4 of the best productivity apps and websites

No matter how motivated we think we are, we all experience that productivity-lull – and it doesn’t just happen on Friday’s…

Thankfully we’re dosed-up on caffeine, and have ploughed headlong into the world of productivity apps and useful websites so you don’t have too.

Here are a smattering of our current favourites:

Best productivity tools: Slack messaging app

Slack

We’ve crushed on Slack hard here at Procurious HQ… We’ve had to tell Jack (Product Manager) off for making googly eyes at his screen, and the idea was to boost productivity!

Tony Conrad (founder of About.me) says the following: “I am basically in love with Slack. It took us less than 24 hours to get everyone on board (as you know, people are resistant to change), and it is amazing.” But this could come from any number of fresh Slack converts…

Slack brings all of your communication together in one place. It takes all the best bits from your MSN Messenger’s, Skype’s, and Lync’s, while leaving all the needless bloat behind. Its clean and uncluttered interface means nothing gets in the way of the meat and potatoes of

The best bit? Slack is completely free to use (for as long as you want), and with an unlimited number of people too. Go team go!
Yo app gets new features

Yo

Today we’re revisiting Yo – the simplistic, throwaway app has graduated to big-boy pants and somewhat surprisingly has attracted even more funding…

Remind yourself what we said about it first-time round. 

The #firstmovers among you may still have Yo installed – and if so you might like to know that its just received its first considerable update. But with it comes an extra layer of complexity, one we’re not entirely sure is needed.

Yo Link adds the ability to chaperone your ‘Yo’ with a URL – Or Arbel (Yo Founder) says this of the functionality: “News websites can now offer not only getting instant Yo notifications when a story breaks, but also attach the story itself and readers can open it in a frictionless and convenient way.”

Hashtags are also now supported.

The beauty (or madness, depending on who you asked) of Yo, was its purposefully limited offering. Has Yo’s visionary over-egged the pudding?

Best productivity tools: Timeful app

Timeful

Are you an iPhone user, and suffer from poor time-management? As luck would have it, we have the very app for you…  Timeful aims to take the weight off your heavy shoulders by helping you to get things scheduled and completed more effectively.

Timeful arrives in an already crowded market, but because it syncs with your calendars (Google, Microsoft Exchange, Apple iCal, etc.) it can use its intelligent time management system to help you make the best use of your time by suggesting things for you. The app also allows the user to add specific to-do items and ’habits’ they would like to turn into recurring activities.

What’s more, the more you use it, the better it gets. Over time, our algorithms will learn what you like to do and when you like to do it, which will help generate more accurate suggestions.

Android users fear not – a version is reportedly in the works, as is a web-based edition. So soon you’ll all have so much free time you won’t know what to do with it… Spend it on Procurious yeah?

Best productivity tools: Buffer app for iOS and Android Buffer

While we’re not playing around with the excellent IFTTT or Friends+Me services – we’re turning our eye to the equally-awesome Buffer app. It’s definitely worth a go if you find yourself juggling posts across multiple social networks…

By making Buffer part of your daily routine you don’t need to worry about lumping all of your social media updates together in one period. Just bash some posts out, save and schedule them to be pushed out throughout the day (or week).

Buffer will play quite happily with your Internet browser (Chrome, Safari, and Firefox are all supported), just install one of the browser extensions, then click the Buffer icon whenever you spot something shareable.

There’s integration with Twitter, Facebook, Google+ (and more) under the hood, plus it offers both web and mobile access so you can post and schedule updates even if away from the computer.

How connected are you?

Here on Procurious we’re making it even easier for you to connect…

If you’re of the opinion that social networks (and the content shared on them) is just a load of noise – and your colleague bullied you into becoming a member here, let us calm some of those fears.

I Can Haz Cheezburger and Kim Kardashian in a beautiful example of the riches the Internet brings...
I Can Haz Cheezburger and Kim Kardashian represent a beautiful contrast of the riches the Internet brings…

Believe it or not, it’s not all selfies on Facebook, cat videos on YouTube and a plethora of Kardashians on Twitter. OK those things all exist, but peer a little closer and you’ll see it for what it really is. Justin Beiber, Oprah and Grumpy Cat aren’t the only ones using social media – your peers, thought leaders, potential new contacts, and your competitors are all out there – they’re just waiting for you to reach out and connect.

Online networks (like Procurious) are the communication hubs of the future. Our lives  are increasingly becoming more digital, we live and breathe the online space. Procurious, LinkedIn, and Twitter all make it stupidly easy to communicate with people you wouldn’t normally reach – think of it as the world’s biggest Filofax!

