Tag Archives: IBM Watson

6 Sure-Fire Ways To Become A Head Of Supply Chain

We explore six ways that can guarantee you that dream head of supply chain management job…

head of supply chain
By fizkes/ Shutterstock

Firstly, take time to find out what the job is really about. At its simplest level in manufacturing, for example, it means leading the sourcing and procurement of direct and indirect materials from suppliers, production, warehousing, transport and the distribution to the customer and/or end consumer.

A simple supply chain

Secondly, jobs may not even have similar titles: it could be Executive Vice President of Global Supply Chain, Supply Chain Director or just Head of Supply Chain. The job content differs widely across industries so no two jobs at this level are the same.  There is no one definitive job description.

Whatever the title, the Head of Supply Chain is responsible for integrating and optimising all the processes that are involved in every stage of getting a product or service to a customer. If your desired role is in an industry such as agriculture, healthcare, or I.T and telecommunications, there are other considerations including security, waste, safety, managing returns and many other different risks. 

In reality, it has become much more complex. It may rather look like this.

Let’s look at the 6 ways that can get you that dream job.

There is no substitute for experience

Prospective or current supply chain managers that aspire to reach the top job in supply chain should acquire in-depth working experience in at least one of the functional areas within supply chain.  Heads of Supply Chain, in the list of the top 25 leading global supply chains as identified by Gartner in 2019, have all got extensive and relevant work experience, usually in their industry sector.

In fast-moving-consumer-goods (FMCG), global leaders also need expertise in distribution technologies, emerging markets and sustainability.  For example, Sandra MacQuillan, the Executive Vice President, Integrated Supply Chain at Mondelez International, has “a wealth of international expertise in sustainable supply chain and technology strategy, with vast experience in packaged goods at global companies where she has built world-class supply chain capabilities,” according to the CEO.

Get an educational qualification   

The competition for the top jobs is tough, without a recognised qualification it is almost impossible to get hired. An exception may be where the candidate has a spectacular skill in a tight niche where there are no other suitable applicants, but this is rare.   

The most common route into supply chain management is to take a foundation business, finance or engineering degree, and then an advanced diploma or certification in an area such as logistics or procurement within supply chain management.

Demonstrate the required technical skills

As a leader, it may not be necessary to be an expert on all the technical skills that exist in your teams, but some level of proficiency in most of these will provide you with a certain level of respect. 

  • Knowledge of the raw materials, manufacturing processes and distribution methods in your business
  • An understanding of business and management principles and strategic planning
  • Well-developed analytical skills and attention to detail
  • Knowledge of economic and accounting principles, ERP/MRP systems, forecasting, and budgeting

Show your ability to lead others and drive change

Building relationships and influencing others are fundamental to the role.

Change management is ultimately about people and your capability to guide them in a particular direction.  Some of the elements that lead to success in leading a team are:

  • An open and participative style when collaborating with influential stakeholders and their teams
  • Well-developed verbal and written communication skills and the sense to know when and how to use which channel 
  • Ability to work in a fast-paced dynamic environment while keeping calm under pressure
  • Solving problems based on available information
  • Dealing with ambiguity while providing positive outcomes and minimising risks.

A leader will spend a fair portion of their time on employee competency development, building capacity and understanding what people need to perform well.

Keep up with the program!

Because the role is essentially process driven you should be comfortable when implementing new technological solutions. Digital technologies are inserting themselves all over the supply chain from data analytics and e-sourcing through to automated picking and drone deliveries.

The implementation of digital solutions is redefining supply chain operations at leading companies such as BASF, Cisco, Intel, Johnson & Johnson, BMW and many others. As Head of Supply Chain you may not need to be head geek, but you will need to understand the basics of the various applications of each type of technology and be alert to trends. 

Have a global view with a local focus

The head of supply chain often has global responsibilities that entail maintaining supplier relationships across continents and cultures. Understanding these complexities is essential in supply chain planning and its execution. 

It is becoming increasingly important for supply chain leaders to have had global business exposure, either from working in virtual teams or preferably having completed international assignments.

David Cutter, as President, Global Supply & Procurement, for Diageo, a major supplier of alcohol beverages, is responsible for a world-class supply chain delivering their brands to over 180 markets around the world from over 100 production facilities located in some 30+ countries.  

Leading firms are looking for those people with process-driven experience, often in similar size companies, attained from outside their home country.   

There is no one accepted preferred career path or basket of skills that you need to become the head of a supply chain.  However, you will need to be able to apply modern methodologies and solutions to a wide range of responsibilities across the entire supply chain. 

If you’d like to read additional related content or get involved with thought provoking discussions check out the Supply Chain Pros group – a one stop shop for all your supply chain needs.

Supply Chain Pros: Could AI Save Your Day Job?

Supply chain leaders know AI is a game-changer, a technology that will allow them to optimise their supply chain for competitive advantage. But just how much will it impact your profession?

Shutterstock

Today, business leaders are looking to their supply chains to create differentiation and they recognise that data is a key driver. Having said that, only a small fraction of supply chain data is effectively used, and most companies are virtually blind to data that is unstructured – for instance, from social, weather and IoT sources. With limited visibility it’s difficult to optimize supply chain operations, leaving the business exposed to unnecessary disruptions, delays and risks, as well as increased costs. In fact, 87 per cent of Chief Supply Chain Officers say it is extremely difficult to predict and manage disruptions.

