Tag Archives: covid-19

Webiquette: Webcam Woes Procurement Professionals Must Avoid

8 simple steps for improving your webiquette while working from home


Washing drying on a radiator, all that junk you thought was hidden away on top of the wardrobe and the unmade bed in the background… all within screen shot. Yes, your webcam will show it all! Not very professional, is it?

While the hashtag of webcam #covidiots is going viral online, the chances are that you too are guilty of revealing more than you realise when you hold your virtual meetings with colleagues and co-workers, clients and customers

It’s not something new (check out this BBC TV interview from a few years back which went viral).

Judging from some of the experts broadcasting live to the world during this COVID crisis, many pundits are still getting it wrong.

Is it just me, or do you too get distracted by a crazy pattern on their curtains, the peeling wallpaper, strange colour scheme or whatever else these talking heads have in the background? I love looking at their books (I’ve read that too), their DVDs (who’d have thought they were a sci-fi fan?) and critically judging their taste in home décor. Yet I should be listening to what they are saying!

It’s also incredibly irritating to hear their phone pinging constantly (presumably their friends WhatsApping them to say “I can see you on TV”).

So how do you get your screen performance right?

STEP 1: LINE QUALITY IS EVERYTHING

If you keep cutting out, nobody can hear you etc. it’s not going to work. If this is an issue, when you have important meetings switch off everything else connected to your internet router.

STEP 2: WHAT ARE YOU WEARING?

Dress for the office – it will put you in the right frame of mind to talk business.

Don’t forget basic personal hygiene too. Wash your hair, shave/make-up (which ever is appropriate) and check your top is clean (yes marks show up on webcams). You don’t have to wear a suit and tie – something suitable for dress-down Friday is fine.

STEP 3: WHAT’S IN THE BACKGROUND?

The easiest way to get round piles of washing and stacks of junk is to blur the background something that’s easy with Microsoft Teams and Skype etc.  For example, for Skype simply hover over the video button and select “Blur my background”. Or why not chose a virtual background feature during your Zoom Meeting – a forest perhaps or maybe an image of busy office? You probably don’t have a green screen at home (for that TV look) but will need uniform lighting for Zoom to detect the difference between you and your background.

Alternatively “stage” a background –  scholarly tomes and framed academic certificates (to make you appear intellectual), an electric guitar and framed vinyl album covers (to give the impression that you are a serious muso) or posters from art exhibitions and museums (who knew you were such a culture vulture?).

STEP 4: GET YOUR POSITIONING RIGHT

If you are looking down at your laptop it’s not only incredibly unflattering, you will find it harder to have a natural conversation. So put your laptop or screen up higher so you are looking straight into the camera.

Think about lighting too. A bright overhead light might cast a shadow over your face and the same applies to side lighting. Just watch the pundits on TV… often the light colour is all wrong and they appear either washed out or slightly yellow. So you might want to experiment with different light bulbs.

Also make sure you are comfortable. Constantly fidgeting is distracting. You need to be sitting up straight to appear interested and engaged in the conversation. Leaning forward to prop yourself up with your hand under your chin or looking away to constantly check your phone will just scream “I’m bored with this”. At least try to appear interested.

STEP 5: TEST IT OUT

Enlist a family member to sit in front of your screen and talk – you can then get a good idea of what you might look like. Perhaps your chair might need changing or adjusting. Or is the light from the window casting an unflattering shadow? Is your camera now so high you can only see the top of your head?

You will never know unless you try it.

STEP 6: DON’T FORGET THE MICROPHONE

People can hear more than you realise – the screaming spouse shouting at your children to “shut up”, the washing machine and of course your phone.

But you don’t have to worry about background noise if you use the mute button. Keep it on at all times – other than when you want to speak.

And to make it easier to hear every word, consider headphones. Wireless earbuds are best as you won’t have to worry about an unsightly wire.

As with your screen test, do a sound test too so you can check people can hear you and whether there is a nasty echo or your microphone is picking up too much background noise.

STEP 7: PRACTICE YOUR PERFORMANCE

Remember, when you roll your eyes, or smirk at what someone says, they can see you! The same applies when you scratch your face, pick your nose or lift up a buttock cheek to pass wind.

If you’ve been in self isolation for a while you might have forgotten how to behave in an office environment. You might need to practice your webiquette.

