Tag Archives: interview tips

Help! A Potential Employer Asked For My Facebook Password

You’re in the middle of a job interview when the recruiter shocks you by asking for your Facebook password, citing “company policy”. Do you: A) Meekly hand it over; B) Kick over your chair and storm out; or C) Politely but firmly refuse?

Have you ever been asked to hand over your social media details in a job interview? Don’t panic – it’s probably just a stress test.

Stress tests are designed to put you under pressure and see how you handle it. They range from grilling you about your weaknesses, to subjecting you to a barrage of quick-fire questions to try to fluster or catch you off-guard.

Heineken took this to the extreme in their viral recruitment video where interviewees are subjected to a range of stressful situations, including a creepy hand-holding interviewer who later feigns a heart attack. While it’s fun to watch, there’s a lesson here – in an age where candidates often give text-book answers to text-book interview questions, recruiters are looking for ways to separate the wheat from the chaff.

“We need your Facebook login details”

Your three potential reactions:

A) Meekly handing over your password: Wrong answer. This shows that firstly, you’re desperate for this job and secondly, you’re a pushover. Is this how you would behave when representing the company in a tough negotiation?

B) Anger: You’ve fallen into the trap. Even though it’s an outrageous demand, getting angry only demonstrates that you won’t be able to remain calm in the face of on-the-job pressure.

C) Politely but firmly refuse: Correct! You were on the lookout for a stress test, and you’ve identified this one as such. This takes the pressure off, allowing you to present a calm and logical response.

Unfortunately, that’s easy to say and hard to do!

How to say “no” politely 

  1. Call them out

If you’ve read the situation correctly, then you could simply respond by saying, “This is one of those stress-tests, right?”, and then launch into a detailed explanation of how you’re able to stay calm under pressure, with examples.

If they still insist, and genuinely appear to be demanding your Facebook login (and you still want this job), then you’ll need an excuse beyond the bare fact that you don’t want them seeing your drunken photos from the big party last weekend.

  1. Privacy

“I have an obligation to protect my friends’ privacy. They have their own privacy policies set on their accounts to safeguard themselves and their loved ones and that’s their right. If I start sharing their information with potential employers then I’ll have broken my trust with them.”

  1. Work/life

“For me, work and home are two separate things. I’m careful to keep work-related posts off my Facebook page, so it’s in no way relevant to any potential employers.”

  1. Direct to LinkedIn

“I think you mean LinkedIn? While I wouldn’t hand over my login details, I’d be happy to connect with you on LinkedIn so you can see how I present myself professionally on social media.”

  1. Show me yours and I’ll show you mine

This one’s a bit more provocative! “Absolutely fine – I think this is a great idea. I’d also like to see the type of team I’m joining, so if you can share your log-in details, along with your director’s and all the team members’ Facebook passwords, then I’d be happy to share mine.”

  1. Throw the question back at them

Whatever you decide to say, it’s vital you do so in a professional, calm and reasonable way. In a stress test, how you say it is more important than what you say. The interviewer will be judging your response, attitude and manner, but you can turn the tables by asking them to put themselves in your shoes.

For example:

  • “I’m sure you would agree …”
  • “I’m sure that if you were in my position…”
  • “From a privacy perspective, my friends wouldn’t be comfortable with me showing their information to people. I’m sure your friends and family would agree.”

Asking someone to put themselves in your position makes it almost impossible to be offended by a calm and rational argument.

In the end, keep in mind that there is no right answer to a stress-test question. It’s designed to judge how you react, so be confident in whichever answer you choose.

Are You Sitting Comfortably? Then I’ll Begin…

Treat your next interview like you’re telling a story. Make it engaging. Make it clear. But most of all, make it memorable.

tell a career story

Once upon a time in an office block not too far away, our hero/heroine walked into the most exciting and biggest interview of their career…

For me, a successful interview is like reading an enjoyable story. Stories “create “sticky” memories by attaching emotions to things that happen. That means leaders who can create and share good stories have a powerful advantage over others”(1).

