Tag Archives: Biotech

Attention All Employees: Report For Microchipping

Does the idea of a corporate microchip implanted into your body make you squirm, or are you fascinated by the possibilities?  

“Hold your breath – one … two … [stab].”

A Wisconsin-based marketing company (Three Square Market) recently hired a piercing professional to inject microchips into 50 of its staff. The radio-frequency identification (RFID) chips are encased in glass capsules about the size of a large grain of rice. They were injected into the fleshy part of participants’ hands, between the forefinger and thumb.

Sounds like something from a corporate dystopia, doesn’t it? Don’t worry, all of the microchipped individuals were entirely voluntary – along with a handful of journalists who were eager to see what it was like.

What can the microchips do?

At present, not much. It’s entirely internal to Three Square Market’s office, where microchipped staff can wave their hand to open doors, unlock computers and pay for items in the kiosk, provided the systems have the software installed and a contactless chip reader.

But in the future, the possibilities of human microchips are only limited by the scale of the technology’s implementation. Scannable items such as passports, drivers’ licenses and credit cards would no longer be necessary. Car keys could become a thing of the past, and of course home automation systems would be operable with a wave of the hand.

There’s a good example of microchips in play in Sweden, where a company named BioHax has implanted nearly 3000 customers with chips that enable them to ride the national rail system without having the show the conductor a ticket.

For data analysts, the potential flood of information from microchip use within a company is alluring – data could be collected every time an employee makes a purchase, enters the building, or uses a photocopier.

Can microchipped people be tracked remotely?

Not yet. The microchips aren’t a GPS device, but are entirely passive until they come within a few centimetres of a compatible reader, just like a bank card. Pet owners familiar with the technology know that microchipped pets can’t be located remotely if they go missing – instead, owners must wait until their pets are handed into a vet with a chip scanner.

Will employee microchips one day be compulsory?

At Three Square, over 60% of the company volunteered to be microchipped. The remaining 40% had a range of reasons for demurring, including a dislike of needles, a fear of having foreign objects in their bodies, and privacy concerns.

The concern is that if this technology becomes mainstream, a refusal to allow your company to embed you may lead to losing out on a promotion, raise, or simply being seen as “not a team player”. Forward thinking legislators in Pennsylvania have already introduced a bill to outlaw mandatory chip embedding, with a spokesperson saying: “If the tech is out there, what’s to stop an employer from saying either you do this, or you can’t work here anymore?”

Another issue is that with an increasingly mobile workforce, a chip that only works within the walls of a single organisation would become useless once that person leaves. One day, perhaps you would simply have your chip deactivated upon your exit interview and re-calibrated by your next employer, but this isn’t yet the case. Of those 50 volunteers at Three Square Market, it’s likely that a handful will move on to other roles within the next few months, but what becomes of their chips? The company won’t be happy with non-employees being able to open doors with a wave of their hands, so will the chips be (painfully) removed? Perhaps they will simply be deactivated, meaning users are left with a useless piece of “abandonware” technology embedded in their hands.


In other procurement news this week:

Are emerging professionals being paid more than experienced hands in procurement?

  • Based on 3808 responses across the United States, ISM’s 2017 Salary Survey revealed that emerging professionals (with under 9 years’ experience) are earning nearly $5000 more per annum than experienced professionals (with 9+ years).
  • This suggests that organisations are having to offer higher salaries to attract new talent.
  • The survey also revealed the following average salaries: CPOs – $259,340, VPs – $135,757, Directors – $153,347, Managers – $109,401.

Coupa appoints new Chief Marketing Officer

  • Cloud-based spend management company, Coupa Software, has announced that digital marketing executive and veteran software industry marketer Chandar Pattabhiram has joined the company as its chief marketing officer (CMO).
  • Named one of five CMOs to follow this year by LinkedIn, Pattabhiram has more than 23 years of experience in both fast-paced and large technology companies including Marketo, IBM, Badgeville, Cast Iron Systems, Jamcracker, and Anderson Consulting (now Accenture).