STEP 8: SET – OR ASK FOR – AN AGENDA

You want to reply to a point, but so does everyone else. You all end up talking over each other… and that does not make for great communication.

So, it’s best (as with any meeting) to have an agenda with a running order which is circulated before the meeting and a chair (who acts like the host of a radio phone-in).

Remember, the whole point is to be productive. That can mean limiting the number of participants or limiting the time for each question/point.

How To Lead Your Team In A Crisis: Covid-19 Procurement News

How should you lead your procurement team during a crisis? Here’s what you need to do

“The ultimate measure of a leader is not where they stand in moments of comfort, but where they stand at times of challenge and controversy.” Martin Luther King Jr.

Martin Luther King Jr. was certainly onto something when he said that leaders are tested not in not the good times, but in the challenging times – and everyone can agree, we’re certainly experiencing the latter right now. All of us – literally every single one of us across every continent of the world – are experiencing our own unique stresses and pressures, and our leadership ability may not be our focus. But likewise, now is also the time when our teams need us most. 

So how do we lead amidst so much uncertainty? We talked to Justine Figo, People and Culture author, and Naomi Lloyd, Director Procurement and External Manufacturing Partnerships Asia Pacific at Campbell Arnotts, to get an insight into how to lead your procurement team during a crisis. 

Managing expectations

With the coronavirus situation changing weekly, if not daily, helping your team understand what’s expected of them, as well as manage the expectations of executive leadership, can be a challenge. But according to Justine and Naomi, what your team really needs from you at this time is a realistic challenge, and more clarity. 

Justine believes that leaders need to have the courage to challenge their team to be productive – but at the same time, understand that there might be significant barriers at the moment: 

‘Right now, it’s about taking stock of what is going on for everyone at the moment, and saying: “What is the best possible challenging standard I can set for myself and for my team?” 

‘Of course, you need to understand that people will be disrupted, but still have the courage to give them purpose, with compassion.’ 

Naomi believes while realistic challenges are important, what’s more important is that you realign your priorities with your team – and communicate your expectations clearly, with much more granular direction: 

Want to hear more of Naomi and Justine’s great advice? Join our exclusive Supply Chain Crisis: Covid-19 group. We’ve gathered together the world’s foremost experts on all things supply chain, risk, business and people, and we’ll be presenting their insights and daily industry-relevant news over an 8-week content series via the group. You’ll also have the support of thousands of your procurement peers, world-wide. We’re stronger together. Join us now.

How COVID Could Kill Excessive Pay?

Mind the Gap? We most certainly do but will it finally start to narrow?


Funny memes, inspiring posts and far too much fake news – we are being inundated with information to entertain, amuse, inform and frighten us while we are in lockdown or self isolation. However, one post that really caught my eye was about the value of people’s work – it reflects a sea-change in attitudes towards excessive executive pay. 


To give them their due credit, a significant number of sports stars are taking pay cuts, several celebrities have announced vast donations to Covid-19 relief efforts and even Lady Gaga is giving a percentage of profits from her beauty brand to support food banks. 

Mass altruism is a global phenomenon. 

But what about businesses? Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), it seems, is just a way to brand businesses as caring. So far, they are doing little sharing. 

With footballers deferring 50% of their pay and tennis ace Roger Federer donating 1 million Swiss francs to vulnerable families, why aren’t we seeing CEO after CEO lining up to do something similar? 

While “ordinary” employees are being laid off or furloughed, most of the C-suite seem to be keeping quiet on pay. 

WE WILL REMEMBER THOSE WHO GET THIS RIGHT – AND THOSE WHO DON’T 

There are few exceptions… and they will not be forgotten. Those executives who are sharing the pain are doing a fantastic PR job for themselves and their businesses. 

Take the CEO of hotel group Marriott Worldwide, Arne Sorenson, who will not be taking any salary for the balance of 2020 and whose executive team will take a 50% cut in pay. While Ford’s top 300 executives will defer 20% to 50% of their salary. 

However, considering the vast pay packets these top execs earn, a cut (or a lesser sacrifice of a pay deferral), seems pathetic compared to the generosity of sports personalities and stars of stage and screen.  

Yet as more and more leadership teams follow suit, other boards will be under pressure to make similar sacrifices on salaries – or they could fall foul of public opinion. 

