Tag Archives: apple

Apple To Finally Get Into Bed With Amazon

Will Apple and Amazon put aside their differences and unite in time for the launch of Apple TV? 

The professional relationship between tech giants Apple and Amazon has been rocky to say the very least.

Firstly, In 2014 Amazon removed  in-app payments from the iOS versions of several of its services  in response to Apple demanding a 30 per cent share of the profits.

And then, in what was considered by many to be a bizarre decision, Amazon announced in October 2015 that it would no longer be selling Apple TV or  Chromecast because of the direct competition between them and Amazon’s own streaming products.

At the time, the move was likened to Apple TV’s refusal to play Netflix’s streaming service because they did not want to promote a competitor, but Apple eventually gave in.

Whilst certain reports this week suggest there are changes in the waters, Amazon’s Echo Show announcement  this week might be a little too close for Apple’s comfort.

Will Apple Echo Amazon’s product?

Last week, Amazon introduced the latest Alexa expansion, unveiling an Echo with a touch screen and a camera. The Echo Show features “everything you love about Alexa” with the added benefits of being able to show you things – whether it’s the weather forecast, a wikipedia page, a video, photos and more.

The device allows users to video chat with anyone who has an Echo, Echo Dot or the Alexa App, posing a big threat to Skype and  Apple’s FaceTime video-calling service.

Watch Amazon’s Introducing Echo Show video below to find out more.

The device costs $229 and is expected to be a huge hit when it begins shipping in late June, quite possibly to the dismay of Apple.  Indeed, the rapid speed at which Amazon has managed to expand its Echo hardware and the reasonable price points present a real threat to Apple.

As its already proven many times, Amazon is in the unique position to deny competitors access to its store. And that’s not to mention it’s currently ahead of the game and anything Apple subsequently releases is likely to come with a hefty price tag.

Time will tell what Apple has up its sleeve and whether consumers are willing to sack in their i-products for Echo.

Amazon Video for Apple TV

Various rumours have suggested this week that Amazon and Apple are headed in a much friendlier direction.

Last Thursday, Buzzfeed announced that the one major flaw of Apple TV was to be addressed: Amazon’s Prime Video service will, at last, be made available. Apple are expected to announce an Amazon Video app designed for Apple’s set-top box at the Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) on June 5 in San Jose.

Last year Amazon CEO, Jeff Bezos, explained that the company was waiting for  “acceptable business terms” with Apple before  a Prime Video app was considered.  Perhaps those terms have now been agreed.

If all goes ahead, Amazon is expected to return the favour by resuming sales of Apple TV’s on its website, following a two year hiatus.

In other news this week…

Co-op releases first slavery statement under the Modern Slavery Act 

  • Co-op has outlined how it sources, the clauses it uses in contracts and the steps it takes to audit suppliers withe regards to modern slavery. It also describes how the Co-op helps former slaves into work.
  • The 10-page statement outlines the Co-op’s ethical policies, its supplier approval process and how it carried out 444 audits in 2016.
  • The Co-op said it provided training for suppliers and it planned to develop a new procurement academy and roll out a business-wide training and awareness plan on ethical sourcing.
  • Cath Hill, group marketing director at CIPS, said: “The Co-op’s modern slavery statement is an excellent example of what organisations should be doing to combat this important issue. “

Read more on Supply Management 

Like coffee? You’ll like it even more when it’s sustainable!

  • Australians use an estimated one billion disposable coffee cups annually, but these cups are not recyclable in most states…until now!
  • Melbourne-based social entrepreneur Soula Thuring has taken the direct approach, selling biodegradable coffee cups with an additional Enviro Grow kit which turns the used cup into a plant
  • The $2 Grow Cup of Life kit contains a soil pellet that expands with water, a seed mat and instructions for growing kale, beetroot, rocket and other healthy foods. It can be planted in the backyard or elsewhere and it breaks down in a few months
  • Recently the social enterprise, Streat, teamed up with Melbourne-based coffee startup Pod & Parcel to put its coffee in biodegradable coffee pods to be used in Nespresso machines

Read more on The Guardian 

2017 FM Global Resilience Index exposes supply chain risks

  • The 2017 FM Global Resilience Index, which was recently released, provides SCMR readers with additional insights on emerging nations
  • The annual index, which is online and interactive, ranks 130 countries and territories by their enterprise resilience to disruptive events
  • Supply chain managers are being told that three of the most pressing risks to business performance in the 21st century are cyber attack, natural hazards and supply chain failure

Read more at Logistics Management 

Image credit: AppAdvice

WikiLeaks Reveals CIA Interference in iPhone Supply Chain

WikiLeaks has released new information on CIA programs aimed at monitoring Apple device owners. Has the CIA redirected iPhone shipments to its own facilities to infect them with spyware?

President George W Bush visits CIA Headquarters, March 20, 2001.

