Tag Archives: contract management

Have You Aligned Your SIM & CLM Systems?

Procurement teams with mature SIM and CLM systems can extract greater value from supplier relationships. How can the two be brought into better alignment?

This article was written by Kelly Barner for Determine

Procurement is so accustomed to aligning our technology and processes with the objectives of the business at large that we sometimes miss opportunities to align our own technologies and processes with each other.

Supplier Information Management (SIM) and Contract Lifecycle Management (CLM) provide a perfect case example. Both bring together suppliers and internal touch points, extend beyond procurement’s peak involvement in managing spend categories, and play an important role in addressing (and mitigating) supply chain risk.

Procurement teams that have mature SIM and CLM programs in place reduce their risk, but they also create opportunities to extract greater value from each supplier relationship and reduce confusion within the enterprise.

When we stop and think about how SIM and CLM can be brought into better alignment, three critical shared issues come into focus: information integrity, ownership and actionability.

  1. Information Integrity Through Integration

Information is such an important component of SIM it is included in the name, whereas with CLM the devil is always in the details. An incorrect piece of information in a contract can easily become a legal liability. Both start with essential supplier contact information and metadata and extend to the details associated with supplier onboarding and contract terms. Although the following information is collected for separate reasons, it is critical that it be consistent across SIM and CLM:

Supplier Onboarding

 When a new supplier is on-boarded post award, a standard set of information is usually collected. This includes their contact information, location details, proof of certification, and details regarding the users who will represent the supplier in company systems during the term of the agreement. Making sure as quickly as possible that this information is complete and accurate lays the groundwork for an equally smooth implementation and on-going relationship. Beyond simple collection and centralisation, procurement must also validate supplier information at the time of onboarding – paying particular attention to documentation associated with certifications that were included in the award decision.

Contract Initiation

When creating a new contract, it is natural for procurement to focus on product/service specifications, prices, terms and SLAs, but capturing other more straightforward information is just as important. For instance, specifying a production location might seem like a minor detail — until the supplier makes the decision to outsource their production to another facility, or even another country. Having specified the location in the contract may not prevent the change from being made, but it does create an opening for discussion of the associated quality and oversight expectations. As contracts become an increasingly dynamic part of supplier management, more details need to be incorporated.

  1. Ownership

Since managing risk and increasing performance are at the heart of both SIM and CLM, establishing ownership early on is critical. Who will manage the relationship and who will be the documented owner of the contract? Should it be the same person? Why or why not? Alignment of goals can not be achieved if the individuals associated with each responsibility are not also aligned.

Supplier Relationship Management

Any supplier may have multiple relationships in an enterprise. Procurement is certainly a point of contact, but so are the budget owner and any functions that have a high volume of demand associated with that supplier. Many people may have contact with a supplier in the course of daily business, but information about performance reviews and contract updates should be managed in an organised fashion so that the supplier is kept informed and no one speaks out of turn.

Contract Ownership

 In addition to including a complete set of terms and signatures, each contract needs an owner from the outset. While captured as a simple name field in many CLM systems, a lot of consideration must be given when deciding who will own each contract. The primary value proposition of CLM is that it allows contracts (and the business deliverables they govern) to “leave the filing cabinet” in order to have a measurable impact on the business. Empowered by automated CLM notifications, someone in the enterprise needs to take action based on the information provided; and having an appropriate designated owner from the start provides accountability and ensures a prompt response.

  1. Alignment Actionability

Putting SIM and CLM in place is not about static documentation or information centralisation, but rather the actions each motivates. Unlike information integrity, where consistency is key to alignment, actionability requires each of these systems to “feed” information to each other. There are supplier performance considerations in both systems, and while they are different, it is in their combination that the best result is achieved.

Supplier Performance

SIM systems often include supplier performance details submitted by procurement, as well as the other individuals in the enterprise who come into contact with the supplier’s products or services. In some cases, determinations of performance will be based on buyer perceptions and expectations. This information should be recorded and communicated to suppliers on a regular basis.

Contract Compliance

When viewed through the lens of a contract, supplier performance is about following the “letter of the law.” Just as suppliers can have performance issues that do not rise to the level of legal non-compliance, a supplier can be in perfect standing based on the requirements of the contract and still not meet the expectations of the company. If performance measurement and contract terms are not both aligned and visible, it will be hard for procurement to know the difference and lead the appropriate response.

The full benefits of SIM and CLM alignment are realised over the term of the agreement, as long as 3-5 years in some cases. The sooner the enterprise can achieve alignment in terms of information integrity, ownership and actionability, the shorter the timeframe to evaluate and lower the overall risk.

This article was orginally pubished on Determine. 

Showcasing Your Big Ideas – Volatility as an Opportunity

Kicking off the day of the Big Ideas Summit, we’re looking at another of your Big Ideas. Mike Robertson shares his thoughts on why volatility represents an opportunity to procurement.

At the Big Ideas Summit 2016 today, we will be asking our speakers and attendees to record their ‘Big Ideas’ live on camera for the whole of our Procurious community to see.

But we also believe that every single procurement and supply chain professional has a unique vantage point in the industries, communities and businesses they work in. Thank you to all who have submitted their Big Ideas to us – we think they have been great!

Mike Robertson, CEO of POD Procurement

According to Mike, markets are more volatile than ever before, and this volatility is now impacting bottom line profits. Traditionally, procurement has looked at volatility as a risk within contracts.

