Tag Archives: learning and development

Have A Nibble On These Bitesize Videos

Take a 2 minute  break from your hectic schedule to join Tania Seary. She’ll help you to dig a little deeper, inject some sparkle and rise to the top in your procurement career with these new videos.

 

 

Finding and keeping up with the most intriguing, and useful, procurement content online can put you ahead of your peers. But who has the time in their working day to go looking for it, or spend hours at a time absorbing it?

At Procurious, we know and understand your need to prioritise to ensure every minute you spend on social media is a minute well spent, which is why a lot of our online content is concise and gets straight to the point!

That’s certainly the case with our latest batch of eLearning videos, featuring Procurious’ founder, Tania Seary.
In this six-part series of two minute videos Tania offers some top procurement advice on networking, driving change within your team, hiring new talent  and making it to the top!
These videos are perfectly designed to be small enough for you to have a little nibble on at your leisure but guaranteed to fill you up with handy career tips.
Here’s a quick summary of what you can expect:

Network Your Face Off

Tania believes that networking is in procurement’s DNA and a key contributing factor to making it to the top! If you could benefit from a few handy networking tips, take Tania’s advice and get connected to get ahead!

The Disney Approach to Procurement

Is it possible that Disney has the magic formula for driving change management success in your procurement team? Adding a little Disney sparkle to your program might just be the solution to your problems. Here’s how to embrace the book, the film and the ride.

My 5 Killer Interview Questions

If you’re looking to hire new recruits any time soon, this is the video for you! Tania explains the importance of creating a good culture within your businesses. The best way to do that is to find people who are the perfect fit during the recruitment process by asking these five killer interview questions.

You Don’t Have To Be a Genius In Procurement

We all like to think that we’re some kind of procurement genius, that we can solve all of the world’s problems. But in truth, some of these problems are just too big for us to solve alone. Tania explains why collaboration is key.

Five Sure Fire Ways To Become A CPO

If you want to make sure you’re the procurement cream that rises to the top, you need to hear Tania’s five top tips for becoming a CPO. Start out by filling your trophy cabinet…

How To Strike Gold When Seeking A Mentor

This video is all about myth-busting. Tania explains why there’s absolutely no such thing as being too old for a procurement mentor. If you’re  yet to embrace reverse mentoring, now’s the time. Dig a little deeper and you’ll strike gold!

If you’d like Tania Seary to speak at your event, contact Olga Luscombe via olga.luscombe@procurious.com or visit TaniaSeary.com for more details. 

5 Career Lessons From a 75-Year-Old London Cabbie

Inspiration can often come from an unusual source. And you should never be too closed off to learn career lessons from a wide variety of people!

Cab Career Lessons

On my way to the Productivity in Pharma meeting in London yesterday, as is often the case, my cab got stuck in traffic.

As we edged our way across Westminster Bridge, I got chatting to my taxi driver, and discovered that I was going to be his very last customer after a 45-year career as a London taxi driver.  His plan was to drop me off, return his cab to the depot, and catch a bus and train combination back to his wife in Surrey.

Not one to miss an opportunity to learn, I quickly thought through what this wonderful man’s life and career lessons could mean for procurement professionals.

A Quick Side Note!

But before I share my learnings, let me tell you how much I love London cabs! I’ve always wanted the opportunity to share my love in one of my blog articles, so I’m very happy to now have the chance! These unique, purpose-made vehicles can turn on a dime, and accommodate five passengers, as well as luggage. Amazing.

According to Wikipedia, many black cabs have a turning circle of only 25ft (8m). One reason for this is the configuration of the famed Savoy Hotel. The hotel entrance’s small roundabout meant that vehicles needed a small turning circle in order to navigate it.

That requirement became the legally required turning circle for all London cabs. Also, the custom of passengers sitting on the right, behind the driver, provided a reason for the right-hand traffic in Savoy Court, allowing hotel patrons to board and alight from the driver’s side. I love these types of London stories!

Back to Career Lessons

Anyway, back to the career lessons learned from my septuagenarian chauffeur.  Here’s what came to mind –

1. Don’t sweat a couple of hiccups early on in your career

Don’t worry if you have to go over a couple of speed bumps early in your career – my cabbie got fired twice early in his.

