Tag Archives: diversity and inclusion

Advocating For Inclusion Is The Best Way To Get It

Advocacy increases inclusion. Being an advocate makes a difference and you can increase inclusion by using your voice within your network… 

Small acts of advocacy are all it takes to make a social movement. The #metoo movement was for the 12 years prior to last year’s Harvey Weinstein scandal a very small force for change. It wasn’t one single event that caused the social explosion. But it was when sufficient people acted in concert that it became a social movement.

And it certainly isn’t just about hashtags. With the current US President’s finger firmly on the Twitter trigger, you might think It is. There are so many more voices advocating publicly for their position. That makes it even more important to make your advocacy effective, not just noisy. I’m not ruling out social media as a tool for advocating, but it’s a means, not a message.  I’m going to rely instead on a Gandhian approach –  ‘be the change you want to see in the world’.

Advocacy increases inclusion. You can increase inclusion by using your voice within your network. By speaking out more about the importance of inclusion, you can create more inclusion.  More people will feel included and more people will join you to advocate for inclusion. If you raise your voice with confidence you will be a social force for change. People will feel included and experience a greater sense of belonging.

Being an advocate makes a difference, yet many leaders don’t feel comfortable advocating.

Some people don’t advocate because they think that saying it once is enough. If you say it once, everyone will get it. If you’ve got or work with kids, you’ll see through that one straight away! It’s not that different if you work with adults.

Another reason we don’t advocate is because we believe others are advocating, their efforts will be enough for the message to get through. It won’t make any difference whether or not I do.

Still others don’t advocate because they don’t think their single voice has much weight; it doesn’t seem worth it.

The harder thing that stops people advocating is that they don’t believe they can be powerful enough to make change: a social movement seems to take a lot of effort to organise without a guaranteed outcome; it all seems too much.

Hannah Gadsby’s Nanette is an example of using your own story to advocate for change. Not all advocacy needs this degree of personal disclosure to be effective.

Advocacy that resonates with those around you is like a swarm of starlings, a murmuration. When the individual birds come together they create a powerful and amazing sight. The magic of it is that this happens because each bird pays attention to just seven of their neighbours. Starlings are ordinary birds, all it takes is for seven of them to pay attention to each other, to get in sync, and they create something extraordinary.

Just like the starlings don’t have to influence the whole flock, don’t try to influence a crowd. Focus on seven key people around you, and magically, you too will influence a social movement.

Procurement Professionals: Get Your Blinkers Off!

Reluctant or unsure about driving greater diversity and inclusion in your procurement teams and the organisation at large? You need to take your blinkers off!

Simon Burt/ Shutterstock

When it comes to implementing diversity and inclusion initiatives in the workplace it can be difficult to know where to begin.

And perhaps you’re equally skeptical that your actions could even have a significant impact?

But when we were joined last month by Timo Worrall, Senior Category Manager, Facilities Management – Johnson & Johnson; Julie Gerdeman, General Manager, SAP Ariba and Darren Swift (Swifty), Inspirational Speaker, The Drive Project & Blesma Ambassador for our latest Procure-with-Purpose webinar all three speakers quickly put these doubts to rest…

The Facts

People with learning differences

“Just 6  per cent of young people with a learning difficulty are actually in employment which is a burden on society and for individual and their family,” explained Timo.

“These people are often willing but unable to work because we don’t give them the chance to get a foot in the door. They can’t find work because they can’t find work experience. We are often unwilling as big corporations to accept their differences. But they can do the work and they can also be very loyal. The barrier to entry isn’t them, it’s us.”

Veterans:

The Drive Project’s Veterans Work report found that three in ten businesses admit they have not even considered employing veterans. While the majority claim to be more open minded, 60 per cent of businesses rule out recruiting someone if they have no industry specific experience.

There are roughly 700,000 veterans currently in employment, over half find themselves in routine, low-skilled or low-paid jobs.

Neurodiversities 

“Individuals who are neurodiverse or on the autistic spectrum are underused source of talent with great skillsets that our leaders are seeking on their teams,” argues Julie. “There is a constant need for great talent and a unique point of view.”

Starting small is ok

“I have always been a huge advocate and proponent for diversity of thought,” explained Julie. “I’m one of nine children and so growing up I lived with lots of different opinions and personalities and thoughts and I saw the amazing environment that that created. And so I brought that with me to the workplace.

“I wanted to contribute to change. I volunteered to become the global exec sponsor for D and I at SAP Ariba. I started with a gender focus but it has evolved to become something much bigger and much broader.

“At SAP Ariba we think it’s ok to start small. It’s really ok. We started D and I [initiatives] with employees’ passions. [People who said] ‘this is what we’re passionate about.’ Welcoming and embracing personal passions into the professional workplace in a small way  blossomed into bigger, more formalised programs and from there we built a D and I framework to drive a more inclusive workplace”

As Timo explains, measuring success isn’t just about measuring numbers. “It’s easy to get bogged down in numbers and spend reports.” explained Timo. “[At Johnson & Johnson we are] trying to use story-telling and build business cases around the work we are doing. Talking about meaningful impact is a lot more powerful than just numbers.”

Take your blinkers off and crack on!

When it comes to getting started procurement teams simply need to “crack on and do it! I can promise you that you’ll find it hugely rewarding and enjoyable” asserted Timo. “I’m a firm advocate that [diversity and inclusion initiatives] change how procurement is viewed in the business and how we’re perceived.

“A social innovation agenda drives a completely different conversation with our business partners beyond that age-old savings conversation that we all get a bit bored of.

I really believe there is a massive untapped potential out there of many different groups that we don’t support as well as we should do. They can bring tremendous value and insights and different ways of doing things, often better than we can into our supply base. Get involved.”

Whilst serving in the Army in 1991, Swifty was seriously injured by a bomb. He lost both his legs, a number of his fingers and damaged his arms along with various other injuries.

Many years on and Swifty continues to live by this motto, championing individuality, pushing the boundaries of life as a double amputee and creating his own path.

