Tag Archives: Brexit

Three Key Steps To Getting Brexit Ready

It’s been over two years since the UK voted to leave the EU. But beyond the exit date of 29 March 2019, little is known about the details of the Brexit agreement…
Negotiations between Brussels and Whitehall are rumbling on with little sign of a breakthrough. And the longer they continue the less likely it seems a deal will be struck.

A recent EU exit impact study conducted by Efficio for a UK central government department indicated a potential 8 per cent increase in costs as a result of Brexit.

Yet a poll of 800 business leaders carried out by the Institute of Directors has revealed that 49 per cent of businesses do “not anticipate drawing up nor implementing any contingency plans for Brexit”.

Similarly, a Survation survey commissioned by Maritime UK found that nearly half of businesses polled have done ‘very little’ or no preparation in anticipation of the UK leaving without a deal – despite two-thirds of business leaders believing such a scenario is ‘very likely’ or ‘likely’. Only 27 per cent  consider it ‘unlikely’, with another 8 per cent saying they are unsure.

Stick or twist?

Few can argue that these are unprecedented times, the likes of which Europe has never seen before. There’s no blueprint for untangling member states from the union – a situation made more complex by the need for Brussels to safeguard the EU project and potentially make the UK pay a high price for ‘independence’.

The majority of public and private sector organisations appear to be biding their time, waiting to see the terms of an exit agreement before they invest time and money in putting contingency plans in place. Is this a deliberate, tactical approach? Or could it be that procurement teams are unsure of what action to take and/or lack the capacity to deal with the task ahead?

Whatever the situation, now is not the time to hunker down and do nothing. On the contrary, businesses should be using these crucial few months to assess the scale of the impact on their supply chains and ready themselves to respond to what lies ahead.

Sourcing strategies, suppliers, contracts

Organisations should start by considering three core pillars of procurement, namely existing contracts, sourcing strategies and current suppliers.

1. Contracts

Form a clear understanding of your contract risk profile. Identify your risks against a hierarchy of needs. Examples of potential risks may include EU funding reliance, lack of freedom of movement restricting labour availability and driving wage increases or foreign exchange and tariffs creating cost pressure. Examine key contract clauses linked to EU exit readiness, such as termination, cost pressures and continuity resulting from legal change to determine where further risks may lie.

2. Sourcing strategies 

Review your existing category strategies to understand category objectives, sourcing strategies and the pipeline of work. Identify which elements will be affected by the EU exit and, where this impact is significant, determine how to take account of EU exit activity in your category plans.

3. Suppliers

Engage your suppliers and assess the wider market to pinpoint cost and risk drivers in key categories. Work with your suppliers to review expected pressures resulting from Brexit, their current mitigation plans and their view of the company’s main risks. Then encourage them to implement effective business continuity plans.

Deep knowledge of these areas, coupled with strong contingency plans to deal with change, are essential to manage risks and seize opportunities.

Act now to get ahead

Efficio is working with a number of public and private sector companies, including large central government departments, to carry out detailed readiness analysis ahead of the EU exit. The service is designed to prepare organisations to make fast, structured change and mitigate risk when the time comes.

To find out how we can support you in getting Brexit-ready, visit our website.

Is Australia’s Proposed Modern Slavery Bill Well Below Par?

Australia’s new modern slavery bill is a welcome development in the fight to end slavery worldwide. But is the proposed legislation up to standard? 

In April 2016 the UK passed  new legislation, the first of its kind, making it compulsory for all businesses with a turnover of over £36 million to prove they have taken steps to remove slave and child labour from their supply chains.

Legislation like this, which also exists in France the Netherlands and the US,  forces big organisations to fully audit their supply chains and has consequently put pressure on smaller businesses to eradicate the practice too.

This week, Australia announced it would be following suit, proposing a Modern Slavery Bill, which uses the UK’s act as a model.

The bill, introduced by Assistant Minister for Home Affairs Alex Hawke, “seeks to stamp out the sale of any product in Australia that involves non-voluntary labor” and will require Australia’s organisations with an annual consolidated revenue of more than $100m (around 3000 businesses) to publish annual statements on the efforts they are making  to tackle modern slavery in their supply chains. These statements will have to be signed off at board level and published within six months of the publication of their annual reports.”

The Department of Home Affairs will also start publishing an annual statement on possible modern slavery risks in commonwealth procurement.

The proposed bill follows the Federal Government’s announcement in May that $3.6 million would be provided to the Department of Home Affairs for a new Anti-Slavery Business Engagement Unit to manage Modern Slavery Reporting Requirements by large businesses.

Part of this task will be overseeing a publicly accessible central repository of businesses’ Modern Slavery Statements, as well as providing support and advice to businesses on modern slavery risks.

The announcement was well received by anti-slavery charity walk Free Foundation. “The Australian Government’s commitment to support an Australian Modern Slavery Act with a new, well-funded unit is clear progress towards the Act’s effective implementation” said Jenn Morris,  Chief Executive.

Is the proposed modern slavery bill up to scratch?

Australia’s proposed Modern Slavery Bill has sparked some controversy amongst charities and human rights campaigners for a number of reasons.

  1. The bill proposes that only businesses with a revenue of over $100m must audit their supply chains. The Law Council has argued that the revenue threshold should be much lower – no higher than $60m to demand compliance from more organisations
  2. The bill doesn’t demand that there will be a public list of who must report. Without this information, if companies fail to act, this fact will remain hidden
  3. The bill does not propose any penalties for organisations that fail to report their findings or report incorrect or misleading information on the steps they have taken to combat modern slavery. Clare O’Neil, the shadow minister for justice said “we shouldn’t be leaving it to business to police themselves on slavery”
  4. The government have not established an anti-slavery commissioner to enforce the legislation nor vowed to provide access to a national redress scheme for victims of modern slavery

Keren Adams, director of legal advocacy at the Human Rights Law Centre, said “It’s absolutely the right step for the government to be introducing legislation to help flush out abuse, but today’s bill is missing some vital ingredients that would make it effective in doing so.”