Say you want to message the CPO of Glaxo Smith Klein, you don’t have her email on file but you CAN search Procurious.  This isn’t the Dark Ages, instead take the initiative and reach out to her – make the connection.

Size does matter

Take a look at your network – you can check this at any time by clicking on your profile picture and scrolling down to the ‘My Network’ area.

How many people are in your network? 100+ you’re doing very well indeed…

How big is your Procurious network?

There are a number of extremely ways to increase your standing: If you haven’t already, pay a visit to the ‘Build Your Network’ page (you’ll find it behind the green button, and it’s in the same place no matter which page you’re on).

Here you can see who you’re already connected to, how you connected (via Procurious itself, or LinkedIn), and a handy selection of search filters that makes finding new friends a piece of cake.

Don’t forget you can also invite existing connections from LinkedIn to join you on your Procurious pilgrimage. Click the blue invite button to select up to a maximum of 10 contacts per day.

Email is another option (if your address book is bulging), or there’s the personal invite link that’s free to be pasted anywhere you like. Think Twitter, Facebook, and your Google+ page.

While browsing Procurious you may have also noticed the ‘Get Connected’ area. This is our way of recommending other interesting members to you, just click the ‘Add To Network’ button to send a request to connect.

With all of these tips, your network will be booming in no time! 

How far would you go for charity?

Since we published this story, the #IceBucketChallenge has spread to front pages the world over. To view an ever-updating list of participants visit this exhaustive Wikipedia page.

What’s the idea behind it? To raise awareness (and money) for the ALS Association, who research the motor neurone disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. However in Britain this money instead goes to Macmillan Cancer Support.

From 29 July 2014 the challenge has generated a whopping $22.9 million in contributions.

Updated with Bill Gates Ice Bucket Challenge:

Question: Have you ever seen Mark Zuckerberg pour a bucket of ice-cold water on himself?

Answer: Yep, now you have.

Microsoft’s CEO – Satya Nadella, previously stepped-up to the ice-cold mantle. By completing the Ice Bucket Challenge, Zuck’s got to nominate three people of his choosing, namely: Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg, Netflix CEO Read Hastings, and Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates. Not high-profile choices at all then…

Those nominated have just 24 hour to give themselves a dousing, or donate to the ALS Foundation. Of course they can always choose to do both.

Are you inspired by Zuckerberg’s show of charity, and would you do the same? 

Bite-size procurement takeaways for the time-poor

Gordon Donovan provides his insights into procurement-related articles and news stories.

I am a principal consultant with The Faculty a management consultancy specialising in procurement. I have been involved with the profession for 25 years as a practitioner, consultant, trainer and coach. I am passionate about procurement, and am one of the few that made a conscious choice to go into procurement. It was a choice made when I witnessed my father (who was a sales manager for many years) dealing with buyers –  and I thought I’d much rather be on the other end of that conversation. In later years it made for some very interesting dinner conversations…

Gordon Donovan on procurement

In this blog series I will trawl the news and provide you with my personal procurement take-aways.

First up is an article I found on LinkedIn on why the supplier selection process is dying [read it here]. It is written for selecting marketing or creative agencies, but I think its just as relevant for selection of any strategic supplier of goods and services.

To summarise it suggests that the “traditional way” of selecting (RFI, Shortlist, RFT, Shortlist, Presentation/trial, Award) isn’t working and fails to find a supplier that’s best suited for the organisation about 50 per cent of the time.

This reminds me of an article written some time ago which stated that 80 per cent of the things we buy are from distorted supply markets, yet 80 per cent of the tools we use are for competitive markets.

Don’t get me wrong, I think that RFT/P/Q are great tools, but we should use them where they are the most effective, or at least do some groundwork to ensure that they are effective when we use them. They rely on competition (or the illusion of competition) to be successful. The worry for me is that ignore can be bliss; we don’t really know when we don’t get the value unless our preparation is good enough.

Talking about preparation brings me to the second article that caught my eye. This is for a podcast I subscribe to by AT Kearney (yes it’s a procurement podcast, don’t judge me!)

Download ‘Wave of the Future’ from iTunes

This episode is all about why Googling isn’t enough. It hits a nerve with me as I hear a lot of my workshop delegates chime “well we will just Google it”.

The podcast says that while Google has made things quicker and simpler, it doesn’t give you the breadth or depth of information that you really need to fully understand supply markets.

