Tag Archives: cost savings

You Could Be In For A Nasty Shock This Easter

What’s “shrinkflation”? It’s the practice of selling a smaller product at the same price, and it’s increasingly common in the chocolate industry. Procurious looks at three big stories about Chocolate supply management that have hit the news in the past week. 

Regulation impacts complexity, complexity impacts costs, and costs impact the size of your chocolate bar.

Shrinkflation: Why Brexit means Cadbury chocolate bars will get smaller

It might be time to panic-buy your favourite Cadbury chocolate bars in bulk, because Cadbury UK’s parent company (Mondelez International) has warned that Brexit could lead to higher prices, or shrinkflation.

What’s shrinkflation? It’s the practice of selling smaller products for the same price. Mondelez has done this before, when its new-look Toblerone was revealed to have wider gaps between its iconic chocolate triangles, reducing the weight from 400g to 360g but selling at the same price. A pack of six Cadbury Creme Eggs – an Easter favourite – was also reduced to five eggs with only a slight decrease in the recommended retail price, from £3.05 to £2.85. The company has pointed to rising commodity costs, the falling value of the pound and an increase in cocoa prices, while Brexit is expected to make it increasingly costly to do business with other countries in the future.

Mondelez’s UK boss Glenn Caton told The Guardian that his organisation is watching the Brexit negotiations closely. “First of all [the Government] needs to make sure we have a stable and thriving U.K. economy,” Caton said. “If the economy is growing, all businesses benefit from that. Secondly, ensuring there is no new, more complex regulation and that there is free movement of goods and minimal barriers to trade. Regulation impacts complexity, complexity impacts costs, as do trade barriers and tariffs.”

Mondelez has invested more than £200m in Cadbury UK, including £75m on modernising manufacturing at Bournville in Birmingham, the home of the 193-year-old Cadbury brand. Bournville is also home to the global R&D team, which has grown from 25 to 250 people since Mondelez took over in July 2013.

Mars reinvests US$70 million in US supply chain while president warns of protectionism

Mars is re-shoring its manufacturing operation in a move that will mean over 95% of its chocolate products sold in the US are made domestically.

The investment of $70 million will add approximately 250 new jobs to production sites across the US, including a Mars Food factory in Greenville Missouri which will receive a $31 million injection. Last year, Mars poured US$52 million into its chocolate factory in Ontario, Canada.

The announcement was made on the same day that Mars Good President, Fiona Dawson, told the American Chambers of Commerce to the EU that protectionist trends worldwide are “threatening to undermine global trade and make the world less connected”.

“The absence of hard borders with all their attendant tariff, customs and non-tariff barriers allows for an integrated supply chain, which helps to keep costs down. The return of those barriers would create higher costs, threatening that supply chain and the jobs that come with it.

“If Britain ends up trading with the EU on the basis of WTO rules, ‘Most Favoured Nation’ rates would come into force. In the area of confectionery that alone would mean tariffs of around 30%.” 

Prince Charles seeks to halt chocolate-industry deforestation

HRM Prince Charles, a keen environmentalist, convened a meeting with global cocoa and chocolate companies to target deforestation in the cocoa supply chain. Delegates from twelve major companies, including Hershey, Mars and Nestle, met with senior government representatives from two of the world’s leading cocoa-producing countries, Cote d’Ivoire and Ghana.

In his speech to the attendees, Prince Charles noted that aside from environmental damage, “The most powerful direct reason for action is that deforestation threatens to undermine the very resilience of the cocoa sector itself, and with it the livelihoods of the millions of smallholders who depend on it, due to the increased climate variability that follows forest loss.”

The meeting resulted in a Collective Statement of Intent to end deforestation and forest degradation in the cocoa supply chain.

That’s more than enough about chocolate. In other procurement news this week…

UK Grocery Chain Waitrose introduces trucks powered by rotten food

  • Waitrose has partnered with bio-fuel company CNG Fuels to place an order for 10 flatbed trucks that will be powered entirely by rotten food.
  • The fuel will be sourced from unsold food at supermarkets across the UK. Globally, an estimated one-third of all food, or 1.3 billion metric tons of produce – goes to waste every year.
  • The new biomethane trucks have an average range of nearly 500 miles, with the biofuel to cost 40% less than diesel fuel. The biomethane emits 70% less carbon dioxide than diesel.

Read more on Konbini.

Boeing’s VP Supply Chain nominated for US Deputy Secretary of Defence

  • The White House has nominated Boeing’s Patrick Shanahan as Deputy Secretary of Defence, with a view to tap Shanahan’s knowledge of the business side of military aircraft procurement.
  • In December, Trump rattled Boeing management with a Tweet complaining about the high cost of replacing the presidential plane (Air Force One) and threatening to cancel the program. Since then, the relationship between the White House and Boeing appears to have improved.
  • Under new ethics rules, Shanahan will be required to recuse himself from any Boeing-related procurement contract decision for the next two years.