Modern slavery: know the signs

Procurement and supply chain professionals are uniquely positioned to identify and tackle modern slavery in their supply chains. But you need to know the signs…

Firstly, it’s important to understand and look for the red flags, which might be extremely subtle. The likelihood of modern slavery is increased in conflict zones and unregulated sectors, particularly if the jobs are low-income and do not require education or specific skills. Migrant workers, women and children are among the most vulnerable.

Circumstances when passports or identification documents have been removed, excessive recruitment fees are subjected upon migrant workers or subcontractors further outsource work without prior consent are all indicators of exploitation.

Encountering one of these situations may not in and of itself amount to modern slavery but your organisation mustn’t assess anything  in isolation. It’s important to look for the series of signals in order to  decipher whether they paint a clear picture of modern slavery.

“Procurement teams are on the frontline,” Fiona David, former Executive Director Global Research  – Walk Free Foundation asserts. “They manage supplier relationships, they understand the business, the risks and the regions in which they operate. The indicators of modern slavery, being a grievous crime, is actually quite easy to identify, when you know what you are looking for.”

But advocacy groups and investigative reporters mustn’t be the sole figures doing the digging to reveal incidents of modern slavery.

“CSR and Procurement teams should work together across the sectors on these issues, as addressing modern slavery is a “pre-competitive” issue.  Companies can’t compete on sub-standard ethical and criminal practices.”

Have a listen to our recent webinar on modern slavery, Procurement Unchained. 


Jaguar Land Rover (JLR) warns of mega Brexit costs 

  • JLR has become the latest firm to warn of the costs of losing frictionless trade between the UK and EU.
  • JLR said more than 40% of parts going into cars built in the UK were imported from Europe and it spent £5.37bn with EU suppliers in 2017-18.
  • “A bad Brexit deal would cost Jaguar Land Rover more than £1.2bn profit each year. As a result, we would have to drastically adjust our spending profile; we have spent around £50bn in the UK in the past five years – with plans for a further £80bn more in the next five. This would be in jeopardy should we be faced with the wrong outcome” said Ralf Speth, CEO of JLR.

Read more on Supply Management  

Donald Trump imposes first tariffs on China

  • Punishing American tariffs on Chinese imports took effect early on Friday, marking the start of President Donald Trump’s trade war with the largest US trading partner and intensifying the anxieties of global industry.
  • The arrival of the long-threatened tariffs marked the failure of months of dialogue between the world’s two largest economies
  • An industrial survey confirmed that companies were white-knuckling their way through Trump’s intensifying, multi-front trade assault.

Read more on the Telegraph

Grenfell: Inspectors label procurement a ‘fundamental problem’

  • A leading industry certification and inspection body has labelled the procurement process a “fundamental problem” that has led companies to become “complicit in poor outcomes”.
  • Speaking yesterday at a select committee hearing on Dame Hackitt’s review of Building Regulations, British Board of Agrément chief executive Claire Curtis-Thomas said the procurement process for main contractors represented a “real problem”.
  • In Dame Hackitt’s post-Grenfell review of Building Regulations, it was suggested the industry should take the lead and decide for itself how to improve building quality and standards.

Read more on Procurious 

Brexit: What Happens Now?

Brexit is complicated and it’s very, very messy. And what happens during the next couple of years will be determined by a number of political factors…

At last month’s CPO roundtable Anand Menon, Director of the UK in a Changing Europe based at Kings College London, spoke to us about the long-term causes of Brexit and their future implications.

“Hand on heart I don’t know [what’s going to happen]” he said. “If I could answer that I’d be rich and famous!”

It’s the most uncertain moment in British politics since World War Two and what’s striking is that, two years on from the referendum, nothing has been decided.

A key reason for such uncertainty is the nature of the referendum itself.  As Anand explained, the referendum packaged so many different options and outcomes into a binary choice: leave or remain.  No one understood quite what they were signing up for and since the result, Brexit has largely been defined in terms of the different adjectives applied to it; black Brexit; white Brexit; hard Brexit; soft Brexit; white red and blue Brexit… the list goes on.

“Brexit was a vote against globalisation and it was a vote against the economic status quo. Subsequently, it’s interesting  to see that the South of England has noticed the North and we’ve had a chance to address issues that never got air time under old centrist, liberal politics.

“More profoundly, the referendum and its outcome have taught us about us. In the same way that Trump has been a wakeup call for the U.S, the fallout from Brexit should be a wakeup call to our politicians to think about the real problems confronting the country. ”

And how to best to manage negotiations as we ready to leave the EU.

Does the UK want to establish a relationship with the EU similar to that of Norway’s or maybe more like a more distant partner?

Anand admitted that due to Brexit being such a complex and all-consuming process, there is no avoiding it being a messy one at that! What happens during the next couple of years will largely be determined by the following three political factors:

  1. Theresa May

The UK Prime Minister relatively quickly defined what she meant by Brexit (leave customs market, end free movement etc) and her position has remained relatively unchanged since. Whilst she is unpopular with many in her party, it is unlikely her critics will choose to get rid of her yet. As long as she in place, she is a powerful force for stability.

  1. The Conservative Government

There are a significant number of Tory MPs who want a much softer Brexit than the Prime Minister is proposing so it’s possible they will vote against May’s Brexit deal. However, if May loses this vote there is no question that she has to go; after all, her whole mission as Prime Minister is Brexit. If that happens, the Conservative Party will either elect a new leader or the UK will face a new general election. And the one thing no Tories want is another general election.