According to ATK, 60 per cent of information is in commercial online databases. Some tips provided within include:

  • Use the advanced search feature rather than the vanilla search. Click the cog icon to select this mode.
  • Disable the personal settings. As a default it will look at your previous searches and location and customise the results – especially useful if you’re trying to source a supplier from overseas.
  • Compliment with other more traditional methods (such as interviewing subject matter experts.
  • When reviewing a web site think about who wrote it, for whom and why.

Finally, I came across an interesting article from Mckinsey about different sourcing strategies.

It’s not ground-breaking but contains some interesting insights.

My main takeaways are:

  • The vast majority of onshoring initiatives were in manufacturing.
  • A two-thirds decline in the US price of natural gas since 2008 is attracting some manufacturing industries that use gas as direct fuel or feedstock.
  • Strategic offshoring of IT and business processes retains the promise of reducing costs, hedging production risk, and increasing access to talent by employing a network of offshoring locations.
  • American International Group (AIG), is moving ahead with the creation of nearshore centres in multiple regions.
  • Many companies are discovering that sourcing decisions cannot simply be made based on the notion that ‘noncore’ business activities can be offshored.

I trust that you find these articles and insights useful, and if you wanted to discuss please feel free to contact me via Procurious, join my network, or follow me on Twitter @gdonovan1971

7 stories you might have missed

Thirsty for news? Lucky for you we’ve prepared a liquid lunch for your pleasure. So pop-back that ring pull, fill that glass with ice, and drink-in our weekly news update.

Coca-Cola pledges $5bn investment

  • The Coca-Cola Company and its African bottling partners announced a new investment of $5bn during the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit in Washington.
  • The investment, to be made over the next six years, increases its total announced investment in Africa to $17bn from 2010 to 2020.
  • The Company and its bottling partners anticipate that this investment will fund new manufacturing lines, cooling and distribution equipment and production; create additional jobs and opportunities across Coca-Cola’s African supply chain; and support key sustainability initiatives and programs focused on safe water access, sustainable sourcing, women’s economic empowerment, community well-being and operational efficiency improvements.

Read more by Coca-Cola Company

KFC’s Indian ambitions hit by quality-control issues

  • The fast-food chain is already China’s biggest restaurant operator with 4600 outlets, but it appears that opening 2 new stores a day is beginning to take its toll – especially when it comes to quality-control.
  • KFC is reeling after a Chinese supplier was accused of selling expired beef and chicken to it, McDonald’s and possibly other restaurant chains.
  • “On the supplier side, people are not well-trained, or there is not good oversight,” said Ben Cavender of the China Market Research Group. “On the restaurant side, they have people checking the products, but they probably don’t have enough people who are spending enough time at the supplier sites.”

Read more on USA Today

APICS, Supply Chain Council merger completed

  • APICS has announced that it has completed its merger with Supply Chain Council, creating a global provider of supply chain research, education and certification programs.
  • “As APICS and APICS SCC, we now have the resources to ensure supply chain organizations are ready to address two of the most important topics in the global economy today – elevating supply chain performance and developing supply chain talent,” said Abe Eshkenazi, CEO of APICS.
  • The merger creates a global leader in supply chain solutions, poised to benefit members, customers, partners and employees in several ways.

Read more about the merger on Supply Chain Brain

Kimberly-Clark releases sustainability report

  • When it comes to sourcing, Kimberly-Clark has set lofty goals. The target is to source 100 per cent of its wood fiber from suppliers who have achieved third-party certification of their forestry activities by 2015.
  • A 2016 target is to achieve 100 per cent chain of custody certification. All of the Kimberly-Clark tissue mills in North America and Europe are already chain of custody certified.
  • The company also achieved a 26.4 percent reduction in water use in manufacturing in 2013, beating its 2015 goal of 25 per cent. Further reductions can be observed in areas such as greenhouse gas emissions, and energy use.

Read more on TriplePundit

World Bank’s procurement process to undergo reform

  • Under the changes a one-size-fits-all methodology will be replaced with a more tailored approach, with procurement made more “fit for purpose”. Christopher Browne, the bank’s CPO, said: “We’re making World Bank procurement fit for the future.”
  • The new framework introduces sustainability, use of procurement systems other than the World Bank’s, engagement with strategic suppliers and a more streamlined approach to complaints.
  • The bank has a procurement spend of £26 billion a year but its current procurement processes were established in the 1970s.

