Tag Archives: COVID_Safe

Top Tips For Business Travel During COVID And Beyond

Business travel will become popular again, and when it does, it might look unrecognisable. Here’s how tech is changing travel.


Do you miss business travel?

The thrill of meeting new customers. The networking opportunities. Or even the simple joy of sipping coffee while watching planes take off.

Or maybe you don’t miss it at all.

The constant time zone changes. Missing family events. The tedious routine of airports and convention centres.

Let’s face it, pre-COVID we all travelled A LOT (maybe too much?).

Almost a third of European corporate travellers flew once a month. And Americans logged more than 400 million business trips each year (Statista). 

Procurement and supply chain professionals were no strangers to the ‘road warrior’ lifestyle.


Wendy Clack is at the forefront of COVID travel safety technologies.


After all, how many other industries have internal stakeholders and suppliers to visit in literally every part of the globe?

The world may have abandoned business travel for now, but it won’t be long until we take to the skies again.

In fact, one firm predicts we’ll hit 60%-70% of typical volumes next year, with a return to pre-pandemic passenger numbers by 2022.  

But this supernormal world will look quite different to the one we knew.

You may soon check into your flight with eye movement, use your phone as your hotel room key, and keep your passport tattooed on your arm.

Here’s what you can expect, and what comes next.

What measures are the travel industry taking?

Cleanliness and safety are the top priorities for airlines now, with luxury amenities taking a backseat.

At the airport

Touch-free and healthy are the buzzwords in this new world of air travel.

Many countries now require proof you’ve tested negative for the Coronavirus within 48 hours of when you travel.

Some airports offer testing onsite with results in a couple of hours. This includes Frankfurt Airport, which plans to integrate your results with your Lufthansa boarding pass.

Lufthansa’s Björn Becker told the Financial Times airport testing gives passengers, “a comfortable opportunity to test themselves for flights abroad or a stay in Germany, to avoid quarantine.”

And Abu Dhabi airport is trialling a sterilisation chamber that looks a whole lot like a spray-on tanning booth. It takes just three seconds to sanitise.

Etihad airlines has touch free check-in kiosks that let you select different options using your eye movements.

That same kiosk is loaded with sensors that can take your temperature and measure your heart rate.

 And you’ll also notice thermal cameras around with built-in facial recognition, like the ones Heathrow Airport are trialling.

These track body temperature to detect if someone has a fever.

Most airlines are encouraging passengers to check in using the airline’s app, and choose the self-service bag drop.

But in the rare instance you actually need assistance from a human, you’ll likely find them behind thick plexiglass.

On your flight

Again, procedures vary by airline. But you can be confident planes are getting a deep-clean between flights.  

Most of the flagship carriers are using measures like electrostatic spraying, which is a hospital-grade disinfectant.

Another tool that destroys germs is UVC light.

Companies like Honeywell offer aeroplane UVC light systems, which can sanitise an entire cabin in minutes.

Airlines are using any measures they can to limit human interaction. So if you’re wondering where your in-flight magazine has gone, you’ll find it online.

When you land

When you reach your destination, you may need to show proof you’ve recently tested negative for the Coronavirus.

And you’ll need to fill out forms if you’re required to quarantine.

Some countries may even require you to download a contact tracing app for the duration of your stay.

When you get to your hotel, you can expect a slightly different welcoming.

You may be asked to have your temperature taken on arrival.

And don’t expect a face-to-face greeting by the front desk. Many of the business hotel giants like Hilton and Marriott now ask you to check in via an app where you’ll receive a digital room key.

Rooms are deep-cleaned as standard, and many hotels use some type of seal on the door so you know it hasn’t been entered since cleaning.

When you’re ready to check out, simply use the app and be on your way.

What measures can you take to stay safe?

The best ways to protect yourself are obvious: wash your hands frequently, use hand sanitiser, keep a safe distance from others, and wear a mask.

More airlines are requiring masks to be kept on the entire flight.

But if you really want to make a statement on your next business trip, you might want an LED mask.

The Lumen Couture LED Matrix Light Up Face Mask lets you enter any message you want into an app, and it appears on the mask.

And you’ve heard that your phone is one of the dirtiest surfaces you encounter, right?

So why not bring along the PhoneSoap, a little box that uses UV light to disinfect your smartphone.

While it’s disinfecting your phone, it can also charge it.

You might also be interested in a no-touch door opener, like the KeySmart Clean Key.

It lets you avoid direct contact with doorknobs and elevator buttons. Plus, it comes with a retractable carabiner to clip onto your belt loop, so you can keep it close.

In a less high-tech move, many of the big airlines offer personal sanitary kits with disinfectant wipes for your piece of mind.

What does the future of business travel look like?

It’s impossible to say what procedures will stick around once the initial pandemic is over.

But the emphasis on healthy and touchless travel is here to stay.    

In fact, we’re quickly moving to a world where your face and body will be your passport, according to the World Economic Forum.

“More touchless options will come into play including contactless fingerprint, as well as iris and face recognition,” says the organisation.

And once a vaccination is available for COVID-19, you’ll be expected to carry proof of immunisation.

How? One solution could be an invisible arm tattoo that contains your health records. They are accessed by a simple infrared scanner.

This technology already exists, so it could just be a matter of time until it goes mainstream.

Bottom line

If you’re tense at the thought of a world where you need your own door-opening tool, take heart. You may not travel as often as you think.

Many industry experts are predicting a more thoughtful approach to business travel going forward.

Delta CEO Ed Bastian thinks the number of trips the typical road warrior takes will go down.