When News Corp Australia announced that the executive team would take a “significant” pay cut in response to Covid-19 – showing that those at the top of the pay scale are sharing the pain of those at the bottom – it also added that executive perks such as entertainment and travel events were also being halted. It doesn’t look good to be seen to be enjoying the perks of a private jet at a time like this. 

It shows just how mindful organisations are of public opinion. 

There will come a point when bosses who haven’t budged on pay and bonuses will start to stick out…and it will be noticed. 

THE BALANCE OF OPINION IS SHIFTING – AND IT’S GREAT NEWS FOR SOME ORDINARY WORKERS 

At the other end of the scale, there is beginning to be more appreciation of those in essential but poorly paid roles. Take Food City supermarkets in Chattanooga, Tennessee making headlines for giving its 16,000 employees a total US$3 million bonus reflecting their hard work ensuring people can still buy food at this difficult time. 

In Singapore, frontline healthcare workers – who are at a higher risk of contracting Covid-19 – will be given a special bonus of up to one month’s pay.  

Across the world, there are similar stories of those at the bottom of the pay scale finally receiving some appreciation (in the form of hard cash).  

MIND THE GAP? WE MOST CERTAINLY DO BUT WILL IT FINALLY START TO NARROW? 

With trillions of dollars wiped off the value of the global economy – and the G20 pledging to inject $5 trillion to blunt the economic impact of the coronavirus pandemic – any exec whose remuneration package is based partly on performance is in for a big financial hit. 

This could finally do something to narrow the phenomenal gap between pay at the top and bottom of organisations.  

CEOs in the USA earn 265 times more than the average worker according to Statista, while in S&P 500 Index firms this increases to is staggering 361 more for the top boss than the average rank-and-file worker. 

Yet back in the 1950s the typical CEO made only 20 times the salary of the average employee.  

SHAREHOLDERS MIGHT WIN THE DAY – AFTER SUFFERING SUCH HIGH LOSSES 

Shareholders have suffered some catastrophic losses. So they are likely to put significant pressure on executive remuneration committees to bring salaries back in line. 

Or, as global advisory firm Willis Towers Watson puts it: “there are reasonable expectations to see directional alignment in the change of realized executive pay relative to shareholder value”. 

BUT AT THE END OF THE DAY – IT’S PUBLIC OPINION THAT REALLY MATTERS 

In the UK new regulations requiring certain UK companies to disclose their executive pay ratios are also designed to shine a light on inequality. And it’s quite timely that the first reporting is this year. So, the requirement could not have come at a worse time for overpaid executives. 

With the UK’s Corporate Governance Code asking boards to create a culture which aligns company strategy with purpose and values – and explicitly requiring remuneration committees or RemCos to explain how pay policies for executives are appropriate in their annual reports – 2020 was supposed to be the year when the value of CEOs was brought into question. 

According to the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD) in the UK for every CEO appointed, another 100 candidates could just as ably fill the position. 

In a world where you cannot find 100 nurses or doctors or first responders to fill every vacancy, it is going to be hard for these RemCos to justify pay excess. And it is not just an issue in the UK. As with the coronavirus, this is a global issue and very much one that will dominate the corporate world in 2020. 

Want to join in on the coronavirus discussions? We have procurement and supply chain professionals from all around the world crowdsourcing confidence in our Supply Chain Crisis: Covid-19 group.

Coronavirus: What You Need To Know According To These Procurement & Supply Chain Thought Leaders…

What do these thought leaders think about covid-19 when we asked them recently at Big Ideas Summit London 2020?


As of yesterday, the number of coronavirus cases topped 500,000 worldwide – doubling in just over a week.

While we can all do our part to stop the virus spreading, there is an added pressure on procurement & supply chain professionals with the business world on our shoulders.

So, we seized the opportunity recently at our Big Ideas Summit London to ask some of our favourite thought leaders what we can do when it comes to coronavirus.

This is what Group Procurement Director at Just Eat, John Butcher had to say when we asked him ‘What’s been your #1 risk with the coronavirus and how are you mitigating it?’…


Procurement Digital Transformation Lead at Diageo, Amit Sheth had a slightly different response when asked the same question…


Strategic Supply Chain Risk Expert and Professor of Supply Chain Management, Omera Khan had this brilliant bit of advice when we asked her ‘How can companies manage supply chain risk in times of crisis?’…


We’re living in extremely uncertain business and economic times at the moment with many sources indicating that a deep global recession is coming. So, what should procurement be most worried about? This is what Rachel Stretch, Consultant at John Lewis & Partners suggests…


Pressure is something that procurement & supply chain professionals everywhere would be feeling right now. So, last, but certainly not least, we asked legendary Rugby coach, Sir Clive Woodward ‘How do you work under pressure?’

