurious, do I still need to register?

Yes! If you are already a member of Procurious you must still enroll to access the webinar. We’ll send you a email with a link to the webinar platform in the run up to the event.

When is it taking place?

The webinar takes place on 10th October at 10am EDT/ 3pm BST. Sign up or log in via the form above and we’ll be in touch ahead of the event to provide details on how to join the webinar live.

Help! I can’t make it to the live-stream

No problem! If you can’t make the live-stream you can catch up whenever it suits you. We’ll be making it available on Procurious soon after the event (and will be sure to send you a link) so you can listen at your leisure!

Can I ask a question?

If you’d like to ask one of our speakers a question please submit it via the Discussion Board on Procurious and we’ll do our very best to ensure it gets answered for you.

What is the Procure with Purpose community?

Procure with Purpose is a community for procurement pros who want to deliver value beyond cost savings and efficiencies – shining a light on the biggest issues from Modern Slavery to Environmental Sustainability – and on you, our members, who are already driving exponential change.

Webinar Speakers

Oliver Campbell, Director Procurement & Packaging Engineering

Oliver is a Director of Procurement & Packaging Engineering at Dell Technologies.  He has become one of the most influential thought leaders in the packaging industry by combining innovation and supply chain best practices.  Under his leadership, Dell introduced industry changing materials such as bamboo, mushroom, and molded paper pulp for more environmentally healthier packaging.

Most recently, Dell launched Ocean Plastic packaging with the aim of creating an industry response to tackle the task of the ocean plastic crisis.  Through founding NextWave, a cross-industry consortium of like-minded companies, Dell is creating a commercially viable, and scalable, supply chain that is focused on keeping plastics out of the ocean and in the circular economy.

Oliver’s accomplishments have been highlighted for their business and social influence by Fortune in their 2017 Change the World Companies, and by LinkedIn in their 2017 Top Companies to Work For.  Additionally, the 2018 Consumer Electronics Show recognized his pioneering work in Ocean Plastic with a Best of Innovation Award.  Mr. Campbell holds Bachelor and Master Engineering degrees from Cornell University and an MBA from The University of Texas.  In his free time, you can find him training for his next triathlon.

Justin Sadler Smith, Head of United Kingdom & Ireland, Ariba Cloud Procurement at SAP Ariba

Justin Sadler-Smith is head of SAP Ariba UK and Ireland, procurement and supply chain thought leader, and cognitive procurement ambassador. He is one of a growing number of procurement leaders around the world who helps procurement and supply-chain teams ensure that fair labor practices are in play across their global supply chains by harnessing innovative technology and increasing competitive advantage

Padmini Ranganathan, Global Vice President – SAP Ariba

Padmini Ranganathan is Vice President, Products and Innovation for Supplier Risk, Compliance and Sustainability solutions for SAP Ariba.  In this role, she is responsible for product strategy and engineering and leads a team of experts focused on delivering solutions that enable risk-aware, sustainable and ethical supply chains.

Prior to SAP Ariba, Padmini led the Analytics for Industries solutions marketing team at SAP which brought to market the first analytical applications and content for “art of the possible”  industry and line of business application scenarios. Before joining SAP, Padmini worked at Oracle, where she was part of the procurement product management team that delivered the first web-based, self-service applications for procurement and a technical consultant in the areas of order management, inventory & distribution, procurement and manufacturing.

Padmini is a passionate advocate for bringing technology to business users that simplifies and enriches their daily work and decision making. And as the Products & Innovation lead for SAP Ariba’s Procurement with Purpose initiatives, she is dedicated to helping businesses balance their costs with conscience and make an impact on the larger world.

Padmini has a post-graduate diploma in computer science from UC Berkeley, California, and a bachelor’s degree in commerce with a major in Cost & Management Accounting from Bangalore University, India.

Sign up for The Missing Puzzle Piece: How Technology Can Empower You To Procure With Purpose ahead of 10th October. 

The Three Pillars of Procurement Risk Management Strategy

What are the three essential factors for  effectively addressing the shifting conditions of sustainability risks and opportunities?

rawf8 / Shutterstock

This year has provided plenty of examples of why organisations need to better manage or participate in more effective sustainability and CSR initiatives to better manage risk, and purchasing and supply chain managers are finding themselves at the forefront of these initiatives, as keepers of the risk management keys. While hot button issues like worker safety and reputation risk are only increasing in importance, transparency and sustainability are reshaping consumer demand, and intelligence trumps data in supply chain risk management.

