Tag Archives: digital strategy

IT Procurement Without a Tech Strategy Is A Recipe For Disaster

If you’re struggling to effectively run your IT procurement processes, it might be time to evaluate your strategy!
This article was written by Harry Wilson, an IT Consultant. Read more via Leap Consulting.

If procurement is the series of activities and processes required during the acquisition of any IT infrastructure, software and systems, IT procurement and the purchasing of updated systems are essential to any business which uses information systems and digital technology equipment to drive projects, management and processes.

The running of the IT procurement process should be carefully managed and examined to ensure that  purchases provide both a good foundation and high-quality equipment for the future process, in line with the businesses goals.

This requires a dedicated employee in charge (usually the CIO) and an IT strategy to allow a business organisation to reach best practices of IT procurement.

Digital transformation and disruption

Digital transformation and disruption have changed the IT buying process. Traditionally, the CIO had the final say in IT purchasing decisions following consideration of the IT strategy and alignment with business goals.

However, recently it has been found that nearly a third of purchasing power has moved outside of the executive suite into the hands of departmental managers.

Business departments making technology decisions without the CIO can lead to CIOs losing control of the IT then having to deal with issues such as;

  • Lots of different systems running in silos
  • Information sprawl
  • Incompatible systems
  • Gaps in internal information technologies
  • Hindered business growth
  • Loss of competitive advantage

This emphasises the need for an IT strategy as one of the biggest mistakes a business can make is committing to a system or contract without due diligence or consulting the overarching IT strategy to understand how the implementation of the considered technology will impact the operations and systems within the business.

What should an IT strategy include?

An IT strategy can benefit both CIOs and department managers as it encourages collaboration that results in alignment with existing and new investments. A strategy should include up-to-date versions of:

  • A systems architecture rundown of the whole business
  • An inventory containing end-of-life dates, and usage
  • A list of emerging problems recorded by staff and IT team

The rapid speed that these technologies are being innovated is phenomenal, and businesses are being exposed to more technologically advanced IT systems which creates the need to update and adapt to these IT systems regularly.

The benefits of an IT strategy

Despite significant investments in new technologies over the past decade, many organisations are actually watching their operations slow down due to underutilisation of technology and poor user engagement related to technology usage is part of the problem.

Poorly designed applications and a general lack of training causes many employees not to leverage the innovation and drive productivity.

Encouraging effective adoption of new technology requires an IT strategy for organisational change management.

There’s no easier way to manage IT than to work with an IT specialist who can help you manage these IT services and create a more efficiently run business. Many companies are seeking It managed services for a source of competitive advantage, so there isn’t a lack of responsibility or confusion within the company.

By following an IT strategy and understanding the reasons behind process bottlenecks and other errors, enterprises can more efficiently allocate IT and human resources. By partnering with a managed services provider who can create and implement an IT strategy, businesses can focus on their core competencies to cut costs and increase productivity.

This article was written by Harry Wilson, an IT Consultant. Read more via Leap Consulting.

Whose Services Are You Really Procuring?

The workforce is fundamentally changing and it’s increasingly important that you can access the skills you need when, where and how you need them. But with the increase in corporate usage of external workers comes additional challenges and risks.

Driven by the digital age, we’re seeing a shift in the way work gets done. Globalisation and new ways of working are rapidly changing how talent interacts with companies, making it increasingly likely that the top talent needed by a business might not be – and might not want to be – on their payroll.

As a result, organisations increasingly rely on the external workforce – including contingent worker, Statement of Work (SOW)-based consultants, freelancers, specialized talent pools and more. In fact, these resources now account for nearly 40 percent of the average company’s workforce.

Why is this happening?

There are four factors impacting the way work gets done:

  1. Data: Data is the currency of the digital economy and we hear a lot about it these days. Big data is powering new insights and enabling better business decisions and outcomes.
  2. Digital technologies: Advancements such as artificial intelligence and machine learning are speeding processes and increasing efficiency. Looking forward, technologies such as blockchain will disrupt industries by facilitating the exchange of goods and services.
  3. Design-thinking or user-centered design: This is driving better experiences by putting people at the center of technology, not the process or the product.
  4. People: Perhaps the most profound change we are seeing in how work gets done is with people. Many of today’s workers – millennials, in particular – are looking for different experiences rather than spending decades with one company. As technology has enabled people to be untethered, the external workforce has boomed.

The result is that a significant portion of the external workforce is now comprised of service providers. To stay ahead of the competition, you need to be able to easily access this specialised and you need to be able to manage it effectively.

Challenges in services procurement

With more and more companies using external resources to fill vacancies, compensating for skills gaps and staffing ad-hoc projects, how do you know you’re getting the best talent at the best price?

With products, it’s relatively straightforward – prices are fixed and margins are small for suppliers. When it comes to services procurement, the situation is very different. Margins vary hugely and tend to be relatively high for the supplier.