He had a lot of fun in his very first job, which was being the doorman at the very exclusive Dorchester Hotel. A highlight he shared was when Zsa Zsa Gabor dropped her towel and exposed herself as he made a delivery to the room. His photo also blessed the Daily Mail, when the famous Hollywood actress Jayne Mansfield rewarded his good work with a kiss. Maybe as a result of these heady experiences, one day he fell asleep on the job and was summarily dismissed.

He tried couple of other jobs, including being a bus conductor, but when he threw his supervisor off the bus, he realised he wasn’t really meant to work for others. Despite these small set-backs, this gentleman still enjoyed a 45-year career.

Which brings me to my next point…

2. Your career is a marathon, not a sprint

I know that during the first decade or two of my career, I was convinced that the faster and harder I worked, the faster my career would progress. To a certain degree, this may have been the case.  Even now, I am probably working at a slightly unsustainable pace, but I am learning that sometimes you have to slow down in order to go faster.

While chatting as we edged our way along, it dawned on me that this gent was someone who was in extremely good shape.  At 75 years of age, he still had a full head of hair, was highly animated and spoke lovingly about his children, grandchildren and wife of 52 years (“who kept him young”).

He was obviously a man who enjoyed good health and had a positive life. As much as we feed our self-esteem through career success, we need to remember that our health, happiness and support of our family and friends are really what will sustain us on the long haul.

3. Do what you love

People who have been successful in their career often say things like “I’ve been very lucky”. But what you normally find is that they have worked hard at a job they love.

Make sure you are passionate about what your career – it will reflect in everything you do and will help buoy your success. Being in procurement is a great head start, because you’re working in the most exciting profession in the world…right?!

4. Know your stuff

One of the defining characteristics of the London taxi drivers is their in-depth knowledge of London’s streets and their ability to navigate their way to the desired destination through the congestion and chaos London is so well known for! All without the help of a sat nav.

This is because London taxi drivers go through stringent training to obtain their licence. They need to pass “The Knowledge”, a test which is among the hardest to pass in the world. The drivers need to memorise every possible route through the 25,000 city streets, and know all 20,000 landmarks. Apparently, it takes the average person between 2 to 4 years to learn the knowledge. And it shows – these guys really know their stuff!

So no more complaining about studying for your MCIPS or ISM qualification! Knowledge will give you the credibility you need to achieve your career success.

5. Trust the universe

Amazingly, in his long career (which must have included literally tens of thousands of customer trips), he only had a handful of people not pay their fare. To me, this really reinforced that the universe is actually quite a good place.

There are more good people than bad and in the large majority of cases, people are honest and do the right thing. A cause for us all to remain optimistic!

Safe travels!

The Productivity in Pharma Think Tank brings together a conclave of senior procurement leaders from the Pharmaceutical industry, creating a unique, mini-MBA style environment, where the most pressing issues facing the function are explored in detail and, from which, key insights and applicable takeaways are derived.

You can find out more about this event at The Beyond Group website, and connect with the event hosts and facilitators Giles Breault (@GilesBreault) and Sammy Rashed (@RashedSammy) on social media.

Businesses Alarmed by Digital Skills Shortage

A major training effort is needed to improve digital skills, and make sure people are not left behind in the digital age, say the Institute of Directors.

Digital Skills

The Institute of Directors (IoD) have stated that a major effort is required in the UK in order to ensure that workers have the digital skills required to keep up with technological advances.

The IoD was responding to a report from the House of Commons Science and Technology Committee, which suggested that, while 90 per cent of current UK jobs required digital skills, over 12.6 million UK adults did not have the skills to allow them to perform these roles.

The report also stated that two-thirds of digital-based organisations have struggled to fill a vacancy in the past 12 months, and that 93 per cent of technology companies have seen a direct impact on commercial operations from a digital skills gap.

This is despite over 12 per cent of Computer Science graduates still being unemployed six months following graduation.

Digital Exclusion

The House of Commons report also highlighted a worrying trend in digital exclusion, with 23 per cent of the UK population lacking even basic digital skills. These include a high percentage of disabled and elderly people, as well as those without a formal education.

However, the good news on this front, is that around 4.5 million of the 12.6 million are currently in full time employment, with employers being asked to assess how to aid with digital skills education and training.

While the impact on the economy of these statistics is estimated to be in the region of £63 billion per year, in lost potential GDP, individuals also miss out on savings of £560 per year on average by not being online.