“From my perspective I was lucky. I was surrounded by the right people. They were what I call “blinkers-off” people. They don’t wear blinkers. Or they’re prepared to take them off. They gave me the opp and had the right attitude to see some of the attrubutes that could be nurtured and untilised.

Broden your thinking. Take a punt on difference and diversity. Instead of always thinking you can’t ask why not, why wouldn’t we why shouldn’t, we let’s give it a go.

Unicorns are a mythical creature but they’re also a type of horse. Horses wear blinkers and they wear blinkers because it makes them go down a particular route, stops them from deviating stops them from thinking elsewhere and I quite like the idea of taking those off and having a wider vision.”

“What are the essential traits of future leader in procurement?” asked Julie.

“Is it this unicorn that ticks all the boxes. We intentionally seek a diversity of thought and a diversity of experience; different skill-sets. Because that drives innovation and that leads to great advancements.”

Procure with Purpose – Join the movement

Procurious have partnered with SAP Ariba to create a global online group – Procure with Purpose.

Through Procure with Purpose, we’re shining a light on the biggest issues – from Modern Slavery; to Minority Owned Business; and from Social Enterprises; to Environmental Sustainability.

Enrol here to join the Procure with Purpose group and gain instant access to our exclusive online events, including the Don’t Go Chasing Unicorns webinar. 

Disabled Does Not Mean Disqualified: Challenge Your Perceptions of Ability

How can procurement professionals make disability work in the workplace? 

This blog was written by Julie Gerdeman, General Manager, SAP Ariba. 


One of the greatest joys of my work at SAP Ariba is the opportunity to wear more than one hat; not only heading up our payments business but also serving as the executive sponsor of our diversity and inclusion efforts. At the core of our D&I strategy is an aspiration to build an inclusive culture around the customer, innovation, and employee experience to enable us to become the most diverse company in the cloud.

Recently, I had the honor of hosting SAP Ariba’s popular Diversity and Inclusion luncheon at Ariba Live Amsterdam. This year’s theme, Rising Above the Impossible, focused on the importance of disability inclusion and leveraging accessible technology for better business outcomes because SAP Ariba recognizes them as important to the future of the workplace. For the event we assembled disability inclusion experts from different parts of the globe, and I had the great pleasure to get to know a group of phenomenal and courageous women, including our keynote speaker Nicky Abdinor (Nicky’s Drive) and panelists Lesa Bradshaw (Bradshaw LeRoux), Tania Seary (Procurious), Susan Scott-Parker (BDI), and Stefanie Nennstiel (SAP). I’d like to share with you three nuggets of wisdom from my discussion with them that has left a lasting impression:

1. “If You’ve Got the Drive, the Destination Is Up to You.”

I will never forget Nicky Abdinor, a clinical psychologist, who touched our hearts and minds as she challenged all perceptions around ability with her core message to focus on what you can do versus what’s you can’t. She graciously shared her personal story of overcoming her disability by focusing on her ability to create sustainable change in her attitude, beliefs, and emotions to achieve the possible. She shared her mantra with the audience: “If you’ve got the drive, the destination is up to you.” I thought this was a great takeaway we can all relate to and apply in our lives because no matter if the disability is visible or invisible, we all have the power within us to choose to achieve the possible.

2. “Make Disability Work in the Workplace”

The talent pipeline and impact on the future of procurement is top-of-mind for our Procurement professionals. I see now more than ever that a diverse workforce is imperative for a business to survive in the digital era and is a topic that all our audiences want to discuss.

Our panelists were candid and offered some practical advice for all to use when they returned to their businesses, particularly around “making disability work in the workplace.” Companies must commit to building an inclusive culture that allows all employees, not just the perceived majority, to thrive at work. This begins with recruiting and retaining diverse talent.

At SAP Ariba, we are building our strong foundation by empowering employees to uncover their unconscious biases, which we all carry as human beings, and learning to eliminate bias from decision-making for better outcomes with our Business Beyond Bias training program. In addition, the panelists encouraged the audience to ensure their companies develop a disability and inclusion strategy to empower managers to make intentional decisions around reasonable accommodations that allow everyone the same opportunity to perform their job responsibilities. For example, SAP Ariba has made the intentional decision to participate in the Autism at Work Program because we value neurodiversity and are seeking a specific set of skills to enhance our workforce to widen our perspective on the business. Our disability and inclusion strategy enables our managers to go beyond traditional sources of talent, and this has made a positive impact in our overall employee morale.

From experience, we know that innovations often originate from unlikely sources.

3. Accessible Technology Can Make a Real Difference

Another critical component that enhances the success of disability and inclusion efforts is accessible technologies. The benefits extend from the home to the workplace, as accessible technologies transform the way people with disabilities contribute and thrive. They serve as a tremendous equalizer leading to retention, development and advancement. At SAP Ariba, we are deeply committed to ensuring that accessible technologies are integrated into our business.  We are amplifying this approach by promoting the importance of accessible technologies among buyers and suppliers and buyers on the Ariba Network.

The Important Role of Procurement

Procurement leaders play an important role in bringing visibility to the value of a supplier diversity strategy that can increase competitive advantage through an inclusive supply chain, offering opportunities to underrepresented suppliers. By now, we are all familiar with the research that shows companies that embrace diversity are more profitable. If you haven’t already, I recommend reading The 2018 Delivery Through Diversity Report by McKinsey for the latest data and insights.

As I reflect on my wonderful experience learning from our knowledgeable disability and inclusion experts, I feel hopeful and encouraged with the opportunities available to procurement professionals to make a positive contribution toward building an inclusive workforce and a diverse supply chain. Ultimately, as we embrace business with a purpose, the ability to contribute toward the greater good of society fuels my passion for leading and implementing diversity and inclusion within procurement.

Julie Gerdeman is GM and Global Head of Payments & Financing at SAP Ariba. 

Don’t Go Chasing Procurement Unicorns

Trying to build a team of procurement unicorns? You might just want to re-think your strategy…

What makes a procurement unicorn?

They’ve got the grades, the qualifications and years of relevant experience. They tick off every core procurement skill in the book and they’ve worked for some big-name companies.