Supply chain leaders know AI is a game-changer, a technology that will allow them to optimise their supply chain for competitive advantage. They understand and have relied on descriptive analytics – using massive volumes of data within the enterprise to understand better what has happened in the past and what is happening today. They’re now ready to explore how to use AI to see beyond the four walls of their business; understand how potential disruptions in the environment could impact the supply chain; and act quickly to seize opportunities or mitigate risk.

A new era of AI in the supply chain

Already, AI capabilities in IBM Watson Supply Chain Solutions are moving from descriptive analytics to predictive insights. We’re helping clients look ahead of supply chain events and see likely delays, demand spikes, supply changes and stockouts with new capabilities, such as anomaly detection in supply chain processes and leveraging conversational analytics for response management. Going even further, we are showing clients the power of prescriptive analytics, where Watson evaluates several dynamic parameters associated with a supply chain scenario and in near real time suggests the best actions and can even automatically create supply chain playbooks.

But this is not the end of the journey. We are also creating a plan where Watson adapts on its own, learning what matters to you and developing the capability to show you where to focus your attention to mitigate disruptions and take advantage of opportunities.

Here are some new capabilities available today (and some that are still to come!) :

  • Expanding data sources for Watson – IBM Supply Chain Insights allows us to add new data sources specific to each client’s challenges in as little as five weeks, accelerating the content that Watson draws from to gain intelligence, from basic ontology and supply chain terminology to weather and now many more external data sources. 
  • Anomaly detection – This new capability in IBM Business Transaction Intelligence for Supply Chain Business Network tracks supply chain transactions, spots anomalies and provides early warning signals so you can discover potential problems and take corrective action sooner. 
  • Optimising order and response management – IBM Order Management software uses AI to select the best location to fulfill an order, adjust availability promises and safety stock levels, and empower customer service reps to make more informed decisions and answer questions with greater accuracy and speed.
  • What’s next for AI – In the future, Watson Supply Chain capabilities will include predicting supply chain cycle times, to new frontiers where Watson adapts to your supply chain and users and learns about trends, issues, actions and behaviors to make recommendations. 

Could AI save your day job?

On 30th April I’ll be taking part in a new Procurious webinar: “How AI Saved My Day Job – Confessions from a Supply Chain Pro.” We’ll be exploring the real-life applications of AI in workplaces today and the problems it can solve for supply chain professionals.

How AI Saved My Day Job – Confessions from a Supply Chain Pro will go-live on 30th April 2019. Sign up here (it’s free) to join the Supply Chain Pros group on Procurious and gain access to this webinar.

A Supply Chain That Never Forgets

How do you retain knowledge and talent and how do you ensure your supply chain team doesn’t forget key information?  Imagine having a supply chain that never forgets…

By Kletr/ Shutterstock

At last month’s CPO roundtable in London we discussed the importance of improving diversity and inclusion in the workplace, how to nail your next big career move and how AI is enabling supply chain professionals to add greater value to their organisations.

At this point, supply chain and procurement professionals might be getting a bit impatient with AI. We’ve all heard how this technology is poised to revolutionise the supply chain, but day to day you’re not working in R&D; you’re responsible for P&L. You need the insight across the business and with your suppliers – but don’t have a technical degree.  The obvious question you might be asking yourself is – what’s in it for me and the bottom-line performance of my business?

Roger Needham, IBM Supply Chain Consultant, led an insightful discussion on why AI does matter to supply chain and procurement professionals.

IBM’s $2.47 billion supply chain consists of a 12,000-strong supplier base across 100 countries with 150,000 contracts managed. It’s no mean feat managing the risks associated with such a large-scale operation. So when it comes to AI, Roger argues, it’s not a theoretical concept. “AI has been deployed in IBM’s supply chain over four years and it is delivering real bottom line benefit.”

“What led to AI being directly implemented within our supply chain centered around the trade lane and visible logistics elements and how these impacted the supply chain. You can set up a factory perfectly but if you can’t get the materials you need to it then it’s a completely wasted effort.”

“After a Japanese tsunami disrupted our supply lanes in 2011, we asked ourselves how to get better predictive insights of real world supply chain disruptors. IBM Watson Supply Chain is the result.” AI can help manage unforeseen disruptions by alerting key decision makers and working towards solutions.

In Roger’s experience AI can supply chain teams to learn on a daily basis and to do more with less. From concept to final delivery the platform is developing but as a minimum we have to be able to do more with the same. With AI We don’t need to hire three more people, we can do more with the five we already have. And we are learning every day how to deploy this AI into our supply chain.”

Roger outlined the four pillars of Watson Supply Chain.

  1. Identify and alert – Control towers are able to alert supply chain professionals when something goes wrong
  2. Analyse and understand – Watson is able to analyse the impact of a disruption on the business. How many orders will be affected by a tsunami in Japan and what is the value of those orders? A supply chain that can feedback that critical business data is important.
  3. Interact, Collaborate, Resolve – If there’s a challenge that needs solving, Watson can bring all the relevant people into a virtual room and resolve it quickly, also advising who should be in that room.
  4. Learn and Share – How do you retain knowledge and talent and how do you ensure your supply chain team doesn’t forget things?  If your team encounter a problem that has happened before – you won’t know to resolve it if those involved the first time around have now left the business. You’re effectively starting from scratch. Watson, on the other hand, is like an elephant – it never forgets.