I consistently advise people that I have represented to have their own story and message when attending an interview. An engaging and memorable story resonates with the reader; it holds our attention, keeps the pages turning and becomes memorable in the mind of the reader.

Here are a few points to think about.

The beginning of the story…AKA first impressions.

A great story has a strong start. So if you get an opening question like, “So, tell me about yourself?” or, “So, why are you interested in this role/company”, then start well. Through your opening 2-5 minutes, generate interest and attention in the mind of your ‘reader’.

Use language that feels right for your career story. I think it never hurts to describe things simply but effectively. Try to use words that add zest to your experience and motivations. Just try not to over complicate the ‘plot’.

Don’t lose your reader, keep those pages turning.

What is your message in your story?

Understand what the challenges of the role are, and what are the current and future demands on the organisation. Your recruiter and your own research will help you understand this.

Settle on your ultimate message, then you can figure out the best way to illustrate it at interview. Use your career story to invoke a clear connection between what value and experience you bring and how you can harness that experience for your new prospective Employer. Make the Interviewer want to know the story behind your career. Characterise yourself positively.

Be true to your IQ and that of your audience.

It would be foolish to underestimate your audience. Your interviewer is looking to hear information on your career experience that resonates with them.

They will want to understand you as a character and what you offer and stand for, so never dumb down your message or yourself. Make your story relevant and credible.

Maintain pace, select an appropriate momentum

I’ve heard on too many occasions from hiring managers that an Interviewee started amazingly well, then petered out after 20 minutes. 10 times out of 10, the hiring manager is terribly disappointed – ”Gee, they started so well, we thought we had found our perfect candidate!”.

Like any strong story, start well, maintain the plot, maintain clarity and consistency through each chapter (or job).

Don’t lose the reader, keep those pages turning.

To do this, you must be well prepared. You must have planned your storyline, organised and detailed all sub-plots, and all the characters in your career history. It has to remain relevant to your ultimate message.

A strong ending

Many an interview can lose its way with a fluffy and overly elaborate ending. Be concise and finish strongly. Be positive, perhaps even bold. Don’t fade out with a whimper.

Ask yourself, how many times have you commented on poor or lacklustre ending to a book that you have read. I bet you can remember how that ending made your feel years after reading it. I’ll even bet you never read, or recommended, that story to anyone again!

  1. Extract from the Harvard Business Review – ‘How To Tell A Great Story‘.

The Source is a specialist Procurement mid to senior and executive recruitment and search firm with national reach. We provide tailored contract and permanent recruitment solutions to leading organisations in the Australian market.

Stories from The Source – Part Two: Sanne Gruter

The Source Recruitment Consultant Sanne Gruter gives Hugo Britt her top tips for procurement professionals to excel in their next interview.  The Source Interview Tips

Read Part 1 of this series here.

In more ways than one, Sanne Gruter is the international face of The Source. As part of her portfolio she looks after the fast-growing international sourcing part of the business, reaching out to potential candidates in markets including the UK, China and Singapore. Sanne is also ‘international’ in that she hails from Holland, has a partner from Uruguay, and has found a fulfilling and exciting career here in Melbourne, Australia.

Sanne’s academic history is impressive – she holds a Bachelors degree in Applied Psychology, and an International Masters of Culture, Organisation and Management which integrates anthropological, sociological and psychological approaches to identity, politics and cross-cultural co-operation with management and organisation theory. She enjoys the challenges involved in recognising, qualifying and nurturing top talent.

What made you decide to come out to Australia?

I love to travel, and still take every opportunity I can to see the world. I was out here in Australia travelling as a tourist, and of course I loved the sunshine. Melbourne, in particular, really appealed to me as the home of the Australian Open! So when the opportunity came up to join The Source, I took it.