However, Mike’s Big Idea focuses on changing the way procurement addresses volatility, from viewing it as a risk, to viewing it as an opportunity.

How to Submit Your Big Idea

There’s still time for you to send us your Big Idea for procurement! We don’t mind if you film your submission on your phone, tablet, laptop or PC. However, to help you out we’ve compiled a list of some of our recommended methods for reaching out.

Once you’ve completed your film, you can reach us by email ([email protected]); on Twitter (@procurious_) or via Google Drive or Dropbox (using [email protected]).

You can find all the information you need on recording and submitting your Big Idea here.

You can still register for the Big Ideas Summit 2016, which takes place today! Visit www.bigideassummit.com, join our Procurious group, and Tweet your thoughts and Big Ideas to us using #BigIdeas2016.

Don’t miss out on this truly excellent event and the chance to participate in discussions that will shape the future of the procurement profession. Get Involved, register now!

Are Your Suppliers Treating You Like a Cash Cow?

Businesses are at risk of being treated like a cash cow by their suppliers if they are not managing their supplier agreements and contracts with complete visibility.

Cash Cow

This article was written and has been shared with Procurious by Daniel Ball, Director at Wax Digital.

We’ve all done it. Stuck with the same old suppliers year after year, because they’re doing the job and, let’s face it, it’s far less hassle to stay put than to make a change. Whether it’s for banking, car or home insurance, or even utilities, as long as prices haven’t risen too significantly, and you’re getting what you pay for, why go to the effort of changing?

For the consumer, a failure to review supplier agreements means that, at worst, you’re potentially missing out on a more competitive deal (and a complimentary Meerkat). For a business it can have much more serious consequences.

A large organisation will typically have hundreds or even thousands of contracts in place. A lack of management of these contracts can have a huge impact on business performance, bottom-line and risk. So what can organisations do to make sure they’re not milked like the proverbial cash cow?

Lack of Clear Visibility

Auto-renewing ‘evergreen contracts’ are a problem we see frequently, and they cost organisations millions of pounds in wasted budgets or unintentional spend. With no system in place to effectively manage contracts, they can easily get ignored or forgotten about, and without realising it, you’re locked in for another 12 months.

Worst case scenario, a high value contract has auto-renewed just as you sign another with an alternative supplier offering a similar service, or decide that you no longer need this service at all. It’s easy to see how missed renewal dates, contract overlaps, timely supplier reviews or intended supplier terminations can be overlooked.

This can be an inconvenient truth for large organisations whether they have a procurement function or not, left grappling to manage the contracts they have in place without clear visibility of them.

Aside from wasting money, with no control over contract terms, how can you be sure that your contracts are delivering what was originally agreed with the supplier? If you’re not in the habit of reviewing or monitoring your supplier contracts, the service you are receiving may have gradually moved away or deteriorated from what was originally intended.

The supplier may have been providing alternative quality products (substitutes), changed services levels or personnel (in the case of professional services), or altered other factors from the original terms agreed. All of this could potentially reduce the value of the original agreement.

Factoring in Change

It’s also necessary to consider the changes that will undoubtedly have occurred in your business since your contracts were first put in place. Throughout the lifecycle of a contract, it’s highly likely that your business will have changed in some way, whether that’s changes to pricing, or other things which may affect the terms of the original contract, or your organisational needs.

For example, the sum you spend with a supplier may have quadrupled since the start of your contract, putting you in a far stronger buying position. This of course should mean you are in a better position to negotiate discounts or lower rates, but it is difficult to do this without having the facts at your fingertips.

The first step towards managing contracts effectively is to have a clear and in-depth understanding of them. This won’t happen if they’re stuffed in the top drawer of a filing cabinet, or indeed held by each department that owns the supplier relationship.

The last thing any department head wants is to be going into a new budgetary period with a legacy of unwanted supplier costs to justify and accommodate. It’s one thing to have to field tricky conversations with your CFO, but another entirely using up valuable budget on historical services that are no-longer essential to you.

Your suppliers’ contracts themselves hold the answers to many of the key things you need to know in order to effectively manage them. How often do you actually review your suppliers’ contracts? And how do you get the information you need to effectively monitor, manage and measure the value they are delivering to your business?

Avoid Being a Cash Cow

Contract control gives you sight of which contracts are up for renewal in the next few months. If you’re unhappy with that supplier then you have the time to put them on notice, or appraise their performance and renegotiate a better deal. Or if you wish to invite new suppliers to bid for the contract, you have time to factor in this work and consider your options.

Effective contract management is an essential part of the supplier management process. It is only made possible if they are held in a central repository so that they are accessible for all key stakeholders.

Such a repository enables all contracts to be reviewed periodically to determine if changes are needed or even if it should be renewed at all. The growing realisation for this process to be automated has led to the adoption of contract management systems.

These systems deliver a simple and secure way to store contracts which are easy to audit and provide automated alerts and reminders if an agreement is due to expire. A full contract management system within an integrated source to pay process can further streamline the process by automatically adding newly sourced suppliers’ contracts to the repository for future tracking.

So don’t risk becoming a cash cow to your suppliers because contracts were signed and filed away years ago. A structured and more formalised approach to contract management is the key to unlocking operational efficiencies, compliance and savings.