  1. The Labour Government 

In the last general election, Labour picked up votes from both remainers and leavers. As such, the party have been careful to keep their Brexit policies ambiguous. Whenever Corbyn speaks about Brexit, he speaks in ambiguities.

Does Anand believe there is any chance of a second referendum? “The beauty of Britain at the moment is that any outcome is possible – I can imagine us crashing out with no deal or a great deal but I can also imagine a scenario where the first referendum is overturned.”

“No one knows what would happen to public opinion at this point – we could vote Brexit again. Or, imagine second time around the UK votes to remain 52-48 per cent. We’ll find ourselves in a political groundhog day. There would need to be a huge swing in vote for it to carry much weight.”

Ultimately, Anand warns, the real danger for the UK’s economy is that the negotiations go pear shaped, the UK crashes out of the EU in March 2019 and they end up with no wiggle room to extend the UK’s transition period.

His advice to procurement organisations trying to prepare? Plan for a World Trade Organisation outcome from 2021 – “That, I think, is the most likely outcome.”

Driving Change The Procurement Way

At yesterday’s London CPO Roundtable we explored how procurement teams can drive big change in their organisations whether it’s through Brexit policy, implementing cognitive technology or smart hiring…

When was the last time you took a wild punt in your hiring process?

Is your procurement team under more pressure than ever to cut costs?

How can CPOs make the business case for cognitive technology to their CFO?

Will there be a second EU Referendum?

These are just some of the questions we discussed when we gathered a dozen procurement leaders in London yesterday for a CPO roundtable sponsored by IBM.

We discussed the implications of Brexit and how procurement professionals are preparing, how procurement can make sure its cognitive projects come out on top in the battle for capital and  why employers need to be far more open minded when hiring new talent.

Surviving the Perfect Storm

Nick Ford, Co-founder – Odesma gave us an overview of his organisation’s latest Brexit survey; Surviving a Perfect Storm.

Many would argue that Brexit is the biggest negotiation to ever  take place in UK, but the path ahead is still very unclear. And that’s presenting some major challenges for procurement teams.

Indeed, 45 per cent of Odesma’s survey respondents (300+ procurement executives primarily from the UK/EU ) admitted that Brexit was hampering their procurement strategy and 82 per cent claim that they have felt under more pressure to reduce costs for third party good and services.

Nick highlighted some of the changes procurement departments are attempting to implement in order to prepare for life post-Brexit:

  • Contingency Planning – including managing an mitigating risk, moving supply chain out of Europe etc. : 27 per cent
  • Investigating new suppliers:  9 per cent
  • Re-negotiating contracts with existing suppliers: 9 per cent
  • Reviewing country location for procurement operation: 6 per cent
  • Re-evaluating inbound supply chain: 6 per cent 
  • No changes to supplier base: 15 per cent

On a positive note, 73 per cent of procurement professionals believe their organisation sees procurement as an important part of its post-Brexit preparation process. As Nick highlighted, it is a fantastic opportunity for re-negotiation of supplier contracts, a chance to do a thorough supplier clean- up or develop new suppliers entirely and it gives your organisation a competitive advantage if your procurement team is in good shape – given that only 40 per cent of businesses have  started putting plans in place to prepare for brexit.

Read more from Nick Ford on how procurement can prepare for a post-Brexit world.  

The Battle For Capital

In the battle for capital, how does procurement ensure its cognitive projects come out on top?

Amit Sharma, Global Procurement Practice Leader for Cognitive Process Services (CPS) -IBM addressed how difficult it is for procurement leaders to communicate the need for, and value of, cognitive technology to their business.

“The problem for procurement” he argued “is that the CPO doesn’t always have the authority to drive transformation. It depend on lots of other people and that stops them from driving change.”

“For procurement, maintaining our relevance to the organisation beyond cost savings is imperative. [procurement pros] need to embed the latest in technology as best practise into the business as it will free up our time and help us to move from transactional to strategic management.”

The logic is unquestionable.  We know the sophistication of AI is going to come. It’s a question of when, not if. But when it comes to making the leap to cognitive, which can do a world of good for analytical and predictive analysis, organisations are still hesitant.

The CPOs in attendance were in agreement; citing short-termism, lack of buy-in from the CFO and a limited understanding in the business about cognitive technology.

Procurement needs to make the business case for how cognitive can add long-term value and, as Amit reminded us, “If you’re not convinced, you can’t convince someone else”

Brexit: What Happens Now?

Professor Anand Menon, Professor of European Politics and Foreign Affairs, Kings College led a session discussing the long-term causes of Brexit and their future implications.

“Hand on heart I don’t know [what’ going to happen] – if i could answer that I’d be rich and famous!”

It’s the most uncertain moment in British politics since World War Two and what’s striking is that,  two years on from the referendum, nothing has been decided.

A key reason for such uncertainty  is the nature of the referendum itself.  As Anand explained, the referendum packaged so many different options and outcomes  into a binary choice; leave or remain.  No one understood quite what they were signing up for and since the results Brexit has largely been defined by whichever adjective most aptly applies to specific people or groups; black brexit; white brexit; hard brexit; soft brexit; white red and blue brexit… the list goes on.

Does the UK want to establish a relationship with the EU like Norway, like North Korea or will they define something wholly new.

Anand admits that due to the Brexit process being so complex and all-consuming, there is no avoiding a messy process. What goes on throughout the next couple of years will largely be determined by politics.

  1. Theresa May

The UK Prime Minister relatively quickly defined what she meant by Brexit (leave cutoms market,end free movement etc) and her position has remained relatively unchanged since. Whilst she is unpopular with many in her party, it is unlikely her critics will choose to get rid of her yet. As long as she in place, she is a powerful force for stability.

