Tag Archives: global change

The Brexit Horror Show: It’s Going To Be Rocky!

We all like to watch a good horror show.. but UK customs trying to manually process our imports? Entertainment it is not!

Are you ready to watch the Brexit horror show unfold?

The National Audit Office (NAO) pubilished a report last Thursday reviewing HM Revenue & Customs’ development of the new Customs Declaration Service (CDS).  The system is being developed in an attempt to manage the predicted 255 million UK customs declarations per year (an increase from 55 million)  once the UK leaves the EU.

But, with a significant amount of work still to be completed before March  2019,  many are concerned about what chaos might ensue.

Amyas Morse,  head of the NAO, did little to disguise his own concerns when he briefed the media on the report this week. He warned of a potential “horror show” at customs if the transition to CDS is not made by January 2019.

He said “What we don’t want to find is that, at the first tap, this falls apart like a chocolate orange.”  (Yep, we were confused by this too – it’s well known that Terry’s Chocolate Oranges are not known for their fragility; hence the marketing slogan “Don’t tap it, whack it!”.)

“It needs to be coming through as uniform, a little bit more like a cricket ball” he continued.

What Is The Customs Declarations Service?

The CDS is a new system, which will be installed to manage all imports and exports post-Brexit, replacing existing system, Customs Handling of Import and Export Freight (CHIEF).

CHIEF can currently process only 100 million declarations per year.  This leaves no question that a new system is needed given that HMRC are estimating an increase to 255 million once new trade and customs agreements are made during Brexit.

Completion of the installation is forecasted for January 2019 which doesn’t allow much room for error or delay given that the UK will officially leave the EU in March 2019. Indeed, the report confirms that there is still a “significant” amount of work to complete and a number of vacancies to fill, which means there’s a pretty good chance that the full functionality of CDS won’t be ready in time.

Ironically, in 2016, the UK came fifth out of 160 countries in the World Bank’s ranking of the efficiency of the border clearance process, including customs. Time will tell if this can be maintained post-Brexit!

Why Should Businesses Be Concerned?

The National Audit Office believes the government is only just starting to realise how difficult Brexit will be.  In a worst-case scenario it would become impossible for customs to collect the £34bn of duty, excise, and VAT taken at the border every year.

Customs officials might have to manually process imports and exports if the new electronic system is not in place, which would of course be a nightmarish scenario for businesses and their supply chains.

Mike Cherry, chairman of the Federation of Small Businesses, said “It’s extremely concerning that the UK’s new customs system may not be ready in time for Brexit, potentially resulting in massive delays to trade and leaving thousands of businesses in the lurch.” And hat’s not to mention a lack of confidence businesses will feel in the UK if their flow of goods is disrupted.

“Can government actually step up in these very difficult circumstances and deliver a unified response?” Morse asked. “I’m not seeing it yet.”

The report, and the alarming comments made by Amyas Morse will no doubt increase the pressure on the prime minister to re-evaluate Brexit progress and policy, but will it be in time to stop a customs horror show?

Let us know your thoughts on the NAO report in the comments section below. 

In other procurement and supply-chain news this week….

Bangladesh Factory Blast

  • Major European buyers of apparel supplied by a Bangladesh garment plant have started investigations after a boiler explosion in the plant killed 13 people and injured dozens
  • The explosion occurred during maintenance work at the factory, whose top buyers include Finnish fashion chain Lindex, which is part of Stockmann
  • Stockmann communications manager Anna Bjarland confirmed to SM that the factory supplied garments to both Stockmann and Lindex saying that the company was investigating

Read more on Supply Management

Hazardous chemicals in Tesco’s clothing supply chain

  • Tesco has joined a growing list of major high street retailers in beginning to remove chemicals thought to be hazardous from the supply chain of its clothing brand
  • Greenpeace said Tesco will immediately begin the process of eliminating 11 groups of hazardous substances from its F&F brand, including phthalates, brominated and chlorinated flame retardants, chlorinated solvents and heavy metals
  • Alan Wragg, technical director for clothing at Tesco, said: “This commitment is part of our goal to protect the environment by sourcing products sustainably and responsibly for our customers.”

Read more on Business Reporter 

Could China lead the way with AI?