The report concludes that there is more to be done by the UK Government, both in terms of facilitating the training of digital skills, but also putting the infrastructure in place to enable the entire population to have access to the Internet.

Digital Skills Education

In April, the IoD released a major report arguing significant changes to education and life-long learning were needed to enable the UK to adapt to rapid advances in technology and automation.

The IoD’s Chairman, Lady Barbara Judge, in a piece for the Sunday Telegraph yesterday said that society needs to make “a concerted effort to upskill and reskill its population, and not leave a whole generation ill-equipped to meet the new reality”.

Seamus Nevin, Head of Employment and Skills Policy at the Institute of Directors, said of the House of Commons report: “This report shows the need for businesses to invest more in training British workers. We also must make sure tomorrow’s workforce is leaving school or university with the digital skills that employers require. Just as importantly, we must enable people already in employment to retrain or up-skill in order to meet the demands of the changing workplace.

“The IoD has called for the government to increase the use of technology in education — such as use of MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) — to provide training at much lower costs and improve access to learning for all. We have also suggested the creation of tax incentives to encourage and enable people at all stages of their career to return to education and learn new skills”.

“The Committee says the UK needs another three quarters of a million workers with digital skills by next year. In order to meet the immediate shortfall, businesses must be able to access workers with the right skills from abroad.”

eISM – Introducing the Future of Learning

People don’t want a one-size-fits-all solution for their professional development. eISM aims to provide a set of flexible options to take e-learning forward.

eISM Learning on Demand

Whether skills are learned through small chunks, longer competency-based training, or direct job experiences, there’s no one-size-fits-all solution when it comes to gaining career knowledge and experience.

ISM’s Senior VP of Programs and Product Development, M.L. Peck, understands this, and has made it the foundation of ISM’s exciting new eISM initiative. “E-learning is the future of learning – it’s how our customers are consuming information”, says Peck. “But just like face-to-face learning, it has to allow for individuals’ learning styles”.

That’s why ISM has come up with no fewer than three completely different methods for varied learning styles within its eISM offering: Just-in-Time learning, Self-Guided learning, and Guided Learning. It’s up to the user to choose the method that best fits in with their busy schedule and learning style.

ISM’s e-learning is designed to support ISM’s Mastery Model, providing the training needed to equip practitioners with the skills and certification to master various competencies and sub-competencies within the model.

The content itself is pulled from ISM’s impressive 101 years of supply chain leadership, drawing upon its global network of subject matter experts to create a remarkable library of digital knowledge.

Just-in-Time Learning

Peck talks about the “just-for-me, just-in-time, and just-enough” approach. For example, if you have a negotiation in an hour and need an answer immediately, all you have to do is search for your answer based on Mastery Model competencies and sub-competencies. You’ll find the answer they’re looking for in a short video of no more than 15 minutes in length (micro-learning). Information is delivered in multiple, engaging methods, including:

  • whiteboard animations,
  • live interviews (Q and A’s) with executives and leaders in industry,
  • short lectures from industry experts,
  • fun activities, games and flashcards.

Self-Paced Learning

Self-paced learning courses are longer, on average an hour in length each. Users are given access to a wealth of knowledge with which they can create their own schedule and work at their own speed. This method is ideal for exploring a broad topic, or for diving deep into a sub-competency.

Guided learning

Nothing will replace the benefits of face-to-face learning, but eISM’s Guided Learning comes close. It includes an online instructor and peer-learning, ideal for people who want to make contact with the subject-matter experts or who are uncomfortable with learning a completely new concept alone.

The facilitated courses range from three to five weeks in length, running five days per week, in which the learner logs on and completes an activity of approximately 40 minutes each, or participates in a 1-hour weekly webinar (to be viewed live or recorded). The facilitator sends reminders to complete exercises.

Getting started

For more information on eISM, including subscription and pricing, visit the Education Area on ISM’s website. The best way to start is by using ISM’s self-assessment tool, which will rate your skill-set against the Mastery Model sub-competencies and identify gaps in your knowledge.

From there, find the learning approach that best suits you, whether it’s small, focused micro-learning, longer self-guided courses or the facilitated classes. “People are craving content that address specific needs at specific times”, says Peck. “eISM offers our customers that choice”.