Tag Archives: bitcoin

Blockchain: Are You Bothered?

There are so many misconceptions around blockchain and its potential impact. Will the fundamental concept of blockchain really have a significant impact on procurement, finance and supply chain?

Last month’s Procurious London Roundtable was sponsored by Basware

Blockchain is the coolest technology of the moment and the hype surrounding it only appears to be growing year upon year. Whilst the concept was first used for Bitcoin, the digital currency, its potential is far wider, and many industries are actively investigating the possibilities of using blockchain-based solutions.

But despite organisations around the world jumping on the Blockchain bandwagon and advocating for its enormous potential, do the majority of professionals understand precisely what it is, what it can do and the extent to which it will impact our businesses?

At last month’s Procurious roundtable, Paul Clayton, Head of New Service Development, Basware put us through our paces with an overview of blockchain technology and his insights as to why procurement pros need to be cautious not to overestimate it’s bearing on the function.

What is blockchain?

A blockchain is simply a digitised, decentralised and cryptographically secured ledger of transactions.

“The biggest misconception” Paul begins, “is that there is only one blockchain. There are actually many blockchains in use today throughout many different industries.”

“Blockchain is actually only a concept, whose origins go back to academic work in the early 90s, rather than a thing. The concept was first publicly used to allow the crypto-currency Bitcoin to be traded virtually, anonymously, and without the need for a centralised bank.”

“Blockchain technology says where something has been transferred to and retains a trace of the transfer. Conceptually a blockchain acts like is a single ledger, a source of the truth if you like. In reality, it is physically distributed where there are actually multiple ledgers, known as nodes, that all work together to come to consensus on where something has been transferred to, which is then shared between them.”

An obvious advantage of this technology, is that it’s very difficult for you to break the integrity of the ledger. “There are multiple copies of the same ledger and so if someone hacks one it becomes immediately obvious that it is different.”

The flaws at the heart of blockchains

Whilst a blockchain itself is safe, an application using it remains hackable – Security researchers and hackers have proved it’s possible to hack someone’s Bitcoin wallet and empty it of crypto-cash. Mt. Gox infamously lost 7 per cent of all Bitcoins in circulation in 2014, which were worth, at the time, approximately $473 million. It also appears to be an uphill battle trying to prosecute someone for taking a Bitcoin

It’s can be too transparent – With public blockchains, once a transaction and its associated data have been placed onto a blockchain, anyone and everyone who has access to it can view everything, whether you like it or not

It’s not the most elegant solution – The very nature of the deliberately distributed ledger with multiple copies (nodes), means that you have multiple nodes undertaking exactly the same piece of work ie working out where something has been transferred to. From a pure computing power point of view, for certain applications, this is a highly inefficient way of doing things.

The blockchain for Bitcoin for example, has already had to be re-designed to increase its scalability as the number of Bitcoins in circulation and the growth in the associated transactions meant that the ledger became too unwieldy and it was taking too long for it to update.

You can still lose things!

Even if you know where something went, you can still then lose it. Who could forget the unfortunate James Howells, who mistakenly threw out a hard drive containing 7,500 Bitcoins, now estimated to be worth $7.5 million

 

Blockchain for business

There are some who would argue that these problems have been addressed and eliminated for blockchain for business. Paul is not one of them!

“The distributed nature of ledgers means blockchain is good at maintaining the integrity of who owns something but what it cannot do is determine whether the person who put something into a system owned it in the first place.”

This means, when making a transaction via a blockchain, the recipient needs to be able to trust the supposed owner of the thing that is being exchanged. “You are, essentially, reliant on the veracity of the source of what goes in to the blockchain.”

For example:

Does the “owner” actually own the rights to the house they are trying to sell you?

If you’re exchanging metals, does the “owner” have documents to prove they have the rights to the gold?

It might be good at preventing a fraudulent transfer of an asset but blockchain is “next to useless at establishing if a person owned something in the first place”

“As a ledger system it is extremely inefficient, almost clumsy in the way it works. In certain circumstances, where there are a high volume of transactions it uses so much computing power it’s almost not worth it.”

“And it’s for these reasons that, whilst it will have applications in many areas from supply chain through to electronic voting, blockchain won’t change the world!”

Where is the value for procurement?

“Is there value in blockchain tech? Yes. Does the value match the hype right now? Not even close!”

“From a procurement point of view the biggest area of impact right now is most likely to be in supply chain applications. There are obvious applications for the transfer of title and bill of lading. Of particular interest in this space right now are supply chains that can be subject to fraud such as pharmaceuticals and food

Going beyond that the application of so called “smart contracts” to a blockchain can help automate certain business processes. Smart contracts, are pieces of computer code attached to a blockchain that automatically execute an action once a set of agreed criteria have been met. For, example, a smart contract could be used to automatically pay a supplier once the buyer has received their goods without the need for invoice processing and payment.

” In 2017, blockchain is word of the year, it’s absolutely everywhere. But it’s not earth shattering, it’s not the third generation of the Internet its just an interesting concept with some obvious benefits and flaws.”

Last month’s Procurious London Roundtable was sponsored by Basware

Everything You Need To Know About Bitcoin In One Super Infographic

 The precise workings of Bitcoin are still a mystery to many but here’s everything you need to know about the rise of the digital currency. 