In short; on paper, they’re perfect.

If you’re self-proclaimed unicorn hunter, you’re probably hoping to fill your entire procurement team with a herd of these mythical creatures. Because you think that’s what’s best for your business…

And that’s where you’d be very wrong. Because in today’s world, Unicorn = Uniform!

With this narrow outlook on your recruitment processes, you run the risk of missing out on extraordinary talents.

It’s impossible to know the unique skills, experience and perspective that a potential hire can bring to your team if you don’t open your mind to their many differences and diversities.

In our upcoming webinar Don’t Go Chasing Unicorns we’ll be celebrating individuality. Join us on 18th July as we explore how organisations can better accommodate people  who are differently abled; whether it’s those with physical disabilities or people who are neuro-diverse.

We’ll be discussing:

  • The importance and benefits of recruiting and retaining differently-abled people to your teams
  • Why it is such terrible idea to set your sights on procurement unicorns!
  • How  procurement pros can help to build truly diverse teams and foster a workplace environment that is inclusive to everyone?
  • How are some of the biggest organisations making the workplace inclusive and accessible for everyone?

Who is speaking on the webinar?

Tania Seary, Founder – Procurious

A true procurement entrepreneur, Tania is the Founding Chairman of Procurious, The Faculty and The Source. Throughout her career, Tania has been wholly committed to raising the profile of the procurement profession and connecting its leaders.

After finishing her MBA at Pennsylvania State University, Tania became one of Alcoa’s first global commodity managers.

In 2016, Tania was recognised by IBM as a #NewWaytoEngage Futurist and named “Influencer of the Year” by Supply Chain Dive. She hosts regular procurement webinars, and presents at high-profile events around the world.

Darren Swift

In 1991 Swifty was injured by a terrorist attack that resulted in him loosing both his legs above the knee. During his extensive rehab he made a decision to not let his injury affect his life or career going forward.

Since then Swifty has gone on to achieve a huge amount including becoming the first ever double above knee amputee solo skydiver and snowboarder. Swifty’s unique and inspiring story demonstrates the need for employers to be open minded when hiring as without this outlook they could miss out on an extraordinary talent!

Timo Worrall, Senior Category Manager, Facilities Management – Johnson & Johnson

Timo is responsible for the procurement of Facility Services across J&J’s global portfolio, including leading recent initiatives in EMEA and APAC. He is a key part of the team that has implemented the ‘Social Impact through Procurement’ initiative through the J&J business in the UK, including driving the introduction of Social Enterprises into the facilities supply base. It is this work with social enterprises that will help J&J reach its target of a £15 million of social value spend by 2020.

Timo’s work includes contracting a 3 per cent social value target into two regional FM contracts, that will deliver £3 Million of social value across Europe and Asia. Timo believes passionately about the impact that big business can have on impacting the lives of those disadvantaged in our society. He lives in Woking, Surrey, with his wife and two children.

Julie Gerdeman, General Manager, SAP Ariba

Julie Gerdeman is GM Payments & Financing at SAP Ariba. In this role, she is responsible for all aspects of the company’s strategy and execution to transform global B2B payments.Prior to this role, Ms. Gerdeman led the SAP Ariba Digital Transformation Organisation. This team of 100+ advisors lead SAP Ariba’s delivery of customer value: from identification, to enablement through realisation.

Before joining SAP Ariba, she held various leadership positions in sales, customer success and marketing at J.P. Morgan Chase and American Express.Ms. Gerdeman holds a B.A. from Dartmouth College and lives with her family in the Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania. She is a member of the board of directors for Apparent Financing, an SAP.io funded start-up that leverages data from the Ariba Network to facilitate financing to small business suppliers. Ms. Gerdeman is also the global executive sponsor for Diversity & Inclusion at SAP Ariba and speaks and blogs frequently on this topic.

How do I register for the webinar?

Registering for Don’t Go Chasing Unicorns couldn’t be easier (and, of course, it’s FREE!)

Click here to enter your details and confirm your attendance. We’ll send you a email with a link to the webinar platform in the run up to the event.

I’m already a member of Procurious, do I still need to register?

Yes! If you are already a member of Procurious you must still enroll to access the webinar. We’ll send you a email with a link to the webinar platform in the run up to the event.

When is it taking place?

The webinar will take place at 10am EDT/ 3pm BST on 18th July 2018

Help! I can’t make it to the live-stream

No problem! If you can’t make the live-stream you can catch up whenever it suits you. We’ll be making it available on Procurious soon after the event (and will be sure to send you a link) so you can listen at your leisure!

Can I ask a question?

If you’d like to ask one of our speakers a question please submit it via the Discussion Board on Procurious and we’ll do our very best to ensure it gets answered for you.

Our webinar,  Don’t Go Chasing Unicorns, takes place at 10am EDT/ 3pm BST on 18th July 2018. Register your attendance for FREE here. 

How To Free Your Decisions From Bias

It’s not easy to free yourself and others from decision bias. But the pay off for your organisation is worth it…

A CEO mentioned recently to me his frustration with a few of his Senior Leaders who play the ‘merit card’ whenever diversity is raised. In doing so, they stymie good initiatives. Each small block they construct rebuilds the wall as fast as the CEO and supportive leaders tear it down. ‘What can I do?’ he asked. I shared his pain: invoking the ‘merit card’ is a wicked, if effective, tactic for, paradoxically, subverting merit and keeping control.

The CEO and his leaders have an awareness of unconscious bias and know a bit about how it works. Until recently unconscious bias was heralded as the holy grail for achieving significant improvement in diversity and inclusion outcomes. But the value of unconscious bias training in particular, and diversity training in general, is being challenged.

Dobbin & Kalev’s influential article ‘Why diversity programs fail’ importantly identified that command and control approaches, adopted by many organisations, backfire. You can’t get people to change by telling them to. And you don’t get people to change by blaming them for doing the wrong thing.