  • In the battle of technological innovation between East and West, artificial intelligence (AI) is on the front line. And China’s influence is growing
  • China has invested massively in AI research since 2013, and these efforts are yielding incredible results. China’s AI pioneers are already making great strides in core AI fields
  • It is becoming clear that belief in U.S. dominance of the tech world is flagging. As it stands, China is in the driver’s seat

Read more on Venturebeat

Can Procurement See Past The End Of Its Nose?

Procurement must learn to think the unthinkable, predict the world weather forecast and look further than the end of it’s own nose when it comes to technology in order to remain relevant!

The Procurious London Roundtable was sponsored by Basware

Procurement 4.0, Cognitive Procurement and Thinking the Unthinkable were among the hot topics canvassed at last week’s inaugural meeting of the Procurious London Roundtable.

Packed with leading-edge speakers, a ready supply of valuable expertise, peer-led market intelligence, and networking, CPOs were unanimous that a reimagined Procurement must be the business’ source of market intelligence on these issues – if it is to secure and maintain a “seat at the table”.

Speakers addressed everything from global politics to AI and making it ito the C-Suite. If you’re intrigued to hear what they had to say, look no further; we’ve managed to pack the finer points into one, handy article!

Learning To Talk Across The  Lily-Pads

Nik Gowing, BBC Broadcaster,  Visiting Professor at King’s College and Big Ideas Summit 2016 Speaker,  joined the roundtable to provide an update on Thinking The Unthinkable.  Unthinkables are critical events that are not being considered or prepared for by organisations or by our governments around the world.

From Brexit to the election of President Trump;  from Putin’s invasion of Crimea to upcoming European elections, unthinkables have been occurring frequently over the last few years and they’re not letting up! In fact, if anything, unthinkable events are happening more rapidly than ever before.

Nik firmly believes that, in a world of social-media, time-scales for unthinkables which were once 20 years could now be 20 months, 20 days or as little as 20 minutes!

Take the infamous United Airlines (UA) flight as an example. Last month,  a passenger was violently dragged off a plane, the incident was filmed and then instantly shared around the globe. In a matter of minutes, UA’s reputation was destroyed and has perhaps threatened  the way airlines will operate in the future.

Nic’s advice for preparing for the future? Instead of destroying mavericks within our organisations, we need to turn them into visionaries and harness a culture where they can thrive. Nic has likened the current situation to frogs on lily pads – everyone is sitting in the same pond but not talking to one another – we need to find a way to come together and talk.

Grab An Umbrella And Face The Future

Justin Crump, CEO Sibylline, shared Nic’s concerns for the future and expressed his desire for organisations to address the current void of awareness about, and study of, the corporate security intelligence environment.

An intelligence-led approach to managing risk and predicting disruptions to your business  is absolutely the  way to go. It allows you to work out when you might be forced to take risks and when it’s worth taking them!

But how do you go about doing this? It all starts with reading your morning paper with purpose! Justin suggests you ask yourself why you’re reading it  and how and why it’s relevant or interesting to you. Consider where your clients work and where your supply-chain  is based. If missiles started flying over a particular country, would it be critically damaging to your business?

It’s possible, and preferable, to turn reading the news into a data-collection process by collating information and highlighting the important areas to disseminate to people within your organisation.

If in doubt, implement the ADAM model:

ASSESS – Understand your business and your world and what these interactions mean to you

DECIDE – Derive actions to help mitigate risks and refine into an achievable plan

ACT – Implement planned actions

MONITOR  – Use ongoing world risk register outputs to understand what is changing in your world. This will help you predict the world weather forecast and figure out when you’ll be needing an umbrella!

Looking Further Than The End of Your Nose

Eric Wilson, head of Basware‘s Purchase-to-Pay business for the Americas and APAC, discussed the critical actions CPOs can take today in order to safeguard against technology obsolescence. When 90 per cent of technology is about to become irrelevant can procurement implement a watertight process that evolves with industry trends?