“Human and machine always get a better answer than human alone or machine alone” Ginni Rometty, THINK 2018

“Watson gives the information, and the ultimate decision rests with a human being,” explains Roger. “But an issue is solved with two individuals and three email exchanges with Watson advising versus three weeks to resolve with fifteen people and dozens of emails.”

Putting the D in D and I

In today’s workforce, diversity has become a buzzword, with organisations increasingly communicating its importance through their advertising and core business values.

But what does diversity mean, why is it important, how do you achieve it and, once you have it, what do you do with it?

Joelle Payom, Global Strategic Sourcing & Vendor Management Lead explained that there is an enormous pressure for organisations to hire people that are different. But alongside that moral pressure to ‘do the right thing’ is a very strong business case.

“A UK report revealed that the British economy could be boosted by as much as £24 billion if black and minority talent was fully utilised. When you have a diversified workforce you have a broader [talent pool] who are able to bring different ways of working, different ways of dealing with issues and can provide greater innovation.”

As Joelle points out, there is no point in building a diverse workforce if it is not nurtured into being an inclusive one. “To reap the benefits of a diverse workforce it’s vital to have an inclusive environment where everyone is treated equally, feels welcome to participate and can achieve their potential”

Diversity = The What 

A mix of diverse types of people

Inclusion = The How

The strategies and behaviours that welcome, embrace and create value from diversity

“What I want people to take away is that diversity and inclusion (D & I) is not only for women or for people of different ethnicities or sexual orientation. It is for everybody. D & I, which is much more important than diversity, means that we need to provide each human being with equal treatment in the corporate world. By having an inclusive corporate environment for people we can make a change and improve the way society works.”

Being a business leader

Lucy Harding, Partner and Global Head of Practice, Procurement and Supply Chain at Odgers Berndtson led a discussion on what it takes to get to the top and the qualities that will set you apart from the pack when aiming for the C-Suite.

She advises that ambitious procurement and supply chain professionals put the business first and the function second.

“The biggest reason CFOs go to market [for a CPO or Head of Supply Chain] is because they need a business leader, not a function leader.”

They will assume you can do the mechanics of a procurement or supply chain role and will spend far less time testing these specifics, particularly given that most CFOs aren’t in a position to test technical procurement and supply chain competence. “You should know your stuff and they’ll assume that.”

What a hiring CFO really wants to know is how you’ll apply what you know to their business and how you’ll build a talented team below you. Everyone else on the shortlist will equally qualified, from a procurement and supply chain perspective, so it’s about differentiating yourself.

Lucy highlighted a further four crucial capabilities for a prospective CPO or Head of Supply Chain

  • Breath of experience – function and broader business
  • Leadership
  • Learning agility
  • Embrace technology and innovation

IBM Watson Supply Chain sponsored Procurious’ London CPO roundtable on 13th February. 

To request an invitation contact Olga Luscombe. If you’d like to read additional related content or get involved with thought provoking discussions check out the Supply Chain Pros group – a one stop shop for all your supply chain needs

The Making of a Supply Chain Leader

What are the key skills  supply chain professionals should be developing in an AI-enabled future?

Ekaterina_Minaeva / Shutterstock

“I’m a great believer in great passion,” says Ron Castro, Vice President, IBM Supply Chain. And it’s just as well given that Ron is responsible for all strategy, execution, and transformation of IBM’s US$70Bn global end-to-end supply chain, delivering to clients across more than 170 countries.

“Always be as bold and as fast as you can,” he says. “I’ve never looked back in a transformation and thought ‘Darn it! I wish I had gone slower.’ There’s always room to be bolder and to go faster.”

On Day Two of Career Boot Camp, Ron speaks to us about the greatest challenges and complexities of his role, the importance of leadership, and the key skills that supply chain professionals should be developing in an AI-enabled future.

Building a cognitive supply chain

“We’re at a point when new technologies are truly enabling us to take advantage of all kinds of data and giving us actionable insights close to real time,” Ron says.

“In our case, it all started several years ago when we built our transparent supply chain across [all] processes and systems, which gave us an excellent platform to apply advanced analytics and manage our business by exceptions. We set a very clear goal to become the first cognitive supply chain. This is based on our strong belief that with machine and human interaction we can truly augment supply chain professionals’ daily decision-making,” he says.

Ron points to several emerging technologies that provide incredible opportunity – AI (Watson, in IBM’s case), machine learning, blockchain, the Internet of Things, virtual reality, and 3D printing.

“Humans and machines always get a better answer than machine alone or human alone. With that principal we’re training Watson with our best supply chain experts [and] letting it observe our decision-making in digital resolution rooms,” Ron says. “Watson is learning in real time with us so it can help us to identify risks, predict issues and, as a trusted advisor, suggest our best course of action. How were similar problems tackled in the past? What are the risks or alternatives? Who should be involved or advise us on what actions we should be taking to manage the situation better and faster?”

“As we map the future of our supply chain it is crystal clear that we are getting the most value of our capabilities as we start to stack technologies together,” he says.

