Tag Archives: knowledge sharing

Writing a Brief for the Procurement of Goods or Services

Whether you aim to start your own business or are looking for ways to up your game in terms of paperwork, the procurement of goods and services document is something that’ll inevitably come your way.

procurement of goods
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Whether you aim to start your own business or are looking for ways to up your game in terms of paperwork, the procurement of goods and services document is something that’ll inevitably come your way.

According to Convey Co, it is estimated that the global B2C sales will exceed $4.5 trillion by 2021, while at the same time B2B sales are expected to rise to $17.6 trillion. Whether you operate as a small business that handles shipping papers and orders, or as a manufacturer or delivery intermediary, documents pertaining to the procurement of goods and services can often make or break a contract.

While the document is a standard affair for companies that focus on shipping, eCommerce and other trade industries, it may prove challenging to those who are uninitiated. With that in mind, let’s take a look at how you can write a brief for the procurement of goods and services regardless of the type of good or service you intend to procure or ship to a third party.

Procurement of Goods and Services Basics

Before we go any further, it’s worth noting what the procurement of goods and services represents – the process of agreeing to the terms and acquiring goods or services from an external source. The external source in question can be an existing B2B networking partner, an open market bid you’ve made previously, or procurement via tendering.

Generally, the process of procurement involves making buying decisions for your company under certain conditions outlined in the brief and delivered to the external source in question.

Due to the nature of these documents, its good practice to rely on professional platforms such as Evernote (a cloud-based writing and editing service), Trust My Paper (an outsourcing and editing platform), Hemingway (service which is used for legibility optimisation) and WoWGrade (a dedicated writing platform) in your brief writing activities.

Typical briefs for the procurement of goods and services involve clear outlines of all factors pertaining to the sales/purchase contract, including quantity, delivery, handling, discount and price fluctuations, as well as the procurement timeline. These are technical documents that are standard in the corporate, manufacturing and shipping industries, but very important as they legally bind all parties involved to respect their agreed-upon contract.

Advantages of Writing a Procurement of Goods and Services Brief

Now that we have a clearer idea of what briefs for the procurement of goods and services are in practice, let’s take a quick glance at the benefits of their existence in your business’ documentation. Given that businesses typically work as suppliers or buyers with a multitude of other companies and brands, often internationally and at the same time, it can get daunting to manage the paperwork efficiently.

Even though procurement is only one small part of the contractual equation in this sense, it can still take up a lot of your time and even small deviations can cause you to lose trust or much-needed goods, services or revenue if you are a supplier.

In that respect, writing procurement brief outlines in advance can bring several benefits to your business going forward, including the following points:

  • Streamlined operational performance
  • Standardised documentation workflow
  • Improved accuracy and clarity of the procurement data
  • Lowered margin for the procurement error
  • Growth of positive brand reputation and industry authority

Writing Guidelines to Consider

Write a Brief Overview

The first item on your list in terms of writing a brief for the procurement of goods and services is to create an overview of your documentation. This is the segment of the brief in which you are expected to give a short outline of your business, its product portfolio and relevant website links for the receiver to follow up on.

It’s also important to provide a clear description of the procurement items you are requisitioning, as well as a brief summary of their intended purpose and its target audience. These items will allow the reader to quickly discern what the document is about without going over minute details or items in the order itself.

Define your Procurement Method

Depending on what type of goods or services you aim to procure via the written brief, you can propose the procurement methodology personally or ask for suggestions from the target business. It’s always good practice to state which procurement methods you’d like to see in the follow-up letter depending on your own business’ infrastructure and resources.

You should also take potential issues and complications into consideration based on the previous procurement experience in order to anticipate bottlenecks before they rear their head. Data in regards to past procurements or sources of information you are willing to share in regards to the particular goods or services should also be attached in this section of the brief for your reader’s convenience.

Detail your Deliverables

The deliverables section of your procurement brief is self-explanatory. However, it also has to abide by certain standards and expectations. Mainly, your deliverables should be outlined based on quantity and (in case of manufacture) the time you expect them to be completed by.

For example, if you are procuring certain types of pipes for your business, you should note any special requests you may have in regards to their length, custom build, etc. You can also add a small addendum in the deliverables section of your brief that will inform the reader that they can contact you in case of additional questions or concerns in regards to your procurement document.

Outline the Procurement Timeline

The timeline of procurement is one of the most important elements in the outlined brief as it pertains to specific deadlines in regards to your requested goods and services. While not complex or lengthy, the procurement timeline section is essential and should be clearly highlighted for emphasis.

Elements such as a procurement return deadline, procurement decision deadline as well as clarification meeting dates (if necessary) should be included. This section can be capped off with a listing of your contact information, such as email and phone, which the reader can use to let you know if the procurement request was accepted.

Request a Follow-Up on the Brief

Lastly, a formal follow-up should be included as the final element of your procurement brief for the sake of colloquial and professional courtesy. The follow-up request should be in the form of a simple call to action that will respectfully inform the reader of your anticipation of their response in regards to your document.

It’s good practice to repeat the procurement return deadline from the previous section to drive the point of urgency home. After all, it is in both parties’ interest that the procurement brief goes through so that the goods and services can exchange hands as quickly and efficiently as possible.

Creating a Clear and Streamlined Template

Once your brief for the procurement of goods or services is set in stone, you can easily retrofit it for different requests, both as a supplier or a demander. Make sure to brand your document accordingly in order to make it stand out with elements such as business logo, minute visual elements as well as a unique style of writing.

If your requests are within the realm of deliverable possibilities for the receiver, your procurement will always go through, additional clarification or not. Write your procurement brief outline through the set of guidelines we’ve discussed previously and your business documentation will be that much clearer and more streamlined for it.