For many readers of the latest data dump from the controversial website WikiLeaks, two surprising facts stood out:

  1. The CIA has been hacking iPhones, Macbooks and other Apple products for a decade
  2. To install the malware, the CIA requires physical access to “factory fresh” machines. WikiLeaks suggests this is done through redirecting Apple’s supply chain through their own facilities

What has the CIA been up to?

According to the documents, CIA’s Embedded Development Branch (EDB) implants malware called NightSkies 1.2, a “beacon/loader/implant tool” that apparently allows the CIA to “gain persistence” (spy) on the device. Notably, this program has been in use since 2008. WikiLeaks also describes a project called “Sonic Screwdriver”, which allows spies to remotely hack a Mac computer from a USB accessory plugged into the machine. The release also contains details of other malware products with striking names such as “DarkSeaSkies”, “DarkMatter”, “SeaPea”, “Triton”, “Dark Mallet” and “DerStake”.

Listen to WikiLeaks’ Julian Assange’s commentary on the CIA’s malware specifically developed for Apple products:

How is the malware installed?

According to the CIA documents, NightSkies 1.2 is physically installed by a CIA operative on “factory fresh iPhones”, or handsets that users haven’t yet interacted with.

The two key words here are “physically” and “factory fresh”. The malware cannot be installed remotely, which means the CIA agent needs to get their hands on their target’s phone to install the program. This brings to mind a Hollywood-style manoeuvre where the operative would somehow pickpocket the target, install the malware with a USB, and return it to the unsuspecting iPhone owner who will never realise they’re being tracked.

However, as the iPhone needs to be “factory fresh”, WikiLeaks believes it’s possible the CIA has redirected iPhone shipments to install the tool. The organisation wrote:

“While CIA assets are sometimes used to physically infect systems in the custody of a target, it is likely that many CIA physical access attacks have infected the targeted organization’s supply chain including by interdicting mail orders and other shipments (opening, infecting, and resending) leaving the United States or otherwise”.

This raises two questions, neither of which are answered in the WikiLeaks documents:

  • Is the CIA infecting Apple products en-masse, or are they only intercepting, infecting and re-sending specific phones that have been ordered via mail by persons of interest?
  • Does the CIA visit the factory floors of Apple’s suppliers to install the malware?

Has Apple responded?

Yes. Apple has released a statement pointing out that nearly 80 per cent of the vulnerabilities exploited by the CIA have already been fixed with security patches (years ago in some cases) and added that it “will continue work to rapidly address any identified vulnerabilities.”

In its statement, Apple did not directly condemn the CIA for interfering with its products, choosing instead to distance itself from WikiLeaks:

“We have not negotiated with WikiLeaks for any information. We have given them instructions to submit any information they wish through our normal process under our standard terms. Thus far, we have not received any information from them that isn’t in the public domain. We are tireless defenders of our users’ security and privacy, but we do not condone theft or coordinate with those that threaten to harm our users.”

In other news procurement news this week…

London Mourns Victims of Westminster Attack 

  • Thousands of Londoners gathered in central London to honour the victims of Tuesday’s terrorist attack
  • On the 22 March, Khalid Masood drove into pedestrians on Westminster Bridge before crashing his rented four-wheel drive into a fence outside parliament
  • He attacked two police officers as he tried to enter the building, fatally stabbing Keith Palmer before he was shot. Five people, including the attacker, died, and at least 50 people have been injured.
  • On Thursday evening, a candlelit vigil was held in Trafalgar Square. In what was a moving tribute to those affected, the Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, addressed the crowd to much applause and a minute of silence was observed.

Read more on BBC

Avian Influenza resurfaces in Asia

  • An outbreak of H7N9 avian flu that has been described as the worst in seven years is dramatically impacting the poultry industry across China, Japan and South Korea.
  • The outbreak has been linked to over 140 human deaths in China in January and February, along with enormous stock culls including 30 million chickens in South Korea alone.
  • Chinese poultry imports are expected to grow by 10%.

Read more on the Wall Street Journal.

Starbucks announces aggressive expansion plans

  • Starbucks will open 12,000 new cafes globally by 2021, including 3,00 new stores in the U.S.
  • The new stores will require a workforce of 240,000, with the company planning to hire 25,000 military veterans and military spouses.
  • Starbucks has also announced it would hire 10,000 refugees in response to Donald Trump’s executive order calling for an immigration ban.

Read more on MarketWatch.

MasterCard & Basware create new platform to speed-up supply chain payments

Hungry for your weekly news fix? Join us as we reveal what’s been happening in the world of procurement during the last seven days.