The challenge that’s keeping supply chain leaders up at night

“I have the pleasure of leading one of the most talented supply chain teams in the world,” Ron says. “I really love the adrenaline and all the variables that you need to be able to optimise it and the challenge of ensuring the right balance between demand and supply while [delivering] the highest quality and [focusing] on managing revenue cost.

“We are sensing and responding fast in the most intelligent way to any changes in the supply and demand equation, whether it be the introduction of new products, reacting to a natural disaster, geopolitical issues or supplier constraints,” he says.

But Ron also acknowledges that the tech industry is changing by the minute.

“[T]he challenge that keeps me up at night is are we transforming, are we moving fast enough and, more importantly, are we giving our team the tools they need to be successful?” he asks. “At the end of the day [are we building] an organisational culture that’s primed to leverage new technologies, unleash innovation, and challenge the status quo? Do we truly have the skills for the future?”

The making of a supply chain leader

 Ron always sees the need for strong leaders. “Some of the fundamentals [of leadership] don’t change; passion, perseverance, global and holistic thinking, collaboration and the value of diversity, [and] building a culture of feedback and continuous improvement,” he says.

Ron believes all these factors, indicative of a high-performance culture, will become even more critical in an AI-enabled future.

“We need leaders that take risks and drive a clear vision around digital supply chain and the need to be innovators; leaders that value experimentation over perfection [and] are willing to try new things and correct fast as needed,” he says.

Ron believes that leaders need a deep understanding of technology and where the trends are heading.“Disruptions are coming and they will hit us faster than ever so the ability to react becomes essential,” he says.

Ron advises aspiring supply chain professionals to take a step back and ensure that they are holistic, global, and horizontal thinkers. He encourages them to embrace new ways of working and collaborating with one another in order to become agile thinkers.

“In this new world the basics of supply chain are still critical so you can optimise a supply chain holistically from an end-to-end perspective. But you also need to be technically savvy,” he says. “The machine-human interaction will continue to increase and all these technologies will continue to become even more critical in supply chain.”

Data scientists will also be highly valuable, Ron says, as the ability to gather insights and ask the right questions will become critical for supply chain professionals.

Ron Castro is speaking on Day Two of Career Boot Camp 2018. Sign up here (it’s free) to listen to his podcast now.

Your Supply Chain Career: Accelerated

What do supply chain leaders predict for the future of the profession and how do you ensure you’re prepared seize the opportunities and get the most out of your career?

What is the biggest mistake supply chain professionals make?

What are the five key skills you need to make it to the top?

How should supply chain leaders embark on a major transformation?

Will the profession evolve in the coming years in preparation for an AI-enabled world?

We’ll answer all of these questions and more when Career Boot Camp 2018 kicks off at the beginning of October.

This year’s series, Your Supply Chain Career: Accelerated, has been designed to help you sprint outside of your comfort zone and get into the best career shape of your life!

Featuring tips and tricks from some of the best in the business we’ll be discussing how to make it as a Head of Supply Chain, the true value of professional certifications, how to persevere in the face of adversity and what the future holds for the profession.

Sign up here ahead of our launch on October 1st.

FAQs

What is the Procurious Career Boot Camp ?

Procurious’ Career Boot Camp, sponsored by IBM, is a global professional development event for supply chain professionals. The series, features five, fifteen-minute podcasts that have been designed to help you get into the best career shape of your life.

How do I listen to the Career Boot Camp podcasts?

Simply sign up here and you’ll be re-directed to the Supply Chain Pros group where you can access all five podcasts. You will also join a mailing list, which will alert you each time a new podcast is released.

How will I know when each podcast is published?

The series will run for one week, starting on October 1st, with a daily podcast released on Procurious each day. We’ll drop you an email to let you know as each podcast becomes available.

Is the podcast series available to anyone?

Absolutely! Anyone & everyone can access the podcasts and it won’t cost you a penny to do so. Simply sign up here!

When does Career Boot Camp take place?

Starting on the 1st October, Career Boot Camp will run for five days. The podcasts will be accompanied by daily blogs from our Supply Chain Career Coaches plus group discussions and articles on Procurious. When the series is complete, all five podcasts will be available for registrants via the Procurious eLearning hub, FREE of charge.

Why should I do Career Boot Camp every day?

Dedicating 15 minutes a day to developing and progressing your supply chain career can make the difference between standing still, or sprinting quickly into more impactful roles. At Procurious, we firmly believe that daily procurement learning is essential for career advancement. And Career Boot Camp will help you get into the habit!

Speakers

Rick Blasgen, CEO & President – CSCMP

Rick D. Blasgen has been the president and chief executive officer of the Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals (CSCMP) in Lombard, Illinois, USA since 2005.

Rick Blasgen has responsibility for the overall business operations and strategic plan of the organisation. His efforts support CSCMP’s mission of leading the supply chain management profession through the development and dissemination of supply chain education and research

Ron Castro , Vice President – IBM Supply Chain

IBM Supply Chain Vice President leading a remarkable team through the digital and cognitive journey to an end to end AI-enabled supply chain. Driving adoption of cutting-edge technology and applications inside and outside of the manufacturing walls.