Want to stay ahead of the curve with all things coronavirus and supply chain? Join our exclusive Supply Chain Crisis: Covid-19 group. We’ve gathered together the world’s foremost experts on all things supply chain, risk, business and people, and we’ll be presenting their insights and daily industry-relevant news via the group. You’ll also have the support of thousands of your procurement peers, world-wide. 

Crisis Mode: What Will My Procurement Career Look Like This Year?

It’s been a disastrous year, but still, we’ve all got one big question: What will my procurement career look like this year?


Over the past month, many of us have been glued to our phones with a sense of dread, waiting for the next phase of the coronavirus crisis to hit. But with many countries now in lockdown, things in China slowly returning to normal, and early signs that the infection rate is declining in Italy, we can all breathe easily, knowing that life will, at some stage, return to normal. 

But what will that ‘normal’ look like, especially for our careers in procurement? There’s no denying that this year will be like no other year when it comes to what we might experience at work and what our career trajectory might look like. To find out exactly what this might be, we spoke to someone on the true frontline of procurement careers:  Imelda Walsh, Manager of The Source recruitment, a specialist procurement recruitment agency. Imelda’s insights are both fascinating and optimistic. In this uncertain world, it seems like procurement professions may have the opportunity to shine … here’s why. 

Critical business changes – and how work is being impacted 

With news that 94% of the world’s supply chains have been disrupted, there’s certainly been a lot going on at the organisations Imelda partners with, which include some of the world’s largest mining companies, banks and health organisations. Imelda says that the situation has been an ‘eye opener’ for many of her clients: 

‘There’s been so many risks they now need to focus on, including mitigating risks from their supply chain, working with local suppliers, or even workplace health and safety relationships with suppliers.’ 

Yet supplier risks haven’t been the only risks that businesses have needed to manage. With the majority of the world now working from home, Imelda says that her clients have been extraordinarily busy sorting out the logistics of what this might look like for their people: 

‘With clients moving to working from home, it has put a strain on their hardware and systems, which they are sorting through. But fortunately, many of them have invested in good technology over time.’ 

Is anyone still hiring?

If we’re in an industry that’s been affected by the coronavirus, which, realistically, is most of us, we all want the answer to the million-dollar question – is anyone hiring?!?

Want to hear more of Imelda’s fascinating story? Join our exclusive Supply Chain Crisis: Covid-19 group. We’ve gathered together the world’s foremost experts on all things supply chain, risk, business and people, and we’ll be presenting their insights and daily industry-relevant news over an 8-week content series via the group. You’ll also have the support of thousands of your procurement peers, world-wide. 

We’re stronger together. Join us now. 


Life At The Coronavirus Epicentre: Is This A Glimpse Into Our Future?

Are you ready for what’s to come? …


Every day, those of us in Australia, the US and Europe are increasingly feeling the full force of the coronavirus. In Italy, where the situation has escalated, the country has been fully quarantined. Countries all over the world are implementing strict restrictions on incoming travellers, and with no end in sight, the stock market continues to plummet.

One Procurious member who has already survived the worst of the crisis, and has come out the other side, is Paul Ryder, President of the International College of Finance at the Bank of China in Shanghai. Paul shared his fascinating story with us about what he’s experienced during the last few months, including special intel on China’s current supply chain situation. His insights are perhaps a glimpse into our future … will we be able to get the coronavirus under control, or will the sacrifice feel too great? 

When the news broke … 

The scenes of chaos we’ve seen worldwide and even worse, the harrowing decisions Italian doctors are now having to make, have become what we all now accept as consequences of the outbreak. But in stark contrast, Paul says that when the virus broke out in China, he felt the response was quite controlled: 


Want to hear more of Paul’s fascinating story? Join our exclusive Supply Chain Crisis: Covid-19 group. We’ve gathered together the world’s foremost experts on all things supply chain, risk, business and people, and we’ll be presenting their insights and daily industry-relevant news over an 8-week content series via the group. You’ll also have the support of thousands of your procurement peers, world-wide. 

We’re stronger together. Join us now.