Luckily , this  emphasis on sustainability and CSR is breathing new life into purchasing and supply chain teams, giving them a renewed sense of urgency to establish  or expand supplier assessment programs and position themselves as greater strategic assets to their organisations and industries.

After reflecting on the variety of new supplier sustainability programs EcoVadis has helped launch or evolve, our experts have discovered three key factors as essential for effectively addressing the shifting conditions of sustainability risks and opportunities.

1. Program Reach and Depth

When setting up a supplier monitoring system, the assessment methodology should cover all key themes in sustainability and Corporate Social Responsibility. It’s common for homegrown or initial assessment programs to start by tackling just one issue, like environmental sustainability or human trafficking. To truly have an impact and effectively manage risk, however, the system should cover criteria across environment, labor and human rights, ethics/anti-corruption, and the supplier’s own sustainable sourcing practices.

Geography is also a significant factor when designing and implementing a program. Most modern supply chains span over 100 countries, so the assessment methodology should be appropriately adapted to cover this spread, engaging and supporting suppliers in local language wherever possible and taking into consideration variances in regulations and culture, at least for the top regions.

Finally, the size of the suppliers/third parties you are working with is another important dimension to examine. Many of them will be small- or medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) that are not listed on any stock exchange, and with little required reporting or public information. The monitoring system and methodology should be adapted accordingly to measure these SMEs.

2. Seamless Integration: Change Management and Processes

To make sure your teams and partners have the best chance of success with a new or changing sustainability and CSR initiatives, the methodology and processes used to both collect data and adopt performance indicators must be integrated into current, familiar processes and workflows.

There are two elements to this:

Change management

It is essential that the supplier sustainability monitoring solution vendor be able to support you and your team in the required change management program that will drive adoption of the initiative. This could include consulting on strategy and rollout, program branding, communications and supporting content development, training, support/helpdesk, onboarding services and reporting.

System and process integration

A key enabler to maximizing the impact of sustainability criteria on purchasing behavior is to integrate the assessment system into the current supply chain management platforms such as e-Sourcing, e-Procurement, CLM, SRM or similar platforms.Supplier monitoring solutions that come with an API that can be used to integrate the CSR indicators to other platforms are a huge advantage here. This way, you can give buyers and category managers access to current and complete sustainability data within the tools they are using today.  

For a deeper dive into these criteria and checklists, get this free Ebook covering “Five Essential Criteria For Selecting A Supplier Sustainability & Risk Monitoring Solution.”

3. Creating Measurable Value

No matter how thorough or amazing the assessment solution, it will only be effective with supplier participation. Here are a couple key ways sustainability monitoring programs can provide value to suppliers, which is vital to engagement and the ultimate success or failure of the initiative:

Alignment with relevant labels, certifications and standards

Suppliers will always care about compliance and a core feature of any monitoring system is to ensure suppliers adhere to the relevant global, regional and/or category-specific labels, certifications or standards. Examples might include FSC for fiber-based products, REACH registration of chemicals in Europe, or EnergyStar for appliance makers in North America, and so on. There are thousands of such labels, certifications and standards across the 120+ countries touched by global supply chains. A comprehensive supplier assessment program must take into account all  relevant assessments and maintain an annually updated list in each major region/country. In doing so, suppliers can ensure that their efforts are “valorized” in the monitoring process, making it more efficient for them to participate.

Actionable results, benchmarks and feedback

The results of a sustainability assessment should be digestible and actionable by both the buyer’s side (procurement and supply chain, EHS&S, risk), but also for the supplier.  Visually exhausting spreadsheets of checkmarks, or a list of documents from a supplier is often hard to understand and thus not actionable by a purchasing or category manager. These roles want instead to understand how suppliers’ sustainability performance compare to their peers and what the norm for the industry or geography is. Also, being able to also clearly understand performance over time is another vital part of any system. Solutions that make the short list should provide actionable results and indicators, benchmarks for comparing performance, and feedback on areas of improvement.

Continue reading The Three Pillars of Procurement Risk Management Strategy

Your Supply Chain Career: Accelerated

What do supply chain leaders predict for the future of the profession and how do you ensure you’re prepared seize the opportunities and get the most out of your career?