MasterCard and Basware launch supply chain payment platform

Basware and MasterCard launch an automated supply chain finance platform

  • Basware has the largest electronic invoicing network in the world — one million organizations generating 80 million transactions a year, worth $500 billion, and growing at 50 per cent annually. MasterCard has one of the largest payment networks, and it is fully global.  They’ve joined forces and created Basware Pay.
  • The solution connects buyer’s and supplier’s payment processes through the Basware Commerce Network which provides an open and interoperable network that only authenticated buyers and sellers can use. Once the invoice is approved by the buyer it becomes available for payment through a virtual MasterCard account number. The combination automates invoice processing and ties the invoice information to the payment, all within a secure, closed environment using MasterCard’s single-use Virtual Account Numbers (VANs) for protection.
  • Hany Fam, President, MasterCard Enterprise Partnerships, said the opportunity is huge: “This market is nascent and in size it is bigger than the entire consumer market. It is very under-penetrated electronically. While the consumer space is 85 per cent non-electronic, this is north of 90 per cent.”
  • “MasterCard is global and none of the others operated globally. We can offer a global solution.” MasterCard is brand agnostic — it will accept payments from Amex and Visa, wires, or even cash, and it works with other business networks, like SAP ’s Ariba.

Read more on Forbes.com

Gartner reveals best regional supply chains

  • Gartner has published its annual list of leading supply chains in Asia Pacific with ten regional companies making the list.
  • Gartner Research Director James Lisica says that Asia Pacific supply chain leaders continue to create agile and lean supply chains capable of dealing with regional challenges. “We have observed some key themes across most industry segments that include building customer-centric supply chains, aligning to local markets while still serving global customers, strengthening risk management processes, improving cross functional communication, driving operational excellence to achieve fiscal discipline and prioritising talent management programs,” he says.
  • The top three is made-up of the likes of Samsung, Lenovo, and Toyota.

View the list in full at Techday.com

Jamaica to benefit from regional procurement system

  • The Regional Integration Electronic Public Procurement System, which is to be implemented across Caricom member states, is geared towards the liberalisation and integration of the regional market for trade in goods and services. This involves establishing and maintaining a regime for the free movement of goods and services within the CSME. The programme is being implemented by Caricom, with funding support from the European Union.
  • Ivor Carryl, programme manager for the CSME at the Caricom Secretariat, disclosed that a regional approach to public sector procurement, supported by a regional procurement system, can bring many benefits to the Caribbean region, and can be one of the key pillars for the advancement of the Caribbean integration process and the CSME.
  • “You are looking at a market that is somewhere in the vicinity of US$17 billion annually and for a region of five and a half million people (with the exception of Haiti). That’s a lot of money,” he added.

Read more on Jamaica Observer

Is Apple’s supply chain a risk to the company?

  • If the rumors are to be believed, Apple‘s newest product, the iWatch, will be announced at its Sept. 9 event but possibly won’t ship until 2015 because of supply chain issues. This was originally reported by Apple analyst Ming-Chi Kuo, and subsequent memos have pushed back the launch date from October to early next year.
  • Based on a thorough analysis of Apple’s supply chain, Kuo has been relatively accurate on delays. He predicts a delay in Apple’s larger-size version of its newest iteration — the iPhone 6, a 5.5-inch “phablet” model — pushing the release date for that unit back to 2015 as well.
  • A slightly ironic point is that these issues seemed to crop up after Tim Cook took the reins. Widely considered a “supply chain maven” among the analyst crowd, Cook started his Apple career as a senior vice president for worldwide operations. Through a relentless focus, he quickly fixed the supply chain, eliminating lags from months to days. Cook was promoted to chief operating officer before becoming the company CEO in the wake of Steve Jobs’ declining health.

Procurement has traditionally had ‘low status’ in UK government

  • The National Audit Office (NAO) said the government “fails to recognise the value of contract management” and “it is doubtful that the government can improve its capability to be able to have the best contract managers on all its contracts”.
  • In Transforming government’s contract management the NAO said current reforms were “going in the right direction” but there is “a lot still to be worked out”. “Too often contract management has been seen as delivering the deal that was agreed when the contract was signed. This has meant that contract management has been seen as a way to avoid things going wrong, rather than unlocking value,” said the report.
  • Amyas Morse, head of the NAO, said: “For several decades, governments have been increasing their use of contracts with the private sector to provide goods and services. This has produced successes but also thrown up major new challenges, which are not easy to surmount. “Not the least of these is the need to build up the commercial skills of contract management staff, both in departments and in the centre, and enhance the status and profile of their role.

Read more on Supply Management

Businesses urged to register for supply chain programme (Durham, UK)

  • NEPIC’s BASME (Business Acceleration for SMEs) programme was set up in 2012 to help regional firms which are keen to increase sales to companies within the sector.
  • So far the programme, which is financed by the Regional Growth Fund, has supported the creation of 450 direct and indirect jobs in the North East and 360 businesses have registered to be part of it.
  • Felix O’Hare, BASME Project Manager at NEPIC, said: “NEPIC launched BASME to help SMEs in the process industry supply chain to develop their sales to the sector. Using a mentoring approach with some of the sector’s most experienced managers, businesses are able to learn more about what companies look for when sub-contracting work so they can be in the strongest possible position to succeed.

Read more at BDaily