Tag Archives: career tips

George Clooney Is Not The Only One In A Catch 22 – Jobseekers Are Too

While nearly nine in ten UK professionals are considering moving jobs right now, according to CV-Library, many are doing nothing about bagging themselves a better paying job.

By Denis Makarenko/ Shutterstock

You want to earn more. (Who doesn’t?)

But the only way to get a significant pay rise is to move jobs.

However, that is risky – what if it doesn’t work out?

Also, there’s a lot of competition.

So even after all the hard work of looking around for a new role, you might be left disappointed.

And if your current boss finds out you are applying elsewhere… well, that might not reflect well on you.

It’s a paradox – a Catch 22 – with seemingly no escape.

We’re feeling trapped

So, while nearly nine in ten UK professionals are considering moving jobs right now, according to CV-Library, many are doing nothing about bagging themselves a better paying job.

Just under six in ten say they aren’t doing so because they believe the salaries on offer aren’t high enough. Although they might be wrong on that score (it’s often hard to find out what you could get paid, unless you apply and get an interview).

In addition, around three in ten are stuck where they are because they don’t feel confident enough to apply for a new role – with younger employees worried they don’t have enough experienced.

The pay paradox

Yet, those who are brave enough to take a risk and jump ship should reap the rewards.

Pay is on the up – by 3.4 per cent – on average for all UK employees. So, it’s great that most people are enjoying above inflation pay rises.

However, if you look for a new role you should be able to earn more.

Talent shortages mean that pay rises for new jobs are 5.8 per cent higher than a year ago with new recruits are seeing higher salary hikes than existing hires.

Much depends on where you live.

Certain UK cities are witnessing well above-average growth in pay for advertised roles.

            Top cities for highest annual hikes in advertised salaries

  1. London – pay up by 16.1 per cent
  2. Hull – pay up by 15.8 per cent
  3. Edinburgh – pay up by 12.8 per cent
  4. Portsmouth – pay up by 10.7 per cent
  5. Nottingham – pay up by 9.5 per cent

Competition is hotting up

So, firms are so desperate for the right candidate they are having to up their advertised salaries significantly. That’s the good news.

The bad news is that everyone else is beginning to get the same message.

As a result the number of job applications is soaring in many cities according to CV-Library.

            Biggest jump in job applications year-on-year

  1. Bristol 27.2 per cent
  2. Brighton 22.1 per cent
  3. Edinburgh 20 per cent
  4. Manchester 19.7 per cent
  5. London 19.6 per cent

Hiring is slipping

Brexit is taking its toll – with many firms adopting a wait-and-see approach. As a result, there has been a 3 per cent drop in the number of job vacancies year-on-year according to CV-Library.

The Recruitment and Employment Confederation (REC) UK Report on Jobs, produced with KMPG, has been tracking this trend.

The number of people placed into permanent job roles has fallen in four out of the past five months and the growth in vacancies hit an 80-month low in April (rising slightly in May – but still subdued).

Once again, much depends on where you live. The Midlands has been seeing permanent staff appointments decline while the North has seen them increase.

            So what does this mean?

More candidates + less vacancies = tougher competition.

Time to be more Clooney

So how do you become the George Clooney of jobseekers – standing out above all those other candidates?

With competition for roles increasing, you need an escape plan:

  • Avoid the scatter-gun approach: Applying for anything and everything is not going to land you a role worthy of your skills. Identify your ideal jobs and employers and then target them specifically – even if a job is not being advertised you can always make an approach. Let them know you want to join their team and believe you will be an ideal fit. You will then be first in mind when a vacancy arises.
  • Network your way to a new job: Referrals, recommendations and introductions are now one of the most popular ways to find new recruits. It really is a case of “who you know” as well as “what you know”. So, boost your social profile (at sites like Procurious and LinkedIn), link to the right people and make sure you are visible.
  • Get the right tailoring: I don’t mean the right suit (although looking the part is important). This is about tailoring every CV and cover to every role and employer. Make it appear that you are only applying for this one job … and this is one that you are not only uniquely qualified to do, but this is THE one you really want.
  • Stand out from the crowd: There will be other candidates… so how do you make sure that you are the preferred one? Well, the first step is to get an interview. For that, your CV needs to stand out. Learn new skills (investing in your own success shows you are a go-getter), be more of a mover and shaker (post blogs, join networking groups, raise your profile) and be very specific in the wording you use on your CV (demonstrate every requirement of the job on your CV). You can also grab the attention of recruiters by including some big numbers (I raised sales by 20 per cent, worked on a £40m project etc).
  • Do your research: Failure to find out about the employer, the work they do, their clients and their values, is one of the main reasons why candidates do not get the job. It’s easy. While you are at it, research yourself online (a bad social media profile can cost you a job).
  • Believe in yourself:  If you’ve ever missed out on a job offer to a less-qualified rival, you’ll know that getting hired is about being the perfect fit rather than having the perfect CV. Practice your interview techniques with friends and family – people work with people. So aim to come across as someone they’d like to work with.

A Brief Overview Of The 2019 Procurement Job Market

So far this year, most organisations have been more actively hiring procurement employees on a permanent basis as opposed to on contracts.

By Rawpixel.com / Shutterstock

How has the supply chain & procurement hiring landscape been over the first half of 2019?

As all contracts with suppliers from the European Union continue to be reviewed as part of Brexit contingency planning, the first half of 2019 has revealed an increased level of permanent recruitment compared to the hiring of contract or temporary supply chain & procurement professionals. As cost savings remain key in the City, the market has remained extremely buoyant, with a strong preference from hiring managers for individuals possessing experience in IT or tech. The thirst for data is continually increasing and with procurement in mind, lots of emerging solutions that provide procurement and vendor dashboards are always needed. Therefore, these roles have frequently been recruited for.