Eric asked our roundtable attendees to consider the following scenario:

A new CPO comes into an organisation and instantly sees that there is  a problem with procure-to-pay and maverick spend.  They know they can save a whole load of money for the business. They challenge their employees to develop a business case, which a cross functional team evaluates and a score-card of criteria is developed.  Whilst this might sound like a totally reasonable approach there is a one major problem. Eric explained that the challenge with this process is that it focuses five inches in front of the CPO’s face; they’ve seen a problem and they’ve fixed it.

Remember Siebel? Not so long ago it was the best CRM system you could possibly use and was responsible for shifting the entire workplace environment into customer relationship management. Anyone who hadn’t bought Siebel already was about to and huge investments were made.

But, almost overnight, it became completely obsolete thanks to arrival of the Cloud. Siebel went bust, many a CMO lost their job and money was wasted, all because no-body looked further ahead.

Eric explained that the next wave of procurement technology is not just about the traditional goals of visibility, control and savings.  Harnessing the value of the transactional data running through the system will be key.

Given the way tech is trending, particularly AI, within three years 90 per cent of procurement tech will be obsolete.  People will not raise requisitions – robots will! And procurement must prepare for that.

What’s Holding Up Cognitive?

Pascal d’Arc, former GM of Cognitive Scale, talked us through the journey to cognitive and what some of the practical applications are in today’s world. Is cognitive really all the fuss it’s hyped up to be?

Judging by some of the fascinating examples Pascal gave us, absolutely! One such example was a cognitive system that had been given the ability to experiment with building a drone. The resulting machine had a frame shape which was modelled on the pelvis of a flying squirrel, representing something very close to nature.

But why is the progress of advancing and using cognitive tech so slow, what’s holding us back in procurement? According to Pascal it comes down to a number of things:

  1. The technology so far has been very experimental. There has been a sense of frustration towards IBM but they are still experimenting
  2. Expectations are huge. We are often missing the low hanging fruit when it comes to deciding what to tackle
  3. Procurement isn’t a key investment area…yet! Fintech and healthcare are the current priorities

Aiming For The C-Suite

Damian Walsh, Partner at Heidrick & Struggles,  gave our CPOs some top tips on what it takes to get to the very top. How do you successfully move on to a bigger CPO role, step up to CEO or take on a non-executive role.

  • Whatever it is you want to do, tailor your approach accordingly
  • Be clear about what you want and position yourself for it
  • Be clear about what you have to offer – think in terms of business solutions. There is no such thing as a “transport”company any more
  • Get your CV in order and make sure it’s accurate- so many people don’t!
  • Manage the search firms – be selective and understanding and clear about what you’re looking for
  • Work on your personal brand- thought leadership, speaking engagements etc.
  • Work your business and personal networks

The Procurious London Roundtable was sponsored by Basware

If you’d like to secure your seat for our second London Roundtable on 11th October 2017, please register your interest with Olga via Olga.luscombe@procurious.com

Are Supply Chains Already Feeling the Trump Effect?

President-elect Trump doesn’t take office until January 20th 2017, but his impact is already being felt in global supply chains.

Trump trade deals

Yes, it’s been a little over two weeks since Donald Trump won the US Presidential election. And it’s still nearly two months until he officially takes office. Yet, it’s hard to get away from media reports on what will happen during Trump’s first 100 days in office.

NAFTA, the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TTP), and import tariffs have all been in the news. And if global supply chains weren’t already watching with interest, they certainly should be now.

NAFTA – Overhaul on Cards

During the election campaign, Donald Trump made much of the movement of US manufacturing jobs to Mexico. One solution was to end US involvement in NAFTA, pushing companies to move jobs back to US heartlands.

The North Atlantic Free Trade Agreement was signed in 1994, effectively eliminating tariffs between the USA, Canada and Mexico. The agreement has allowed for seamless movement of goods across borders. It also means that the US currently has more trade with Canada and Mexico, than Europe and China.

An estimated $1.4 billion worth of goods cross the US-Mexico border every day. However, it’s not all been positive, with many organisations moving production to Mexico, where costs are lower.

However, in the past week, the stance from the Trump camp appears to be one of overhaul, rather than withdrawal. The President-elect wants to ensure a “better deal” for America, as well as reduce America’s $76 billion trade deficit.

This could include tariffs of up to 35 per cent on Mexican imports, and penalising companies moving production there. Other changes could include issue to do with currency manipulation, as well as labelling of meat products, and lumber production.

