Tag Archives: career management

Your Procurement Career Upgrade: Download Complete!

Career Boot Camp 2017: That’s a wrap! 5 global CPOs, 5 FREE procurement podcasts – available NOW! 

Career Boot Camp 2017 is done and dusted!  Sign up here (It’s FREE!) to access all five podcasts. 

Procurious promised we would upgrade your career.

We pledged that we would transform your procurement future.

We swore our five, global CPOs would prepare you for workplace 4.0.

But we never said it would be easy!

Last week, Procurious and Michael Page Procurement and Supply Chain presented Career Boot Camp 2017.  If you joined us, we hope you’re feeling inspired and motivated to make you procurement dreams come true! Now’s the time to take you career to hand; using the tips, guidance and insights provided by our podcast speakers, you’re equipped to take the procurement world by storm. It’s going to be a long journey but we’re right here with you, every step of the way!

Want to catch up on any missed episodes, recap on your favourites or get stuck in to heaps of related content? Look no further.

Over 5000 procurement pros took part in Career Boot Camp.  Were you one of them?

I couldn’t make it, can I still take part?

Want to learn how to “fail forward”, why you should be locking up your data scientists or the reason Co-op’s CPO won’t be showing you her cake recipe?  

Great news! You might be a little late to the party but that means you can access the whole series in one fell swoop. Whether you want to listen on the go, from your sofa or during your lunchbreak, in one day, one week, or one month, Career Boot Camp 2017 is ready and waiting for you to listen at your leisure!

Anyone and everyone is welcome to partake in Career Boot Camp and it’s totally, 100 per cent free.

How do I join?

If you’re already a member of Procurious simply head over to our eLearning area to access the full series of Career Boot Camp 2017.

Not yet a member of Procurious? All you need to do is register here (it’s FREE!) and you’re good to go!

What can I expect?

Career Boot Camp 2017 was designed to help you transform your career and your future if, and only if, you’re ready and willing to upgrade! Our five CPOs provided inside information on what it’s like to work at their organisation, what they’re looking for in new hires and how they see the function progessing in the coming years.

More and more procurement professionals are opting to develop their key skills and gain knowledge through eLearning and other online channels. In a fast-paced, technology driven world, innovation, agility and forward planning are essential if procurement professionals are to succeed and be future leaders.

Need a little more persuasion. Click below to listen exclusively to Day 1 of Career Boot Camp in FULL.

Ramsay Chu, Rio Tinto CPO, How to Fail Forward:

“The best skiers have fallen many times. No one is an Olympic caliber downhill skier from the outset. It’s not a natural or innate talent that anyone’s born with. They get better by learning, pushing themselves to the limits, oftentimes falling, picking themselves up, and moving on.

“I think the fear of failure oftentimes casts a very long shadow, and potentially impairs our ability to really think big.”

Best of the Career Boot Camp Blog

Once you’ve had your fill of our five podcasts you might like to do a little wider reading. There’s heaps of great. related conten in our blog at the moment. Here are some of the highlights.

  • The Biggest Mistake Leaders Make On Their Way To The Top By Tania Seary, Founder Procurious – Procurement leaders, listen up! We hate to break it to you, but life’s not fair. And neither is your procurement career!
  • Personal Development: You Da Brand! By Matthew Friend, Associate Director Michael Page Procurement and Supply Chain – So you’ve decided you need to take your procurement career to hand by proactively managing your personal development? Here’s how to set yourself up for success.
  • 5 Global CPOs Answer Your Top Five Procurement Questions By Procurious HQ – How did the CPOs at Barclays, Vodafone, The Co-operative group, AstraZeneca and Rio Tinto fair when we put them to the test in a round of quick-fire questions?

Gain instant access to the full series of Career Boot Camp 2017 when you sign up to Procurious. 

Already a member of Procurious? You’re automatically enrolled for Career Boot Camp! Click here to listen now!

Personal Development: You Da Brand!

So you’ve decided you need to take your procurement career to hand by proactively managing your personal development? Here’s how to set yourself up for success.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Career Boot Camp 2017 launches on 4th September, featuring podcasts  with 5 global CPOs. Sign up here (It’s FREE!)

What are the attributes of top talent within procurement?

Are there any common themes among successful leaders?

Where should I focus to ensure my career continues to progress?

These are but a few of the many questions you’ll have asked at different stages in your career.  But I’d like to make the assumption that a focus on personal development is the area that suffers above all else. Workload, pressures of a role, delivery objectives and even personal life challenges  means we are constantly investing in the here and now, and not on our longer-term aspirations.

Personal development is a topic we are enormously passionate about at Michael Page. Not just for our own employees, but also through the conversations we have with candidates and clients every day. A lack of development is often cited as a main reason to change roles, with development and progression opportunities both being a compelling sell for a new employer.

