Super Bowl 2015 - how did the advertisers do?

Super Bowl XLIX: did it pay off for the advertisers?

Feeling a bit tired this morning? You might be one of the estimated 4 million Brits who watched the Super Bowl last night? Don’t worry, no spoilers here for those who have recorded it!

Super Bowl 2015 - how did the advertisers do?

If you did watch the game, or have been following the coverage over the last week, you will have heard almost as many stories about the adverts as you have about the game itself.

The NFL’s marquee event boasts an estimated 112 million viewers worldwide and, with breaks in play every few minutes and an extended half-time interval (complete, this year, with Katy Perry), the 30-60 second advertising slots are like gold dust.

What’s the big deal?

The size of the audience, profile of the game and the advertising tradition are just part of the attraction for big companies. Several studies have proven that 50 per cent of the Super Bowl audience tunes in just to watch the adverts.

Big names this year included Budweiser, Victoria’s Secret, Doritos and many more. From a marketing point of view, there isn’t another event anywhere in the world that gives companies an opportunity to get their brand into the public consciousness in the same way.

Conversations about adverts start weeks before the Super Bowl when the advertising line up is announced, and can last for weeks or months after, particularly if you nail the advert. Check out which adverts have gone down this year here.

Facts and Figures

  • $359 million – the estimated value of all the advertising for the Super Bowl this year.
  • $4.5 million – the cost for a 30-second advertisement at any time during the game. Divide it down and that’s an eye-watering $150,000 per second!
  • $42,000 – what the cost was during the first Super Bowl in 1967. Costs are increasing year on year at a massive rate.

And these costs are only for purchasing the slot from the network. Companies have to factor in creating the advert, with some going really overboard.

Does it pay off?

That’s the $4.5m question and the answer might be yes. In the coming weeks, the best adverts will be featured and shown in full on TV shows, blogged about, discussed and re-watched on YouTube. The PR value generated from this can quadruple the media cost for the advert.

In 2014, a survey of 37,440 U.S. consumers by the tech firm BrandAds found that the average Super Bowl ad increased viewers’ likelihood of buying the product by 6.6 per cent. Larger brands like Hyundai and Budweiser saw increases of 39.5 per cent and 37.8 per cent respectively.

Other companies have seen similar sales increases. Audi, with advertising slots during the Super Bowl since 2006, have doubled their market share, while Skechers (26 per cent) and Chrysler (54 per cent) have seen big increases in sales.

Worth the risk?

It’s still debatable even with figures like those above. There’s no guarantee that your advert will be a success and no guarantee you’ll see similar sales bumps.

But, even with that in mind, would you want to be the one name that wasn’t at the biggest party of the year?

The Super Bowl in Numbers

  • $10 million – the cost of the half-time show, paid for by the NFL. Artists aren’t paid but can expect considerable sales on the back of an appearance.
  • $58,780,000 – the sum total of the basic salaries of the highest paid players for the New England Patriots and Seattle Seahawks
  • $8 billion – the total gambled on the game (worth noting that in most states gambling is illegal)
  • 325 million gallons – the volume of beer drunk during the game
  • 1.23 billion – the number of chicken wings that were eaten in the US yesterday

Read on for more of the biggest stories commanding headlines right now:

Qatar Airways acquires $1.7 billion stake in IAG

  • As part of efforts to enhance operations and strengthen existing commercial ties initiated through codeshare agreements with IAG as well as its membership of the oneworld alliance, Qatar Airways has acquired a 9.99 per cent stake in IAG.
  • Non-EU shareholders of IAG including Qatar Airways are subject to an overall cap on non-EU ownership as a result of the requirement for EU airlines to be majority owned by EU shareholders. Qatar Airways may consider increasing its stake further over time although this is not currently intended to exceed 9.99 per cent.
  • Akbar Al Baker, Group Chief Executive of Qatar Airways, said: “IAG represents an excellent opportunity to further develop our Westwards strategy. Having joined the oneworld alliance, it makes sense for us to work more closely together in the near term and we look forward to forging a long-term relationship.”

Read more at Supply Chain Digital

Ex-Zomato CMO’s Yumist raises $1 million from Orios to deliver food efficiently

  • Yumist, a food delivery startup that started operations in Gurgaon in October 2014 has raised it’s first round of funding from Orios Venture PartnersYumist was founded by Alok Jain, a technology entrepreneur and ex-CMO at Zomato along with Abhimanyu Maheshwari, a seasoned F&B entrepreneur. to provide easy access to tasty and homely daily-meals.
  • A combination of food, logistics and tech, Yumist owns the entire delivery supply chain. It allows customers to place orders in a few seconds through it’s Android app and the meal is delivered hot in under 30 minutes.
  • The investment will be used by Yumist to grow it’s team, expand geographically and build it’s production, technology and delivery infrastructure.

Read more at YourStory

Walmart and Target move forward joint supply chain initiative

  • Walmart, Target and NGO Forum for the Future (FFTF) have set up three working groups to take forward actions agreed at last year’s beauty and personal care product sustainability summit. The groups will focus on aspects of chemicals in products, says Michelle Harvey of the Environmental Defense Fund, co-chair of two of them.
  • During the summit in September, priority chemicals and transparency emerged as one of the main issues to work on, according to an FFTF report. Delegates identified five areas for action. These included:
    • Making disclosure easier and more consistent, building trusted relationships along the supply chain and facilitating a willingness to share information.
    • Reaching alignment on the process of prioritising chemicals.
    • How to facilitate more research and development into alternative chemicals.
    • Exploring what stakeholders can do to contribute toward the industry’s sustainability efforts.
    • Engaging and educating consumers on the science behind priority chemicals in a way that is meaningful and accessible.

Read more at Chemical Watch

DWC unveils plans for aerospace supply chain facilities

  • Dubai World Central’s (DWC) Aviation District has announced the development of new aerospace supply chain facilities as part of its efforts in shaping a comprehensive ecosystem dedicated to the aviation industry.
  • Located at the DWC Aviation District – a 6.7 square kilometre master planned district adjacent to Al Maktoum International Airport – the development will include three facilities spread across an area of 45,000 square metres.
  • Estimated to cost $32.6m (AED 120 million), the project will feature a multi-purpose building for tenants that are a part of the aerospace supply chain and is scheduled for completion in Q1 2016.
  • Tahnoon Saif, vice president, Aviation District, commented: “This project marks the latest milestone in our journey to create value-added infrastructure for players across the aerospace supply chain spectrum.

Read more at Arabian Supply Chain