Read more on Seattle Times.

How Top Procurement Professionals Conduct Reverse Auctions

Using reverse auctions opens up a wealth of benefits for procurement professionals. But it’s important to fully understand when and how to use them. 

Reverse Auctions
Image from reynermedia

Reverse auctions have been around since the late 1990s, and have been regularly used as a tool by procurement professionals to obtain better pricing and lower supply costs. The use of reverse auctions can benefit companies of all sizes, but it really comes into its element when used by professionals within the procurement industry.

In an ordinary auction, buyers would compete with each other to obtain a product or service, yet in a reverse auction, the roles of the buyer and seller are reversed, and involve sellers competing to supply goods or services to a buyer. Over time, the price in the auction will start to decrease. Think of it like an eBay for the supply chain.

For procurement professionals who still haven’t started on the reverse auction or e-auction game, we’ve taken a look at how some of the finest procurement professionals use reverse auctions in their daily lives, and what benefits there are to using the service.

Time is of the Essence

When it comes to reverse auctions, as the supplier does most of the work, one of the greatest benefits is that the procurement professional can save time.

In the case of a traditional contract, businesses send out a request for a proposal which would have to be completed by the seller. The business would then sort through the proposals to make a qualified decision. The process of a reverse auction means that the whole process can be done online, cutting the requirements for manpower and time, with a decision being made much quicker.

Most reverse auctions won’t last longer than an hour either, meaning that the actual process can be wrapped up quicker, and both business and supplier can get on with what they do best.

Money can be Saved

Many companies these days are under economic pressure to become more streamlined and to reduce costs. In 2014, it was reported that the DLA, the U.S. Defense Logistics Agency, had found that by using reverse auctions they were able to save around $1.6 billion in a year – with $400 million coming from three auctions alone.

Whatever the size of your business, reverse auctions can be a great way of saving lots of money. Pitting suppliers directly against one another will mean that the lowest prices will be offered, and you be able to purchase services at a highly competitive price. Many companies will also tend to buy in bulk, meaning that even greater savings can be made to the bottom line.

The net will be opened up

Reverse auctions provide a great opportunity for smaller and lesser known businesses to get involved, and compete for something they may have otherwise never have had the opportunity to. Depending on the situation, the process can help to create new, long-lasting relationships between the business and the supplier.

In the past, companies may have felt limited to choosing suppliers local to their area. Nowadays, thanks to the growing reliance of technology, this is no longer a major issue. The net has been opened and allows businesses around the world to compete, which in turn allows both the buyer and supplier to network and build connections.

Reverse auctions are not for everyone

However, reverse auctions are not for everyone. It’s important that procurement professionals are able to determine when it’s right to use the service.

As it is a service that is mostly fixated on providing the lowest price, it can be hard to determine the level of quality or service that will come with that low price. In many cases, the lowest bidder may not necessarily be able to provide the highest of quality, and this can end up having a knock on effect on other aspects of the business.

To tackle this issue head on, Market Dojo believes you should use price as a stepping stone only, and not a set rule. Obviously, you want to be able to pay as little as possible, but if you factor in levels of quality and the reputation of the seller, then you are more likely to make a better buying decision.

Finally…

Ultimately, reverse auctions are a great tool for the procurement professional in today’s technology-focused climate. The buyer can spend less resources on purchasing decisions, whilst new suppliers can take part in sales that they wouldn’t otherwise.

To be effective at buying goods through the reverse auction medium, those in the procurement industry need to remain vigilant and try not to focus entirely on price. High quality goods and delivery times also need to be factored in order to make the process efficient and cost-effective. Otherwise, you may just end up paying out more.

About the Author: Adam Maidment is a Content Writer for Portfolio Procurement, specialists in the recruitment of experienced procurement professionals throughout the UK.

It Takes a Perfect Procurement Programme to Cut Costs

How would you define perfect procurement? We’ve spoken a great deal recently about how saving money or getting the best deal is no longer the be all and end all in procurement.

Perfect Procurement

Customers demand and expect a more transparent, more ethical, and more sustainable supply chain. This ultimately means that procurement priorities vary globally, and across companies. This week, however, we are singing the praises of some perfect procurement strategising which has led to some serious savings.

The Aircraft Carrier Alliance announced savings of $139 dollars on the UK’s two new aircraft carriers, South Africa plans to reform public procurement to save R25 billion, and Australia’s fifteen-year-long infrastructure plan aims to to save the average Australian household $3,000 a year by 2040.

And, under the pressure of a slow economy,  sources have suggested that Russia plans to cut defence procurement by 5 per cent this year.

The Aircraft Carrier Alliance

The Aircraft carrier Alliance (ACA) have just announced savings of £139 million on the construction of two new aircraft carriers at the CIPS Supply Management ‘Best in Procurement‘ event in Manchester. Having initially been tasked with saving £86 million, the ACA significantly exceeded this thanks to their implementation of an effective procurement programme with PwC.