It’s a wonderful thing to be inspired to take control of your career development. But it’s also easier said than done, particularly when it comes to kickstarting your journey. Here are my four key building blocks to help you set yourself up for great success!

1. What does good look like?

When thinking about your own personal development, a great place to start is to gain an appreciation of what good looks like, think of someone you have worked with that has stood out from the crowd and use that as your inspiration.

2. Using failure to progress

The starting point for me when thinking about individual procurement and supply chain leaders who stand out from the crowd is often bravery. Having the confidence and foresight to try something different. This approach requires a corporate culture and environment that encourages ideas and isn’t restrictive. On a personal level, having a growth mindset is critical for framing outcomes as a development of one’s own capability. Failure should help move you forward as much as success would.

3. Nature or nurture?

One of the questions you should ask yourself is how much your culture, environment and leader, enables you to show this type of bravery. The strongest leaders will encourage you to think differently, whilst also allowing a sufficient degree of autonomy to do so. More importantly, they’ll provide cover for you internally should things not work out as desired. It is important to work for these types of individuals for your own growth and development as a leader but the type of organisation you’re in is also critical. It needs to be one that has a clear focus on development and a path for progression.

4. You’re the brand!

Think of yourself as a product. You can only take a highly effective product so far without the right marketing and brand behind it. Equally, a product with strong marketing backing and investment that doesn’t deliver what the customer wants will ultimately fail. As an individual, you have to develop your procurement toolkit, your softer skills and general competence. But you also have to build a strong personal brand. Think about the CPO’s that you aspire to be like.  Your reasons are informed through a mix of their achievements and career highlights, but also the personal brand that they have created.

Be bold, be forward thinking and creative, find an environment that enables you to do these things. Above all, live your own personal values and beliefs then create a personal brand that is true to who you want to aspire to be.

Michael Page Procurement and Supply Chain have partnered with Procurious to bring you a series of podcasts from some of procurement’s leading lights.

Throughout this podcast series, five global CPOs will talk about their career journeys and the skills required to become tomorrow’s CPO. We hope this will provide you with the chance to reflect and positively affect your own development and longer-term career aspirations.

Career Boot Camp 2017 launches on 4th September, featuring podcasts  with 5 global CPOs. Sign up here (It’s FREE!)

Four Work-Life Questions To Ponder On Vacation This Summer

Going on vacation this summer? Print this out and take it someplace without any Wi-Fi….

Our webinar, Out of Office: Your Career Break (Through), takes place at 1pm on 10th August 2017. Register your attendence for FREE here

You packed your favorite journal and a couple of pens. You planned some time on the beach, or left an afternoon empty to find a table at an outdoor cafe where you can grab an ice-cold drink and just think. This vacation, you’ve told yourself, you’re finally going to be able to take a break and get some clarity.

But clarity about what, exactly?

It’s true that vacationing can hold some unexpected career benefits, in addition to letting you recharge your batteries and do some self-reflection about your working life, your personal life, and your overall goals. But musing on these big-ticket themes isn’t something many of us have a lot of practice doing. When you finally get a chance to do it, you might find your thoughts a little unfocused. That’s fine—mind-wandering is sort of the point here. But in case you need a little more structure, these are four questions to let your mind wander over.

1. Stresses and worries aside, am I happy at work?

One question worth asking is whether you’re happy with your job on a day-to-day or week-by-week basis. You may find some workdays pretty stressful, and that’s normal, but do you generally find your job fulfilling to do?

Vacation is a great time to really step back and consider that, because it’s one of those rare occasions when you can step back to monitor your own reaction to being away from work. A change of pace is always nice, but at the end of your vacation, are you excited to get back to the projects you’ve been working on? If you totally dread the end of vacation, it might be time to start looking for something else.

When you’re away from the office, you can also think about which aspects of your job are most rewarding. By identifying the tasks that excite you, you can lay the groundwork to pursue opportunities that let you do them more often.

2. Where am I headed?

One of the most aggravating questions hiring managers like to ask on job interviews is, “Where do you see yourself in five years?” Lots of people find that hard to answer, in part because a lot of the time they don’t honestly know.

That’s understandable. It can also be difficult to do long-range planning when you’re buried in the daily grind, when your goals are changing, when your industry is evolving at a breakneck pace, or all of the above. Taking some time off lets you think about whether your career is headed in a direction you’re generally happy with. To get a handle on a big-ticket question like this, try to think specifically about the skills you feel you still need to acquire to succeed.

