Tag Archives: climate change

Sorry Kids: Easter Chocolate To Be Cancelled After 2050

The world is running out of chocolate… And if procurement pros can’t find a way to save the day, no one can! 

Most of us like to indulge in a little (or a lot of!) chocolate over Easter.

In Britain alone, the projected Easter spend for 2018 is $892.6 million.

And in the US, 2018 Easter spending is expected to total a whopping $18.2 billion.

But, depending on how attached you are to your Creme Eggs, Lindt Gold Bunnies or your Waitrose chocolate avocados , you might need to stockpiling now; in preparation for a very uncertain future!

Why climate change is claiming our chocolate?

More than 50 per cent of the world’s cocoa comes from West African countries, primarily Côte d’Ivoire and Ghana, whose climates have traditionally best-accommodated the cacao tree.

But,  in recent years, drying conditions, long draughts and rising temperatures, are making it harder to grow cocoa beans.

Warmer, dryer climates “will suck moisture from the soil and make it impossible to produce a good crop in many regions around the world.”

In short, climate change could destroy the chocolate industry within 30- 50 years.

What can procurement professionals do?

All is not lost! Procurement teams around the world are already investing in alternative, and more sustainable options, for their cocoa sourcing.

  • Developing a sturdier cacao plant

Last year, Mars unveiled their Sustainable in Generation Plan stating:

“We’ll invest $1 billion over the next few years to tackle urgent threats facing our business and the society we operate in – threats like climate change, poverty in our value chain and a scarcity of resources.”

Part of that investment will go towards “recruiting University of California researchers to develop a sturdier cacao plant that won’t wilt in drier climates.”

  • Changing farming approach

The majority of farms in Côte d’Ivoire and Ghana are run by poorer families who cannot afford fertilisers and pesticides. If modern farming techniques were made available to the farmers in Western Africa; cocoa production might be easier.

The Rainforest Alliance is working with smallholder cocoa farmers to manage climate change and protect their livelihoods and way of life.

  • Relocating suppliers

Farmers in Western Africa have the option to move their crops to higher ground; but there is limited space and many upland areas are protected for wildlife.

Organisations could look to source their cocoa beans from a different region entirely.

Dr Barry  Kitchen, executive chairman of Daintree Estates, told the New Daily that “Cairns generally had ‘ideal’ conditions for cocoa trees, which need consistent rain, warm temperatures, and shade with dappled light.”

“You’ve got to be continually innovative and continually looking at ways that you’re preparing yourself for the future.” he said.

But, given the much higher labour costs in Australia, it’s unlikely that the industry could ever migrate to Australia.

  • Changing the nature of chocolate

Research by The Conversation suggests wild mango butter, made from the fruit’s stone, has a very similar chemical, physical and thermal profile to cocoa butter.

If procurement teams decide to invest in the science behind it,  it mightn’t be too long before we’re eating mango butter Easter eggs.

Personally, Procurious thinks it’s an egg-cellent idea!

In other procurement news this week…

Starbucks Testing Blockchain

  • Starbucks is piloting the use of data technology, including blockchain, to make its coffee supply chains more transparent
  • The firm hopes the technology will provide real time information about the beans within the supply chain and help financially empower rural farmers
  • Kevin Johnson, chief executive officer at Starbucks, said: “Over the next two years, we will look to demonstrate how technology and innovative data platforms can give coffee farmers even more financial empowerment

Read more on Supply Management 

Amazon’s Latest Drone Patent

  • Amazon’s latest patent is a delivery drone that understands when you shout at it
  • The drone is designed to recognise human gestures, and then respond accordingly. Gestures the drone would recognise include, for example, waving arms, pointing, the flashing of lights, and speech
  • An illustration demonstrating the drone’s functionality shows a man wildly waving his arms and with a speech bubble next to his mouth

Read more on The Verge 

From Pittsburgh to Paris – Let’s Clear the Air

It’s all very well putting Pittsburgh before Paris, but did you know that modern anti-pollution laws first started in Pennsylvania? Tania Seary gives the run-down on steel cities, “death-fogs” and Pittsburgh’s incredible transformation into an innovation hub.      

It’s not every day Pittsburgh hits the news, but it certainly did last week with the comment, “I was elected to represent the citizens of Pittsburgh, not Paris”. The subtext is that there’s an obligation to protect the steel industry before the climate.