Across Financial Services, Banking and Insurance, organisations are still busy and hiring. More specifically, the mid-tier and SME businesses have been busier than the larger tier 1 banks, as they seek to reduce their spend and ensure contract risks are minimal in these uncertain times.

Procurement is a money driven profession and salaries are particularly competitive at present, so bonuses and benefits packages can be crucial deciding factors when professionals are looking for new roles. From the perspective of hiring organisations, they have to be prepared to exercise flexibility in terms of salaries or day rates if they want to bring professionals with the right skill sets to the business. 

How to keep the workforce motivated and attract new employees

A large number of professionals are now requesting an element of flexibility in their role or the opportunity to work remotely.  The 9 – 5 working day is no longer how professionals in the UK operate. Flexible working, in terms of hours or being able to work remotely, is expected by the majority of employees in the UK. Organisations have to offer a level of flexibility if they want to attract high quality applicants in what has become a highly competitive marketplace.  

Some organisations continue to lean towards implementing tools or programmes for learning and development that are tailored specifically to procurement professionals. This shows an increased effort to bolster their candidate attraction and retention in these key business areas. In turn, this empowers employees to increase their knowledge in areas such as ‘best practice procurement’, sourcing methodologies and stakeholder engagement. This has become a real talking point, showing the right business highly prioritises procurement and its people.

What has made a Supply Chain & Procurement CV stand out?

Category Management remains a key area of hiring, so upskilling in this is hugely beneficial for all procurement professionals. Those candidates possessing detailed Category Management experience, including spend, savings and projects have been highly sought after by hiring managers. The increase in specialist IT category roles was category specific, mainly consisting of infrastructure, applications and digital transformation spend areas.

Any candidates who upskill in these areas will put themselves in a strong position. Having a good level of experience in any of these will make you stand out against other applicants. Businesses have also continued searching for tendering specialists who can help them mitigate risk on their EU contracts amid all the Brexit confusion. Those with transformation experience is sought after as businesses will require such support to guide them through the uncertainty of Brexit.

How can supply chain & procurement job seekers stay motivated over the slower summer months?

It is not looking like things are going to slow down for Procurement professionals during the summer months – it is a busy time for the industry. For those job seekers actively engaged in any processes, it’s important to keep in touch with your recruitment consultant. Call in weekly to make sure you are hearing about all suitable opportunities; this will keep you at the forefront of your consultant’s mind.

Procurement specialists need to develop their wider skills to implement in negotiations to ensure ‘compliant contracts’ that mitigate risk without over-engineering a low risk engagement – robust frameworks to manage third party engagements could inhibit flexibility for a negotiator.

This article was written by Natalie Limerick, Director – Morgan McKinley

Are You In The Right Job?

The average working life is more than 3,500 days, so that is a long time to spend doing the wrong job. The sooner you switch, the easier it is. So how do you begin?

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If you dread going to work in the morning, get a sick feeling every Sunday night, or spend hours sitting at your desk desperate to be anywhere else, then it’s obvious that you should find a different job.

However, is it really the career path that’s wrong for you?

Perhaps you are doing the right job, just in the wrong place… or with the wrong people.

If you work in a toxic environment or with the boss from hell, there is no need to make a drastic career change. All you need to do is find the right employer.

You don’t have to hate your job for it to be the wrong one

However, not everyone who is in the wrong job is miserable. Many are just not fulfilled or energised by what they do.

Nearly nine in ten UK professionals are considering moving jobs right now, according to CV-Library – and they want to move for a range of reasons from career progression to a pay rise.

Only one in ten (13 per cent) of UK employees are actually unhappy at work according to research by recruiters Robert Half UK.

Although that is still 4.3 million people nationwide, that a lot less than the number wanting to leave for pastures new.

So, don’t assume that you have to hate your job, for it to be the wrong one.

Simply ask yourself this: “If I am still working in this type of job in 10, 20 or 30 years’ time, will I look back with regrets that I had not done something else – or be happy to have done a job I loved for so long?”

The average working life is more than 3,500 days, so that is a long time to spend doing the wrong job. The sooner you switch, the easier it is. So how do you begin?

Step 1: Take the test

Before jumping into another job, it pays to work out what career path you should be on.

Many of us fall into a particular career and often end up accepting a role because we were offered it, rather than because it was the job of our dreams.

One of the most highly regarded tests is a Myers & Briggs personality test. If you have never taken one, you can pay for one online (myersbriggs.org) or do a similar free test such as 16personalities.com or humanmetric.com.

Whichever test you take, it’s important to be honest – then read through the results to gain a better understanding of what types of careers could suit your personality. Giving some thought to your strengths and weaknesses is a great way to reassess why you do what you do.

If you are an extrovert, who is intuitive and relies on your feelings when making decisions, then being stuck behind the scenes in a process-driven, methodical, technical role, might understandably make you miserable. Or if you are naturally quieter and more reserved, being thrust into the limelight and forced to make presentations, might be your idea of hell.

So if you are the proverbial ‘square peg in a round hole’ it is time for a change.

Remember, it is much easier to change your job than trying (and failing) to change your personality – after all, one is what you do, the other is who you are.

Step 2: Don’t get stuck in analysis paralysis

If you are in the wrong job, you probably spend a lot of time thinking about what else you could do – but are then deterred because you don’t have the qualifications/ don’t have the experience/cannot afford to retrain/ cannot afford to step down the career ladder…. and so on.