In other words, you may not be able to see the future, but you can still think like a futurist when it comes to your own career planning. Are there people who might be good mentors (including of the unofficial kind) to help you fill in those skill gaps? Maybe it’s time for some more education. Going back to school for another degree may be daunting, but you can always start by taking a couple of professional development courses. Or maybe you just need to do a little more networking to brush up on the latest goings-on in your field.

Many companies have some form of educational benefits that lots of employees don’t know much about, let alone actually use. Maybe this vacation is the time to figure out which opportunities you can ask your HR team about once you’re back in the office. In fact, even companies that don’t offer a standing set of training resources may be willing to cover some of the cost of professional development you pursue on your own.

This is one of those items that way too few employees actually negotiate for, beyond compensation. Use a few spare hours this vacation to come up with some training options you’d like your company to help you go after.

3. Who don’t I know

You have more colleagues than just the ones who work for the same company as you. There’s a whole community out there of professionals who do much the same kind of work, but most of us don’t spend enough time getting to know them. After all, networking is a tedious chore and often completely fruitless.

And sure, sometimes that’s true. But there are a few things you can do to expand your connections in ways that don’t feel like networking. One of them is pretty old-school: Join a professional society. They’re often a great source for the latest developments in your field, sparing you the need to scroll LinkedIn for industry news. And they often have local meetings where you can meet people dealing with the same issues you are, rather than blindly scouring a random mixer for them.

There are also “networking” opportunities that might be lurking in your average workday—chances to connect with valuable people you haven’t had a chance (or a non-awkward pretext) for to strike up a conversation with yet.

You’re on vacation, though, so all this will have to wait, right? Technically, yes. But one of the reasons so many people procrastinate on (or just downright avoid) networking is because they haven’t given much thought to who’s missing from their contact lists, let alone what the best strategy might be for filling those gaps. Your vacation is a great chance to consider that. Based on where you are in your career and where you’d like to be before long (see above), think about the ideal connections you’ll need to make. Here’s a handy guide for figuring out who’s most important to you at the moment and where can you find them.

4. What’s Missing?

Work is great, but there’s more to life than the things you do to make your company money. In high school and college, you might’ve spent a lot more time doing things you were passionate about—or things that helped you discover what you’re passionate about. After hitting the workforce, most of us start to shed extracurriculars. If you look back, you may see a graveyard of discarded instruments, sports, clubs, and volunteer work stretching out in your wake.

It’s great to draw a sense of purpose and fulfillment from your full-time job, but those outside activities can also be powerful sources of energy. What’s more, they can be the steam valves that give you much-needed emotional release when the pressure at work builds up. Vacation is a good time to re-engage with old hobbies and pursuits you’ve left behind. Pull that old French horn out of the closet. Brush off your tennis racquet. Find a local dog shelter that needs another pair of hands. (Puppies are always a great cure for whatever ails you.)

Don’t feel guilty about carving out a little more time away from your work to pick up these side gigs and activities. Not only will they give you a chance to develop your other interests, they’ll also give you people to hang out with who aren’t all focused on the same set of work issues that you are.

And hey, you never know; over winter vacation about 16 years ago, I started taking saxophone lessons. Not only has it been great fun, I’m now in a band!

Our webinar, Out of Office: Your Career Break (Through), takes place at 1pm on 10th August 2017. Register your attendence for FREE here

This article, written by Art Markman was originally published on Fast Company.

Art Markman, PhD is a professor of Psychology and Marketing at the University of Texas at Austin and Founding Director of the Program in the Human Dimensions of Organisations. Art is the author of Smart Thinking and Habits of Leadership, Smart Change, and most recently, Brain Briefs, co-authored with his “Two Guys on Your Head”co-host Bob Duke, which focuses on how you can use the science of motivation to change your behavior at work and at home.

Infographic: Want To Get Ahead In The Gig Economy?

By 2020 43 per cent of workers are expected to be freelancers, embracing the gig economy  – How can you be sure to make it work for you?

There is a lot of upside to being your own boss, and more and more people are finding this out by taking the plunge. Today 34 per cent of workers in the U.S. are freelancers, and this figure is projected to reach 43 per cent by 2020.

What’s making this lifestyle so attractive? When you are your own boss you can choose which projects to work on and reject any projects you don’t want to do. You can choose what hours to work, where to work, and how to work. You can even take your work with you to the beach and enjoy a vacation without getting too far behind.

But there are some drawbacks- you are responsible for getting clients, paying taxes, and health insurance and retirement. In order to keep ahead:

  • Market yourself like a company
  • Keep your portfolio up to date
  • Maintain your website and social media presence
  • Network with previous clients so you can get repeat business and referrals.