“The international trips that we’ve all been on where we’ve flown over to Europe for a two-hour meeting and flown back…does nothing but beat you up, and you’d certainly be much better accommodated over a video call,” Bastian said.

“But it’s going to be trips that are focused on relationship building or interacting – whether it’s with your customers, conventions, new contacts, reviewing performance on a global scale – those are going to stay.”

CPO Digital Forum: Crown Resorts And IKON Services

A clean start: tips and tricks for corporates to create a COVID-safe workplace.


One of the biggest misconceptions out there right now is that cleaning is booming, says Estelle Lewis, who is the group executive general manager for partnerships at cleaning services and hygiene products company IKON Services.

The company, which provides cleaning services and hygiene products to a number of blue chip clients, including Crown Resorts, has been on a difficult journey.

A big challenge has been accessing accurate information and ensuring it’s disseminated to staff and clients, she says.

“People turn to cleaning companies as the experts about COVID-19, but the reality is that this has sort of hit us all very quickly and none of us have really had time to sort of take in what this virus actually means for all of these businesses.

“We’re learning while our clients are learning, but we need to be that one step ahead,” Lewis says.

The Group General Manager of Procurement and Supply Chains, Ben Briggs admits he’s had similar challenges at Crown Resorts, with approximately 16,000 staff and contractors regularly on site.

“Reopening a Casino will have its challenges. It’s probably one of the most difficult things to do because you don’t typically reopen, you’re always open,” Briggs says.

“So we have to understand how to create a safe working environment for people, staff and patrons as part of the reopening phase.

“There’s a lot of human elements that we’re going to have to work through over the next couple of months to make sure that we can create a safe working environment at Crown,” he says.

As people get back to work, there’s going to be a level of comfort around the fact that we’re getting back to normal. But we need to be reminded that it’s a ‘new normal’ and a complex space, the pair agree.

The pair opened up about some of the 7 biggest challenges for companies looking to create a Covid-safe work environment:

1. Public confidence

A key priority right now is looking for ways to make the public need to feel safe about returning, so a lot of work needs to go into messaging, Briggs says.

“It will be a different working environment and a different operating environment. You may see thermal scanners at entry points, limited access points into the casino, furniture removed so that we can create social distancing and all the communication that needs to go along with that so that people feel safe,” he says.

“It’s not going to be easy, but I’m pretty confident that with the measures we’re putting in place, people are going to feel safe to come back to the property and come back and enjoy our facilities again,” he says.

Briggs admits he’s been dubbed ‘The Sanitiser Guy’ and ‘The Sneeze Guard Man’ by his colleagues as he looks to overhaul Crown.

“Where practical be such as hotel reception desks, we’re putting sneeze guards up. There’s sanitisation stations everywhere you go. People are going to have access to masks and sanitisation,” he says.

2. Visual reminders

Visual reminders in the form of signs and messages are being erected throughout properties and visual reminders added to flooring to keep people apart.

Making sure that hand sanitisers and wipes are available to all for staff to clean down their environments when they come and go will be crucial, Briggs adds.

Remote working will also be crucial, because we are unlikely to get all the 15,000 people back to work in the same space. We’re going to have to be smart about it. “Assessing which roles can work remotely, how we structure the work environment to enable appropriate distancing and which roles are operational and are needed on the ground will require some finessing,” he adds.

Lewis adds that she’s looking at sourcing a piece of sophisticated technology with an LSD screen to allow customer communication that allows you to add COVID-19 messages and takes temperatures at reception points is on the cards for clients.

3. Communal kitchens

The communal kitchen was once a place where food, coffee and great conversation takes place in offices, but that looks set to be a thing of the past, Lewis says.

Communal plates, cutlery, glassware and the shared office fruit bowl is on the chopping block.

“Kitchens are also a tricky space from a cleaning perspective. It could be an area where fogging works really well, which is a mist spray that works well for tight spaces. The high grade chemical concentrate mist helps get into corners and edges where viruses can live, which I’d recommend doing on a regular basis,” Lewis says.

And while there a plethora of new cleaning companies entering the market offering fogging and sanitisation, businesses need to ensure they engage companies that stand for trust and integrity.

4. The boardroom

Board meetings will be a very different function within a business. The room will be transformed to adhere to social distancing, with every second chair removed, access to wipes and additional bins for wipes to prevent the spread of germs. Hand sanitiser will also be added to the room.

People will be expected to take responsibility for their own hygiene, and report any symptoms if they’re feeling unwell and stay home, Briggs says.

5. Vulnerable workers

Vulnerable workers who are considered high risk require special consideration in the workplace, Briggs says.

It’s about putting enough protections in place for them so they feel safe and willing to come back into the office. A perspex screen and floor markings to encourage social distancing perspective so that people have their own space will be crucial.

“Adapt our workplace policies and processes to ensure they are safe and their workspace is a safe haven will be crucial. Reporting and compliance is also important,” Briggs adds.

6. Response plan

Creating a rapid response process that provides specific measures for closing down in the event of an outbreak is crucial, Briggs says.

The rapid response plan ensures properties are closed down and reopened swiftly, which also needs to be part of a training regime for staff and enforced, he says.

7. Clean desks

The traditional desk station is being overhauled, while hot desking has been abandoned in corporate settings around the world.

While people will continue to be encouraging people so work from home, if they do need to come into work, each personal workspace will need to be kept tidy and minimalistic so surfaces can be cleaned is paramount, Briggs says.

“It’s about keeping those practices up so that we don’t get comfortable and lazy in the area that things have gone back to normal so that we can go back to our previous behaviours,” Briggs says.

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