Read more on Supply Management 

Supply chains becoming increasingly vulnerable to cyber attacks

  • While natural disasters such as earthquakes, tsunamis and flooding have disrupted supply chains around the world, cyber attacks pose even greater risks as companies rely more on computers and the Internet to conduct their business.
  • Companies need to be keenly aware of their cyber and supply chain risks as well as the limits of cyber, business interruption and general liability policies when buying insurance.
  • “Supply chains, especially critical infrastructure supply chains, can potentially be very vulnerable to hacking and malware attacks and, depending upon the attacker’s motivation, susceptible to business interruption and extra expense exposure,” said Ken Goldstein, Hartford, Connecticut-based vice president and worldwide cyber security manager at Chubb Corp.
  • “Space in warehouses is expensive, but what if somebody takes out your weekly shipment?” said Dena L. Magyar, Charlotte, North Carolina-based vice president and national practice leader in the professional risk group at Wells Fargo Insurance Services USA Inc.

Read more on Business Insurance

Drilling tower

Sasol enjoys 17% profit hike, eyes-up local suppliers

  • The world’s largest producer of gasoline from coal said full-year profit probably rose as much as 17 per cent as an increase in synthetic-fuels output exceeded its forecast and the rand weakened.
  • It was recently reported that it was looking to increase the number of local firms in its Mozambican supply chain. Benjamim Cavel, local content manager for Sasol in Mozambique, said the company had to “lead by example” and it was working with local suppliers to bring them up to the level where they can compete with multinationals.
  • Speaking at the CIPS Pan African Conference in Zambia, he said: “Sasol Upstream Oil and Gas intends to grow the economy of Mozambique. One way is to integrate the local supplier market into supply chain activities.

Read more on Bloomberg

Helen Mackenzie talks procurement reform in Scotland

Meet Helen Mackenzie: The self-confessed motorbike racing buff is pictured here sitting on Ian Hutchinson’s Supersport bike (incidentally the only rider to win 5 races at the Isle of Mann TT,’s). Helen dreams of buying some lovely race bikes from Yamaha or Honda for a racing team!

Helen hails from Stornoway in Scotland  and is the next in our #firstmovers series. Reach out to her – here, and say howdy!

Helen Mackenzie

Procurious asks: What is the procurement profession like in Scotland? How do you think procurement differs as opposed to elsewhere in the world?

Helen Mackenzie: Not sure about the Scottish private sector but public procurement in Scotland is really buzzing at the moment.  The Scottish Government’s just got the new Procurement Reform Act through the Parliament and so sustainable procurement is high up on our agenda.  

There’s never been a better time to be in public procurement.  At last many of us are getting to take up our seat right in the heart of corporate management and decision making.  Exciting times ahead.

Procurious: Should Scotland win independence in the forthcoming referendum, how do you see your business changing/will it be affected?

Helen: I don’t think there will be much difference for public procurement if Scotland votes yes.  We already have a different way of operating, different legislation etc.  

What might affect us is the whole question of whether Scotland stays in the EU and also whether we retain the pound.  To be honest I haven’t decided how I’ll vote yet.  I’ll have to get off the fence soon though! 

Procurious: Tell us a little bit more about your department/team (and do you envisage them getting on Procurious too?)

Helen: We’re a small council in the far North West of Scotland but we’re doing well in terms of procurement improvement and helping our colleagues to reduce costs and improve outcomes.  

I can see lots of public procurement people in Scotland using Procurious.  We’ve got a knowledge hub for Local Government but it’s a bit dry.  

I think the interaction that Procurious provides will be just what those of us who can’t get enough of procurement need to feed our passion and discuss ideas.

Procurious: Are you usually an early adopter? (Perhaps you’ve been a “first mover” with something else…) 

Helen: I must admit I have been a bit of a tail ender when it’s come to social media. I finally succumbed to doing a bit of Facebook and more recently LinkedIn but Twitter has been my main place for hanging out for a few years now.  

I love motorbike racing and so like a bit of Twitter banter with fellow fans.  I was a founding member of a network called Phinkit which operated for a bit last year.  It was like Procurious in structure but more general.  I think the general nature of it was its downfall in the end.

Why did you join Procurious?/How does it differ from other social networks currently out there?

Helen: I was desperate to find somewhere to hang out with other people who love procurement but wasn’t finding a lot of action on Twitter or LinkedIn.  Imagine my joy when I found Procurious!  At last a place just for buyers like me to talk about supply chains, contract management, invitations to tender and community benefit clauses.