It is easy to come up with dozens of reasons to stay where you are.

That means you will inevitably stay just there.

So stop thinking, start doing. Talk to people who are doing the jobs you are interested in, join a networking group for that industry sector, seek out others who have made a career change – and step out of your comfort zone. Once you can visualise a new job for yourself, it will be easier to start making the change.

Also visit careershifers.org for some inspiration. When you read other people’s stories you will realise they were all just as terrified of making the wrong career move…and once you discover how they overcame their fears to find a more fulfilling working life, you will realise that it is possible to do something that makes you want to get out of bed every morning.

Also do a 360 – ask people you trust what career they see you doing. They may say ‘I always imagined you as a teacher’ or ‘Why aren’t you in marketing, you love being creative and persuading people about your ideas’. Remember, to listen.

Step 3: Try before you buy (into a new career)

Before handing in your notice, and taking up one of these new career paths, give it a try.

Take two weeks off and find someone to work shadow. Volunteer in the sector. Use LinkedIn to reach out to those working in roles you are interested in and talk candidly about their careers.

If your personality tests show you would make a great teacher, but you really think you would lack the patience to deal with dozens of children every day, give it a go – volunteer as a reading partner or to help run a school club. You will still find out if this is something you are going to love – or hate.

The other drawback of a career change to something more fulfilling is that many rewarding roles are low paid.

The solution? Stick with the day job, and have a side-hustle doing something you really enjoy. So, if you have always wanted to be an artist, illustrator, cook, actor, gardener, photographer or fashion designer, then do this part-time while seeing your day job as a means of funding your dream career.

At least that way, you won’t have any regrets when you look back on your working life – instead of a “I could have been” you will be an “I was”


Want to get your wheels turning towards a supply chain career one could only dream of? Then don’t miss our upcoming Career Boot Camp with IBM – a free 5-part podcast series with some of the very best of the best. Check it out here: https://www.procurious.com/career-boot-camp-2019

Do Fringe Benefits Increase Productivity?

Does employee happiness improve productivity and which types of workplace benefits produced the greatest productivity gains?

By fizkes/ Shutterstock

Until we are all replaced by robots, there are very few businesses where employee productivity is irrelevant.  It is self-evident that fringe benefits which increase employee happiness and reduce stress are likely to increase productivity.  But until now there has been very little hard data around this concept.

A recent series of studies by the University of Warwick, Department of Economics, looked at whether employee happiness improved productivity and, more specifically, if they do, which types of workplace improvement produced the greatest productivity gains. 

The series of experiments was based on creating ‘happiness shocks’ in one group and not doing it in a matched group.  Both groups were then asked to perform a series of easy mathematical additions under time pressure.  They were paid about 50c for every correct answer, so there was incentive to take the test seriously.

Everyone was also asked to provide their most recent school level results in mathematics and do a separate mathematical reasoning test so that adjustments could be made for individual mathematical ability. The time-pressured mathematical test was designed to simulate the type of work done in typical white-collar job in a precise and measurable way. 

The happiness shocks in the first two experiments were created by showing the group a 10-minute movie clip of a well-known comedian performing comedy sketches.  Based on their own assessment, on average people shown the clip were 1 point (on a 7 point scale) happier than people not shown the clip.  In an attempt to make the happiness shock more closely reflect real-world examples, in the third experiment the participants were given chocolate, fruit and drinks instead of being shown a clip. They were given 10 minutes to consume whatever they wanted.  This was equally effective in raising the mood of the participants.

All three experiments showed that the happy people were more productive than the people who weren’t shown the clip or given treats.  Both groups were paid for their answers, but the happy group shown the comedy clips attempted 10 per cent more problems and got 10 percent more correct answers after adjusting for mathematical ability. 

The researchers analysed those results in detail and found that the improved outcome was entirely due to attempting more problems. The happy workers were more motivated to put in more effort. The improved mood did not make them smarter or better at maths. If they were bad at maths before the experiment, they still were when they were happy, they just attempted more problems and so had a greater chance of getting correct answers.  And the same was equally true of those that were good at maths before they started. The improvement was uniform across all ability levels.

The improvement was approximately doubled in the experiment were the ‘happiness shock’ was snacks. Interestingly one of the experiments involved not telling the participants that they would be paid for correct answers.  It made no difference to the outcome.

The researchers also tried a variation where they attempted to see if recent ‘bad life events’ in the participants real life showed up as having any effect on their happiness and their performance. In this experiment, no ‘happiness shocks’ were given, and they were asked to perform the timed task after they reported their self-assessed level of happiness.  After the test, they were individually asked if they had, at any time, experienced one of more of: close family bereavement, extended family bereavement, serious life-threatening illness in the close family or parental divorce.

People who had reported one of the ‘bad life events’ within the last three years were measurably less happy and less productive.  They were at least half a point lower on the 7 point happiness scale, they made 10 percent fewer attempts at the maths problems and got around 15 percent less correct answers.  The more recent the ‘bad life event’ the lower their initial level of happiness and the worse they did on the test. If it happened more than 3 years ago, it made no difference to either happiness or performance.  When they looked at how people who had suffered bad life events had gone in the other experiments they found that the ‘happiness shocks’ were just as effective at improving their performance.

When the researchers separated out the results by the type of event experienced, they found that ‘parental divorce’ probably didn’t qualify as a ‘bad life event.” It had no effect on happiness or productivity and in some instances actually improved both. 

These are obviously not real-world experiments, but they do a reasonable job of simulating the effect of delivering happiness to a workforce.  Happy workers try harder and do more immediately after receiving a ‘happiness shock.’ And their cash reward for the work, their pay, had little effect.