2. The Conservative Government

There is a significant number of Tory MPs who want a much softer Brexit than the Prime Minister is proposing so it’s possible they will vote against May’s Brexit deal. However, if May loses this vote there is no question that she has to go; after all, her whole mission as Prime Minister is Brexit. If that happens, the Conservative Party will either elect a new leader or the UK will face a new general election. And the one thing no Tories want is another general election.

3. The Labour Government 

In the last general election, Labour picked up votes from both remainers and leavers. As such, the party have been careful to keep their Brexit policies ambiguous. Whenever Corbyn speaks about Brexit, he speaks in ambiguities.

Ultimately the real danger for the UK’s economy, Anand warns, is that the negotiations go pear shaped, the UK crashes out of the EU in March 2019 and they end up with no wiggle room to extend the UK’s transition period.

His advice to procurement organisations trying to prepare? Plan for a World Trade Organisation outcome from 2021 – “That, I think, is the most likely outcome.”

The Drive Project

The Drive Project is an award-winning, creative social enterprise. They work alongside charities and businesses to inspire and empower people with creative projects, training and talks. We were joined by one of their speakers Darren Swift (“Swifty”).

On 25th May 1991 Swifty was injured by a terrorist attack that resulted in him losing both his legs above the knee.

Within seconds of being hit by an IRA coffee jar bomb he went, he jokes, from being 6 foot 2 to 4 foot 6; his left leg completely gone and his right hanging on by a thread.

During his extensive rehab, when he was forced to confront his new reality, Swifty made the decision to not let his injury affect his life or career going forward.

Since then Swifty has gone on to achieve a huge amount including taking up skydiving, becoming the first ever double above knee amputee snowboarder and taking up a career as an actor. Swifty’s unique and inspiring story reminded us that employers need to be far more open minded when hiring new talent.

When it comes to hiring our organisations need to be ‘blinkers off’ people; asking ‘why not?’, rather than having a ‘you can’t’ attitude. You don’t know what’s possible with a potential hire until you take a punt and give them a chance.

Without this outlook employers could miss an extraordinary talent.

As Emily Shaw, Director- The Drive Project,  pointed out “[We should] give people a chance not to be a victim – because they can achieve so much more.”

Find out more about The Drive Project and the amazing work they do here. 

6 Top Tips From 6 Procurement Influencers

We interviewed some of procurement’s most influential leaders to hear their advice for the global procurement community. Here are there 6 top tips…

Are we running out of humans who can get the procurement job done?

Is the future office-free?

Should every procurement team have a Chief Data Officer?

How do you sell yourself, your team and the profession to the stakeholders that really matter?

Can procurement teams make themselves indispensable?

These are some of the questions that we addressed at last week’s Big Ideas Summit in London, where we brought together the top procurement minds to connect, collaborate and innovate.

Couldn’t join us on the day? Not a problem! We’ve documented all of the highlights for our digital delegates and pulled together this list of 6 top tips for procurement pros from some of the function’s most influential leaders.

1.Become an essential partner to the business – Bob Murphy CPO, IBM

IBM’s CPO, Bob Murphy, believes that while procurement leaders “need to be able to use technology to get the insights and knowledge, their focus should be on developing their emotional intelligence (EQ) rather than their IQ, and their ability to talk to clients in a consultative manner. Listening is critical – When we’re talking, we’re not learning.”

“Project management, empathy, innovative thinking and an agile mind-set are also critical skills at IBM.

“You hear a lot of people talk about procurement leaders becoming “trusted advisors” to their businesses, but I think we need to take it to the next level and become ‘essential partners.’

“We should enhance everything that we touch.”

Read more from Bob Murphy in this article.

2. Procure with Purpose – James Marland Vice President, SAP Ariba

James Marland, Vice President – SAP Ariba argued that it is an exciting time to be part of procurement an professionals should seize this opportunity. Procurement professionals are often told that they’re the ones who save the money, deal with suppliers and cut purchase orders.

But now procurement can have a new agenda; bringing to the table initiatives that achieve crucial social goals such as eradicating slave labour, improving sustainability and creating an inclusive and diverse workforce.

Take that opportunity and procure with purpose!

Read more from James Marland in this article. 

3.  Engineer Serendipity –  Greg Lindsay, Urbanist and Futurist

Greg Lindsay, Futurist, Urbanist, Journalist and Author, is a firm believer in the fact that innovation is fundamentally social. Indeed, case study after case study has demonstrated that the best ideas are more likely to arise from a casual chat around the water fountain than in any scheduled meeting.

They are the result of serendipity – a chance encounter at the right time by the right people, regardless of their rank, affiliation, and department or whether they even work for the same company.

The most innovative companies in the world are busy engineering serendipity and harnessing social networks and new ways of working designed to cultivate the discovery of new ideas. And that’s exactly what procurement should be doing!

Read more from Greg Lindsay in this article. 

4. Take More Risks – Professional Poker Player Caspar Berry

Professional poker player Caspar Berry believes “People are broadly hard wired to be risk-averse. It keeps them alive. Its kept our species alive for however many thousands of years.”

“What we call risk aversion is essentially a desire to succeed in the short term. And a desire to succeed is another way of describing a fear or aversion to loss and risk.

“I don’t judge anyone negatively for not being able to push the latitude and risk level but it’s important to engage in a conversation in order to try.

“Its our own results we’re sabotaging, sometimes inadvertently, if we don’t!”

Read more from Caspar Berry in this article. 

5. Gather data and do something with it- Chris Sawchuk, Principal The Hackett Group

Top procurement teams achieve their superior performance because they have higher-caliber people who apply their skills to effectively harness digital technologies and capabilities.