Making training about beliefs and preferences mandatory is almost guaranteed to fail. That’s because suppressing unconscious beliefs, to ‘do what’s expected’, is  well-known to make bias more, not less, likely. And that’s the danger with these senior leaders who play the ‘merit card’; their biases may increase rather than decrease.

Unconscious bias awareness is not a silver bullet, it is however, worthwhile. It’s not easy to free yourself and others from decision bias, so what will make it worth the CEO’s effort? You can’t work with it effectively if you don’t understand it. And it’s how you work with it that counts. 

Debias by accepting your fallibility

At an individual level, part of the work is to accept your own fallibility. We are susceptible to many types of bias, that cover all sorts of decisions. Frustratingly, because these biases operate unconsciously, we can’t really know when we are in their grip. And our bias for overconfidence means that we tend to think that our decisions are much better than they are. So, we’re not actually very likely to think we’re biased. It’s bit of a Catch-22.

The most practical approach is to be aware of the tendency towards overconfidence. Be more modest, less certain, about your decisions. Whether or not you know you are biased matters less than accepting that you are likely to be biased.

Leaders who play the ‘merit card’ probably suffer certainty bias, they don’t think they are biased. They don’t like the suggestion they have a ‘weakness’ like ‘bias’. Without that openness, their decisions remain narrow. Feelings of certainty are biases themselves. It’s when we feel most certain that we are most likely to be unsystematic, think we know, circumvent objective methods, or neglect to ask for alternatives.

If you accept that you are likely to be biased you are more likely to act to mitigate against bias. And that, currently, seems to get the best results.

Biases show up in:

  • What we notice
  • What we expect
  • What we ask, and
  • What we value.

What we notice

Collectively, we are getting much better at noticing gender-participation differences by industry and occupation. When we take the time to collect and examine the data about, for example, pay, it transpires that there are often gaps that can only be attributed to gender.  When we notice the difference, we can act on the difference.

At the individual level, what we notice has a big impact on careers.

Letters of recommendation for male academics emphasise research skills, publications and career aspirations, which are the ‘get ahead’ characteristics. Whereas teaching skills, practical clinical skills and personal attributes, the ‘get along’ characteristics, are more often identified for females.

Women scientists’ early career advancement is hindered, even when they have the same qualifications as male scientists. Male and female faculty make biased hiring decisions, preferring male candidates over female. Their capabilities are noticed differently. Male candidates are seen as more competent, more worthy of mentoring and deserving of a higher salary than female candidates.

Notice what you notice

Set yourself a noticing challenge. Pair yourself up with someone of the opposite gender, with whom you will be interacting regularly throughout a designated day. Commit to taking observations during the day. Each half hour, record what you have observed in terms of interpersonal interactions.

At the end of the day, compare your notes with each other.

What do you notice about who takes what kinds of actions, and what is the impact of their actions on others? What’s similar in your observations, and what’s different?

What we expect

We expect men to be ambitious and we don’t expect women to be. This erodes women’s ability to express their ambition. In numerous professions, from policing to medicine and science, women begin with the same levels of ambition as do men. Yet, while men’s ambition increases over time, women’s decreases. Because women are constantly fighting structural barriers, their ambition often wanes.

We expect men to be competent and women supportive. A recent European study reviewed 125 applications for venture capital funding. Forty-seven percent of women’s applications, versus 62% of men’s, were funded. Women applied for and received less funding.

There were four distinct differences in the language used to assess applications:

  • Women were described as needing support, men as assertive.
  • Women were not described as entrepreneurs but as growing a business to escape unemployment. Superlatives were used about men’s fit with entrepreneurship and risk taking.
  • Women’s credibility was questioned, men’s was not.
  • Women were seen to lack competence, experience and knowledge; men to be innovative and impressive.

Expectations about how men and women should behave were carried over into evaluations which then affected their relative success.

Disrupt your expectations

What happens if you disrupt your expectations regarding ambition and competence? What if you spent a day imagining all the women you engage with are ambitious, competent and want to get ahead? Imagine the men with whom you engage want to provide support and take a back seat.

If our Senior Leaders imagined that the men in their teams wanted to leave work to pick up the kids from school and prepare dinner, how would they think about their next career move?

What we ask

The group of researchers involved in the VC funding example above observed the full application process. They concluded that the questions that were asked undermined women’s potential, but underpinned men’s.

A recent US study found a similar kind of bias. In a start-up funding competition, venture capitalists (VCs) were much more likely to ask male entrepreneurs promotion-oriented questions. They focused on ideals, achievements and advancement. By contrast, VCs asked females entrepreneurs prevention-oriented questions. These questions focused on vigilance, responsibility, risk and safety. Male-led start-ups raised five times the funding of females. Consistent with what we know about unconscious bias, the research found that male and female VCs displayed the same questioning biases.  It is often assumed that men favour men and women favour women; increasing the number of women on selection panels is routinely seen as the solution. Yet unconscious biases about gender are held as commonly by women as by men. While simply increasing the number of female decision makers does make balanced decision making more likely, it does not guarantee it. However, when panels have gender balance, or are female only, bias tends to disappear.

Question what you ask

 How might you disrupt the kinds of questions you ask men and women? Do you ask men and women the same questions? What happens when you do?

Imagine our Senior Leaders asked men and women the same questions they ask women. What would they learn?

What we value

Johnson & Johnson, which fields about 1 million job applications for over 25,000 job openings each year, now uses Textio to debias their job ads. When they first started using it they found that their job ads were skewed with masculine language. They were disproportionately valuing male characteristics. Their pilot program to change the language in their ads resulted in a 9% increase in female applicants.

Even when managers and decision-makers espouse a commitment to gender equality and a desire to promote more women into leadership positions, they are prone to evaluate women less positively

By deliberately analysing and structuring how information is conveyed and options are presented, it can become easier to make fairer decisions.

Women are commonly demoted to traditional gender roles. Forty-five percent of women in one study have been asked to make the tea in meetings. Some were CEO at the time. Female doctors are often mistaken for nurses, female lawyers for paralegals and female professionals of many kinds for personal assistants.  We do not expect women to hold senior roles, despite the fact that, increasingly, they do.