Translating those findings into the workplace suggests that if an employer provides “extras” which the majority of their workforce regard as a treat, the workers are likely to be at least 10 per cent more productive.  As long as the cost of that benefit is less than the measured productivity increase, then employers would be mad not to do it.


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Why Do Introverts Make Great CPOs?

Recent research suggests we might be selling more introverted professionals short.

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Unassuming, cautious, reserved – these probably aren’t the first words that come to mind when you think of an effective Chief Procurement Officer. More likely, your ideal CPO exudes confidence and commands attention. They’re a charismatic extrovert who feels most energized and productive when they’re surrounded by others. It’s not surprising that the stereotype of the camera-ready executive has persisted. Throughout our lives, just about all of us are encouraged to speak up, take initiative, and fearlessly make a name for ourselves. Conventional wisdom suggests that anyone who can rise through the ranks and serve as the face of a business unit has done all of that and then some.

In the age of social media oversharing and open office environments, introverts can find it challenging to function in procurement, let alone distinguish themselves. The world has rarely looked more hostile to independent work and quiet reflection. It’s only growing more tempting to assume that all effective leaders are extroverts.

Recent research, however, suggests we might be selling more introverted professionals short. While they’re less likely to seek out leadership opportunities – and less likely to earn high-level appointments – they are no less effective at driving change and empowering their peers. In fact, the CEO Genome Project found that “introverts are slightly more likely to surpass the expectations of their board and investors.” And that’s not just a matter of setting the bar low.

Publishing their findings in the Harvard Business Review, the CEO Genome Project identified four key traits that all effective CEOs share. The most essential was not ambition, charisma, or a collaborative spirit. “Mundane as it may sound,” the report reads, “the ability to reliably produce results was possibly the most powerful of the four essential CEO behaviors.”

Introverts are rarely flashy, but they’re nothing if not reliable. HBR suggests that consistent performance is generally preferable to the sudden spikes in innovation and productivity that might characterize a more extroverted executive’s leadership style.

If your organization is looking to appoint a new Head of Procurement, don’t forget to look past the most vocal and most obvious candidates. It’s possible – even likely – that the best candidate is the one who’s least likely to make an impassioned case for themselves. Here are a few of the reasons an introverted leader could be the right pick to drive Procurement into the future.

1. Introverts are Great Listeners

How many times have you come prepared to a meeting with insights and suggestions only to find yourself talked at? Nobody likes this experience. Leaders who talk more than they listen tend to stifle creativity. At worst, they can instill a sense of fear that will make collaboration all but impossible. Not all extroverted leaders bowl over their teams and toss out constructive suggestions, but few if any introverted leaders do.  Introverted executives come to both meetings and one-on-one conversations looking to absorb wisdom from members of their team. In doing so, they foster an office environment where no one is afraid to speak their mind and mutual respect rules the day.

2. Introverts Build More Genuine Connections

At a glance, it’s easy to tag an introvert as disengaged or disconnected. Dig deeper, however, and you’ll see that the introverted conversationalist is probably doing the same. Rather than speaking just to speak or networking just to network, they’re identifying opportunities to introduce real insight and build a meaningful connection. This makes them especially adept at carrying out interviews. Rather than talking about themselves or professing to know what the candidate wants to hear, they’ll listen intently and identify opportunities to make the candidate feel at home. An extroverted leader might enter the interview process with a list of talking points designed to sell the position. In some cases, they could come off as aggressive and cow a candidate into silence. Someone more introverted, on the other hand, will let a candidate speak for themselves and encourage them to describe the experience they’re looking for. Where it makes sense, they’ll connect their organization to the candidate’s interests and experience. Once they’re on-board, these candidates will feel connected to their new employer and confident in their ability to make a difference.

3. Introverts are Humble

For the introverted leader, good listening and a facility for collaboration stem from a strong sense of humility. While they certainly trust their own judgment, they never forget that they’ve still got a lot to learn. That’s why they’re quick to consult with their teams before kicking off an initiative. It’s also why they tend to avoid the spotlight. Rather than leading to earn personal plaudits, an introverted executive seeks to empower the entire organization. They would rather see a member (or several members) of their team earn recognition than collect an award for themselves. In their work, they will always emphasize the personal growth and development of their team rather than personal gain. This wealth of humility will ultimately build a sense of trust and rapport across the organization. It will quickly become clear that leadership is acting with the greater good in mind.

4. Introverts are Thorough

Introverts don’t rush into things. Quite the opposite. They leverage both collaborative sessions and private periods of introspection to make solid, strategic business decisions. Though they’re not opposed to risk-taking, introverts are far less likely to make hasty suggestions. Their prudence often pays dividends in the form of solutions that are both creative and low-risk. It’s not just about avoiding unnecessary hazards. The tendency to carefully mull things over and consider every option also means that introverted leaders are unlikely to settle. In other words, an introverted CPO won’t rush to implement a strategy that’s ‘good enough’ just because it looks like the best option at a given time. Rather than encouraging over-caution, their attitude will build a culture where mediocrity is never an option. Initiatives might take longer to get going, but they’ll enjoy a greater chance of producing results and elevating the entire organization.

This is not to say that extroverts cannot make effective CPOs. It’s entirely possible that your organization will thrive under the command of a more outspoken leader. The changing nature of Procurement and Supply Management, however, certainly calls for some broader definitions and more open-minded thinking. The same qualities that defined the function for generations are beginning to evolve. So, too, will the qualities that define its leaders. If you’re looking to appoint a new leader, don’t limit yourself to the most obvious options. Take a page out the introvert’s handbook and carefully reflect on every option. That introvert who’s sitting quietly through meetings and working independently might be a world-class CPO in hiding.