I’m not a political analyst, nor a climate change expert, but I have lived in Pittsburgh, visited Paris and worked in the metals industry. I therefore wanted to share some of my own personal learnings (and give some historical context) for those of who are trying to catch up with all the news.    

The Donora Death Fog

Ironically, Pittsburgh is only 30 miles north of a town which famously claims to have kick-started modern anti-pollution laws.

You may not have heard of the Donora Death Fog (actually a smog), where the deadly combination of an atmospheric inversion, toxic gases from the town’s zinc and steel works led to the death of 20 people and half a town hospitalised in 1948.

Comparable to the Great Smog of London and perhaps even modern-day Shanghai, the Death Fog played a big part in opening the eyes of Americans to the hazards of air pollution. The tagline at the Donora Smog Museum is “Clean Air Started Here”, because concerted political action saw the first act concerning air pollution being put into law in 1959. Pennsylvania passed legislation that afforded the state the authority to prevent the “pollution of the air by smokes, dusts, fumes, gases, odours, mists, vapours, pollens and similar matter, or any combination thereof”.

Modern Pittsburgh is a tech hub, not a steel city

The jobs that the administration wants to save left Pittsburgh in the 1970s. Since then, Pittsburgh has built itself into a great example of a city that has thrived on new opportunities.

I had the pleasure of working in Pittsburgh for a couple of years around the turn of the century – in fact, I was there during the Y2K frenzy. For those of you who weren’t in the workforce then, the “Y2K bug” caused a panic when people thought the world’s computing systems would go into a meltdown when dates changed from 1999 to 2000. The consulting companies made a fortune!

Although it was once among the most polluted cities in the country, Pittsburgh has reinvented itself from a steel town to a centre of “eds and meds”. It has become a hub of technical innovation and medical research. The city even has its own Google outpost, along with a test track for autonomous cars.

In reinventing itself, Pittsburgh has benefited from flagship universities like Carnegie Mellon and the University of Pittsburgh, which produce their own tech entrepreneurs and medical breakthroughs.

Pittsburgh nurtures entrepreneurs

I have to mention two of the city’s most famous entrepreneurs – both named Andrew. Andrew Carnegie and Andrew Mellon were huge drivers and beneficiaries of the steel industry (like the U.S. itself) and then spent the large majority of their lives giving their money away.

Born in 1835, Andrew Carnegie was a Scottish-American industrialist who is still identified as one of the richest Americans ever. By the time he was 50, he had almost total control of steel production in Pennsylvania. He squeezed every penny out of his mills, living by a famous motto that every procurement professional can relate to: “Watch the costs, and the profits will take care of themselves.”

He sold Pittsburgh’s Carnegie Steel Company to J.P. Morgan in 1901 for half a billion dollars, propelling him to the position of richest American (surpassing even John D Rockefeller). While J.P. Morgan transformed his company into the U.S. Steel Corporation, Carnegie devoted the rest of his life to large-scale philanthropy, with Pittsburgh itself benefiting enormously with stunning libraries, a university, museums, a gilded concert hall and more.

It seems like the state governors and city mayors who are committed to upholding the 2015 Paris agreement agree with Andrew Carnegie’s quote: “Do your duty, and a little more, and the future will take care of itself.”

Or, in Andrew Mellon’s words, “Every man wants to connect his life with something he thinks eternal”.

Andrew Mellon built up a financial-industrial empire throughout the late nineteenth century by supplying capital for Pittsburgh-based corporations. He founded the Aluminium Company of America (Alcoa) and branched into industrial activities including oil, steel, shipbuilding and construction. Mellon also reformed the US Government’s tax structure while he was secretary of the treasury. Like Carnegie, he gave back an enormous amount of his wealth, with his philanthropy making possible the the building of the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.

These days, Pittsburgh is home to one of the procurement profession’s all-time entrepreneurs, the legendary Glen Meakem. Meakem founded Freemarkets Inc., the first online auction technology, which was later purchased by Ariba. Keeping with tradition, Meakem has also invested a lot of his resources into philanthropy.

Giving back

The story of these entrepreneurs all point to a wider trend as Pittsburgh continues to evolve. Like Carnegie and Mellon, the city grew rich on the steel industry, but now it’s giving back. Firstly, by producing a new generation of entrepreneurs whose success ultimately benefits the community, and secondly, by being part of a climate alliance that is looking for future opportunities rather than trying to bring back the past.