Tag Archives: music

What Every Procurement Professional Needs To Know About Music

How much should you pay for using music in a commercial?

By PopTika/ Shutterstock

Around 70 per cent of TV commercials use music in one form or another. That is a lot of music. And a lot of money being paid by brands and their agencies to the music industry.

Procurement departments ask us three questions:

  • Can you explain to me why we are paying so much for music?
  • Where can we make savings without compromising creativity?
  • How do we know that the music we are paying for works?

Library music (with their regulated rate cards) still often feels like the poor relation to the agency creative team. Fees for commissioned music and new productions can be as creative as the music itself. And copyright owners don’t have rate cards because it is forbidden by law.

So, to a Brand and their procurement departments, negotiation on music rights can feel like operating blindfold. The underlying challenge is that the parties involved all have a different agenda. Procurement needs to work within the budget. The creative teams don’t want to know about budgets – they just want the track that they believe works with their brilliant visuals. And the TV producers have a harder job than David Davis at the Brexit table with a deal that works all round. No wonder there is tension between the will of the agency and the chequebook of the brand.

Giving a straight answer to a brand about buying music usually demands more questions:

  • Do you have a full breakdown of your music spend, beyond a total amount spent?
  • Do you know where you are spending your money and with whom over the last three years?
  • Do you or the people who buy music on your behalf have a music-buying strategy that you have seen and approved?
  • Do you have centralised buying of music across all agencies and all media?
  • Do you ever test the music you buy which goes beyond ‘like’ and ‘dislike’?

It is still common practice for music to be a one-off consideration for each campaign and for each agency production department to negotiate and buy music. Very often, final decisions about the music are left to the last minute in the editing suite, when the creatives make up their minds what works best. But when things are left to the last minute, people are under pressure to negotiate.

And when things happen this fast it is harder to justify taking time to test the resonance of a track with the desired target market.

But these two apparently small steps have vital ramification on the final outcomes. I know of a brand where the music was changed in the editing suite for the sake of saving €15,000. Six months and €7.5 million later, when consumer testing did take place, the brand was mortified to discover that the last-minute music change meant that consumers missed the point of the ad completely – in hindsight, a very expensive cost saving.

It’s natural for people to spend money on the things they care about, whether they are fully aware of it or not. In business, however, we have to be aware and strategic. If buying music is still seen as a one-off transaction and the discussions about the costs feels like one from ‘Groundhog Day’, then something has to change.

There is not one solution for all companies, but having a music-buying strategy is a good starting point. It removes ambiguity and puts measurable systems in place. For the above – mentioned brand, it meant ongoing savings of 25 – 30 per cent year on year with commercials that scored well in post-production testing.

If music is not to be regarded as an expensive indulgence, we need to liberate those involved in the creative process and hand it over to people who are not, but still have all parties’ interests clearly in focus.

Ultimately, having real figures about music spend will make it easier for planning, production, and marketing teams to justify their budget requirements. That will be good news all round.

This article was originally published on Sound Lounge

5 Nashville Chartbusters For Procurement Professionals

How are the smash-hit singles of Johnny Cash, Willie Nelson and Dolly Parton relevant to procurement? Let’s find out.

Procurious has landed in Nashville! This iconic town is everything we hoped for – the neon lights, the honky-tonk venues, the gift shops brimming with cowboy boots and sequin-studded denim jackets. But Nashville is also known as Music City, so as ISM2018 gets underway, let’s explore some of the smash-hit tunes that this city has gifted to the world – and find out how they relate to our profession.

1. Johnny Cash: Folsom Prison Blues

I’m stuck in Folsom Prison / And time keeps draggin’ on…

Unfortunately, procurement is one of the top business functions where fraud takes place, mainly because the nature of the profession means the opportunity – and temptation – often exists. Organisations fight fraud by removing this opportunity through policies, processes, strict ethical standards, audits and (increasingly) tech solutions.

Corruption, procurement fraud and other ethical breaches aren’t just bad for the companies involved – they also tarnish the reputation of the profession as a whole and undo a lot of the work we’ve all done to build the profile of procurement as a trusted business advisor. So, take Johnny Cash’s advice: Walk The Line in supply management if you want to stay out of Folsom!

2. Dolly Parton and Kenny Rogers: Islands in the Stream

Frequently nominated as the best country duet of all time, this song describes how two lovers’ affection for one another is strong enough can withstand anything life can throw at it (the stream).

From a procurement angle, let’s flip this concept upside-down. Imagine that the ‘stream’ is your supply chain – whether it’s a small creek or a raging torrent, ideally it will keep flowing without interruption, day and night.

Now – imagine that the ‘islands’ are the disruptive forces that threaten to choke and block your supply stream. From natural disasters, to disruptive technologies, to bankrupt suppliers, disruptions really can feel like a huge boulder has been dropped out of nowhere, causing chaos and delays. Let’s hope you’ve got a plan in place in case an island threatens to block your stream.

3. Willie Nelson: On the Road Again

No road-trip is complete without this classic from the great Willie Nelson. It resonates strongly with procurement and supply managers simply because we’re one of the most well-travelled professions out there. Aside from attending must-see events such as ISM2018, we’re always on the road visiting suppliers, dropping into our organisation’s different sites, and even traveling overseas to review critical parts of complex global supply chains for ourselves.

I know a few CPOs who don’t want to see certain team members in the head office for more than one day a week – in fact, they’re of the opinion that if a supply management professional spends most of their time at their desk, they’re not doing their job properly.

So – pack your travel case, put Willie Nelson on Spotify, and get on the road again to see your supply chain for yourself.

4. Dolly Parton – Working 9 To 5

Still working 9 to 5? It’s 2018! Most workplaces have introduced a little something called flexibility. A long time ago I worked in an office full of clock-watchers. You could work until 6.30pm in the evening and no-one would even blink, but God help you if you walked in five minutes after 9.00am the next morning. Luckily, most managers now recognise that it’s outputs that count, not the time spent sitting at one’s desk.

Flexible working hours are especially important if you interact with global supply chains. Chances are you’ll need to be on the phone at least once a week with overseas suppliers late into the evening or at the crack of dawn. That’s time on the clock – so if you want to front up at the office a little bit later the next morning, you’ve earned that flexibility.

Flexibility is also crucial for driving gender equality in the workforce, bringing talented new parents back on board after parental leave, and a source of competitive advantage when it comes to attracting the best young talent to work with your team.

5. Billy Ray Cyrus – Achy Breaky Heart

Gotta love that mullet, Billy Ray.

Have you ever had to ‘break up’ with a supplier? Just like splitting up with a significant other romantically, things can get messy. No matter how gently you break the news, the meeting can become emotional – particularly when both sides have invested heavily into the relationship.

Avoid giving your suppliers an achy-breaky heart by establishing and maintaining a strong feedback-loop throughout the relationship, and give them as much warning as possible that you won’t be renewing their contract.

This topic is worthy of its very-own blog article, as there’s no shortage of break-up songs from Nashville! Runners-up include Roy Orbinson’s It’s Over and Brenda Lee’s Break It To Me Gently.


Are you at ISM2018? Visit Procurious in the Exhibitor Hall – Booth #207!

Don’t miss out on Procurious Founder Tania Seary’s inspirational & informative ISM2018 Session on Tuesday 8th May, 3.45-4.45:

From the Amazon to the Moon: The Possibilities for Procurement