Brian Wallace,Infogrpahic Expert, is the founder of NowSourcing, the U.S.’s premier infographic design agency.  This infographic was originally published on JobVine and LinkedIn

9 Signs You’re Undervalued At Work

Feeling undervalued at work? If you can’t remember the last time you got a pay rise , haven’t received any formal training since your role commenced and are consistently working unpaid overtime, you probably are!

This article was written by Anna O’Dea, Director and Founder of Agency Iceberg. 

We all have a sense of our personal worth in the workplace, and sometimes it can feel as if our valuable experience, strong commitment and innovative ideas are being taken for granted.

At Agency Iceberg, I meet a lot of people facing this situation. They suspect they aren’t being supported by their managers, they’re being underpaid for their knowledge and input, or are being overlooked for well-deserved promotions.

From my experience working for eight years in the recruitment industry, my team and I have found there are nine key signs that suggest you could be being undervalued by your employer. If they sound familiar, it could be time to speak up or move on!

1) The numbers aren’t stacking up

In the current economic climate, pay rises aren’t vast. But if you’re constantly stuck with getting just the minimum cost of living rise, while your peers get bumped up for a similar job, you might not be getting the financial reward that you should be. With the internet, it’s not hard to compare your earnings with what others in the same role are getting. Do the research and you’ll have tangible evidence to back your case.

Another one to watch is bonuses. Did your colleagues get a flash of cash that you missed? If there’s no logical reason why you were skipped over, there could be unfairness at play.

2) Your performance and pay reviews are constantly postponed

If your annual performance and remuneration review keeps getting put off another week, month, or a few months, with lots of excuses from management (and no guarantee of back pay) you’re being taken for a ride. The longer you don’t get a pay rise, the more you’re working at a higher skill for the company’s benefit.

3) You have to ‘act’ in a higher role before you’re promoted

It’s common to get told you need to step up your responsibilities to ‘prove your worth’. But if ‘acting’ in the next role goes on for too long, the advantage can again pass from you gaining experience, to your employer getting excellent skills for less pay.

4) People are promoted around you

If you’ve got the credentials and factual evidence to deserve a promotion, yet continually miss out, they may not be seeing your true worth. More worrying, and harder to fix, could be signs of favouritism, sexism or ageism.

5) You’re not trusted to be autonomous

If you have to run every move by your manager, or aren’t trusted to manage your schedule or clients your own way, your abilities may not be recognised. In extreme situations, you could be being micro-managed, which can be quite destructive to growth.

6) Your input is curtailed

When you show your talent, such as sharing innovative ideas in meetings, or suggesting positive ways to improve processes, and it’s clear they’re not welcome, it’s a concerning sign. In some cases, insecure managers won’t let you shine, which is not only letting you down, but also the business.

7) Overtime is expected, and you aren’t given time in lieu

We’ve all read that clause in contracts that says ‘extra hours may be necessary’. However when overtime is systemic and with no lieu time offered, the business has you in its claws. We see this when people travel for work – enduring overnight flights or early morning trips with no time off.

8) You can’t be sick on sick days

Sick used to mean staying at home and sweating out the bug. However technology has shifted the expectations of many bosses to be on 24-7. If your boss insists you stay online when you should be recovering, or text messages and countless emails on the weekend from your boss doesn’t sound out of place, it’s a sign you’re being overworked.

9) You’re not getting trained for growth

Every good employer should encourage the development of their employees. If your employer isn’t investing in your training or opportunities, you could be in a one-way relationship.

If some of these signs ring true, take time to consider the next phase of your career. Your professional pride, mental health, sense of purpose and financial future are too important.

Anna O’Dea is a recruitment expert, LinkedIn Top Voice 2016 and Founder and Director of Agency Iceberg. This article was originally published on LinkedIn

Is P2P Keeping Us Stuck In The Mud?

Still debating maverick spend in your organisation, griping about tail spend or struggling to implement the right systems? Perhaps P2P is holding you back!

This article was written by Eva Milko. 

Is it me or has not much changed in the world of Purchase-to-Pay (P2P)? Twenty-five years have come and gone and yet we continue to discuss maverick spend, we gripe about tail spend and struggle with the right systems and the right processes to enable the simplest of transactions a company has in its portfolio: buying stuff.

In the meantime, those who realised that their value sits in higher areas of supply chain opportunity are doing wonders to automate, digitiSe, codify and outsource P2P work to those who have become transactional experts. Entrusting a part of your procurement house to others is not an easy task, many failing in the process, but I argue that it is somewhat necessary when the world is getting more complex, challenges more broad and opportunities often surpass the risks.

The CPO seat belongs to the one who carefully coordinates all aspects of the source to pay process with a keen eye on what can be standardised, outsourced, digitised, robotised and automated, balancing that with strategic decision making on where to place their precious human resources.