Student evaluations of teaching appear to be influenced similarly. Even in an online course where the gender of the instructor was manipulated so that identical experiences were provided to students, those students who believed they had a female teacher provided significantly lower teaching evaluations. While these lower ratings misrepresent actual competency, they nevertheless may create a self-fulfilling prophesy where women’s career advancement choices begin to conform to the stereotype. And erroneous beliefs about women’s competency levels limit the opportunities that are provided to them; the misrepresentations are perpetuated.

Put the value back into evaluation

Debias evaluation by using blind, automated processes. Take human bias and error out, and increase the value of the decisions you are making.

Would our Senior Leaders be prepared to do this? Would they be prepared to take themselves out of the equation? Would they believe an objective merit-based process could occur for a decision in which they have an interest, but in which they were not involved?

Put it all together

People are responsible for their own minds. Our CEO has provided opportunities for his senior leaders to engage with curiosity, respect and candour in their diversity programs. There are some wonderful stories emerging.

The challenge for those who don’t yet get it, is to agree to the overarching purpose that people decisions are based on merit. If merit is what we are aiming for, we should all be prepared to sign-up for practices and tools that increase and uphold it. Will they do this?

But merit is both more and less than it seems. It is more complex and difficult to define than most people think. It is less objective and rigorous, particularly in knowledge work and leadership roles. It is ripe for bias. Paradoxically, invoking merit is perhaps the most powerful way to subvert it.

It’s time for Senior Leaders to throw away the ‘merit card’; their people deserve a fairer hand.

Eroding merit corrodes culture, and culture is where the CEO leaves his biggest legacy. What can he do? To leave a lasting legacy, the CEO knows he needs to call out the fallacy of the ‘merit card’ and hold his Senior Leaders to account for fair people decisions. He can help them to exit the organisation if they are not prepared to play a fair hand.

If the Senior Leaders are prepared to admit to fallibility, to be aware that they may notice and value the behaviours of different groups of people in different ways, there are many practices that will make sure bias is minimised and fairer decisions are made.

We can all keep working to debias our decisions.

What to do if you believe in merit:

  1. Accept your fallibility – be more modest, less certain about your decisions.
  2. Notice what you notice – record what you notice and assess it for fairness.
  3. Disrupt your expectations – imagine women are ambitious and men supportive.
  4. Question what you ask – ask the same questions of everyone.
  5. Put the value back into evaluation – by using blind processes.

Supplier Diversity? I Don’t Have Time For That!

“No one wants to change suppliers…” but embracing Supplier Diversity is getting easier than ever before, and there’s a whole host of reasons it’s good for your business! 

Sunny studio/Shutterstock.com

Supplier diversity programs are a hot topic.

We know we’re supposed to have them…

And we’re told that they’re a great thing both for our organisations and the broader communities in which we work and live.

But what are the actual facts when it comes to embracing a supplier diversity program? Do they really add innovation and value to your business? Is finding a minority owned supplier more trouble than it’s worth?

What is supplier diversity?

Supplier diversity is a business strategy that ensures procurement professionals source their goods and services from a diverse range of suppliers; whether they’re minority or women owned businesses, not-for-profits or social enterprises.

How suppliers gain classification as a diverse business differs across the globe but both a formal process of classification and legislation supporting these businesses is extremely valuable to both buyers and suppliers.

United States

The United States is often regarded as being at the forefront of advancing supplier diversity.

The National Minority Supplier Development Council (NMSDC), with a network of 1,750 corporate members, advances business opportunities for certified minority business enterprises and connects them to corporate members.

Businesses in the US that are least 51 per cent  owned by citizens who are Asian, Black, Hispanic and Native American can be  Minority Business Enterprise (MBE) certified.  According to the Minority Business Development Agency, there are 8 million minority businesses in the US that account for nearly $1.4 trillion in revenues.

South Africa

The Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment (B-BBEE) Act passed in 2003 with the fundamental objective  to advance economic transformation and enhance the economic participation of black people in the South African economy.

UK

The UK has been slower to implement clear policy in this area but is an increasing number of organisations working in this space .

MSDUK, for example, is a non-profit membership organisation driving inclusive procurement. We promote the ethos of diversity and inclusion in public and private sector supply chains by identifying and introducing innovative and entrepreneurial ethnic minority owned businesses (EMBs).

CIPS supports the definition of a diverse supplier as one that is “51 per cent owned, controlled or operated by one or more individuals who are members of an ethnic minority group, are disabled, or are women and who are ‘economically disadvantaged’, in that their personal net worth is less than $750,000”

Australia

Supply Nation connects Australia business with Indigenous businesses and is endorsed by the Australian Government as the leading directory of Indigenous businesses for their procurement teams to fulfil their targets under the new Indigenous Procurement Policy.

We interviewed two people who know a thing or two about the benefits;  Rod Robinson, Founder & CEO, ConnXus, Inc. and Lamont Robinson,  Vice President, Supplier Diversity -Nielsen.

Why should our organisations support supplier diversity?

“Supplier diversity has evolved throughout the years since its original inception through Executive Order 11458 in 1969, establishing the Office of the Minority Business Enterprise,” begins Lamont.

“Since that inception, supplier diversity has grown into a business imperative.”

He explains that organisations are establishing these programs to meet needs in six areas:

1. Clients

“Clients are increasingly asking their suppliers to help them with their diversity efforts. It is important to understand the reality that consumers use their purchasing power to support businesses that support companies with owners that look like them.”

2. Competition

“Having a successful supplier diversity program is often a differentiator for retention/recruitment of clients.”

3. Compliance

“Since some clients have federal contracts, they turn to their suppliers to assist with their diversity goals”

4. Communities

“Since diverse businesses typically employ more individuals in underserved communities than their larger counterparts, increased sales for those businesses should lead to more jobs in the community and more paid insurance for those employees.”

“A successful supplier diversity program could positively impact the recruitment and retention of diverse talent.”

5. Customisation innovation

“Diverse suppliers are more innovative and flexible in providing [a] solution.”