Chris Crozier, Chief Digital Officer – Orica

Chris Crozier is the Chief Digital Officer for Orica International, the world’s largest manufacturer and supplier of explosives for mining and civil construction. In this capacity, Chris’ digital teams supports the global footprint of the organisation across Business, Customer and Manufacturing systems, including governance of Orica’s digital ecosystems, architecture, data and cyber posture. Prior to this, he has held executive roles within Orica as Global Vice President Supply Chain, and BHP Billiton.

Tom Evans, UK Ultramarathon Runner

Tom Evans is a 26 year old professional Trail Runner and Red Bull athlete. In 2017 he discovered ultra running and finished 3rd in the famous Marathon des Sables, which was his first ultra marathon. Since then, he has become a full time athlete. He finished 3rd in the Trail running world championships while representing Team GB. He has recently won the CCC – one of the most prestigious 100km mountain races”

Samantha Gash, Australian Ultramarathon Runner

Samantha Gash, as a World Vision Ambassador, ran 3253 km in 76 days across India, raising over $150,000 to fund education programs. Her other achievements include a 1968km expedition run along South Africa’s Freedom Trail and four 250km desert ultramarathons as part of the Racing the Planet – Four Deserts Grand Slam.

Laura Faulkner, Director Supply Chain Management – Nationwide Building Society 

After graduating from Strathclyde University with a BSc in Technology & Business, Laura joined Polaroid as a Graduate Buyer. Laura then spent time with GSK and Ernst & Young before taking a role with RBS that led to her being appointed CPO in 2014.

Laura is now CPO and Director of Supply Chain Management (SCM) at Nationwide Building Society where she has brought together Procurement, Property Services, Third Party Risk, Vendor Management, Accounts Payable and Offshore Operations.

SCM’skey focus is to maximise the value of 3rd Party Relationships across the Society, leading the Supply Chain Strategy to drive efficient, resilient and innovative solutions for the benefit of all Nationwide Members.

Career Boot Camp, Your Supply Chain Career: Accelerated kicks off on October 1st 2018. Sign up here (it’s FREE!)

Team Comes First in IBM CPO’s Roadmap To Success

What would you do after all of the low-hanging fruit in procurement has disappeared?

Here’s a quick quiz:

What would you do if you became the CPO of a procurement function that is a top-quartile performer and already highly mature?

  • Keep things as they are – if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.
  • Make small, incremental improvements, being careful not to change anything significantly.
  • Roll your sleeves up and transform the function from top-quartile performer to a world-class organisation.

Bob Murphy was faced with this choice back in 2014 when he first took on the role of IBM CPO. In many ways, inheriting a highly-mature procurement function is more of a challenge than stepping into a low-maturity team. For Bob, the low-hanging fruit had all been picked: the team had already undergone a significant transformation, it was recognised internally and externally for its high level of excellence, cost savings were at record levels, and supplier relationships and sourcing strategies were delivering results. Client engagement and interlock with business unit stakeholders was also maturing, while procurement was viewed as a key function enabling business unit objectives.

So, what was there left to do? Bob’s challenge – as well as his opportunity – was to take a high-functioning team that was delivering best-in-class outcomes and make them even better. He did this through unleashing his passion for the profession, leveraging 30+ years of procurement and supply chain experience to mobilise a global team of 3000 procurement professionals around a shared vision.

He developed a set of global, transformative initiatives and domain priorities that moved IBM from the front of the pack to a truly world-class outlier position. Today, IBM Procurement services have arrived at a status dreamt of by many CPOs – that of an essential trusted advisor to the business.

IBM’s secret recipe for success isn’t actually a secret – the roadmap established by Bob early in his tenure as CPO covers six key areas:

  1. Investment in talent and skills development
  2. Digital transformation through AI (Watson cognitive procurement), robotic process automation and Source-to-Pay transformation.
  3. Unlocking big data to drive informed, outcome-based decision making for IBM and its clients.
  4. Supercharged engagement through end-to-end ownership for deliverables and client-aligned squads, while satisfaction is captured using the Net Promoter Score.
  5. Deployment of Agile principles and self-empowerment across the entire team.
  6. Growth of supplier innovation as complex enterprise relationships mature.

Leadership recognition

It’s interesting to note that people and talent are at the very top of Bob’s list. To quote an article he wrote for Procurious, “I learned a long time ago that the key to success is having a great team. And there is a very human element to procurement. There will always be a need for people to handle the relationship management side of the function, with both suppliers and stakeholders and make the strategic decisions.”

Although he operates in a highly technical sphere, Bob stresses the importance of soft skills:

“When we think of the soft skills necessary for future success in the procurement industry, we focus on building closer stakeholder and supplier relationships. Broadening our communications skills, including active listening is a key enabler to both visibility to value proposition, but also in understanding our stakeholder requirements from their point of view. Another critical element is having better agility skills; think flexibility, adaptability and speed.”

Bob Murphy’s achievements in leadership were celebrated at the Procurement Leaders awards in May, where he picked up the prestigious 2018 Procurement Leader Award.

His first comment when interviewed after receiving the accolade? “This award is about my team.”

4 Reasons Why Your Organisation Isn’t Embracing Cognitive

In the battle for capital, how does procurement ensure its cognitive projects come out on top?

At last month’s London CPO roundtable; Amit Sharma, Global Procurement Practice Leader for Cognitive Process Services (CPS) –IBM led our attendees in a discussion on how procurement leaders can ensure their cognitive projects come out on top.