P2P buying systems remain a mystery. They are the most disliked, worked-around and challenged factor by employees in almost any company.  Our research found that only 36 per cent of stakeholders find procurement systems favourable and comfortable enough to engage with.  Our internal stakeholders are screaming “make it easy for us” and yet we continue to throw them into the bowels of twenty process steps, multiple buying channels and layers of authorisations. That’s not to mention lost time and corporate energy.

Procurement Prime

Molson Coors Procurement Office recently hosted an Executive Roundtable on this very subject and we challenged ourselves to envision a world of guided buying where the stakeholder is not exposed to procurement rigmarole but interacts with an intuitive and interactive set of buying steps. We called it Procurement Prime, taking our inspiration from the most admired ordering system in the world; Amazon Prime.

Many procurement executives and their friends in finance will say to me “but wait, we need to mitigate and monitor supplier risk” …..True, and it  is possible with a set of algorithms and predictive tools embedded into your P2P ordering process, alerting the requisitioner at the time of purchase of the supplier’s health status, including fulfillment capabilities, shipping disruptions, banking and payment alerts, further yet, providing alternative solutions.

If you can imagine it, you can plan it. If you can plan it, you can get it done.   Paying attention to how your corporate buyers embrace the P2P steps (or not), diving into their buying methods, listening and empathising will go a long way. Interestingly enough, we found that Procurement functions aligned to the Chief Supply Chain officer have much greater alignment in their organisations than those who report to the CFO. Is is time to change alliances?  Not so fast! Here are a few enablers to make such transformations possible.

Changing your functional and corporate mindset

Let’s start by recognising that your procurement value does not reside in chasing requisitions around the office and beating internal stakeholders into procurement policy submission.  Successful companies are taking a much more customer-centric approach, focusing on relieving the organisation of procurement jargon and building sophisticated systemised methods, especially for more repetitive buying.  Think Guided Buying and think Procurement Prime! This is your future and #tomorrowstartsnow

Changing your skill set

This is pivotal to opening up these conversations and imagining the possibilities.  In procurement, we do not hire enough creative people who are empowered to challenge the status quo and bring forth cool solutions.  We need more inventors, technology savvy, stakeholder centric entrepreneurs who are bold, persuasive and get things done! Yes – these transformations take money, take energy and take skilled resources to get it done, but thinking long term possibilities versus short term barriers will unshackle the organisation from procurement processes horrors and free up resources to address much more interesting issues.

Changing your focus

In our recent study, we found that 84 per cent of procurement organisations remain firmly rooted in functional effectiveness and cross functional collaboration buckets. What goes with that are correlating trends of declining year on year cost savings, the most admired and used procurement metric on the planet.  Enhanced value, total shareholder return, enhanced recognition, awesome jobs and great pay will not come from these areas.

Getting rid of the important but non-essential procurement work and entrusting it to someone much more capable is part of the transformational focus that all CPOs need to consider embracing.  Successful partnerships are built on a shared long term vision, shared values and a solid long term plan.

In our research, we found that that introducing robust supplier collaboration, supplier enabled innovation and total value chain coordination is where procurement can truly make a difference for the organisation.  Some organisations have made the leap but many struggle to make ends meet.

My prediction for these organisations is bold:  transform or die – become de-prioritised, outsourced or automated. #tomorrowstartsnow

This article, by Eva Milko, was originally published on LinkedIn. Eva is Managing Director at Procurement Leaders. 

eLearning Videos: It’s The Final Countdown

They say all good things must come to an end, and,  sadly it holds true for our FREE e-Learning videos. The good news? You’ve still got a little time to enjoy them! You’ve got four weeks to access our eLearning course “Introduction to Procurement” for FREE: enrol here

Good times don’t last forever, and boy has Procurious had some good times in the last three years – don’t worry, that’s not going to change anytime soon!

What is about to change, however, is the pricing of our eLearning videos, which you can find in the Learning Area of Procurious.

If you’ve been with us, and supported us, from the beginning, you’ll know that our fantastic eLearning course, Introduction to Procurement, is currently available to our members free of charge.

But, on the 30th June, everything changes. The entire course of 17 modules, covering everything from Profiling the Supply Market to Developing a Scope of Work and Negotiation for Procurement will  instead be available for the price of USD$135.

Get ’em while they’re hot* (*FREE)

We’d hate for you to find yourself half-way through our eLearning course, which you’d started for free, and suddenly faced with a charge.

We also want to give you, our loyal Procurious members, plenty of notice and opportunity to share the course with your networks and procurement teams, before the new pricing comes into effect.

Tell your mother, tell your father, tell your sister and your brother (and, most importantly, your procurement peers) that they’ve got four more weeks to enjoy the course free of charge! With over two hours of video footage, you better get started. Go, go , go!