“Smaller, more nimble companies typically have greater customer service than their larger counterparts. The customer service is also more personable than with what is provided by large companies.”

6. Costs

“A diverse supplier base creates more competition, which leads to aggressive pricing.”

Rod Robinson argues that “corporate supplier diversity programs yield proven, measurable results in improved innovation, quality and value.

“Overall, it makes good business sense for corporations to do business with diverse suppliers to build a more sustainable supply chain.

“The U.S. Census Bureau reports that minority-owned businesses continue to grow significantly faster than non-minority-owned businesses. From 2007-2012, the number of minority-owned firms increased 29 per cent.”

How can supplier diversity add value to your organisation?

“If a procurement policy requires at least two diverse bidders for every three bidders, those new suppliers will not only have a chance to offer competitive pricing, but they can expose the organisation to new avenues of revenue growth, including access to new markets,” says Rod.

“Furthermore, these suppliers often align with corporate sustainability efforts (energy conservation, reduced paper consumption).”

Lamont believes that “diverse suppliers are typically created by individuals or groups looking to disrupt the marketplace.”

“These individuals seek innovative ways to create a service or product that more effectively meets the needs of clients. Working with smaller, nimble, and more innovative diverse suppliers allows supplier diversity to introduce innovation to the supply chains of their respective organisations.”

Supplier diversity programs are too time consuming

“No one wants to change suppliers,” Lamont admits.

“We all would like to maintain status quo when partnering with the companies that supply us products and services we consistently use and consume.

“However, there are various organisations and tools created to speed up the time needed to source from diverse businesses.

“Best practices are identified when organisations join diversity advocates such as the National Minority Supplier Development Council, the Women’s Business Enterprise National Council, the National Gay & Lesbian Chamber of Commerce and other similar organisations. Networking with peers from organisations that are members of the aforementioned advocates provides a platform to source for diverse businesses to meet an organisation’s needs.”

Rod agrees with this point of view, arguing that “vetting diverse suppliers requires the same process and time as vetting non-diverse suppliers, but procuring with purpose and intention yields a more sustainable business model, supply chain and economy.”

“Partnering with a technology leader such as ConnXus offers procurement professionals increased visibility and ease-of-use for what might seem to be a difficult or time-consuming task. Choosing the right technology partner can enable procurement professionals to have a unified tool to manage diverse sourcing, supplier diversity, supplier risk, economic impact and more.”

Procure with Purpose – Join the movement

Procurious have partnered with SAP Ariba to create a global online group – Procure with Purpose.

Through Procure with Purpose, we’re shining a light on the biggest issues – from Modern Slavery; to Minority Owned Business; and from Social Enterprises; to Environmental Sustainability.

Enrol here to join the Procure with Purpose group and gain instant access to our exclusive online events.

6 Reasons It Pays To Care In Procurement

“Do good, feel good” or “Do good, and save lots of money”? Whichever  you find the more enticing, we can certainly conclude that it pays to care in procurement!

Roger Clark ARPS/Shutterstock.com

Pat McCarthy, SVP and GM, SAP Ariba North America, is one of the driving forces behind SAP Ariba’s Business with Purpose initiative. Over time, he’s noticed how business attitudes have shifted as corporations become more socially aware. “For companies in the past it was pretty simple, the charter was pretty simple – increase profits for their shareholders or their owners. But today we find that many companies are taking on a higher mission to make the world a better place to live and work and to run their businesses with a higher purpose.

Of course, you don’t need Pat to tell you that sourcing from minority owned businesses, eradicating slave labour or watching your carbon foot print is a good thing. No one would try to contest that. But aside from the “do good, feel good” ideology, is Business with Purpose actually good for your business, or is it going to cause your procurement team a whole lot more – in money and stress!?

“We know that purpose driven companies out perform the market by almost 5 per cent” says Pat. “In other words they can do good and do well. Procurement has a unique opportunity to lead the way.”

And so it would seem that there’s a strong business case far beyond the moral imperative to embrace a higher cause in your procurement team.

Peter Holbrook, CEO Social Enterprise UK, gives six reasons why this is the case.

1. It’s cost effective

“We’ve undertaken research with PwC to look at what social value means for people within procurement departments” begins Peter. “We see that in the majority of cases when you take a social value or an environmental lens to procurement your new suppliers coming in to support your business are in most cases creating value add but are actually cheaper. [You will find] suppliers are much more cost efficient as a result of being more socially and environmentally imaginative.”

2. It brings in top talent

Attitudes of the millennial workforce is a significant factor for organisations to consider in today’s world if they want to recruit and retain the best talent. Employees, for the most part, want to feel as though they are working for companies who care for more than simply profit, who are making the right decisions for the world around them as well as the right decisions for the business.  As Peter explains “the good work your business does can give you the cutting edge or differentiation to bring in the very best talent.  When [organisations] take these approaches and staff believe they are authentic they are more likely to stay in the business in the long term.”

3. It makes suppliers more responsive

The research Social Enterprise UK carried out with PwC revealed that in two thirds of cases  suppliers were more responsive in purpose led companies. This, Peter explains, is due to the relationships created that meant suppliers “were more responsive in terms of responding to the changing needs of companies buying from them.”

4. It makes your organisation more innovative

Purpose driven companies, according to Social Enterprise UK’s research carried out with PwC,  “brought on new products and services to market, which is the traditional way we assess innovation.”

5. It keeps you ahead of the game

“We all recognise that businesses have to change and adapt to help meet the challenges that we all face. Using supply chains as a way to do this is a way of really being cutting edge, staying ahead of the pack and building brand differentiation that all companies increasingly need to be able to define themselves.”

6. It gets your customers on board

“We have researched customer loyalty” says Peter, “And whether it’s members of the public or in B2B relationships – [people] are more likely to remain with companies that are also creating a social benefit.

Peter has some reassuring advice for anyone feeling overwhelmed by the challenge of becoming a purpose-led procurement team. “The risk is that we overcomplicate it. There’s something to be said for proportionality. Start small and start easy- culturally within a company you’ll get much greater buy in if it feels as if its accessible and something that can be achieved relatively simply rather than an additional burden you’re putting on everybody.