However, experts have warned that any or all of these measures could hurt the USA too. Increased meat prices in US supermarkets, higher house prices, and Mexican tariffs on US goods could all be on the cards. And that’s without the guarantee that jobs would come back to the US.

Relocating Supply Chains

One company subject to plenty of Donald Trump’s ire during the election was Apple. The President-elect singled out Apple several times as an example of a company that should re-shore its production.

To emphasise his point, Trump has threatened to put a 45 per cent import tariff on all Chinese-made goods. At present, Apple devices are assembled in China, with key components sourced from specialised suppliers throughout Asia. In spite of this, however, re-shoring is not that simple for Apple.

Experts have warned that moving production would be challenging, citing a lack of skilled workers and a steep hike in costs. There is also the matter of the highly complex supply chain Apple has established in Asia.

Analysis carried out by the MIT Technology Review stated that higher labour costs, and logistics costs of transporting components to the US, would add between $30 and $40 to the cost of producing each iPhone.

However, the Nikkei Asian Review has reported  that Apple is actually looking at moving some elements of production. It would not be unprecedented either. In 2012, key Apple supplier Foxconn set up an iMac assembly line in Texas. And in 2013, Apple supported Flextronics, another contractor, in building a Mac Pro production line in Texas too.

The media this week reported a call between Donald Trump and Apple CEO, Tim Cook, leading many to suspect that discussions are already taking place. However this ultimately plays out, global supply chain movement and disruption could happen. And if Apple were to move first, it seems like that others would follow suit.

‘Made in China’ Great Again?

One country not looking favourably on President Trump’s policies and tariffs is China. It has been reported that China is unhappy with potential import tariffs, as well as being labelled as a currency manipulator by the future President.

Reports from state media have stated that any tariffs would be met with tariffs of China’s own. There was also a thinly veiled threat against raising tariffs above agreed WTO levels, and starting a trade war.

However, at the same time, China could be a major beneficiary of Trump’s plans to pull the US out of the TPP on his first day in office.

The aim of the TPP was to create a common market, similar to the EU, between its members – the US, Japan, Malaysia, Vietnam, Singapore, Brunei, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, Mexico, Chile and Peru. As these countries make up 40 per cent of the world’s economy, it was seen as a great opportunity for many.

However, critics argue that it favours big business, and Donald Trump looks set to abandon it in favour of freshly negotiated trade deals. The belief is that, without the USA, the TPP would be dead in the water. But that would open up markets to greater deals and trade with China.

Australia was one country that signalled it would be interested in a China-led trade deal. Deals such as the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP) could see China increase its power in Asia, leaving America in the cold.

What do you make of the policies announced by President-elect Trump in the past week? Could the US suffer by going down a protectionist route? Tell us your thoughts below.

So you’ve got more time to bargain hunt this Cyber Monday, we’ve tracked down the top news headlines this week…

Samsung and Panasonic Investigate Labour Abuses

  • A Guardian investigation has revealed exploitation of migrant workers in Malaysian factories producing goods for leading electronic brands Samsung and Panasonic.
  • The group of Nepalese migrant workers claim they have been deceived about pay, as well as having to pay large sums of money to secure the jobs.
  • Working conditions are reported to include 14 hours on their feet without adequate rest and with restricted toilet breaks.
  • Samsung and Panasonic have opened investigations into the conduct of their suppliers following the claims.

Read more at The Guardian

BMW Logistics Using Autonomous Robots

  • The first fleet of autonomous transport robots to be used in everyday operation has been launched by BMW.
  • The first fleet of ten robots has been put into operation at the car maker’s Wackersdorf plant.
  • The robots will transport components around the facility, and are capable of carrying loads up to 500kg.
  • The move comes as the company aims to remove as much CO2 emission from its manufacturing processes.

Read more at Supply Chain 24/7

Shell May Face UK Trial Over Nigeria Spills

  • A High Court is to make a decision on whether two Nigerian communities can bring cases against Shell.
  • The communities claim that pollution from repeated spills has caused lasting damage to their environment.
  • Lawyers representing the communities argue that Shell controls and directs its Nigerian subsidiary, and is therefore responsible.
  • However, Shell have also lodged applications to challenge the jurisdiction of the English courts in the matter.