About the eLearning course

Introduction to procurement provides the optimal foundation for tomorrows procurement leaders. Structured around our own six-step strategic sourcing tool, participants will acquire strong commercial skills across a broad range of procurement functions.

But it starts off simple. If you’ve ever wished you had an easy and pain-free answer to that awful question from a distant relative, “So…what exactly is procurement?” here’s your answer:

The course progresses to highlight all aspects of the procurement profession. It gives you food for thought on your own approach and capabilities. It discusses topics such as the value of procurement, processes, market research, negotiating, strategy, social procurement and much more.

Module 6, for example, focuses on Spend Analysis:

What happens after 30th June 2017?

From the 1st July, the course will be available for USD$135 (£110) and includes:

  • 2 hours of on-demand video
  • 14 supplemental resources
  • Full lifetime access
  • Access on mobile and TV
  • Certificate of completion

Don’t forget there’s a whole host of free eLearning content on Procurious ranging from podcasts to webinars and videos.

That’s right! The majority of our eLearning content will still be available completely for free!

Best of the Blog: You Appointed WHO As The New CPO?!

Increasingly, companies are appointing CPOs from outside of the supply management profession. What does this tell us about C-level expectations of procurement, and why are supply management professionals missing out?

Everyone loves a good throwback article, which is why we’re hopping in our time machine to bring you back some of the biggest and best Procurious blogs. If you missed any of the golden oldies, look no further!

This week, we’re revisiting an article which featured some exclusive insights from Deb Stanton, Executive Director of Research and Benchmarking at CAPS Research and former Global CPO of MasterCard. Deb highlights how company expectations for CPO’s are evolving and what this means  for the security of your future jobs!

This is the moment you’ve been waiting for. Years of hard work and a brilliant career in supply management has brought you to within a hair’s breadth of fulfilling your dream – to become the Chief Procurement Officer of your company. Starting at the most junior level, you’ve worked your way up the ladder to your present position as second-in-charge of the procurement function. Your boss announced his retirement last week, and you’re quietly confident your turn has come – after all, there’s absolutely nothing about the organisation’s supply chain that you don’t know.

You step into the meeting room where the out-going CPO and two other executives are seated around a table. Disconcertingly, they stop talking when you walk in and look at you guiltily. Getting straight to the point, they tell you they’re excited to announce the new Chief Procurement Officer is … Jennifer from Marketing.

Is Procurement Being Usurped?

Has this happened in your organisation? There’s every chance that when it comes time to choose a new CPO, the C-Suite will appoint someone from a non-supply background. This means that a colleague of yours in a completely different department may one day swoop in to steal the job that you’ve been working towards for years.

While CEO-level expectations of the CPO continue to blur and broaden, the skill-set required to meet those expectations can now potentially be found in any department. The fact that supply managers are still reporting difficulty in educating their businesses on the value procurement can bring to an organisation doesn’t help the situation. If a CEO (wrongly) believes that a supply manager has spent his or her career focused solely on cost, then they are likely to look elsewhere for candidates for the top job.

Deb Stanton, Executive Director of Research and Benchmarking organisation CAPS Research and former Global CPO of MasterCard, has observed the trend of CPO appointments from outside of the profession. CEOs are no longer as interested in appointing CPOs who possess the traditional skill set that is earnt over years working in supply chain. A savvy marketing professional, or a cost-conscious operations manager who understands how supply management works, makes a very attractive candidate for CPO.

So, what does this mean?

1. CEOs are looking for a different set of skills for the next CPO

The CPO of the future may have little idea how a tender is run, but they must:

  • Be business-savvy and understand the organisation as a whole
  • Know how procurement works from a customer’s perspective
  • Be completely aligned to overall business strategy (not just the supply management strategy)
  • Have a strong knowledge of the business’ finance function
  • Be focused on the core customer and external audiences
  • Embrace changing technology and external disruptive forces
  • Be an influencer and relationship management expert.

Deb referred to CAPS Research’s “Futures Study 2020”, which projects the skills required to manage a procurement function into the future.

2. The CPO doesn’t necessarily need supply management expertise

The complex and varied skill-set picked up through a career in supply management may no longer be enough to satisfy the requirements for the job of CPO. CEOs may even regard procurement’s traditional audience of stakeholders, end-users and suppliers to be too focused.

That being said, technical procurement skills do matter, and are still vital for any procurement team’s success. In the example above, the disappointed candidate who missed out on the top job can still play a vital role in educating and supporting the outsider CPO with their supply management knowledge.

What’s the solution? If you believe the CPO role rightfully belongs to you, rather than someone from a completely different department, then make sure you broaden (rather than narrow) your focus as you move upwards in your organisation. This means familiarising yourself on a macro level with the whole business, bringing the core customer into every decision you make, and being known as an influencer who can clearly articulate the value you, and your function, brings to the business.