Intel to build a fleet of self-driving cars

  • Intel announced last week that it will build 100 high-automated cars to test self-driving technology.
  • The project will showcase Intel’s $15 billion acquisition of Mobileye, which closed this week. Israel-based Mobileye makes technology that helps vehicles “see”; collecting, analysing and transmitting data about the outside world.

Is It All About The Money?

Money has been at the heart of business since the beginning. But as more start-up businesses take shape, we have to ask, “Is it all about the money?”.

Money

This article was originally published on LinkedIn.

Being at JP Morgan, the annual conference where the worlds of biotech and investment collide, gave me the opportunity to catch up and bump into many colleagues and friends. Everyone had a chock-a-block schedule, trying to squeeze in as many meetings as possible with current and potential partners, and money was a top conversation subject.

Of course money is needed to build and grow businesses, but does it define success? Being in San Francisco and talking to many people over the past week has made me think about purpose. All this talk about money made me wonder if it was really the driver. If it was, I am not sure success would be possible.

One could debate that money equals success or success equals money, but I really believe that it takes a lot more than the desire to make money to be successful.

What Drives Individuals?

For example, I caught up with a CEO that recently made an exceedingly large amount of money, but within just a few days of acquisition is already building another biotech company. I spoke with a VP of sales on his fifth successful startup who is working around the clock to grow yet another company’s revenue.

I met a successful physician that has been developing a product for the past 10 years, with a dream to see it approved and change the standard of care. I met with an investor with a very successful track record, diligently meeting with multiple prospects to identify his best new investments. Even without knowing each individual’s personal situation, I can safely say that the main driver is not money.

So what drives them?

I think it is passion. For some, it’s the rush that comes with seeing businesses grow. For others, it’s a desire to see their idea change the status quo. I can easily identify with that feeling.

I could have been satisfied with Matchbook, my successful and growing nine-year-old consulting business focused on providing procurement and sourcing support to fast-growing small biotech companies. I could have also chosen to be home with my three daughters. Although I have other options, I have chosen to work around the clock for the past 18 months to build tealbook.

Supporting Passion

What drives me to make so many compromises and remain so focused on building this business? It is passion for seeing tealbook come to life and become a market leader in providing supplier information. This passion is supported by many factors, and every crazy entrepreneur has his or her own list.

Here are a few of mine:

  • I believe in the idea: I strongly believe that tealbook can help clients significantly reduce time spent identifying the right suppliers and increasing cost efficiencies.
  • I want to solve the problem: I’ve seen firsthand the challenges of inefficient supplier information while supporting sourcing needs for large number of pharma and biotech companies. There is a solution!
  • I see the market opportunity: So many software companies have focused on developing Procure to Pay solutions and back end financial analytics. But compliance of the tools and user experience has not been done successfully. Technology is only as good as people using it and its data. User experience and compliance is at the top of our list when it comes to gathering and accessing supplier intelligence.
  • I want tealbook to be a market leader: We have developed smart and user friendly technology. I know we can give clients access to supplier information better than anyone else – we have talked to enough people to validate this statement both in the life science industry and beyond. We can own this position and easily become the most used front-end platform to significantly reduce the time spent identifying the right suppliers.
  • I made a commitment: I have made a commitment to myself, clients, suppliers, my team and the rest of the industry. Once I decided to launch tealbook, I made a promise to see it come to life, change the industry and make it a success.

One day, I hope to spend more time with my girls before they get too big. But, I can’t see myself stopping with tealbook. What drives me comes from inside and continues to grow with each interaction and success, small or large.

Although money certainly allows us to properly support our customers, grow our technology, generate more visibility, provide employee security and remain  attractive to potential investors or partners, I strongly believe that if we are truly passionate and motivated about growing a company, money will be an outcome.

You can’t put a price on the exhilaration of success!