What is the biggest mistake supply chain professionals make?

What are the five key skills you need to make it to the top?

How should supply chain leaders embark on a major transformation?

Will the profession evolve in the coming years in preparation for an AI-enabled world?

We’ll answer all of these questions and more when Career Boot Camp 2018 kicks off at the beginning of October.

This year’s series, Your Supply Chain Career: Accelerated, has been designed to help you sprint outside of your comfort zone and get into the best career shape of your life!

Featuring tips and tricks from some of the best in the business we’ll be discussing how to make it as a Head of Supply Chain, the true value of professional certifications, how to persevere in the face of adversity and what the future holds for the profession.

Sign up here ahead of our launch on October 1st.

FAQs

What is the Procurious Career Boot Camp ?

Procurious’ Career Boot Camp, sponsored by IBM, is a global professional development event for supply chain professionals. The series, features five, fifteen-minute podcasts that have been designed to help you get into the best career shape of your life.

How do I listen to the Career Boot Camp podcasts?

Simply sign up here and you’ll be re-directed to the Supply Chain Pros group where you can access all five podcasts. You will also join a mailing list, which will alert you each time a new podcast is released.

How will I know when each podcast is published?

The series will run for one week, starting on October 1st, with a daily podcast released on Procurious each day. We’ll drop you an email to let you know as each podcast becomes available.

Is the podcast series available to anyone?

Absolutely! Anyone & everyone can access the podcasts and it won’t cost you a penny to do so. Simply sign up here!

When does Career Boot Camp take place?

Starting on the 1st October, Career Boot Camp will run for five days. The podcasts will be accompanied by daily blogs from our Supply Chain Career Coaches plus group discussions and articles on Procurious. When the series is complete, all five podcasts will be available for registrants via the Procurious eLearning hub, FREE of charge.

Why should I do Career Boot Camp every day?

Dedicating 15 minutes a day to developing and progressing your supply chain career can make the difference between standing still, or sprinting quickly into more impactful roles. At Procurious, we firmly believe that daily procurement learning is essential for career advancement. And Career Boot Camp will help you get into the habit!

Speakers

Rick Blasgen, CEO & President – CSCMP

Rick D. Blasgen has been the president and chief executive officer of the Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals (CSCMP) in Lombard, Illinois, USA since 2005.

Rick Blasgen has responsibility for the overall business operations and strategic plan of the organisation. His efforts support CSCMP’s mission of leading the supply chain management profession through the development and dissemination of supply chain education and research

Ron Castro , Vice President – IBM Supply Chain

IBM Supply Chain Vice President leading a remarkable team through the digital and cognitive journey to an end to end AI-enabled supply chain. Driving adoption of cutting-edge technology and applications inside and outside of the manufacturing walls.

Chris Crozier, Chief Digital Officer – Orica

Chris Crozier is the Chief Digital Officer for Orica International, the world’s largest manufacturer and supplier of explosives for mining and civil construction. In this capacity, Chris’ digital teams supports the global footprint of the organisation across Business, Customer and Manufacturing systems, including governance of Orica’s digital ecosystems, architecture, data and cyber posture. Prior to this, he has held executive roles within Orica as Global Vice President Supply Chain, and BHP Billiton.

Tom Evans, UK Ultramarathon Runner

Tom Evans is a 26 year old professional Trail Runner and Red Bull athlete. In 2017 he discovered ultra running and finished 3rd in the famous Marathon des Sables, which was his first ultra marathon. Since then, he has become a full time athlete. He finished 3rd in the Trail running world championships while representing Team GB. He has recently won the CCC – one of the most prestigious 100km mountain races”

Samantha Gash, Australian Ultramarathon Runner

Samantha Gash, as a World Vision Ambassador, ran 3253 km in 76 days across India, raising over $150,000 to fund education programs. Her other achievements include a 1968km expedition run along South Africa’s Freedom Trail and four 250km desert ultramarathons as part of the Racing the Planet – Four Deserts Grand Slam.

Laura Faulkner, Director Supply Chain Management – Nationwide Building Society 

After graduating from Strathclyde University with a BSc in Technology & Business, Laura joined Polaroid as a Graduate Buyer. Laura then spent time with GSK and Ernst & Young before taking a role with RBS that led to her being appointed CPO in 2014.