Want to get your wheels turning towards a supply chain career one could only dream of? Then don’t miss our upcoming Career Boot Camp with IBM – a free 5-part podcast series with some of the very best of the best. Check it out here: https://www.procurious.com/career-boot-camp-2019

Where Does Your Supply Chain Begin and End?

Supply chain professionals are no doubt an important link in any supply chain but it is but one link in the end-to-end process.

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Working in any supply chain management role can be all-consuming as well as challenging -but we can’t work in a vacuum. Supply chain professionals are no doubt an important link in any supply chain but it is but one link in the end-to-end process.

In the simplest type of supply chains, items and services are sourced from suppliers and converted into products and delivered to the customer or end-user.  During this process, both products and information move forward through the chain.   In the same way, products and related information move back up the chain.   

If only it were that easy. 

Any supply chain involves interactions between people, entities, information, and physical resources that combine, hopefully harmoniously, to sustain a company’s competitiveness.  It also has an objective to reduce overall costs and speed up the production and distribution cycle. As supply chain professionals know very well, if a supplier is unable to supply on time, and within the stipulated budget, business is bound to suffer losses and gain a negative reputation.

Q.  What is the main goal of an efficient supply chain?

A.  To get the customers what they want, when they want it, at least cost.  

If a company fails to focus fully on the consumer or end-user its ability to surviveis severely at risk. 

How to improve your supply chain

Sourcing is an early activity in the supply chain but demand planning comes first. By sharing projected requirements with your suppliers you can assist them to manage their own sourcing process and their inventory. Any forecasts that you supply them may not be cast in stone but they help to take the guesswork out of your order process.    Your Tier 2 suppliers, i.e. your supplier’s suppliers, are the ones that provide the items and services needed to fulfil your orders.  What products do they supply, what are their costs and what are their lead times?   

 The automotive industry is particularly good at this.  Modern vehicles are made up of more than 30 000 component parts.  Most leading vehicle manufacturers have a close grip on their Tier 2 suppliers: the parts suppliers for engines and equipment and computer software and hardware needed to make them run.

Technology in the supply chain 

The use, speed, and capabilities of technology are defining the trends in modern supply chains.  The cost of these technologies is starting to decrease making automation more affordable for mid-size companies. 

Demanding and techno-savvy customers are effectively re-shaping supply chains in the e-commerce world.  Customers expect to receive their order within a day or two whether it’s food, fashion or new bed linen.  They can choose not only what to buy, but who to buy it from and how to buy it.  E-commerce is creating new challenges throughout the supply chain from demand planning through procurement to warehousing, distribution and logistics.  Whether a customer is shopping in-store, on their laptop or mobile device, they expect their experience to remain the same, wherever they are in the world.  Retail companies that can adapt their supply chain operations to the new era of e-commerce will have the best chance of success.  

Global supply chains

Global supply chains are becoming very fragmented and dispersed and so require lots of resources and technologies to function well. Complex supply chains such as those in aerospace, hi-tech, chemicals and pharmaceuticals are becoming more difficult to design and manage.   According to Gartner, some of the most efficient global supply chains are in fast-moving-consumer-goods (FMCG) companies such as Unilever, Nestle, Nike and Inditex (Zara).  These companies have close relationships with their suppliers, even owning some of them, which is contributing to their successes. 

Johnson & Johnson is a confirmed leader in the healthcare industry due to its on-going focus on its supply chain capabilities such as end-to-end visibility.  The company prides itself on being a customer-centric organization.  It is an early adopter of new technologies such as 3D printing which it is using to enhance its manufacturing and distributions operations and unlock new opportunities.  Its global team has played a large part in streamlining the sourcing processes for both ingredients and packaging.    They realized that their supply chain was not as nimble and agile as it could be, and they weren’t leveraging their global scale in sourcing enough.

The professional association for supply chain management and the leading provider of research and education (APICS) provides a supply chain operations reference model (SCOR) on which you can assess your current abilities. It identifies steps in four measures:  process, performance, practices and people.    

The SCOR Model

APICS proposes that to improve your supply chain you need to:

  • Analyse your supply chain business processes and their dependencies with the SCOR framework in mind
  • Document and design your supply chain strategy, processes, and architectures to increase the speed of system implementations
  • Design internal business processes while taking organizational learning goals into consideration
  • Simulate the process to identify bottlenecks, gaps and process enhancements to improve supply chain performance

Underlying any successful supply chain is a strong organizational structure, up-to-date technology and strong leadership. An organisation’s supply chain is a significant source of competitive advantage and business leaders are embracing it as a strategic capability. 

Want to get your wheels turning towards a supply chain career one could only dream of? Then don’t miss our upcoming Career Boot Camp with IBM – a free 5-part podcast series with some of the very best of the best. Check it out here: https://www.procurious.com/career-boot-camp-2019

How To Stand Out Through Radical Optimism

Is your news stream flooded with negativity? Do you unknowingly pass this negativity on to others? Perhaps it’s time to try something radical and be optimistic.

By Dean Drobot/ Shutterstock

As a species, the human race is hard-wired to react more strongly to fear and bad news than to positivity.

If you think back to our ancient ancestors living as hunter-gatherers, this biological reaction made sense. It was necessary to keep them alive in the wild, where curiosity about an ‘unknown’ within their environment was more likely to lead to death than it was to a positive experience.