There is so much potential in cognitive technology to transform the role of procurement. It will allow professionals to do dynamic forecasting, telling you when to raise acquisition and awards contracts to a particular supplier based on a triage.

“For procurement, maintaining our relevance to the organisation beyond cost savings is imperative” said Amit.  “[Procurement pros] need to embed the latest in technology as best practise into the business as it will free up our time and help us to move from transactional to strategic management.”

“The logic is unquestionable.  We know the sophistication of AI is going to come. It’s a question of when, not if.”

But when it comes to making the leap to cognitive, which can do a world of good for analytical and predictive analysis, organisations are still hesitant.

Procurement needs to make the business case for how cognitive can add long-term value and, as Amit reminded us, “If you’re not convinced, you can’t convince someone else”

Throughout our discussion, four key reasons for an organisation’s reluctance to embrace cognitive tech became apparent.

1. Remaining skepticism at the value of cognitive

As Amit explained, cognitive technology like Watson can help procurement professionals to analyse reams of data. It would, for example, allow users to plot the price at which they are being charged for something by suppliers and analyse how the index has moved in past [x] years. Five years ago this process would have been extremely time consuming but with the index data, the system can quickly tell you exactly where you’ve been overcharged.

So it all sounds great. But in reality, business leaders are often skeptical about the actual cost savings brought about by this kind of analysis.

Do you genuinely make better decisions in the long term by having so much data at your fingertips? Or can you have just as much success through effective negotiations with your suppliers?

Amit’s response to this “If you’re not doing spend compliance – you don’t know if you’re compliant. If you’re not analysing this data, you don’t know the potential cost savings.”

“I spoke to a CPO who thought their processes were good. [But it was discovered that] there was a 40 per cent unit price difference across the company in the same category, simply because the left hand doesn’t know what the right hand is doing!”

2.  Spend within organisations is fragmented

One key problem for procurement, when it comes to implementing cognitive technology, is that the CPO doesn’t always have the authority to drive transformation. Perhaps they are reporting to a CFO who doesn’t see value in cognitive tech or the spend might simply be too fragmented across the business. When it depends on lots of other people, procurement are unable to drive change effectively.

As one of our roundtable attendees pointed out “there are organisations I know who can’t justify the need to implement Ariba to their CFO- let alone cognitive technology!”

3. Trouble looking at the bigger picture

Several of our roundtable attendees cited short-termism as a key reason for their organisation’s lack of cognitive adoption. “The mistake we make is that we look at opps in a tactical way and not at the bigger picture,” said one CPO.

“For example, we know that there will be headcount reduction in the coming years and we will benefit hugely from cognitive tech, but articulating that at a hollistic level to the CFO and explaining it as a 5-year journey is the challenge”

4. Confusion about AI

Remarkably, one of the biggest challenges remaining around  the uptake of cognitive technology is a universal lack of understanding of what it actually is and the distinctions between different terms.

“You can start talking to a group about AI and within a few minutes people are talking about blockchain, as if the two are interchangeable,” said one of our attendees. “People need to have a clearer understanding of the buzzwords ; AI, blockchain cognitive etc.”

Of course, there are people who know a little and people who know a lot. And that’s a challenge in itself.

Read more here on the insightful discussions had at our London CPO roundtable. 

“Wat the?” 5 things I learnt about Watson Supply Chain in Vegas

Rather than adopting the “what happens in Vegas, stays in Vegas” mantra, I wanted to share some new insights into Watson that I gleaned at IBM’s mega thought leadership event – Think 2018.

1. Watson needs education – but it’s a fast learner!

When you think of Watson, you probably think of a computer that can win Jeopardy and has a PhD in a whole lot of things…but in reality, when Watson enters a new profession, it is like a child that needs to learn.

As humans, we learn from birth and can only pass on that knowledge to someone who in turn spends time learning.  AI, like Watson, is similar. It learns by gathering information (i.e. data) and interacting with humans.

You could liken Watson Supply Chain today to a  5th-grader, but its rate of growth is so exponential that it will have a Master’s Degree in Supply Chain within the next three months.

How? Because IBM’s own supply chain practitioners are training it daily by feeding their US$30Bn spend through Watson, pushing through millions of documents, data elements and hundreds of real life supply chain challenges that are resolved each day in the Watson Resolution room. Last year, Watson supported $71.7 billion in revenue, managed 150,000 contracts, and supported 20,000 professionals and 11,000 suppliers to ensure 5,000,000 deliveries were made.

With every insightful response and interaction, Watson is getting smarter. The more Watson is used, the more knowledgeable and insightful it becomes.

I first met Watson at the Gartner Supply Chain Executive conference in London last year. Catching up six months later at Think 2018 in Vegas… even I could see the growth.  Watson is now answering supply chain questions in natural language (plain English), and can curate what is most critical for you to pay attention to – alerting you to an impending disruption, immediately assessing the financial impact of the disruption and will help you drill down effectively to understanding what the issues are that you want your team to resolve, and quickly. Watson does this through opening a resolution room, quickly providing answers that typically reside in different system which reducing the time needed to write emails, make phone calls and follow-ups.