How do you use your qualifications in your day-to-day role as a recruitment consultant?

My knowledge of psychology helps me be aware of the subjective element in almost everything I do. Recruiters need to remember that they’re dealing with real people, who have emotions and agendas. When I work with candidates I always let them know if they’re coming across as too aggressive or lacking in energy. Usually, people don’t know they’re doing it. Basically, I try to teach people to be convincing in interviews.

Is there anything unique about recruiting for the procurement profession?

Absolutely. I’ve found that procurement professionals are master negotiators – candidates want a lot, and they play hard on the salary negotiations. The clients we recruit for are excellent negotiators as well, and we generally find that they’re prepared to wait for the right talent to become available.

Where do you find your candidates?

Mainly through headhunting and networking. We reach out to people we believe are relevant for a specific role to have a very general career discussion. Usually people are happy to be courted and to join our network even if they’re not ready to move until the right opportunity comes along. This ‘hidden market’ has proven to be very valuable, since the focus is on the candidate.

We’ve also found quite a few people through Procurious, both inside and outside Australia. So be sure to log onto Procurious and connect with me! One of the exciting trends we’re starting to see is more and more people making a conscious choice to come into procurement from other professions, such as finance and law. Procurement functions can always use these diverse skill-sets.

What are the challenges in Australian procurement recruitment?

There’s a huge amount of change going on amongst our client companies. Restructuring and redundancies take place all the time, which means we have to keep on top of what’s happening in a fast-changing environment. Another challenge is that Australia is a relatively small market, which is why it’s important for procurement professionals to know the right people and reach out to organisations like The Source.

What sort of salary levels do you recruit for?

Personally, I mostly look after the mid-level space, which could range from $80,000 to $130,000 (AUD), but The Source team works collaboratively across all salary levels. And of course there’s the international recruitment angle too. UK professionals are in high demand in Australia, along with candidates from China and Singapore.

Can you share some tips for creating a winning resume?

Don’t just describe your role when you write your resume. Make sure you keep track of your achievements, and back up your claims with hard figures. Procurement employers like to see proof. For example, if you’ve achieved some excellent cost savings, make sure you include the dollar figure or percentage.

Start with a succinct personal introduction explaining your background, key strengths, and what makes you stand out for the role. You’ll never be shortlisted if you don’t communicate your strengths.

Frequently changing roles can indicate a lack of commitment, so try to stay in a business for a minimum of three years. Of course, sometimes it’s out of your control. If you are made redundant, don’t be afraid to put it in your resume – recruiters and employers won’t penalise you for redundancies because they’re so common.

Can you share some interview tips?

Make sure you’re well-presented. Read up about the organisation and find out about the people who will be interviewing you on LinkedIn. It’s important not to over-prepare and create a “script”, because it comes across as fake.

Remember to back everything up with examples. Think about the key competencies you’ll be asked about, and be prepared to talk about how you’ve demonstrated these in the past. You need to be able to explain what you do.

Do you have any stories of disastrous interviews?

We had a candidate who was asked to give an example of how she can balance priorities. Unfortunately, the example she gave was how she was juggling three boyfriends at once!

Another candidate took the advice to provide clear “evidence” of her achievements much too literally, and turned up at the interview with an enormous stack of printed-out reports and emails. She’d rummage through the pile to find evidence whenever she was asked a question.

Did either of them win the role?

Unfortunately for them, no!

What’s your advice for graduates considering procurement as a career?

Procurement is a good career. It’s growing fast, with heaps of opportunity to add significant value to a company. It’s a really diverse job. From the analytical side of things, to the sourcing experts, stakeholder relationship management experts, risk gurus – there are so many aspects to being a procurement professional.

The Source - Sanne GruterThanks Sanne, and all the very best for an exciting career in procurement recruitment at The Source!

 

 

The Source is a boutique mid to senior and executive recruitment and search consultancy with national reach specialising in the procurement market. For more details, visit The Source.