PwC supported a savings delivery team using their procurement cost savings methodology following a five week assessment phase and prioritising of opportunities to cut costs. Currently, savings have come from 67 areas but there are still three years to go on the project.

Ross Elliott, director at PwC said “We had a very robust process, but you have got to take your shareholders with you. As a result [of this project], we have got an organisation that looks for savings and is more cost aware.”

The ACA won 2015’s  Best Procurement Consultancy Project of the Year at the 2015 CIPS Supply Management Awards. The 2016 awards will be announced in April.

South Africa’s Public Procurement Plan

The South African Government is holding talks with suppliers, with the hope of reducing prices and renegotiating contracts for banking services, ICT infrastructure, health technology and learner support materials.

The reforms to public purchasing processes should save the Government R25 billion, out of an annual procurement spend of R500 billion.

South African Minister of Finance, Pravin Gordhan, stated, “It is clear that we can achieve considerable savings to the government, while also ensuring that procurement processes are streamlined and service providers are paid on time.”

Australia’s Procurement Plan

Australia has launched its very first fifteen year infrastructure plan in which procurement has a key part to play.

A report from Infrastructure Australia has detailed a number of reforms to infrastructure to be undertaken by 2040. Among the procurement responsibilities is a suggested increase in competitive tendering.

The report cites how Sweden has increased competitive tendering in public procurement, leading to lower subsidies and 20 per cent cost savings, and calls for the same approach in Australia.

In addition to this, infrastructure projects should take account of the government’s Indigenous Procurement Policy which will “contribute to growing indigenous businesses and increasing employment through remote infrastructure procurements.”

Throughout the plan, whole-of-life costs will be accounted for in procurement when new infrastructure projects are commissioned, including future maintenance costs as well as initial capital expenditure. It is estimated that the plan will save the average Australian household AUD $3,000 by 2040.

Defence Procurement Cuts in Russia

Sources have suggested that the Russian government might be pushed to make a 5 per cent cut in defence procurement spending this year. Despite President Vladimir Putin making military growth a national priority, it seems that the slowing economy could put a halt to his plans.

Russia has entered into its second year of recession as oil prices continue to decline.  Four official sources have said that the cut proposals are to be put forward for discussion at a cabinet meeting.

The finance ministry have argued that Russia can no longer afford a multi-billion-dollar revamp of the armed forces, so will consider the realisation of this plan to be a significant victory.

In today’s current climate saving money is definitely the aim of the game. Perfect procurement might not be possible all the time. But, as proven by this week’s news, a methodical and meticulous procurement plan can make all the difference and ensure money is saved in the right places without compromising quality or ethics.

We’ve scoured the net to keep you updated with some more top procurement news stories from the past week.

Procurement Plans at the zoo

  • Hyderabad zoo animals are soon to find new partners thanks to the biggest procurement plan the state has ever seen.
  • The Central Zoo Authority accepted proposals put forward by the state forest department which permits animal exchange as well as procurement of them.
  • The Nehru Zoological Park (NZP) will soon be procuring a whole host of new animals to complement its existing residents including a pair of barking deer, an Otter, a hyena and an Indian wolf.
  • The NZP’S assistant director said “With the upcoming exchange and procurement, most of the single animals will be complemented with partners.”

Read more at New Indian Express

Deliv Partners with UPS

  • Same-day delivery startup Deliv Inc. is getting a funding boost from an unlikely source: United Parcel Service Inc.
  • As more and more commerce moves online, retailers must match the next-day and even same-day delivery speeds made commonplace by Amazon.
  • Surveys indicate that just by having the option of same-day delivery increases purchase conversion during the checkout process by 20-30 per cent.
  • Deliv, which offers enterprise-grade integrations into point of sale, has completed a $28 million Series B round of funding, adding a key strategic partner and investor in UPS. The company looks set to be the platform that powers this new on-demand future.

Read more at Supply Chain 247

Jacobs’ Procurement Pilot

  • California-based technical services provider Jacobs Engineering Group (Jacobs) has confirmed it is fronting a procurement programme in Australia
  • The programme features a new contracting model designed to enhance efficiencies in military acquisitions.
  • The model is centred on tasking original equipment manufacturers with overseeing project management activities from the funding approval stage through to programme closure.

Read more at Janes

Procurement to help ex-offenders

  • Procure Plus has been awarded a five-year contract to help ex-offenders access employment and training.
  • The not-for-profit organisation, which buys goods and services for several housing associations in the North West of England, will place 24 ex-offenders into employment, apprenticeships or training with contractors in its supply chain every year.
  • Ann-Marie English, senior regeneration manager at Procure Plus, said: “What’s different about our approach [to helping ex-offenders] is a focus on the long term, via sustained career opportunities and support.”

Read more at Supply Management