As Deb points out, procurement professionals are in a unique position to overlook an entire business. They’ve got every chance of seeing where the opportunities are so let’s use it and not lose it!

10 Ways Social Media Can Get You Hired

You never know who’s watching you on social media, there’s every chance it’s your dream employer. Here’s how to make sure you get noticed and get that job!

We live in an era when we have the ability to access information in a fraction of a second. Technology has allowed us to accomplish tasks and reach out to people in ways we never thought possible, even 20 years ago.

Social media is the beast that holds much power in our success or demise. It can crumble a person’s reputation with a tweet, or catapult it. The bottom line is that the user must navigate with extreme caution.

Searching for the job you want can be exhausting. The whole process is time-consuming and impersonal, and it can be difficult to demonstrate your full range of qualifications.

We’ve come up with ten ways to leverage social media in order to look more desirable to employers.

1. Get On Board!

If you don’t have social media accounts and you’re not close to retirement, get at least one now! LinkedIn is the most popular job search site, where an estimated 95 per cent of recruiters search for their candidates.

Employers also look to social media sites like Instagram, Facebook and Twitter to get a more personal take on a candidate and make sure that they fit in with the culture of their company.

2. Maintain Your Account

You should set up a strong profile and use keywords that highlight skills that potential employers may search for.  As you develop new skills or complete certifications, let them know!

Potential employers want to see that you keep active on your profiles, but you don’t need to get overwhelmed trying to show your activity every single day on every single site. Just a little something every few days goes a long way.

3. Become a Social Butterfly

Remember, you have a choice of what to entertain and engage in, so choose wisely. You don’t have to put your entire personal life out there just to make yourself seen. In fact, that disposition has the potential to deter prospective employers and only serves as a distraction. Instead, it’s best to like, share, comment, tweet and retweet relevant information in your field and follow sites that interest you professionally.

The more you get your name in front of businesses, the more it’ll stick and show them that you are relevant and up to speed in the industry.

4. Use Discretion

By all means, be authentic, but if you desire to use social media as an avenue for potential employment, you must remember that once it’s out there, it stays out there. Photos, comments and posts can come back to haunt you with a vengeance.

It’s important to be mindful of the persona you illustrate online. Companies want someone who can represent them professionally at all times and not compromise their reputation. If you do post highly personal photos, you should keep your account private.

5. Make an Impact

Use your social media platform to gain followers by posting information that your audience will appreciate. Gaining followers will not only show employers that you have something to say and can influence the community, it will also give you the confidence to continue to make an impact.

6. Keep It Positive in the Job Search Process

It’s not easy being unemployed (or underemployed). It can take a toll on your self-confidence and your ability to land a new position, so why remind yourself of that?

Avoid using the word “unemployed” and instead highlight what it is that you are looking for. Your profile will sound much more ambitious and will remind employers that they need you as much as you need them.

7. Read Between the Lines

Actually, employers are the ones that will read between the lines, so be sure to cross your T’s and dot your I’s. Using the correct punctuation and grammar on your page and in your comments will show your potential employer how well you actually communicate.

Everyone loves to highlight their “excellent written and verbal communication skills” on a resume, then fail to proofread a comment left on a company Facebook page or description paragraph on their profile. Make sure to stay consistent with whom you describe yourself to be.

8. Get Endorsed

Since LinkedIn is one of the top job search engines, it is important to get endorsements from other professionals within the network. Your connections are allowed to endorse you, or legitimise your skill set. You can ask former bosses or coworkers to write recommendations for you, and you can certainly return the favor.

Creating several symbiotic professional relationships online can only help you. The more high-quality references you can get, the better.

9. Keep It Simple

We know … you have so many awesome qualities it’s hard to narrow it down. But simplicity is key in a great professional social media page. Narrow down your descriptors to what you want employers to know.

You may think you are offering readers a way to get to know you better, but all the extra words serve as a distraction. Get down to the essentials and stick with it.

10. Dress for Success

This seems simple, but you’d be surprised at how many people fall short with this. Your attire should lean toward the conservative, business casual side.

Social media has become a place of validation in our society, and many users look for approval from others in the looks department. Professionally, it’s an entirely different ballgame. Again, be authentic and be yourself, but err on the side of caution.

The Social Media Payoff

If leveraged correctly, social media can distinguish you from your competition without having to even step foot outside of your home. You can make yourself the most sought after in your field, or you can get lost in the shuffle of mediocrity.

If social media overwhelms you, it’s OK. You don’t have to do it all. Simply pick whichever social site works for you and stick with it. Something is better than nothing, and as with almost anything else, you get out what you put in.