Chris Sawchuk, Principal The Hackett Group discussed the need for procurement professionals to develop two fundamental skills:

  1. Procurement has to get better at gathering and creating big data in order to provide meaningful insights for the business and go beyond the data that we have access to today.
  2. Procurement needs to improve their advanced analytics capabilities, to be able to look at data and draw out the opportunities it offers.

The future of procurement is not about the way we execute processes. It’s really about the insights and intelligence we provide to our organisations to give them an advantage.

Read more from The Hackett Group in this article.

6.  Prepare for the worst – Nick Ford, Co-Founder Odesma

Nick Ford, Co-founder – Odesma discussed how procurement professionals can help turn Brexit into an opportunity for their organisation.

It’s an uncertain time for procurement professionals; who must consider how the function will be impacted by an increase in the cost of imported goods, freedom of movement (or lack thereof!) and a potentially depleted talent pool.

As businesses prepare, the role for procurement teams is increasing dramatically and it’s a real opportunity to put procurement at the front and centre of organisations. We just need to prepare!

Read more from Nick Ford in this article. 

Want to explore more content and video footage from Big Ideas London 2018. Sign up here (it’s free) to register as a digital delegate and gain access. 

How To Prepare For Post-Brexit Procurement In The Dark

Procurement pros know the worst and best case Brexit scenario… But how do we prepare when faced with such a lack of concrete insight? 

The Brexit process has been a triumph in politics over practicality.

We may know roughly what the government wants to achieve politically, but the practical solutions for achieving those goals and the real-world impacts these solutions may entail are still unclear.

Despite this lack of concrete insight, it is often falling upon procurement departments to scope and prepare remedies for the uncertain future.

International Supply Chains

UK supply chains are inherently international, with much of what we export made up of things we import, so any changes to the regulatory environment has the potential to cause disruption as supply chains adjust.

It is not yet clear just how much Britain’s regulatory environment will continue to be aligned with the EU post-Brexit, as the two main possibilities – something like Norway with continued single market membership, or something like a Canada-style free trade agreement – offer distinct paths.

In one we commit to maintaining alignment with the EU, but in the other we choose to break free from the EU framework in order to open ourselves up to trade deals with the likes of America, where the regulatory environment is significantly different.

The two options do not exist on a spectrum, rather being distinct sets of tools that we can use to forge our future trading relationships.

The Invisible Border

The government’s commitment to maintaining an invisible border between Ireland and Northern Ireland however, has somewhat tied the government’s hands in this regard, as it essentially makes full alignment the default option.

The government still seems intent on diverging eventually, but having put forward no reasonable suggestions as to how these two objectives can be reconciled, businesses are finding themselves having to plan for the hardest kind of Brexit. Modelling the impacts of WTO rules is possible, and whilst doing so is only indicative of the worst-case scenario, it is a useful exercise in highlighting the key risk areas where contingency planning should be concentrated.

What can international businesses do?

For international businesses, the first port of call is to establish a fresh emphasis on supply chain relationships and risk management.

Many businesses will need to evaluate the possibility of finding new suppliers in order to build a level of flexibility in their supply chains that can help mitigate any disruption. Both UK and EU businesses will be looking into the possibility of switching to domestic suppliers and attempting to beat down prices if the costs of international trade increase.

If Britain does indeed exit both the single market and the customs union, as per the government’s stated intentions, it is very likely that procurement departments will need to face up to changes in contract terms, tariffs, and new non-tariff barriers such as rules of origin alongside potential changes in the identity of suppliers themselves.

This means addressing the chance of increased time and hassle getting goods across borders, as well as potential changes in local regulations if new suppliers are located outside of the EU.

When will these changes happen?

Uncertainty around when these changes may ultimately come into play, and how much of an advanced warning businesses will be given is another major issue.

At the moment it is looking likely that changes will be minimal until at least 2020, but beyond this we can expect to once again enter the realm of politics trumping actual progress.

The reality is that in the absence of reliable information, many firms may continue to take a wait-and-see approach in the hope that disruption is minimal, and currently we don’t know enough about the future to reveal the most appropriate course of action. If one thing is clear, it is that Brexit has put the role of procurement within British businesses under the limelight.

Nick Ford will be speaking at Big Ideas Summit in London next month. To find out more information and register to attend in person or as a digital delegate visit our dedicated site. 

7 Procurement Trends To Watch Out For In 2018

Which hot topics and trends will everyone in procurement be talking about in 2018…?

What’s the buzz in 2018? We’ve done a spot of investigating to identify all the hot topics the procurement world is excited (and concerned!) about in the coming year…

1. Technology Hype Won’t Let Up

Steve Banker, writing for Forbes, concurs stating that “emerging technologies such as blockchain, 3D printing, autonomous mobile robots, IoT, machine learning, and related technologies continue to get a tremendous of amount of publicity.

According to Supply Chain Digital, “The pace of innovation is picking up steam at an exponential rate.

“Robots, self-driving vehicles, electric trucks, blockchain, the Internet of Things (IoT), and new mobile-enabled categories are all poised to explode onto the scene in one form or another.

“It’s hard to predict what’s real and what will fade away, but expect 2018 to become a year of heavy innovation for supply chain leaders, even if it’s experimental.”

Vivek Soneja, writing for EBN online  asserts that “Blockchain capabilities have transformed collaboration across trading partner networks”. He believes Blockchain will “enable much tighter collaboration across supply chain planning and execution decisions. ”

Read our latest articles on Blockchain by Basware’s Paul Clayton and  InstaSupply’s Simona Pop.

2. Brexit Will Continue To Cause Disruption 

“While 2017 was the year of Brexit uncertainty, 2018 will be the year where things start to change,” asserts Francis Churchill on Supply Management.

Last year CIPS revealed that 63 per cent of EU companies planned to move some of their supply chain out of the UK as a result of the decision to leave the single market and customs union.