“It’s about starting a journey and taking small steps to evolve your methodology and your approach and being fairly honest about where you are succeeding and where some of the challenges exist. No one is assuming and no one should assume that when a company starts embarking on this route that they will come to the ultimate solution within weeks months or even a couple of years!”

Sign up for #FeeltheLove, the first Procurious and SAP Ariba Procure with Purpose webinar, which takes place later today  at 10am EST/ 3PM GMT.

Can You #FeeltheLove This Valentine’s Day…?

As a procurement professional, cutting costs is the very least you can do! Procure with purpose and start driving change world-wide…

tomertu/Shutterstock.com

Our webinar,  Feel The Love takes place at 3pm GMT /10am EST  on 14th February 2018. Register your attendance for FREE here. 

NEWSFLASH: Being world-class today doesn’t mean being the best in the world. It means helping the world run better.

In 2018, you should be working beyond cost savings and process efficiencies. You should be committed to making a positive impact on the communities in which you operate by eradicating slave labor, creating ethical and sustainable supply chains and levelling the playing field for all.

Thanks to the awesome power of social media and our interconnected world it’s easier than ever before to make that happen. But the challenge procurement pros still face is kick-starting, and measuring the impact of, their purpose-led work.

This Valentine’s Day, SAP Ariba and Procurious present #FeeltheLove – the first Procure with Purpose webinar.

What can I expect from the Feel the Love webinar?

We’ll be discussing…

  • What is Procuring with Purpose?
  • Why should professionals care about purpose-led procurement?
  • What are the small things that you can do immediately to drive big outcomes?
  • How do you measure and report social impact to the CFO?
  • The procurement teams who are already getting it right!
  • How can businesses ensure that economic growth is always accompanied by a respect for human rights?
  • Our vision for using the power of social media to drive purpose-led procurement around the world

Who are the guest speakers?

Tania Seary – Founder, Procurious

A true procurement entrepreneur, Tania is the Founding Chairman of Procurious, The Faculty and The Source. Throughout her career, Tania has been wholly committed to raising the profile of the procurement profession and connecting its leaders.

After finishing her MBA at Pennsylvania State University, Tania became one of Alcoa’s first global commodity managers.

In 2016, Tania was recognised by IBM as a #NewWaytoEngage Futurist and named “Influencer of the Year” by Supply Chain Dive. She hosts regular procurement webinars, and presents at high-profile events around the world.

Pat McCarthy – SVP and GM, SAP Ariba North America

As head of SAP Ariba’s North American business, Pat McCarthy is responsible for driving sales performance, the go-to-market strategy and overall operations of the field organization across the U.S. and Canada.Since joining SAP in 2005, he has held a number of executive roles successfully leading Net New, Mobility, and Database &Technology teams throughout the U.S.

Immediately prior to his current post, Pat served as chief operating officer for the Midwest region of the U.S., overseeing the consistent execution of sales strategies, operations and the region’s go-to-market initiatives.

Pat graduated from Elmhurst College, sits on the board of Chicago Tech Academy, a charter non-profit for Chicago high school students, and supports global charitable endeavours through Kiva.

Nicole Verkindt – Founder and CEO, The OMX

Nicole Verkindt is the Founder & CEO of Canadian technology company, OMX (theomx.com).

She is passionate about the role that data and networks can play in connecting diverse supply chains and analysing and improving the exact impacts from procurements.

The platform is the only one in the world that manages obligations companies have to invest in local businesses. OMX is an online marketplace to help companies diversify their procurement by providing opportunities through the platform that smartly matches to suppliers.

Nicole is a commentator on CBC and columnist for Vanguard magazine focusing on technology and business news and was a “Dragon” on Next Gen Dragon’s Den, which is dedicated to early stage technology businesses. She was named Canada’s national woman entrepreneur of the year in 2017.

Peter Holbrook – CEO, Social Enterprise UK 

Peter Holbrook became CEO of Social Enterprise UK in January 2010.

Social Enterprise UK is the national trade body for social enterprise and represents a wide range of social enterprises, regional and national support networks and other related organisations. SEUK works to promote social enterprise as a model for changing both business and society.

Peter has established, developed and supported hundreds of diverse social enterprises over his career. He has advised government taskforces in the UK and overseas and chaired the Social Enterprise World Forum, the global network of social businesses until 2015.

Peter has previously worked for Oxfam, Greenpeace and various disability charities. He has experience of working in overseas development, community development and public health. Peter started his career with Marks and Spencer PLC and also spent several years with Body Shop International

He was appointed a CBE in 2015.

How do I register for the webinar?

Joining the Procure With Purpose movement and registering for our webinar couldn’t be easier (and, of course, it’s FREE!)

Click here to enter your details and confirm your attendance. We’ll send you a email with a link to the webinar platform in the run up to the event.

I’m already a member of Procurious, do I still need to register?

Yes! If you are already a member of Procurious you must still enroll to access the webinar. We’ll send you a email with a link to the webinar platform in the run up to the event.

When is it taking place?

The webinar will take place at 3pm GMT /10am EST on14th February 2018.

Help! I can’t make it to the live-stream

No problem! If you can’t make the live-stream you can catch up whenever it suits you. We’ll be making it available on Procurious soon after the event (and will be sure to send you a link) so you can listen at your leisure!

Can I ask a question?

If you’d like to ask one of our speakers a question please submit it  via the Discussion Board on Procurious and we’ll do our very best to ensure it gets answered for you.

Commit to Procure with Purpose

Procure with Purpose is a movement. A coalition of committed, energised procurement professionals who want to deliver value beyond cost savings and efficiencies.

Through the Procure with Purpose campaign, we’ll shine a light on the biggest issues –from Modern Slavery; to Minority Owned Business; and from Social Enterprises; to Environmental Sustainability–and on you –our members -who are already driving exponential change.

How do I get involved ?