The team at IBM told me that their own implementation of Watson has seen disruption mitigation time reduced from days down to hours – or even minutes in some cases – which is critical when you’re moving inventory in the millions of dollars.

“Watson is brand new every day.  Every time you go away, it grows and becomes more interesting, because it is constantly learning.  You come into the office and there will be a new API. Watson doesn’t take a day off, it is adding knowledge and features 24/7/365.”

Watson Supply Chain Program Director, Rob Allan.

2. Watson Supply Chain is helping save lives

… literally. One of the first user test cases for Watson is a global philanthropic organisation working to improve vaccine distribution in Kenya. Local African pharmacies battle constant low stock of critical medical supplies due to lack of inventory and poor visibility across the supply chain.

It is still early days, but the IBM team is really motivated and engaged with this important humanitarian project. I caught up with IBM Watson Supply Chain’s Program Director Rob Allan, who was energised after a recent visit to Kenya. “It’s great to be putting Watson to work on such a worthwhile project. In Africa, it’s not uncommon for a mother to walk half a day to get medicines, with no guarantee that she will be able to secure what she needs. Our program will deliver vaccines and supplies to more than 4,000 delivery points in Africa. This should make a huge difference to access much needed healthcare. We really hope we can make an impact.”

3. The proof is in the pudding.

 Leading companies, like Lenovo, have started mapping their thinking supply chain journey with Watson…but the biggest proof of concept is IBM itself who has been using Watson to manage its multi-billion dollar global supply chain for the last 18 months.

We all know that necessity is the mother of invention and this was certainly the case for the creation of this product. You may not know that it was actually IBM’s internal supply chain team that created Watson Supply Chain Insights.

If you listen to this webinar, you will learn that IBM’s VP Supply Chain at that time, Joanne Wright, had an “aha” moment back in 2011. A series of unthinkable events prompted Joanne to look for a solution. The Japanese Tsunami had wiped out components globally, volcanic eruptions in Iceland disrupted Nordic freight lines and floods in Thailand destroyed disc drive head production.

Joanne’s team struggled to get the right data and she dreamt of a day where she could get a smartphone alert prioritising supply chain failures, present the relevant data and even suggest solutions.

It wasn’t perfect at first. The team had to find and clean the data and learned that you must train Watson … that can’t be underestimated. They consulted the Watson Health cancer team and understood how to train Watson to talk supply chain.

It would seem that it was worth the effort, as it helped IBM’s Supply Chain save millions in inventory and freight costs, not to mention IBM reduced their supply chain data retrieval times by 75% using Watson – and helped build the technology that will drive supply chain into Industry 4.0.

4. It’s not a big a deal as you think!

From everything I have learned in the last 12 months, implementing Watson Supply Chain may not be as onerous as you think. In terms of time to implement, from London, Raleigh to Vegas I have asked numerous executives and they’re all convinced that they can overlay Watson on existing clients’ systems and have a meaningful dashboard up and running within a month.

5. Blockchain … coming soon.

Having been a Queen B2B in the late 90’s, I have long known the value of having common language and data for taking friction out of business transactions. That’s why I’m excited about blockchain. There’s certainly been a lot of hype, and, of course, the bitcoin currency part is totally out of control… but the idea of having a common ledger or “one version of the truth” for all B2B transactions, with the ability for business partners to get in and view the same information, is very appealing.

Watch this space! IBM previewed a new, blockchain-based offering called “Shared Ledgers” at Think.

Taking the plunge…

There’s definitely been a lot of hype about Watson, but there are some real reasons to start your thinking supply chain journey, powered by AI.

In explaining why Lenovo took the plunge with Watson, Bobby Bernard said, “This space is evolving quickly.  We want to be an influencer about these new supply chain technologies.”

With most technology introductions, most organisations have been able to wait out the early adopters and jump on-board when the technology is mature and in widespread use.

But IBM is warning that this is not the case with AI. According to Watson Customer Engagement GM, Richard Hearn, “Everyday you’re not using AI is another day your competitor or upstart might be leveraging AI to learn, adapt and disrupt your market and you!”

Procurious Founder Tania Seary is an IBM Watson Customer Engagement Futurist and attended #think2018 as an #IBMPartner.

Procurement Leaders: Stop Talking About Headcount Reduction!

If you want your procurement teams to be more open to adopting cognitive solutions and less scared of them, stop talking about headcount!

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There are many factors that require careful consideration to bring about effective cognitive solutions.

It’s akin to conducting a group of musicians – it might be possible (easy even!) to attain a pleasant sound from a solo instrument… 

But, if expertly managed,  you could accomplish a symphony from the entire orchestra! 

This week, our podcast series will guide you through the five steps required to conduct a dazzling cognitive symphony. 

On Day 4 of Conducting A Cognitive Symphony Marco Romano – Procurement Chief Analytics Officer, Global Procurement, Transformation Technology, IBM talks on the common pitfalls in the adoption of cognitive solutions, the most impactful actions procurement pros can take to increase the speed of adoption and how to overcome the fear factor!

The Fear Factor

“How the leadership works with the teams to remove barriers (operational, physical and psychological) will ultimately have a huge influence on the rate and pace of adoption of cognitive and analytics solutions” explains Marco in his white paper. 

When it comes to the fear factor, “there is no doubt that there is a concern that rich insightful analytics will show opportunities that imply the practitioners have historically failed in their jobs.