In today’s world however, such life-threatening situations are rarely experienced, yet we still find our monkey brains on high-alert, fed by stories of drama, outrage and anxiety via social media and 24/7 news feeds.

These dramatic, fear-based headlines that are so common in today’s media prey on our anxiety and insecurity and leave us cautious at the best of times.

We find ourselves unable to think rationally or creatively or produce solutions that might otherwise benefit those around us.

I recently discussed this issue on my Inside Influence podcast with Dr Angus Hervey and Tane Hunter, the co-founders of Future Crunch.

Future Crunch believes that if we want to be more influential in our work environment, to think more creatively and produce solutions to problems that might otherwise remain unsolved – we need to become more conscious of maintaining a ‘healthy diet’ when it comes to the information we consume and share.

So how do we do that?

Change your information diet

The first step is to think of your consumption of news in terms of a diet.

Negativity is like junk food – it’s fine to consume every so often but indulge too much and your mental state will start to suffer.

Just like the physical body, the majority of your mental diet – the information you consume each and every day – should consist of healthier options that nurture, nourish and energise you rather than prey on your mental fears and anxieties.

Remember, all media news feeds (including newspapers) as designed to ‘feed’ us information that we have shown interest in in the past. Each and every time we click on headlines that promote anger, outrage and drama we’re telling these companies that we want to see more of the same.

It’s essential that we make a more conscious choice around the ‘information diet’ that we consume, to minimise the negative information stream and make sure that we’re staying in a productive and healthy mindset.

Now – let’s be clear – this does not mean ignoring important information in relation to your field, industry or the world at large. It helps no one to stick your head in the sand and pretend that bad things aren’t happening.

What this means is that – if you can maintain a healthy balance in what you consume – you will be more resilient when the bad things appear on the horizon. This means you will be able to easily think of effective and creative solutions. As opposed to being so beaten down and overwhelmed – that a fast and considered response is impossible.

Use optimism to stand out

Politicians from Julius Caesar to Donald Trump have always known that fear, drama and outrage are an incredibly effective tool for capturing the attention of others.

Take the rise of automation, for example. How many headlines have you seen out there that focus on the negative possibilities of robotics, such as mass unemployment or even an existential threat to the human race? Good news stories about how robotics will improve our quality of life tend to be lost among the negative noise because – again – we are hard-wired to pay attention to bad news.  

But here’s the secret. If a single person in your network, your organisation or your team chose to reframe these developments. Took the time to research, communicate, or write a list of exactly what opportunities these situations might create – would they stand out?

The answer is absolutely yes. To stand against this negative tide and broadcast their message through optimism and positivity – they’ll get noticed. Not only that – but my money is that that person will be the one invited to the table, offered the promotion or requested at the next high-level meeting.

The positive alternative

Overcoming our hard-wired preference for negativity isn’t easy, but it can be done.

Environmentalists around the globe are today coming to understand that they’ve made a critical error in spreading the message about global warming through a narrative of fear – talking about the disastrous consequences of climate change certainly won everyone’s attention, but progress has been slow.

Compare that to the new messages that are now appearing – where we’re being shown the limitless possibilities of renewable technologies and a greener world. Where we’re being given real and actionable ideas to help the situation.

Now that’s an approach to influence that will change things.

Optimism in procurement

Most procurement professionals will one day face the challenge of trying to get their business stakeholders on board with some sort of change agenda – whether it’s getting them to use a new system, reducing maverick spend, or simply engaging procurement earlier in their decision-making processes.

There are two ways to get people on board – through fear or positivity.

It’s a bit more complex than the carrot versus stick approach, but it boils down to replacing threats and cajoling with a positive, what’s-in-it-for-you message.

Instead of telling stakeholders that failing to engage with procurement will risk their project or earn them a slap on the wrist, educate them instead about the benefits – lower costs, higher savings, and better outcomes that align with their goals.

In the end, you want stakeholders to come on board with your initiative out of enthusiasm rather than out of fear.

In short, be aware of the power of fear and replace it with positivity wherever you can. Most of us made a 2019 New Year’s resolution to improve our diet – now it’s time to pay just as much attention on the fuel we give (and offer) our minds.

10 Phrases You Should Never Say At Work

What are the phrases you should avoid in the workplace? We reveal the top ten most irritating and annoying phrases that are guaranteed to wind up your colleagues…

Some are just totally meaningless pieces of jargon – thrown into the conversation to disguise the fact that you have don’t know what you talking about. Others are downright rude or deliberately confusing. While some of the things we say at work just make us look stupid.

So, what are the phrases to avoid? Well the top 10 most irritating and annoying phrases to say at work (things that are guaranteed to wind up your colleagues) are:

1. With all due respect

When someone says this, what do they actually mean?

Often, it is the exact opposite… this is just a passive/aggressive way of saying, “I know better than you”.  Respect you? Well, they obviously don’t.

So, it is probably no surprise that these four words really wind us up and have been voted the most aggravating in the workplace by around half of those surveyed by CV-Library. If you are ever tempted to use this phrase (even ironically), don’t.

2. Reach out

The problem with this phrase, is that it can have so many meanings. When you thank someone for “reaching out” to you, are you implying they are offering to help you or that they are asking for help? Telling someone else to do this (as in ‘go and reach out to accounts’) is patronising particularly if what you really want them to do is make contact in a highly professional manner.

While “I’ll get my people to reach out to you” is incredibly confusing. What does mean? That they will be in touch next week? Or is this just a polite way of saying “don’t call us and we won’t call you”?

