Tag Archives: podcast

A Futurist, An Economist, A Professor, A Psychologist and a CFO Walk Into A Bar…

A Futurist, An Economist, A Professor, A Psychologist and a CFO Walk Into A Bar…It may sound like the start of a terrible joke, but in fact, this is the stellar line-up of experts featuring in Even Bigger Ideas. And alright, they didn’t  actually walk into a bar, it was more of a podcast series…

Whether you love learning on the go, at your desk, on your lunch break or from the comfort of your own sofa, Even Bigger Ideas is made for you! The series is free for all Procurious members and can be found in the learning section of the site.

Why not spend 15 minutes with each of our procurement power-players as they highlight the trends disrupting business. Here’s what you can expect:

1. Make Sure You Still Have A Job In 2020

Futurist Anders Sorman-Nilsson warns that unless procurement pros act now, there’s a good chance they’ll find themselves unemployed as early as 2020. It’s time to embrace the gig economy, learn to speak the language of digital and invest in our education.

Listen to Anders’ podcast here or read more here

2. The Unpalatable Update On Thinking The Unthinkable

It turns out that thinking the unthinkable in the current climate is becoming a rather unpalatable affair. Nik Gowing, BBC Broadcaster and Visiting Professor at King’s College, explains why leaders must learn to recognise and handle impending unthinkables or risk going out of business.

Listen to Nik’s podcast here or read more here

3. How Do You Know When Your Idea’s Got Legs?

Creating an encouraging environment for intrapreneurs in the biggest organisations can be tough. Rio Tinto CFO, Chris Lynch, offers advice on fostering innovation and some top tips on assessing when an idea has legs. How do you know if it’s worth investing time, and money, into someone’s idea and what can the biggest companies do to encourage and motivate their employees to think big.

Listen to Chris’ podcast here or read more here.

4. Unleash Your Creative Genius In Fifteen Minutes

Innovation is now firmly on the agenda for businesses worldwide. According to Creative Change Agent James Bannerman, there’s no such thing as a lost cause when it comes to unleashing creativity. It’s simply a matter of re-educating ourselves and learning some tips and tricks to unlock our creative potential.

Listen to James’ podcast here or read more here.

5. Trump & Trade: Hope For The Best & Plan For The Worst

Dr Linda Yueh, a renowned economist, broadcaster and Adjunct Professor of Economics for London Business School, discusses how supply managers can prepare for the major shifts in globalisation, trade and protectionism under Trump. With any luck the potential impacts on our global supply chains are over-exaggerated!

Listen to Linda’s’ podcast here or read more here.

Four Ways To Ensure You Still Have A Job In 2030

Futurist Anders Sorman-Nilsson warns that unless we act now, there’s a good chance we’ll find ourselves unemployed by 2030. 

ProStockStudio/Shutterstock.com

Sorman-Nilsson spoke with Philip Ideson as part of Procurious’ Even Bigger Ideas, a 5-part podcast series sponsored by State of Flux. You can access the series exclusively on Procurious.

Futurist Anders Sorman-Nilsson wants procurement professionals to ask themselves two crucial questions.

  1. Firstly, think about your future career, your employability, or your entrepreneurial plans for the future. Given the kind of work you’re doing today, can a computer, an algorithm or artificial intelligence do it faster, cheaper, and more efficiently in the future?
  2. Imagine jumping into a time machine and travelling to 2030. You step out of the machine, expecting to find yourself further up the career ladder, successful and wealthy. Instead, you discover yourself lying on the couch, watching daytime television, and no longer employable. What happened?

Roll up your sleeves and conduct a pre-mortem

Business are familiar with conducting post-mortems, particularly after a project or initiative has failed. Sorman-Nilsson advocates for “pre-mortems” instead: “Imagine that in 2030, your personal employment brand is now defunct. You’re no longer employable. What were the trends that you missed? What were the signals you chose to ignore? And what were the education investment decisions that you chose to delay that led to your personal brand’s demise?”

“Finally, ask yourself what change will you make today to prevent that outcome from happening?”

Job-stealing robots are already here

The AI disruption is happening already. Self-driving cars are a reality, machines have automated a lot of blue-collar work and AI is already impacting white-collar work. “In Japan recently, 34 humans in complex insurance claims processing were made redundant in favour of an insurance firms’ investment in IBM Watson to do those claims instead. We’re really just scratching the surface of what’s possible with artificial intelligence and computing power.”

Four actions to take today to save your career in the future

  1. Examine your skill set and focus on where you, as a human being, might still have some kind of competitive advantage over a robot. Where can your emotional intelligence (EI) compete with, or complement, artificial intelligence (AI)? In a world where everything that can be digitised eventually will become digitised, what are the fundamental human skills that you add to a profession that’s largely about numbers?
  2. Learn to speak digital: “You don’t need to speak Java or know the intimate details of cloud computing and data science, but you need to be comfortable in speaking digital. Digital really is the global language of business for the future.”
  3. Embrace the gig economy: As corporates start opting for robots instead of humans, it’s time to take matters into your own hands and offer your personal brand through increasing entrepreneurship.
  4. Invest in your education: “While we’re already experiencing fundamental shifts, we do have some time to prepare ourselves, but this means we need to really invest in our own learning, and our own agility in the way we position our skills. Aim to invest in at least one new skill every year.”

Anders Sorman-Nilsson is the founder of Thinque – a strategy think tank that helps executives and leaders convert these disruptive questions into proactive, future strategies. His latest book is titled Digilogue: How to win the digital minds and analogue hearts of tomorrow’s customer.