“There is also no doubt that there is fear that cognitive solutions could replace some of the activities currently carried out by practitioners.”

One factor that causes this fear is the “poor messaging on why you want to commit these tools, and what the desired outcome is which creates fear and resistance, to adoption and change.”

How can organisations manage their employees fear to ensure the adoption of cognitive solutions isn’t impeded?

Stop talking about head count!

When procurement professionals look at something that brings new information and insights that haven’t been available before, it leads them to question a number of things:

  • Is it a challenge to what I’ve done before?
  • Is it a challenge to the accuracy of what I’ve done before?

and, ultimately:

  • Is this technology going to make what I do now redundant?

“Fear is something that we see. CPOs are constantly talking about robotics, automation, right?”

“And very often, I hear head count being brought into the discussion, Head count reduction being brought into the same discussion with cognitive analytics, and whilst that might be the eventual outcome, I think it’s a dangerous way to enter into the dialogue”

“If that is the primary driver, to reduce head count in the organisation, I find that very often that’s reflected in your metrics. It’s reflected in the behaviours. And in turn, it’s reflected in poor adoption, and resistance by practitioners.”

“You’re creating that fear of job security. And invariably, I find practitioners push back, and they’ll find they spend their time trying to justify why a tool won’t work for them.”

“To overcome this you need the right methods, but secondly, and very importantly, I think you need to provide practitioners with the road map on how to change, and sharpen their skills in this changing environment.”

Educate your teams

Procurement professionals need to have an understanding of the strategy and impacts new solutions will have.

You need to be able “to show the practitioners how the change benefits them, not just the enterprise” Marco explains.

“And this sounds really basic, but it is so important. [You need to be able to show them]  I’m going to help you spend less time on those lower value, tedious, time-consuming tasks, allowing you to focus on the higher value activities.  Most professional practitioners that I know, prefer to spend their time on those higher valued tasks -negotiating with suppliers, rather than crunching numbers”

That’s the first thing. But the second thing  is, providing them education and training, on this new data skill set. I think you very quickly erode that resistance. They see a path for them, within the enterprise, within the organisation, but you’ve given them a marketable skill, which in turn removes resistance and fear.

“I’m not talking here about turning practitioners into data scientists. I’m talking about arming them with knowledge about how they impact data, teaching them the art of the possible, with regards to how technology can help them to be more effective consumers of that data, and insights.”

Striving to conduct a cognitive symphony but in need of some expert guidance? Our podcast series runs throughout this week and will have your orchestrating cognitive success in no time! Register here.

I Don’t Have Time To Do Market Price Research

We’ve all experienced it – a niggling feeling that we could have gotten a lower price for a product or service … if only we’d done our research. But who has that sort of time?

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IBM’s CPO, Bob Murphy, is concerned that his peers around the globe aren’t getting a proper night’s rest.

“Chief Procurement Officers lose sleep at night worrying that their procurement teams are buying over market prices or that falling prices in a particular category of spending are not being rapidly achieved.”

Access to data on historical prices paid and current market conditions isn’t the problem. The data is out there, and readily available, but it takes time and resources to do the research, and it’s a never-ending task.

Monitoring the market is too big a job for a single person, which leaves our sleepless CPO with two options:

A) Carve out an entire team to do the research, or

B) Bring in Artificial Intelligence through a robot to augment the team capabilities.

And that’s what IBM has done. The procurement team collaborated with data scientists and developers to design a solution harnessing external data and analytics that provides users with market intelligence, historic IBM purchasing data, and market sentiment surrounding subcontractor services. IBM Watson Analytics partners with “PeopleTicker” to ingest real-time, external market intelligence providing a comprehensive view of global markets. By comparing historical data with current market information, buyers get an immediate view on the price difference that may be available, enabling new levels of cost competitiveness to be achieved.

The result is “Pricing IQ”, a product where millions of data points can be efficiently organised with interactive graphics and visually clear dashboards where useful trends and insights can be identified. This solution opens opportunities for live price negotiation via the use of advanced analytics – with significantly reduced manual workload for the buyer.

Alongside Watson Analytics, Watson’s Explorer and Alchemy software capture key words and provides sentiment analysis to indicate rising or falling markets. Additionally, PeopleTicker’s data is integrated within the “Pricing IQ” product enabling a seamless solution for our customers. “We have been using PeopleTicker internally now for over 2 years. As a client, they have provided us with over 10,000 global rates. What started as a client relationship has grown into a Watson Analytics partnership.”

Real time insights

If you’re hurtling down a freeway in a high-performance car, having a speedometer that only shows yesterday’s speed isn’t going to help you. That’s why access to genuinely real- time data is emerging as one of the key competitive advantages across procurement functions. The team that developed Pricing IQ recognised this, and have built in real-time alerts for action.

Take A Bow, Pricing IQ

You’ll be hearing a lot more about Pricing IQ, especially since the solution won the Most Innovative Use of Technology Award at the 2017 CIPS Supply Management Awards.

Like all good innovators, the IBM team identified a significant pain-point held in common by procurement teams across the globe, and came up with an idea that eases the burden.

So, the next time you’re manually wading through reams of pricing data and wondering to yourself if there’s a better way – be assured, there is.