You also get the feeling that people are actually listening to what’s being said.  What I’ve found with other networks like LinkedIn is that people post things, people answer but no-one is really engaging with each other.  Just a long long list of replies that no-one’s reading.  I haven’t come across that yet on Procurious. 

Procurious: What are you doing to help your peers to join the network? 

Helen: I’ve invited people I’m connected to on LinkedIn to join.  I’ll also be promoting Procurious through the Scottish Local Government Procurement Forum which I currently chair.  I’m mentioning it to anyone I know who’s into procurement.  Hopefully the word is spreading.

Meet our other #firstmovers:
Harold (Hal) Good
Farshad Bahmed
Sergio Giordano
Paul Smith
Richard Allen
Happymore Mambondiani
Jannine Wood

Why your business card is a piece of crap…

What’s your business card like?

We don’t know about you, but we like to feel quality between our fingertips. You can keep your flimsy sub 350gsm paper, we won’t settle for anything but your finest paper stock…

The business card is an important part of your relationship-building arsenal, if you’re wanting to create a lasting impression your card better be up to the task. If your calling card is sub-standard, it doesn’t say much about the quality of the service or products you’re flogging.

However let’s not get bogged down in talk of gsm, this Kickstarter project has gone one better. The swivelCard fuses the traditional business card with cutting-edge technology to create a truly smart card.

Not only does it feature a USB interface, but it provides you with remote access to the card (so you make changes to the card’s content on the fly, view usage info etc.)

That’s not a business card

This is a business card… Here are some of our favourites (thank you Internet!):

Involved Channel/Shutterstock.com

Now that’s a business card that every sommelier would be proud of… *hic*

Folding chair business card

This folding model chair was used to promote a London business which specialised in vintage/modernist furniture. Swish.

Divorce lawyer tearable business card

What better way for a divorce lawyer to sell his/her services to those with broken hearts?

Mark Zuckerberg's Facebook business card

Read the story behind Mark Zuckerberg’s infamous business card – here.

And finally: No-one knows whether the Chinese Tycoon Chen Guangbiao was being serious when he put in an order for 100+ of these beauties…

Chen Guangbiao business card
Image: Business Insider

Join Procurious Today – The online business network for Procurement & Supply Chain Professionals

Let’s talk about social networking

Social networking infographic

Which social network?

Choosing your social network(s) of choice is not a decision you should make lightly… Once you begin to invest some time, build your profile, and expand your influence, you might as well have it tattooed down your arm.

Game of Thrones fans might liken it to pledging their allegiance to a house of their choosing (without the inevitable bloody wedding…)

Each comes with its own strengths and weaknesses – and we’re certainly not here to pit one against another, instead we’ll share some of our learnings

Twitter is arguably the most powerful online network of all (and the one that boasts the largest worldwide reach). News stories are broken on it, feuds are played out in front of the eyes of the public, and then there’s Nyan Cat.

Twitter also provides (almost instant) access to some of the biggest companies, celebs, businesspeople – such is its influence Germany’s World Cup win drew 280m interactions across the network (more than 2013 Super Bowl) with a peak of 618,725 Tweets a minute.

twitter.com/procurious_

Google+ has always been the butt of many jokes, but as this rather brilliant Forbes article points out – its usefulness should not be overlooked by Internet personalities and businesses alike.

Google pretty much owns the Internet so it should come as no surprise to learn that its own G+ pages rank very well among the rest of the clutter. Procurious’ very own G+ page has only been active a couple of weeks, and already it’s amassed a few thousand views. Testament to the power of ‘el Goog.

plus.google.com/+Procurious

Shakira - most popular celebrity on Facebook
Shakira – her hips don’t lie

Facebook is probably one of the more friendly and approachable networks. More so than others, Facebook users are also likely to become heavily invested in Instagram and Pinterest too.

Professionally-speaking Facebook has proved a particularly successful breeding ground for lifestyle brands and musical artists. In-fact Shakira just became the world’s most-liked Facebook celebrity – with over 100 million likes to her name.

facebook.com/procurious

And then there’s Procurious… but we’ll leave you to write this next chapter yourselves.

Shouldn’t you really be opting-in to more social networks, than out? Follow the links we’ve supplied and you’ll be well on your way.

Ignore this bustling social netherworld at your peril…

In pursuit of best practice

This is a guest blog post from George Vrakas – if you want to contribute to the Procurious blog please drop us a line – here.