3. At the end of the day and 4. It is what it is

So, the boss is stumped…and cannot think of a solution. So, they say “it is what it is” as a way of saying let’s just accept a bad situation. Worse, “at the end of the day” implies that what will be, will be. Put the two phrases together – At the end of the day, it is what it is – and you might as well throw your hands in the air and give up. Please: just say it like it is.

5. Think outside the box

What is wrong with telling someone to think creatively and come up with innovative solutions? Context. Generally, you are told to “think outside the box” when everyone else is stumped for ideas. So, you are being asked to do the impossible. Also, most organisations don’t actually welcome unconventional and original thinking.

6. Let’s regroup

This is another phrase that has too many meanings. Is this a polite way of telling a group that they are all useless and new people need to be brought into the meeting? Or that you need fresh ideas? Or just more time to think of new ideas? Confused? You will be.

7. Can I borrow you for a second? and 8. Have you got two minutes?

Another irritating habit is using a euphemism to impose on your time when you are already extremely busy. Let’s face facts: the interruption is never for two minutes let alone a second. The person who uses this phrase, knows you would refuse to give up your afternoon to help them. But when they pretend that all they need is just a small amount of your time, it is really hard to say “’no” without appearing difficult. Irritating, isn’t it? When you are tempted to use either of these phrases, think about that.

9. At this moment in time

This is a great way to obfuscate when you do not have a clue/haven’t completed the project/forgot to follow a lead/don’t want to commit to a yes or no.  etc. So, “Is the client going to make that purchase?”. Answer: “At this moment in time, they are considering it”. The truth? Anyone’s guess.

10. Get the ball rolling

This is a bit last century when sporting metaphors dominated the world of business gobbledegook. Remember: “pass the ball”, “left field”, and “knocking it out of the park”?  Not only is this dated, once again it is not good communication… tell it like it is.

Surprisingly, motoring metaphors such as “in the fast lane”, “shift up a gear”, “put the brakes on”…or that highly annoying “let’s park this to one side”, don’t feature in the top ten.

So next time you are tempted to slip into jargon remember it is highly irritating. Also, being direct gets better results. “People may take what you are saying the wrong way,” says Lee Biggins, founder and CEO of CV-Library. “If you’re hinting a circling back to the task later or asking for more hands on deck, this can come across as rude. Are they not good enough for this task?”

….AND THE 10 THINGS THAT YOU SHOULD NEVER SAY IF YOU WANT A PROMOTION

While jargon is annoying, in an interview for a step-up the career ladder, it is being too informal that is the problem.

What are you trying to convey? If you are a more mature candidate, perhaps you believe (wrongly) that saying words like “epic fail” makes you down with the kids. It doesn’t.

Or if you genuinely litter your conversations with “totes” perhaps you don’t realise that this is NOT the way to get a better job (even if it is a very informal setting). It is just not professional.

So don’t be tempted. These are the buzzwords employers are fed up with hearing:

  1. Literally 
  2. Like
  3. Just sayin’ 
  4. Banter
  5. Totes
  6. Amazeballs
  7. My bad
  8. Yolo 
  9. Me thinks
  10. Sorry not sorry

“Be mindful that if you’re after a promotion, your employer won’t appreciate you saying a buzzword like ‘my bad’ to excuse yourself for making a mistake,” advises Lee Biggins who warns that using colloquialisms makes you appear less intelligent, can confuse colleagues if they don’t know exactly what you mean and frustrates those you work with because there is a “lack of substance” behind what you’re saying.

Want to get your wheels turning towards a supply chain career one could only dream of? Then don’t miss our upcoming Career Boot Camp with IBM – a free 5-part podcast series with some of the very best of the best. Check it out here: https://www.procurious.com/career-boot-camp-2019

The (Office) Walk Of Shame: Workers Who Quit Because They Are Too Embarrassed To Stay

It’s not all about the money. The real reasons why we quit range from bad bosses who make passes to wars over stolen food from the office fridge as well as shame – doing something so excruciatingly embarrassing we just have to resign.

By worradirek / Shutterstock

You might think that a chance to earn more money would be the number one reason why we quit our jobs. But you’d be wrong. Being offered more cash actually comes in at number three.

Topping the chart is the desire for a better work/life balance whether that is a job with more flexible hours or at least without the long hours most of us have to put in to get the job done.

Also making the top ten are long hours and long commute, which are basically other ways of saying the same thing: many of us are fed up with living to work and want to work in order to live.

We’ve had enough of bad bosses

The appalling behaviour of some managers is another reason why employees can’t wait to hand in their notice according to research commissioned by SPANA the working animal charity (yes, some animals work too!)

 “I thought the boss was useless” comes in at number five, “I fell out with the boss” at number nine and just making it into the top 20 at number nineteen “I had a physical altercation with the boss”. If things get violent, you know it’s time to leave (and perhaps sue?).

Despite #MeToo coming in at number sixteen for the number one most common reason for quitting is “My boss made a pass at me”.

Some of us get stroppy over petty squabbles

However, some reasons for handing in your notice are quite frankly ridiculous. Leaving because the free tea and coffee was taken away, because a colleague stole your food from the work fridge or you are not allowed to change the radio station or don’t like your desk position (all in the top 40) are a bit drastic…. There is no guarantee your next workplace will be any better.

That is why you should spend time really researching your new workplace – not just the job, but also who you will be working with including the boss, the office environment – (it might be a dingy basement not the plush interview office – and important work/life factors such as the commute to work.

Putting two fingers up to your employer

Half of us are so fed up, we just hand in our notice without having another job to go to.