“The slower-than-expected progression of Brexit negotiations has put off business investments in current or new UK operations,” explains Gary Barraco on Global Trade Mag. Recent readings on economic growth showed investment by companies to be flat in the second quarter.

“Supply chain executives are voicing concerns about tariff and quota changes, hoping to keep trade open and flowing as it does today. For manufacturing to remain strong, the raw material imports from Asia need to remain duty and tariff free, as they are currently in the customs union. Costs could go up without the trade advantages, leading to higher export costs from the UK.”

We discuss the implications of Brexit for procurement in this Procurious blog. 

3. Cognitive will reign supreme

Global Trade Magazine predicts that “by the end of 2020, one-third of all manufacturing supply chains will be using analytics-driven cognitive capabilities, thus increasing cost efficiency by 10 per cent and service performance by 5 per cent.”

And IBM predict that, by this point, all of our important procurement decisions will be made with the assistance of artificial intelligence. We know that our teams must “transform or die” if we don’t want the function reduced to the back office,  facing extinction.

But if you’re still feeling a little overwhelmed by the magnitude and potential of cognitive technology or simply wondering how to get started, this Procurious article has some great advice.

4. Transparency

Paul Martyn , writing for Forbes, spoke to Sue Welch, CEO, Bamboo Rose, on her supply chain predictions for 2018, discussing why “transparency and sustainability will be practiced with more vigor in 2018.”  She said ” ‘There’s been an explosion of demand from consumers to know where their products are originating and the required information is extremely granular. For example, with a package of carrots, consumers want to know not only the farm where they were harvested, but also the row and lot number where the carrots were planted.’

“Welch, whose company, Bamboo Rose, works with a number of top retailers and apparel companies, expects traceability demands to not only shape how consumers buy, but how companies will source and market their services.

“Smart retailers will begin to market their products from an information/sustainability-first standpoint and to be credible about it, they’ll need to invest in integrating technology that makes this level of transparency possible at every level of the supply chain.’ ”

5. Cybersecurity

Global Trade Magazine predict that by the end of 2019, cybersecurity will have surpassed physical security as a top concern for one-half of all manufacturers, and in the transition to digitally enabled, cognitive supply chains, cybersecurity will have become a top investment priority.

“High-profile hacking cases that compromise sensitive information for millions of people will continue in the coming year.” states Soneja, “With the proliferation of data and connected endpoints, companies will need to step up their security and privacy protection protocols in 2018.”

Earlier this year, we spoke to Craig Hancock, cybersecurity expert and Executive Director of Telstra Service Operations on the dangers of cyber crime. Read the full article here. 

6. Back to basics

“While a number of new trends are giving procurement leaders directions to explore in 2018, many supply chain professionals are still aiming for easy-to-understand goals” explains The Strategic Sourceror.

“According to Deloitte’s latest research on chief procurement officers, cost advantages and cash flow improvements are still the bread and butter of the supply chain. Traditional efforts to improve contracts and advanced, tech-driven strategies can deliver favorable costs to companies.”

7. Big data is a big deal

“In the context of the supply chain for most businesses, big data and predictive analytics are still an untapped resource that can potentially provide insights which help anticipate or respond to events or disruptions,” explains Raanan Cohen on Supply Chain Management review. 

“Unpredictable consumer behaviour, traffic or weather patterns, and labour unrest are all external events that can disrupt a supply chain and lead to increased costs and customer service challenges. Big data can help organisations become better trading partners to their customers and suppliers. But before insights and analytics can be leveraged for a better supply chain, there’s a huge task at hand for the many organisations that need to first collate data points from all sources and align them to their business operations.”

Deal Or No Deal? The Brexit Effect

What are the implications of Brexit on Procurement? And how should the function be preparing for the various possible outcomes? 

Zycus’ webinar The Brexit Effect Understanding Brexit and Its Impact On Procurement takes place on Tuesday, 21st November 2017. Register for free here.

On June 23 2016, the world woke up to some very unexpected news.

This was the day around 17.4 million people in UK, by a sizeable margin of 52 per cent to 48 per cent, voted to become the first country to leave the European Union.

As the world looked on in shock, the then prime minister David Cameron immediately resigned, leaving his successor Theresa May to handle proceedings. She soon confirmed that Article 50 of the Lisbon treaty would be triggered and did so in March 2017.

From the time the UK submitted its Article 50 letter to the European Commission, a two year formal process of leaving the EU began.  A number of events were set in motion that cannot now be halted without significant agreement between the two governments.

What will happen in these two years?

Within these two years, the UK and the European Commission will either agree upon an interim agreement or trade will be governed under a pre-agreed set of tariffs. The impact of Brexit on the UK economy will be determined largely by whatever relationship the UK manages to forge with the EU, and this may not become clear for number of years.

In these uncertain and unpredictable times, how can procurement professionals prepare and what risks does the function face? In the EU, the public purchase of goods and services has been estimated to be worth 16 per cent of GDP and it is nearly 20 per cent of UK’s GDP.

Regardless of whether you work in the public or private sector, there is no doubt that Brexit’s impact extends across the entire breadth of the procurement industry. It’s really hard to understand how significantly regulations are going to change for procurement.

The worst case scenario for procurement

  • Cost: The costs to import goods within supply chains are likely to rise, whether it’s due to commodity prices or labour cost. In terms of commodity prices, we cannot know for sure of the impact; there could be a major change depending on the value of the pound or we might see no change at all. Labour cost will be dependent on the new immigration regulations, which could make it more expensive to hire EU nationals in the UK and vice versa.
  • Freedom of movement and supply chain delays: There is a chance that there will be a loss in freedom of movement both in goods and services for UK and European businesses with supply chains operating across borders. There is also a possibility that there will be some disruption in existing supply chains because of time-consuming border checks and paperwork at UK ports, which could increase custom processing time.
  • Procurement recruiting and talent management may suffer: Not only the flow of goods and services will be impacted but procurement talent will also be considerably affected. If the “leave” campaign succeeds in stopping migrants from the EU, there is a chance that the procurement talent pool in UK will be considerably reduced. Many of the EU procurement professionals might not want to be a part of UK given the current instability.