“At its simplest, best practice means we are doing our job better than others. …that might translate to closing deals faster, achieving consistently good negotiated results, establishing terms and change processes that support high-performance relationships or realizing results that regularly exceed expectations. So we want to be better, faster, contributing greater value, making fewer mistakes” Notes on “What do we mean by best practice” by IACCM

George Vrakas

As already elaborated here, an essential aspect for becoming successful in the future, is creativity.

The term, creativity, most probably conjures up images of successful entrepreneurs that have a vision and the courage to pursue their dreams.

Outstanding entrepreneurship is a well-defined quality behind every successful organisation.

Entrepreneurs like Richard Branson are followed and their ideas celebrated in the public domain.

However, it would most likely be better for an organisation to not only try and maintain its competitive edge on the ideas of one or even a handful of forward thinking individuals, but also find ways to tamper into the creativity and ideas of every one of its employees.

Hence, organisations should also look into the promotion and support of intrapreneurship.

Read on if you want to find out more about this idea, as well as, get to learn about one way to harvest the concept of intrapreneurship as a means to pursue best practice within your own organisation.

Intrapreneurship

Jeroen de Jong and Sander Wennekers explored the concept here. According to them:

“Intrapreneurship refers to employee initiatives in organizations to undertake something new, without being asked to do so.”

There are a few companies that actively promote intrapreneurial behaviour e.g. Google allows its employees to spend up to 20% of their time to pursue projects of their choice. 3M and Intel appear to have programs towards similar promotions (see here).

However, intrapreneurship is not only about the pursuit of new products and revenue streams.

Intrapreneurship contains an element of innovation. Innovation refers to the production and implementation of useful ideas, including the adaptation of products or processes from outside an organization. As Antoncic and Hisrich highlights (see here)

“Intrapreneurship is about “emergent behavioural intentions and behaviours that are related to departures from the customary ways of doing business in existing organizations”

In other terms intrapreneurship is about the pursuit of best practice.

In parallel, it is also important to note that the support of the practice of intrapreneurship also helps maintain engaged teams that always challenge themselves and evolve the organisational practices, processes and results (read more about team engagement here and here).

Ideas Charter (a simple and practical way to pursue best practice)

As part of an effort to promote employee engagement and intrapreneurial behaviours, I developed the Ideas Charter.

This is a simple process which ensures that all new ideas are captured, evaluated, and then through a process that promotes and supports undertaking innovative projects, implemented.

The Ideas Charter process works like this.

i) A champion is assigned to capture all ideas that can enhance processes or contribute to efficiency and effectiveness in a simple spreadsheet called the Ideas Charter (see template here). This is done on a non-judgmental way to the perceived value of the ideas i.e. following Edward De Bono’s six hat definition – by wearing a green hat.

ii) The ideas are then evaluated and validated by a selected committee and approved or not approved for further development.

iii) If an idea is approved, then that idea is made available as a potential candidate for a future side project to be done by a team member or a team.

iv) Every two months the team is asked to select a side project to work on. Each team member is encouraged to pick one of the ideas in the Ideas Charter and work on it. A due date is allocated.

v) At the end of the allocated period each member presents his/her side project along with a benefits analysis.

vi) The side project outcome is placed into production. This outcome could be a change in process, a development of a business case i.e. it could be anything that promotes efficiency or effectiveness.

vii) After 3 side projects are completed and presented, the team is given the opportunity to vote for the best one. The winner is celebrated.

In pursuit of best practice by George VrakasThis is a simple but effective way to work towards best practice in small teams.

From personal experience this concept has the power to engage the team and also to elevate the level of efficiency and effectiveness as delivered by its outputs.

Finally, it works towards Yves Morieux’s vision elaborated in his presentation about “How to develop a winning organisation”. Yves elaborated that:

“The real battle is not against competitors. The real battle is against ourselves. Against our bureaucracy, against our complicatedness” – Yves Morieux (see here)

What systems do you have in place to promote and support the pursuit of best practice?

Short Biography

George is highly reputed in the fields of Services Procurement and Logistics with over 19 years experience. Based in Melbourne, Australia, George is a member of CIPSA, IACCM and is also serving as a Board Member of CILTA Victoria. George is passionate about Procurement, Team Development and Innovation, themes he has researched extensively. George is the author of the www.george-vrakas.com blog, a contributor to Procurement related publications such as TheSource e-news and has presented on Globalization, Procurement and Continuous Improvement at various venues and Universities in Victoria.

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