Still, you can’t beat that “I quit” feeling… with half saying they felt a massive sense of relief after doing so. That probably includes those who did something so embarrassing (possibly at a work party or with the photocopier) that they just had to leave and never go back. In that case it is entirely understandable that you would not want to hang around while you find a new job.

But we’re not up to admitting why

You can see why someone would not want to admit that they had done something so shameful that they could not bear to return to work.

However, these quitters are not the only ones who shy away from the truth. One in four British workers have lied to their bosses when it comes to the real reason for quitting their jobs according to global recruitment specialist, Michael Page.

We may be leaving because we are not paid enough – or not feeling like we are valued – but we haven’t got the guts to fess up. Ironically, in this candidate-short market, saying you are leaving for a bigger salary could lead to a counter offer from your existing employer, so it might be worth making your point (after all, you are leaving anyway!)

The survey also found that one in ten just do not feel like they fit in – particularly LGBT workers, those from an ethnic minority background, workers with long-term health conditions and younger workers (aged 18 to 34.)

Top 20 reasons for quitting a job

1. Wanted to improve work/life balance

2. It was too stressful

3. Was offered more money

4. I didn’t like the company culture

5. Thought the boss was useless

6. Felt I wasn’t learning anything new

7. The hours were too long

8. The commute was too long

9. Fell out with boss

10. I hadn’t been given a pay rise in ages

11. The perks weren’t good enough

12. I felt I’d hit a glass ceiling

13. The atmosphere was dull

14. Fell out with colleagues

15. Hated my desk position

16. Boss made a pass at me

17. My ‘work best friend’ quit and it wasn’t the same without them

18. Had a physical altercation with colleague

19. Had a physical altercation with boss

20. Did something so embarrassing I was forced to move company

 

Will You Be Your Organisation’s First Chief Sustainability Officer?

For most organisations, there are far more risks and opportunities related to CSR and sustainability in their supply chain than there are within the “internal” business…

By Joshua Resnick/ Shutterstock

What’s the biggest change in terms of the focus and priorities for procurement teams and leaders over the last decade or so? There are a few potential answers to that question, but my feeling is that the whole area of corporate social responsibility and sustainability is a strong candidate for that award.

It’s just over a decade since I last held a full-time CPO (Chief Procurement Officer) role, but I don’t remember issues such as modern slavery, carbon reduction, global warming, plastics or human rights featuring too much in my thinking as a CPO through the nineties and noughties.

But now, it is right up there on the agenda for most organisations, in terms of both procurement priorities and indeed overall business focus.  That’s been driven by consumer demand and a more aware population, with younger people taking the lead on issues such as climate change, as we’ve seen in the UK with major protests and the visit of Greta Thunberg in recent weeks. Firms have become aware of the risks if they mess up on these issues, and that has spread through to shareholder action and sensitivity – a sign that firms really do need to get to grips with this agenda.  

We’ve even seen some CPOs morphing into “Chief Sustainability Officers” in their organisations, or combining the two roles. That’s not surprising when you think about it. The fact is, for most organisations, there are far more risks and opportunities related to CSR and sustainability in their supply chain than there are within the “internal” business.

Certainly, an organisation can look at its own energy and water use, how plastics fit into its packaging strategy, and make sure it is behaving properly with regard to the human rights of its own staff. But if we consider the wider issues once we look at our suppliers, the scope is far greater. For larger organisations in particular, the impact they can have on hundreds or thousands of suppliers, all around the world, almost certainly outweighs anything they could do purely internally.

We can see another sign of how these issues have risen up the agenda with the announcement of SAP Ariba’s “Sustainability Summit” in June. It takes place on Tuesday June 4th, from 9 am to 12 noon, just before the opening of the SAP Ariba Live event in Barcelona that afternoon. There will no doubt be a certain amount of discussion around how SAP Ariba products can help in this area, but the morning is primarily designed to be a very interactive session, with expert panel discussions and small group sessions as well, so participants can pick up ideas from each other as well as from the experts involved.

And this isn’t just about “saving the world”, although there is nothing wrong with believing that we should all do our bit to make the world a better place. There are selfish reasons too for procurement organisations and leaders to position themselves in the foreground for their organisations’ sustainability efforts. From a functional standpoint, the vast majority of us look for purpose in our work, but as we said earlier, younger people are particularly concerned about these issues. So, if you want to attract the brightest and best to your team, it makes sense to show that you are concerned about sustainability and similar issues and that procurement in your organisation is deeply involved in worthwhile initiatives.

It is also clear that because sustainability is high on the corporate agenda, procurement can gain in terms of internal profile and reputation if we are seen to be taking a lead and driving the agenda through our supply chain. I’ve heard a number of procurement executives talking about how topics such as carbon reduction or supporting social enterprises have got them onto the Board agenda, in a manner that day-to-day procurement frankly just didn’t.

Back to the Summit: SAP Ariba Live is the largest procurement event in Europe, we suspect, and numbers for the Summit are limited. So if you are interested, don’t delay and do register now – please contact Miriam Kuritzkes to express interest and for further details.

Procure with Purpose

Procurious have partnered with SAP Ariba to create a global online group – Procure with Purpose.

Through Procure with Purpose, we’re shining a light on the biggest issues – from Modern Slavery; to Minority Owned Business; and from Social Enterprises; to Environmental Sustainability.

Click here to enroll and gain access to  all future Procure with Purpose events including exclusive content, online events and regular webinars.  

Want to get your wheels turning towards a supply chain career one could only dream of? Then don’t miss our upcoming Career Boot Camp with IBM – a free 5-part podcast series with some of the very best of the best. Check it out here: https://www.procurious.com/career-boot-camp-2019