This article was written by Nicola Yap and originally published on Eminent SEO. Follow @EminentSEO for more top tips! 

Best of the Blog: Win The Web – Spin A Personal Brand That Will Get You Noticed

Think you don’t need to worry about how your personal brand appears online? Think again! 

Everyone loves a good throwback article, which is why we’re hopping in our time machine to bring you back some of the biggest and best Procurious blogs. If you missed any of the golden oldies, look no further!

This week, we’re revisiting an article by Lisa Malone  who offers some advice on how to polish your online brand. 

There’s no escaping your online personal brand. Whether you like it or not, all your social media accounts are a direct reflection of you – and your organisation. The content you share, or lack thereof, will be under scrutiny from colleagues, employers, employees, suppliers and influencers.

It’s crucial to take ownership of your online presence by defining your own brand. Take charge of what your profile says about you and reap the professional benefits!

Why Does My Personal Brand Matter So Much?

Online connections are the new business currency.  We all prefer to do business with people that we like and deem trustworthy. In developing a stellar personal brand and building your network, you invite connections to get to know you, observe your integrity and build trust before you’ve even met them in person.

As a prospective employee you can bet that your interviewer/future employer will have already scoured your LinkedIn, Twitter and any other accounts they can access. All of these give an insight into who you are both personally and professionally. Make sure you stand out for the right reasons.

It’s just as important to have a killer online profile as a manager. People want to work for bosses who are well connected, and therefore influential. If your profile is underdeveloped, you appear ‘un-connected’ and risk deterring the best talent. People aspire to work for great bosses that can help grow their careers and they will make the first assessment of this by your online brand.

As a procurement professional, the impetus to have a strong online brand is even more important. Before any business development meeting or negotiation, you can be sure your supply-side counterpart will have looked at your profile, seeking information on what matters to you and your experience.

Where Do I Start?

If you know that your online presence could do with a bit of a revamp but aren’t sure where to begin, it’s self-auditing time!

Spend some time considering how you come across as a person. Are you consistent and authentic across different profiles? Would your network be interested in the things you are saying or sharing? What could you change to get yourself noticed by the right people?

Top Tips For Building Your Brand

Once your initial self-audit is complete, there are some key things to remember as you work on expanding your online presence.

1. Leverage Your Key Influencers

To be noticed online, you need a large network of followers. In the early stages of brand development, building an audience is easier said than done, no matter how brilliant your content is.

A more efficient approach is to leverage key influencers in your industry. Promote and share their work, cite them in tweets and reference them in your content to gain access to their audiences and encourage them to, eventually, return the favour. It takes time and commitment but your efforts will be noticed – just one retweet can make a big difference to your social media clout.

2. Don’t Be a Social Media Robot

You’re a real person so don’t shy away from showcasing the more interesting sides of your personality. If we were all to manage our online accounts with a strictly formal and robotic approach, the social media sphere would be a colourless and dreary place to hang out.

It’s the unique quirks of your personality that people are interested in so it’s unsurprising that the most individual posts with eye-catching photos on Procurious or Twitter are the ones which earn the most likes, shares and retweets.

3. Connect, connect, connect

Building a network is a never ending task so make it part of your daily routine.  Invite friends, colleagues and other connections you meet through events to join you.

On Procurious, we strongly recommend connecting with any and all of the members across our 140+ countries who interest you – perhaps they work in the same industry; manage the same category or perhaps you’d just like to know more about procurement practices in Fiji!

4. Don’t fool yourself – Worlds collide!

Particularly when it comes to Twitter, I’m often asked about whether it’s better to maintain separate personal and professional accounts, or opt for a single social media profile.

In my view, aside from the time management benefits of having just one account to feed, your personal brand is the sum of everything you do – or that is said about you – online.

Trust grows from authenticity. So regardless of how you structure your profiles online, both personal and professional will reflect your overall brand.

If in doubt when posting online, follow this checklist:

  • Does this add to the conversation?
  • Are there any spelling mistakes here? 
  • Does it make sense, would you really talk like that?
  • Would I care if my boss or, more importantly, my mum, read this?

5. Lose the Mask

 Unless you’re batman, you don’t want to keep your identity an online secret. Make yourself searchable on social media by using your full name and your current role. Add up to date photographs so people can put a face to a name.

And make sure your Twitter handle (or gmail account) isn’t some obscure, irrelevant gabble from your teenage years!

Who’s Getting It Right?

If you’re still in need of some further inspiration, look no further than Marie Forleo, entrepreneur, writer and creator of a socially conscious digital empire, enjoyed by millions. Whilst you don’t have to develop your online presence on quite such a large scale, Marie’s website might inspire and motivate you to better your brand!