Read more on Supply Management

Canada Energy Decisions to Impact Freight Carriers

  • Canada has announced a plan to phase out all coal power by the year 2030.
  • Four affected coal power plants will will have the option of switching to lower-emitting resources or using carbon-capture and storage technology.
  • The move will have a knock-on effect on the country’s freight carriers, particularly the railroads.
  • Volumes of coal carried by railroads have fallen by 12 per cent this year, and are likely to get smaller still in the next decade.

Read more at the Wall Street Journal

Could President Trump Make Procurement Great Again?

Not that we’re saying that procurement isn’t already pretty great. But could a new man at the top mean major changes for the profession?

trump great

If you missed the result of the US Election last week, then you must have been on Mars. Or living under a rock/hiding behind your sofa. In an unexpected turn of events, Donald Trump was elected as the 45th President of the United States of America.

And irrespective of your thoughts on both the campaigns, and the ultimate result, it’s clear that there are changes coming. We have no idea what Trump’s first 100 days in office will look like, so much of what we’re seeing is still very much educated guesswork.

But should many of the agendas and policies from the campaign come to fruition, then procurement and supply chains, both domestically in the US, and globally, will be affected.

Automotive Indecision

A great deal of campaign rhetoric from the Trump camp came in the shape of American industry, and American jobs. The President-elect frequently stated he would look to remove the US from the North Atlantic Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) should he win the election.

If this were to happen, it could potentially boost the US’ ailing car industry. In the past year, 8 new manufacturing plants have been created in Mexico, having been moved from the US for lower wages. Included in this number is Ford, who moved all small car production from Michigan to Mexico in September.

If Trump were to end US involvement in NAFTA, these car manufacturers would be just a few of the organisations with a big decision on their hands. Should they manufacture abroad and risk rising import costs? Or return operations to the US heartlands, and pay considerably higher wages?

However, though it’s easy for America to withdraw from NAFTA, it’s unclear what tariffs would be placed on imported goods. Beyond this, it’s likely to result in higher prices for American consumers (and buyers too), without any guarantee that jobs would return to the US either.

From a global supply chain point of view, it wouldn’t create much change. Mexico will remain an attractive proposition for non-US companies, such as Audi, BMW, and Toyota, none of whom are subject to NAFTA. So concerns the Mexican economy will collapse are unlikely to be realised.

Great Big Business Benefits

However, some big businesses and industries would stand to gain significantly from a Trump presidency. In the days following the election, shares in Oil and Gas companies shot up, following Trump’s pledge to make the US energy independent.

This would mean great exploration of the US mainland, and potentially relaxation of environmental policies put in place by President Obama. This would in turn impact procurement, who would have to bear in mind any changes in longer-term contracts.

Another group to benefit could be the Defence sector. There is likely to be great investment in defence in America, which may in turn move other countries to do likewise. Increased spending could free up previously-stalled projects, and kick off new projects benefitting both procurement and suppliers.

Finally, it’s fully anticipated that infrastructure procurement will be increased. With more money being promised to federal budgets, but greater efficiencies required, procurement will play a pivotal role in ensuring that funds are used wisely.

Investment Nerves

In the hours following the announcement of Trump’s victory, global markets dropped significantly. However, the drop, unlike Brexit, was a temporary one, with nearly every major market reporting an increase by close of trading.

Long-term, however, no-one is exactly sure what will happen. As one media source put it, “Investors are in wait and see mode”. This is likely to continue until the middle of 2017 at least, when formal policies will become much clearer.

strong anti-globalisation message resonated through the Trump campaign, and there are concerns that major investments will be hedged until such times that investors are clearer on what the outcomes might be.

Countries like India have traditionally relied on US investment. Any major policy changes could in turn impact significantly on the linked global supply chain. Whichever way it happens, organisations at least have a while to prepare, with President Trump due to take office on the 20th of January 2017.

What do you make of the procurement implications of the election? How major do you think the changes will be? Let us know in the comments below (procurement/business only, no political views please!).

It’s not been easy with news cycles dominated by other events, but we’ve found some great headlines this week.