For example: you’re looking for a plumber to work onsite at your facility for a specific time. Rates will vary depending on their experience and grade. When engaging your suppliers, how can you ensure that the person they send isn’t someone with little work experience who is charging a premium rate? Without insight into who is actually working for you at any given time and confirming that they are providing the level of service you expect, how can you ensure you’re not overpaying?

Organisations need a single place to go to source, engage and manage service providers. But many are managing this key labor segment with fragmented systems and processes which puts them at risk for excess spend, compliance issues and decreased quality.

A lifecycle approach

A solution lies in an external workforce management model. This model should include:

  • Visibility across multiple service providers and headcount tracking so you know who is working for you across your entire enterprise.
  • True demand management to enable the correct buying channels for each category of service.
  • Financial control, operational efficiency and collaboration, both internally and with suppliers.
  • Risk mitigation and compliance to rates and budgeting against contracts, along with the ability to discover how much a service cost last time to better forecast.

Enabling a services procurement solution to drive better operational control and rigor around services engagements not only enables cost savings opportunities, but enables key value levers including compliance, cost, visibility, efficiency and quality.

Procurement plays a strategic role in helping their organisation gain workforce visibility, be more agile and derive more value from their services procurement management. But executing the service only gets you halfway there – full potential is reached with management of the entire lifecycle.

Interesting in learning about more about the SAP Fieldglass External Workforce Management Model? Click here.

How Technology Can Drive Supplier Collaboration Goals

Supplier collaboration basically means that your goal is to communicate better, and work more closely, with suppliers for the best possible project execution.

Supplier Collaboration

According to Deloitte’s 2016 Global CPO Survey, one of the main goals for CPOs is to increase supplier collaboration. What is interesting, and slightly uncomfortable, is that the study also found that 60 per cent of CPOs do not have a clear digital strategy. To me, it seems that when you talk about communication and collaboration, technology is the the clear answer.

Collaborating involves many ideas that ultimately result in a partnership that works better together:

  • Communicate better, faster and more effectively.
  • Create a simpler procurement process between partners.
  • Define clear expectations from the beginning.
  • Share performance data for improvement.

Tactical solutions for these are seemingly very easy. But you can tackle these goals one by one, or face them all by considering the digital options you have. Many people believe increasing supplier collaboration can be accomplished by being more available, or just simply sharing more information. It isn’t just what you do, but how you do it.

Connectivity is Everything

There is a very real opportunity with procurement technology to solve your collaboration problems. Technology connects people in a way that was impossible in the past. Continuing to use old methods to communicate will hold you back on your collaboration goals.

Look at it this way. It’s already difficult to communicate internationally, so improve the way you communicate by eliminating the polluted email accounts. New procurement technologies are developing collaborative features such as live chatting.

What will really allow you to collaborate better is being easily accessible to suppliers and being able to connect to quickly. In turn, all your project communication is redirected onto your system rather than being spread thin in between emails, phone calls, and post mail.

Define a Simpler Procurement Process

Rather than saying “work better together”, you should be working towards making your entire procurement process simpler in order to collaborate better.

The complexity of working in procurement is extremely challenging, and even more so as CPOs try to implement new strategies to optimise operations. Organisational skills are very important for procurement professionals, so leveraging technology to help manage the complex processes can be incredibly valuable. You ultimately become a low maintenance customer to your supplier.

Even the smallest tasks, like simplifying document sharing can eliminate frustration. Create a hub for project related documents which can be updated, rather than engaging in the email document attachment dance.

You should think of the idea as redefining the way you do things to eliminate lengthy tasks and replacing them with short ones. Your team and suppliers would appreciate simpler processes, allowing you to both finish routine tasks quickly and reduce lead times.

Establish Clearer Expectations

With many options coming out into the procurement technology market, it is less valuable to try and tackle your challenges one by one. So if your goal is supplier collaboration, you should consider ones that allow you to invite suppliers to be a user.

A workflow management system that gives access to your suppliers can really close the gap. With access, suppliers can see your workflow, their role in the project, and keep track of progress.

Sometimes it is difficult to communicate compliance issues and other important information regarding the partnership and the roles suppliers play in the projects. Using technology to document clear expectations optimizes clarity on both ends. Suppliers understand what is expected of them and you can feel more comfortable knowing that. It opens the door for trust.

Data is Your Friend

Performance data is very simple to gather when automated. Giving constructive criticism should be an important component to your supplier collaboration strategy. Suppliers need to know key areas for improvement so that they are aware of your expectations and given a chance to better their service.

The most accurate and effective way to show performance is to provide data. Collecting scorecards regularly can keep track of trends that can tell you if your SRM is working. Awareness is only going to help your partnership so you need to collaborate to make sure you both are working towards improvement.

There are many options for procurement organisations, but essentially, the type of system you choose to deploy depends on your main goals. It’s time we stop looking for quick fixes and look for opportunities in technology to meet our goals.

If you’re looking to improve your supplier collaboration, Winddle is a collaborative solution for sourcing and procurement that can absolutely help make your goals a reality.