Procurement’s Pre-emptive Action

CIPS recently conducted a survey with 2100+ supply chain managers, which delivered some very interesting results:

  • Around 32 per cent of UK businesses using EU suppliers are currently looking for British replacements
  • More than one third of UK businesses plan to respond to Brexit by beating down suppliers’ process
  • 46 per cent of European businesses expect to reduce their use of UK suppliers

As supply chain complexity increases, many British companies are considering the possibility of shifting supplier base from continental EU to the UK. In the meantime, European companies that have operations in the UK are looking at moving their operations outside of the UK to ease business. This is because UK will become a separate market for EU and therefore like we discussed earlier, the movement of goods across borders with the UK will be deemed as imports and exports, attracting new customs controls. This will become more time consuming and attract paperwork, taxes, tariffs, excise duties and VAT which will have direct implications for revenue and cash flow of businesses.

If trade negotiations fail throughout the Brexit process, businesses inside and outside the UK should be ready to explore new options. Procurement must plan ahead to find alternative suppliers or start work with existing suppliers to put deals in place, soon!

If you are curious to know more about how Brexit will impact procurement, do join our upcoming webinar on Brexit featuring industry experts Mark Webb and Jon Hansen. They will be discussing:

  • The impact of Brexit on supplier risk assessment and management
  • The influence of trade tariffs on cost
  • Increasing demand for procurement talent
  • What is the procurement technology answer to Brexit? 

Speakers:

Jon Hansen – Editor and Lead writer at Procurement Insights

Mark Webb – Managing Director at Future Purchasing, UK

Kanishka Ghosh – Director of Product Management at Zycus Inc.

The Brexit Effect Understanding Brexit and Its Impact On Procurement takes place on Tuesday, 21st November 2017. Register for free here.

The Brexit Horror Show: It’s Going To Be Rocky!

We all like to watch a good horror show.. but UK customs trying to manually process our imports? Entertainment it is not!

Are you ready to watch the Brexit horror show unfold?

The National Audit Office (NAO) pubilished a report last Thursday reviewing HM Revenue & Customs’ development of the new Customs Declaration Service (CDS).  The system is being developed in an attempt to manage the predicted 255 million UK customs declarations per year (an increase from 55 million)  once the UK leaves the EU.

But, with a significant amount of work still to be completed before March  2019,  many are concerned about what chaos might ensue.

Amyas Morse,  head of the NAO, did little to disguise his own concerns when he briefed the media on the report this week. He warned of a potential “horror show” at customs if the transition to CDS is not made by January 2019.

He said “What we don’t want to find is that, at the first tap, this falls apart like a chocolate orange.”  (Yep, we were confused by this too – it’s well known that Terry’s Chocolate Oranges are not known for their fragility; hence the marketing slogan “Don’t tap it, whack it!”.)

“It needs to be coming through as uniform, a little bit more like a cricket ball” he continued.

What Is The Customs Declarations Service?

The CDS is a new system, which will be installed to manage all imports and exports post-Brexit, replacing existing system, Customs Handling of Import and Export Freight (CHIEF).

CHIEF can currently process only 100 million declarations per year.  This leaves no question that a new system is needed given that HMRC are estimating an increase to 255 million once new trade and customs agreements are made during Brexit.

Completion of the installation is forecasted for January 2019 which doesn’t allow much room for error or delay given that the UK will officially leave the EU in March 2019. Indeed, the report confirms that there is still a “significant” amount of work to complete and a number of vacancies to fill, which means there’s a pretty good chance that the full functionality of CDS won’t be ready in time.

Ironically, in 2016, the UK came fifth out of 160 countries in the World Bank’s ranking of the efficiency of the border clearance process, including customs. Time will tell if this can be maintained post-Brexit!

Why Should Businesses Be Concerned?

The National Audit Office believes the government is only just starting to realise how difficult Brexit will be.  In a worst-case scenario it would become impossible for customs to collect the £34bn of duty, excise, and VAT taken at the border every year.

Customs officials might have to manually process imports and exports if the new electronic system is not in place, which would of course be a nightmarish scenario for businesses and their supply chains.

Mike Cherry, chairman of the Federation of Small Businesses, said “It’s extremely concerning that the UK’s new customs system may not be ready in time for Brexit, potentially resulting in massive delays to trade and leaving thousands of businesses in the lurch.” And hat’s not to mention a lack of confidence businesses will feel in the UK if their flow of goods is disrupted.

“Can government actually step up in these very difficult circumstances and deliver a unified response?” Morse asked. “I’m not seeing it yet.”

The report, and the alarming comments made by Amyas Morse will no doubt increase the pressure on the prime minister to re-evaluate Brexit progress and policy, but will it be in time to stop a customs horror show?

Let us know your thoughts on the NAO report in the comments section below. 

In other procurement and supply-chain news this week….

Bangladesh Factory Blast

  • Major European buyers of apparel supplied by a Bangladesh garment plant have started investigations after a boiler explosion in the plant killed 13 people and injured dozens
  • The explosion occurred during maintenance work at the factory, whose top buyers include Finnish fashion chain Lindex, which is part of Stockmann
  • Stockmann communications manager Anna Bjarland confirmed to SM that the factory supplied garments to both Stockmann and Lindex saying that the company was investigating

Read more on Supply Management

Hazardous chemicals in Tesco’s clothing supply chain

  • Tesco has joined a growing list of major high street retailers in beginning to remove chemicals thought to be hazardous from the supply chain of its clothing brand
  • Greenpeace said Tesco will immediately begin the process of eliminating 11 groups of hazardous substances from its F&F brand, including phthalates, brominated and chlorinated flame retardants, chlorinated solvents and heavy metals
  • Alan Wragg, technical director for clothing at Tesco, said: “This commitment is part of our goal to protect the environment by sourcing products sustainably and responsibly for our customers.”