Big Ideas Summit 2016: Big Idea #33 – Sharing Knowledge Openly

Collaborative working and knowledge sharing benefits everyone in procurement. It’s time to learn from one another.

At the Big Ideas Summit 2016, we challenged our thought leaders to share their Big Ideas for the future of procurement.

From ideas that have the potential to change the very nature of the procurement profession, to ones that got the assembled minds thinking about the profession’s impact outside of the organisation, the response we received was amazing.

Harnessing Knowledge Sharing

Nicola Robinson, Knowledge Manager at CIPS, says that procurement professionals have a huge knowledge collateral at their disposal. And she also believes that by sharing this knowledge openly, everyone can benefit.

CIPS have led the charge at bringing trusted sources of information to the procurement profession. Nicola believes that the profession can bring all their collective knowledge together, harness it, and all learn from one another.

Catch up with all the delegates’ Big Ideas from the 2016 Summit at the Procurious Learning Hub.

Want to find out more about Big Ideas 2016? And maybe what we have planned for 2017? You can visit our dedicated website!

If you like this (and you haven’t done so already) join Procurious for free today. Get connected with over 19,500 like-minded procurement professionals from across the world.

Big Ideas Summit 2016: Big Idea #24 – Sharing Procurement Expertise

Procurement professionals have a great opportunity to develop themselves, and helps others, by sharing expertise in the charity sector.

At the Big Ideas Summit 2016, we challenged our thought leaders to share their Big Ideas for the future of procurement.

From ideas that have the potential to change the very nature of the procurement profession, to ones that got the assembled minds thinking about the profession’s impact outside of the organisation, the response we received was amazing.

Sharing Expertise

David Lyon, CPO at Cancer Research UK, believes there is a now great opportunity for organisations to share procurement expertise. Procurement professionals can push their development, and give something back, by working with the charity sector.

David states that, in the age of CSR and transparency, young people can grow their own careers by gaining insight and knowledge in procurement by working with charities.

Catch up with all the delegates’ Big Ideas from the 2016 Summit at the Procurious Learning Hub.

Want to find out more about Big Ideas 2016? And maybe what we have planned for 2017? You can visit our dedicated website!

If you like this (and you haven’t done so already) join Procurious for free today. Get connected with over 18,500 like-minded procurement professionals from across the world.

So You Want to Be a Content Writer, Do You?

We’re always encouraging our community members to get involved. Here’s your chance to become one of our content writers.

content contribution

At Procurious HQ, we pride ourselves on the quality of content we produce. Over the past two and a half years, we have carefully crafted a selection of high-quality content for you to peruse, digest and enjoy.

And while we’ve had a lot of fun doing it, we think it’s high time for even more of you to get involved.

We’d like to offer you the opportunity to get your work published on Procurious. There are great storytellers in the community, with great stories to tell. And we want to hear them all!

Not only is it a great opportunity for you to dip your toes into the blogging water, but it’s also a great chance to raise your own profile.

I Don’t Know Where to Start…

If you’ve attended a social media workshop run by Procurious, you’ll have heard us say that procurement needs to do a better job of selling itself. We need to improve the brand of procurement by better communicating the interesting stories that we know are out there.

Every single procurement and supply chain professional has a story or experience that is unique to them. From the weirdest thing they have bought, to the worst negotiation experience you have had, your story can help others no matter the subject.

And even if you don’t think you have a story to tell, your experience in procurement is just as valuable. There’s a pretty high likelihood that your experience could help one of your peers sometime in the future.

My Specialist Subject is…

Ok, so you don’t think your a great storyteller. There’s nothing wrong with that! But how about a subject only you can talk about? If you had to go on Mastermind and answer procurement questions, what topic would they be on?

Over the past couple of years, our community members have talked about a range of subjects, including:

Or how about telling us what it’s like to work in procurement in your part of the world? In the past, we’ve had a range of countries and experiences, including, Wales, Brazil and the Ukraine.

fountain-pen-on-paper

Content to Spark an Idea

Still stuck for something to write about? Why not draw inspiration from the events Procurious has held in the past year?

The Big Ideas Summit 2016 brought together thought leaders and procurement executives from around the world. We had great discussions on:

Or how about our Career Boot Camp, held back in October. We asked some of the biggest influencers in procurement to share their tips on boosting your career.

Get inspired by:

Build Your Profile

Being published on Procurious is going to help to raise your own profile in the procurement space. We will share your article across social media, where we have a global audience of over 50,000 people.

What’s more, if your blog is one of the most popular during a week, then it may be added to our weekly ‘Best of the Blog’ eDM.

So now it’s your turn. Sharpen those pencils, put fresh ink in your pen and tune up your keyboard – and get writing!

If you want to contribute to the Procurious blog, send an e-mail to [email protected] or [email protected] and tell us what your idea is.

Big Ideas Summit 2016: Big Idea #1 – Share, Share, Share

Tania Seary, founder of Procurious, believes that procurement needs to share – share learnings, stories, experiences, and questions – in order to change the face of the profession.

At the Big Ideas Summit 2016, we challenged our thought leaders to share their Big Ideas for the future of procurement.

From ideas that have the potential to change the very nature of the procurement profession, to ones that got the assembled minds thinking about the profession’s impact outside of the organisation, the response we received was amazing.

Tania believes that the power of positive words and imagery, such as Avenger, Superhero and Rockstar, combined with the business words like collaboration, can make a huge impact on the people who make decisions in business in how they see procurement.

Catch up with all the thought leadership and ours delegates’ Big Ideas from the 2016 Summit at the Procurious Learning Hub.

If you want to find out more about Big Ideas 2016, and what we have planned for 2017, you can visit our dedicated website!

If you like this (and you haven’t done so already) join Procurious for free today, and connect with over 15,000 like-minded procurement professionals from across the world.