Bitcoin is a digital currency which uses peer-to-peer technology. It doesn’t require a bank for making online transactions worldwide and is also known as the first cryptocurrency that does not use central repositories. As such, it’s classified as a decentralised currency by the U.S. treasury.

The currency was first introduced in 2008 to a cryptographic mailing list. On 9th January 2009, the first version (1.0) of Bitcoin was released and on 12th January, the first transaction took place.

Presently, Bitcoin prices are climbing and there’s a whole host of significant, and widespread, clients. Pennsylvania was the first state in U.S. to  accept Bitcoins back in 2013.

UK bank, Barclays, have revealed that they will be the first to facilitate  users in making charitable donations using the currency outside their system.

Total Processing has created an infographic to explain The Rise and Rise of Bitcoin since 2008.

Toby Dean works on behalf of Total Processing in content creation and marketing. He creates engaging graphics and content that help businesses stand out from the crowd. Over the past seven years has worked with dozens of SME’s in both an agency and freelance capacity.

Tackling Technology and Risk: The Blockchain

The rise of digital payment systems has brought the blockchain into the public consciousness. But can blockchain be used to aid supply chain transparency?

Blockchain Technology

Just shy of ten years ago, technological innovation and the supply chain might have been considered strange bedfellows. Now they go hand in hand. But as technology advances at an ever-increasing rate, it makes sense that supply chains the world-over are also becoming increasingly complex as a consequence.

However despite the numerous advantages brought about by this envelope-pushing, we must remain vigilant and alert to the increased risks such new avenues afford us.

Recent years have seen a rise in both the adoption and implementation of digital payment systems and so-called “crypto currencies”. Such innovations in payments have removed the need for traditional, physical currency, as well as the bricks and mortar institutions that process them.

Bitcoin – A New Way to Pay

Bitcoin is but one example that’s fast revolutionising the payment industry. Bitcoin is a digital currency that’s been heralded as both an innovator and disruptor in yearly tech trend reports.

Bitcoin is effectively a peer-to-peer system. Its users can carry out transactions without the need for a middleman, but all activity is recorded and verified by the blockchain. Think of blockchain as a ledger and you’re halfway there.

Bitcoin has given the blockchain an early success with its 15+ million bitcoins already in circulation. But with a limit of 300,000 transactions per day (a ceiling that’s fast-approaching), we have to wonder – is there a future for a digital distributed database format?

It’s worth noting that the blockchain isn’t owned or operated by a singular body – hereby distinguishing it from a conventional ledger system. Instead, each network node stores its own copy of the blockchain, so whenever a transaction is made it is first recorded in one place, before being transmitted to other nodes that make up the database.

The “block” comes from the name given to accepted transactions. The system checks approximately six times per hour for new ledger activity, and to determine if a bitcoin amount has been spent.

Bitcoin & Blockchain

Blockchain – Bigger than Bitcoin?

Putting bitcoin’s reliance on the blockchain aside for a moment, various figures have spoken out about its potential to transform not just payment systems, but improve the delivery of services and assure the supply chain of goods.

Nothing if not an encouraging sign, a report from Mark Walport, the UK Government’s Chief Scientific Advisor, made proposals that the Government itself should explore applications for the burgeoning technology.

Walport said: “Distributed ledger technologies have the potential to help governments to collect taxes, deliver benefits, issue passports, record land registries, assure the supply chain of goods and generally ensure the integrity of government records and services.”

Records ultimately lie at the crux of the blockchain. So a technology that serves as an incorruptible ledger, and one that can trace each and every interaction, could prove extremely valuable in areas where accountability is key.

Gordon Donovan, Procurement & Supply Chain Manager for Metro Trains, has previously been quoted on Procurious suggesting the development of a ‘supplier wiki’ in order to build knowledge of the entire supply chain.

Blockchain technology could indeed be used to increase transparency, but there would be considerable work required in advance of opening this up, thanks in no small part to the highly complex nature of organisational supply chains and the numerous suppliers involved.

Blockchain network

A Chain is Only as Strong as the Weakest Link

If this reliance on blockchain is going to come to pass, more work needs to be done around trust and security – a fact that hasn’t gone unnoticed by bitcoin’s most vocal critics.

With high visibility services like Twitter, the BBC, and both the global networks for Xbox and PlayStation, all being taken offline by distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks, what crippling effect would such activities have on the blockchain?

Moreover it wouldn’t be too much of leap to suggest vulnerabilities could lead to ‘botnets’ taking control of nodes to reveal the identities of the parties involved in transactions.

But is all of this worry warranted? It would certainly seem so if the letter penned by bitcoin’s high priests is anything to by. The open letter informed the community at large of an action plan to reach a consensus on improving bitcoin security.

“We have worked on bitcoin scaling for years while safeguarding the network’s core features of decentralisation, security, and permissionless innovation” – it began.

“We’re committed to ensuring the largest possible number of users benefit from bitcoin, without eroding these fundamental values.”

In order to achieve these aims, 30-plus bitcoin developers organised two workshops (in Montreal and Hong Kong respectively) to try and carve out a scalable path for the cryptocurrency’s future.

If we’re not looking for a repeat of the Silk Road scandal, let’s just hope they came up with a solution…

Is it possible for blockchain and bitcoin technology to transform the future of digital payments and aid supply chain transparency? Let me know your thoughts.