Read more on Business Reporter 

Could China lead the way with AI?

  • In the battle of technological innovation between East and West, artificial intelligence (AI) is on the front line. And China’s influence is growing
  • China has invested massively in AI research since 2013, and these efforts are yielding incredible results. China’s AI pioneers are already making great strides in core AI fields
  • It is becoming clear that belief in U.S. dominance of the tech world is flagging. As it stands, China is in the driver’s seat

Read more on Venturebeat

Navigating The Changing Rules Of The Game In A World of Uncertainty

Change, change, more change and a hefty helping of uncertainty pretty much sums up the current regulatory landscape. Seal Software explore why winning the game has become more of a battle in an ever changing world.

Nothing sums up the current state of regulatory affairs quite like the acronym, VUCA.

V – Volatility 

U – Uncertainty 

C – Complexity 

A – Ambiguity 

The concept was introduced by the U.S. military towards the end of the Cold War and has since been used in reference to any conditions or situations that are, namely, volatile, uncertain, complex or ambiguous.

In a post-Brexit, ever-changing world, keeping up and complying with new regulations can be a constant struggle…

Change, change and more change…

Nothing could be more true about the regulatory landscape. This has become ever more apparent over the last year following the Brexit vote. Brexit is triggering the need to review and change currency and exchange rates, governing law and logistics terms within numerous contracts. Revisions to trade rules could also lead organisations to consider the impact on their business relationships. Proactive organisations are already starting their Brexit preparedness initiatives, and are realising it starts with a clear understanding of how these elements and many others are defined inside contracts.

The battle to understand new regulations

Of course, it’s not just Brexit. Changes in regulations in the financial services industry mean it’s a continuous battle to understand the new regulations, then implement them in the most efficient way possible by the stated deadlines to avoid penalties, fines, or worse.

The one global constant is the ever-growing strain this puts on financial institutions to keep up and comply. They must figure out how to comply with new rules and deal with potential reviews, and audits without adding disproportionate cost and disruption to the organisation.

Many regulations impact the way organisations make commitments or conduct transactions with their partners or customers. New and changing regulations require companies to find relevant contracts, review the affected language and identify excess cost, liabilities, risk and exposure that directly impact financial services organisations.

Only then can business decisions be made to revise or novate the contract, renegotiate commercial terms or terminate to avoid non-compliance. This has to be done for all affected contracts, which could be in the tens of thousands or more for some organisations.

Global regulatory bodies

Global regulatory bodies are enforcing mandates to better control the solvency and recovery actions of banks and lending intuitions in the case of future economic downturns. Several key mandates stem from the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, signed in 2010 to reduce the potential for a recurrence of the recessionary economic conditions experienced in 2008 and 2009. The consistent theme across stress testing, “living wills”, vendor risk, and overall recovery and resolution mandates is that large financial institutions must have a clear understanding of their contractual relationships and obligations as a foundational element of compliance initiatives.

When organisations manage their contracts for regulatory compliance, they also get insights into the data to support critical business decisions and reporting. This may result in contract novation and repapering or restructuring, depending on the mandate, as well as allowing an organisation to meet changing regulatory mandates, in the best way possible. Managing risks & liabilities during changing regulatory & business conditions

The key to coping with change is agility

It’s critical for financial services organisations to remain agile. They need to have the ability to extract the appropriate data within an overwhelming amount of contracts quickly and without significant business disruption to manage risk, reduce liabilities and compete effectively during times of change.

Previously, when mandates changed, organisations would have to perform manual reviews as a part of their compliance initiatives, resulting in months or years of contract analysis and high costs. However, organisations can now reduce the burden of the contractual review aspect of their compliance initiatives. By using automated contract discovery, data extraction, review and analysis, up to 80% of their time can be saved, providing significant savings. This is critical when organisations are facing tight compliance deadlines and have to review and make strategic decisions on hundreds of thousands of contracts.

Using artificial intelligence and powered by an advanced machine learning framework, the automated solution can extract specific terms and provisions needed for regulatory compliance across all contracts. The framework can be taught by users to look for specific provisions and clauses.

What impact will IRFS16 have?

Let’s look at IRFS16, the new regulations for how leases are accounted for in financial statements. For IRFS16 compliance, all lease agreements need to be located and the impact of the change in regulation needs to be determined. Knowing which of your contracts are effectively leases can be challenging, and an automated contract discovery, data extraction, and data analysis solution will locate all contracts and centralise them in a repository.

The system can extract, gather and validate lease terms from the contracts by identifying which have lease provisions or language. This level of reporting helps business users understand the current environment and develop an optimal remediation plan.

This is just one example which demonstrates how financial services organisations can compete effectively in times of change. Complying with new regulations no longer needs to be such an arduous task.

Using an automated contract review and analysis solution can ensure compliance with global regulatory mandates and help manage the overall risk against defined targets. It can dramatically shorten the time and reduce the cost of contract reviews, as well as help model and analyse the business impact before any changes are made. This results in better decisions on the best ways to achieve compliance.

For more information on how Seal can help address regulatory compliance initiatives, please visit our website.

This article was guest-written by Seal Software, a leading provider of contract discovery. Seal Software uses artificial intelligence and natural language processing to help companies efficiently uncover what’s in their contracts.