GM to Cut Production Shifts in US

  • General Motors are to cut production shifts and lay off 2,000 workers at car assembly plants in Ohio and Michigan.
  • The move comes amid falling demand for passenger cars, and shifting consumer trends.
  • GM is the latest in a series of auto makers taking steps to deal with softer retail sales.
  • Earlier this year, GM announced plans to invest up to $691 million to build new plants and expand current ones in Mexico.

Read more at the Wall Street Journal

Burberry Cuts Product Lines

  • UK luxury retailer, Burberry, is to cut the range of products it offers by between 15 and 20 per cent.
  • The company reported a 40 per cent drop in first-half profits, blaming rising costs for the fall.
  • Pretax profit for the first six months of 2016 was £72 million, compared with £119.5 million in 2015.
  • The company has recently written down a number of assets, as well as incurring major costs for restructuring plans.

Read more at Market Watch

Rio Tinto Suspends Executive Over Alleged Payments

  • Rio Tinto has suspended a senior member of staff following an inquiry into a $10.5m payment made to a consultant on a mining project in West Africa.
  • The company launched an investigation in August 2016 after email correspondence from 2011 was found.
  • The emails showed “contractual payments” made to a consultant providing “advisory services” on the Simandou scheme in Guinea.
  • Rio Tinto has also announced that its selling its stake in the Simandou scheme to another project stakeholder.

Read more at Supply Management

Review Called After Contract Dispute Payout

  • Calls for an urgent review have been made after new details emerged about a £1.25m compensation payment following a contract dispute.
  • Legal proceedings were brought by Triumph Furniture after it challenged a contract awarded to a rival.
  • It has now emerged the Welsh Government was alleged by the bidder to have breached EU rules.
  • The Welsh Government said it was taking the issue “extremely seriously”.

Read more on The BBC

Read All About It! Procurious Pioneering Conversations in the News

Wherever you look, procurement is in the news. And Procurious is helping to drive this by pioneering conversations in the media. So come, read all about it!

In the News

Here at Procurious, our goal is always to help our community advance. We do this by sharing effective strategies and fresh insights on the latest hot button news, trends, and events shaping the procurement and supply chain profession.

Of course, we do so daily on our platform. But we’re also working to really extend our value in the news media by sharing information that procurement needs on a day-to-day basis.

All this helps to grow awareness of not only the Procurious community, but also the procurement profession as a whole. We don’t want to limit ourselves to just talking procurement. We want people to know the procurement perspective on all the major events happening around the world now.

Here are just some of the topics our founder Tania Seary, and the Procurious team, have been commenting on recently.

Showing the Value of Your Profession

As the conversation around procurement grows online, and CPOs increasingly command a seat in the boardroom, it’s more important than ever for procurement professionals to be bold and share information that demonstrates the value that procurement brings to an organisation.

That could be something as simple as using positive words and imagery in discussions online. Or as complex as a CPO defining value metrics around a key business issue. These conversations can help draw a direct, positive link between what procurement are doing, and what the C-suite is concerned about.

Having the Courage to Drive Global Change

The procurement profession is being challenged to recalibrate its thinking and skills around new realities facing our world.

To add the most value to their organisations, leaders must be agile enough to handle unexpected global events like Brexit; master futuristic technology such as cognitive procurement; turn innovations like 3-D printing into business opportunities, and more.

Today’s procurement professionals must be willing to take new risks to tackle these challenges together. This can happen through social collaboration and online conversations with their teams and stakeholders. None of us can go it alone! By tapping into the broader procurement community, we can summon the courage we need to drive global change.

Winning the War for Talent

The supply chain has grown increasingly complex and global. With this comes more demand for workers who have greater technical skills to tackle these changes head on.

Procurement needs professionals who can specialise in one area, but also understand the broader businesses issues and can have conversations with stakeholders.

The true test for organisations is ultimately attracting those individuals, which comes down to having a responsive and engaging presence on social media.

Stay Tuned for More News!

As a profession, we need to stay dedicated to educating people outside of our community on what procurement is all about.

Stay tuned for additional “New and Noteworthy” blogs to hear more about some of the hot news topics and conversations we’re having, to help our profession and community thrive in this changing world.