Laura is now CPO and Director of Supply Chain Management (SCM) at Nationwide Building Society where she has brought together Procurement, Property Services, Third Party Risk, Vendor Management, Accounts Payable and Offshore Operations.

SCM’skey focus is to maximise the value of 3rd Party Relationships across the Society, leading the Supply Chain Strategy to drive efficient, resilient and innovative solutions for the benefit of all Nationwide Members.

Career Boot Camp, Your Supply Chain Career: Accelerated kicks off on October 1st 2018. Sign up here (it’s FREE!)

10 Reasons Why You Should Be A Mentor

Mentoring is quickly gaining recognition as one of the fastest ways to develop talent and accelerate leadership potential. Here are 10 reasons why you should be a mentor…

  • Have you ever considered being a mentor?
  • Do you have a mentor?

These are just two of the questions that are starting to be commonly asked in leadership circles as more people recognise the value of mentorship. Both from the perspective of being a mentor, and the perspective of having a mentor.

Mentoring is quickly gaining recognition as one of the fastest ways to develop talent and accelerate leadership potential. What people are also recognising is the value and development that comes with being a mentor.

So here are 10 reasons why you should be a mentor:

  1. You are supporting a future leader

Seeing a leader developing their skills and knowledge first hand, and knowing that you have played a part in this, can be incredibly satisfying. There is a sense of leaving a legacy and fulfillment when you reflect on what you have given to your mentee.

2. You develop your communication and coaching skills

Your improved skills will allow you as a leader to communicate more effectively with the team in your workforce, making it easier to influence your team. It is important to recognise that not everyone is able to immediately step into the role of mentor. Being an expert in your technical field is one thing, being a mentor is something very different.

3. You build networks and become part of the mentoring community

Relationships are a key to your success in business and your network is a powerful resource as it allows you to share information, insights and provide support. The mentoring community is growing as more and more leaders recognise its value.

4. You gain insights into other industries

There can be incredible learning opportunities when you mentor someone from outside your own industry and you will pick up the nuances of that sector. It is very easy to fall into the trap of always looking at things through the lens of your experience and perspective. There is much value to be head from taking a wider view.

5. You are encouraged to practise solutions-based thinking

All leaders need to be able to understand business challenges as this allows them to make solid business decisions. Understand the problem, then spend more time focused on the solution. The practice of solutions-based thinking is a discipline you will be able to take back into your own leadership and own workplace.

6. Mentoring brings business opportunities

It may be that your mentee brings opportunities to you, or you may simply spot the opportunity as a result of the relationship. Depending how active you are on social media, opportunities might also present themselves as you share your insights along the mentoring journey.

7. Mentoring increases your credibility as a leader

Being a mentor can actually increase your credibility as a leader because it demonstrates that you have the ability to develop others. Employers are looking for leaders who can develop other leaders as succession planning becomes more of a challenge for organisations as expectations grow about career opportunities.

8. Being a mentor becomes a sellable skill

Having your mentoring experience on your resume can add to your leadership credibility, especially if you have been mentoring for a number of years. Leaders who are serious about their careers and recognise the value an external mentor can bring. The value comes in the form of a clear perspective because they are not working for the same employer.

9. Leaders who mentor leave a legacy

As a mentor, it is important to consider the legacy you will leave. You can have a lasting impact on people which goes beyond their working life. This is actually one of the most fulfilling aspects of being a mentor because sometimes just knowing the small contribution you have made to the life of another person is incredibly rewarding.

10. Mentoring gives you opportunities for self-reflection

As you work with your mentee on their career path, their career challenges and anything else which may arise, you will find yourself contemplating your own leadership journey. This can be a powerful experience as you will undoubtedly find lessons in your own development which can, of course, be shared with your mentee.

Mentoring is more than just a fancy word for supporting someone else.

It is a commitment of time and effort that is rewarding and provides a sense of fulfillment that goes beyond leadership and management. It is knowing that you have made an impact on your mentee whilst at the same time undertaking some valuable self reflection, which can only have positive outcomes for your own leadership.

Being a mentor is an idea that I believe all leaders should subscribe to and I imagine what the state of leadership might be like if this were the case.

My book Give Back. Lead Forward: Why every leader should be a mentor and have a mentor is published by Major Street Publishing and is available in all good bookshops and online.