To stake your place, simply sign up here. It’s FREE to join –you just need to be passionate and ready to lead with purpose! When you sign up for the #FeeltheLove webinar, you’ll be automatically registered for the Procure with Purpose group on Procurious and all of our related, online events.

Our webinar,  Feel The Love takes place at 3pm GMT / 10am EST on 14th February 2018. Register your attendance for FREE here. 

The Five Myths Of Workplace Underrepresentation, Busted!

Too scared to talk about workplace diversity and inclusion? Dominic Price will happily go first as he debunks the 5 most common myths about underrepresentation.

Danilov1991xxx/Shutterstock.com

As a 6-foot-4-inch straight white guy in tech, it might seem unusual that I’m writing about diversity and inclusion. The reason is,more of us need to: write about it, talk about it, and, especially, do something about it.

Just looking at the nightly news in recent weeks, or a new report that underscores the gaps between how tech workers view diversity within their companies and the realities of the situation, it’s apparent how crucial it is to speak out on issues of equality. Speaking up can feel uncomfortable (and heck, by writing this I know I’m making myself a target for criticism), but it’s no longer an option for those of us in groups who hold the most power to stay silent.

My colleagues rightly point out that as a white guy, I’ve got quite a bit of privilege in my industry, and there’s lots of good use for it. So, here’s my boldest attempt yet to make my privilege work for everyone. Specifically, I want to clear up some major misconceptions I hear from others, and predominantly from people who look like me.

Our position of privilege means we are the most removed from the hardships others face and we need to proactively reject the myths we hear.

Myth #1: “Why should we give women and minorities a leg up? Isn’t that unfairly prioritising one group over another?”

Standard words from a fish that doesn’t know it’s in water. It’s much easier to blame others’ misfortunes on lack of intelligence or hard work than on a lack of equal opportunities. This is a protectionist strategy by the strong and wealthy to reduce the power and potential of the perceived weak. For all of the talk about being “data-driven,” many seem to believe that everyone has an equal chance to be in the workplace, despite loads of evidence to the contrary. While it would be nice to think we are all treated equally, simply being a minority can mean being treated differently by others and having fewer social and economic opportunities.

Our position of privilege means we are the most removed from the hardships others in our industry face and need to proactively reject the myths we hear.

Advocating for increased diversity in our industry doesn’t mean people from marginalised groups want an unfair advantage or hand-outs. They just want the same opportunities that others have had.

Myth #2: “You have to be a minority to be involved in diversity & inclusion (D&I).”

A wonderful way to pass the buck. The prevalence of underrepresented minorities talking about a lack of opportunities is because they feel the pain every day and are intrinsically more motivated to make it right. Just because we’re not personally guilty of creating the unequal playing field does not mean we’re not personally responsible for helping to fixing it. When your child spills milk, do you say “not my mess”? Our predecessors helped tilt the playing field, and now it’s our turn to level it out. The sooner we realise we contributed to this problem, (even if only passively through lack of action) the quicker we move from rhetoric to making a difference.

Just because we’re not personally guilty of creating the unequal playing field does not mean we’re not personally responsible for helping to fixing it.

There are plenty of ways to get involved: From merely drawing attention to biased behaviours you see, to getting involved in your company’s existing diversity efforts, or starting your own.

Myth #3: “We just don’t have a diverse applicant pool.”

Ah, yes. A favourite of many, especially in Silicon Valley where recruiting is particularly tough — for example by 2020, there will be nearly 1.5 million unfilled computer science roles. But have you asked yourself why you don’t have a diverse pool? Are you hiring your grads from the same tiny set of schools with very homogeneous student populations? Have you searched for underrepresented candidates, or created programs to bring more into the fold? What have you changed to attract and support them? While the talent pipeline is a common excuse, in truth discrimination,  implicit and explicit, constantly blocks underrepresented minorities from entering or advancing in the field; two-thirds of predominantly white and Asian women in STEM report having to constantly prove themselves in the workplace, with black women facing even more extreme biases and challenges.

It’s also worth examining your recruiting tactics to see if you’re doing anything that could be discouraging underrepresented candidates. From gendered language in job descriptions to playing up the office pool table versus paid parental leave on your careers page, you can inadvertently send the wrong message without realising it.

Myth #4: “This is political correctness gone mad.”

Political correctness is a real thing, but it’s also irrelevant to what we’re discussing here. Can efforts to promote diversity be merely political correctness when there’s a mountain of evidence pointing to it being a real problem? Many studies also show diversity has huge benefits when it comes to business and team performance, so it’s something we should all care about.

It’s true that diversity conversations can be very nuanced, which creates fear about saying the wrong thing. But there is a pretty simple fix, which is to ask questions. Listen to and believe the stories from people from backgrounds different from yours. Educate yourself. In the same way you’d tackle a new project or product feature, gather as much information as possible so you can make better, more informed decisions. This isn’t about stifling your voice, but creating room for everyone to express themselves in a way that helps us all do our best work.

Myth #5. “I don’t see gender or race” or “I treat everyone the same.”

This is straight up empirically false. Your brain sees gender, it sees race and it sees just about every other visible category imaginable, whether you consciously pay attention to it or not. Let me say it again: It is neuroscientifically impossible for you to not see attributes like race and gender, and to keep them from affecting your decision-making. I used to think treating everyone the same was what I should strive for, but it turns out that doing so actually results in discrimination and unequal opportunity. Treating everyone the same, even when they’ve faced vastly different challenges, only serves to keep them on a tilted playing field.

Embracing and supporting diversity is something we’re all responsible for and something that, by definition, we are all a part of (a single person can’t be diverse, so diversity includes white guys like me). To move forward, we need to take the crazy myths we’ve told ourselves that attempt to justify the status quo and throw them out the door. Guys like me have benefited from this mess of inequality more than any other group, so it’s our job to actively share opportunities. We’ll all win, as a team.

With what’s happening in the world, it’s important to keep an open heart and an open mind. The choice is yours. You can either become an active part of the solution or a stoic part of the issue in need of solving. Which one sounds more exciting?

Dominic West is Head of R&D and Work Futurist at Atlassin. This article was originally published on Collective Hub