Tag Archives: procurement career

How To Inspire Creativity With The Three Fs!

To achieve creative cultures  within our organisations and inspire creativity in individuals, we need to Fund, Foster and Fill!

Register as an online delegate for the London Big Ideas Summit 2017 here.

James Bannerman, a creative change agent and author of Non-Fiction best-seller Genius! firmly believes that everyone has the capacity to be creative and innovative. He’ll be speaking at the Big Ideas Summit 2017 in London on 23rd February but we’ve picked his brains ahead of the event to find out his top tips for inspiring creativity and his plans for the future..

What is a creative change agent?

A creative change agent is essentially a ‘lateral thinking’ specialist. It’s someone who combines creativity with psychology to help businesses innovate and perform more effectively in a rapidly-changing world.

What’s one thing you know now, that you wish you’d known at the start of your career?

When I was younger I was a laid-back song-writer and did not fully appreciate how important it is, in business and life, to ‘make your own sunshine’. Over the years, however, and especially  when I wrote my books Genius! and Business Genius! I came to realise that books don’t write themselves; they ended up taking me far longer to write than I ever imagined, and involved far more hard work than I ever envisaged. However, fortunately the hard work paid-off – because they ended-up becoming best-sellers in the UK and then being translated into multiple languages from Chinese to Japanese, and Italian to Thai – and that taught me that ideas alone are not what makes the difference; it’s turning those ideas into reality that makes the difference.

What are your three top tips for inspiring creativity in organisations?

My three top tips for inspiring creativity in organisations would be what I call The 3 Fs: Fund, Foster, Fill.

Fund (i.e. invest in) ‘Creative Thinking’ training

Upskill people by teaching them ‘how’ to be more creative. Evidence suggests, for example, that virtually all of us were incredibly creative up until the age of about 5, but then this natural creativity was ‘schooled’ out of us by the double whammy of criticism and conformity. Effective ‘Creativity Thinking’ training can help to redress this situation by inspiring people to re-become creative.

Foster an atmosphere of Psychological Safety

Einstein once said that ‘a person who never made a mistake never tried anything new.’ With this in mind, if an organisation genuinely wants to inspire creativity, it needs to provide employees with enough ‘wriggle room’ to make the occasional ‘excusable’ mistake – rather than ‘inexcusable’ mistake (which is a very different matter).

Fill the well 

I’ve long believed that in order to inspire others we need to feel inspired ourselves. Psychologists refer to this as ‘mood contagion’. So, if an organisation wants to inspire creativity, it needs to keep ‘Filling the Well’ (as the author Sheila Davis describes it) by encouraging people to branch out and watch new films, read interesting books, travel to different places etc… After all, bang in the middle of the word ‘Innovation’ we find the word ‘Nova’ – which meant ‘new’ in Roman times – so a constant inpouring of fresh stimulus is likely to inspire a culture that goes beyond ‘what is’ to explore ‘what could be’.  

You’ve composed hit pop songs, written best-selling books and work as an innovation consultant. What’s next?

I’m currently working on a wide range of projects – linked to ‘Lateral Thinking’ in business and academia. However, longer-term, I’d love to take my Business Genius and ‘Lateral Thinking’ work to whole new level, and develop Lateral Thinking TV, movies, and animations etc…

How do latest technology developments influence the way you consult with organisations and drive innovation?

To be honest, although technology developments have influenced the way I consult with organisations and drive innovation – eg. by making it far easier for me to communicate with clients around the world without always having to ‘be there’ in person – technology itself does not influence me as much as it helps other innovation consultants I know.  I tend to focus more on ‘innovativeness’ than ‘innovation.’ In other words, I focus more on the people-side of innovation – the psychology side.

It’s easy to think that our modern age is infinitely more ‘innovative’ than any other with its amazing advances in technology. Without a doubt the ‘pace’ of change does keep getting faster and faster, which academics label ‘accelerated evolution.’ However, just look at the Edwardian Age. Within ten years along came the Car, the Plane, the Radio and the TV. Each one of them radically transformed the world we live in, far more than the latest XI78 or X189, that will soon end up somewhere in a design museum like the DVD or the first Blackberry.

I work with the ESA,  European Space Agency, who are putting 3-D printers on Space Stations. In fact, there are even 3-D printers now that can make 3-D printers ! We must not lose sight, however, of how technology is driven by ‘people’, and inspired by ‘people’.  The human factors that make innovation happen can also ‘stop’ innovation from happening if they are not addressed and resolved.

Do you ever get tired of thinking up ideas?

Yes and no. I personally get a buzz from ‘divergent thinking’ – i.e. thinking outwards towards multiple possibilities – more than ‘convergent thinking’ – i.e. analysing and dissecting data.

However, when I’m working with groups on Idea Generation, I fully appreciate that ‘thinking up ideas’ can be deceptively tiring for some people. Especially those who have a strong preference for sequence and structure.

Tony Buzan,  the inventor of mind-maps, is a great inspiration of mine. I spoke with him a few years ago and  was struck by how well he manages to fuse the two. Mind-maps, for example, can energise people by stimulating ‘radiant thinking’. They also make it easier for them to think up new ideas, yet at the same its ‘systematic’ approach can also give people a flexible structure to prevent them feeling overwhelmed and swamped by imaginative solutions.

It’s important to remember that everybody has an imagination. We continually ‘think up ideas’ whether we see ourselves as creative or not. In fact, one of the biggest buzzes I get in business is helping people to realise that they are a lot more creative than they give themselves credit for…

Join the conversation and register as a digital delegate for Big Ideas 2017 in London. 

How to Make Your Professional Development Budget Friendly

In a cost-conscious organisation, ensuring that your professional development opportunities are budget friendly is key.

Budget Friendly Professional Development

The time has come around again, at least in my organisation, to set development plans for the year ahead. I’ve come across objectives from becoming more knowledgeable about a topic to completing a formal qualification.

Budget Friendly Development

Whatever you decide to set in your development plan, I want to share with you some ideas about sources of development activities.  In particular, budget friendly, free activities.

As some background, many (if not all) professional careers require Continuous Professional Development (CDP), counted by CPD hours, units or points. Depending on the profession you may gain hours by attending seminars, self-education, presenting at conferences, or even reading a book.

CIPS, for example, suggest 30 CPD hours a year for procurement professionals. By comparison, Australian lawyers are required to obtain 10 CPD ‘units’ – however the criteria is stricter.

Without further ado, here are six ideas for low cost CPD activities.

  1. Learn from other areas of your organisation

Step into another team for a meeting, a day, or longer.  As a procurement professional this is a great way to better understand your stakeholders and their needs, and build the relationship.  Conversely, you may seek to second a stakeholder from the business to support a procurement activity or category management.

  1. Public seminars and lectures (attend in person)

Usually accompanied by complimentary breakfast in the AM and drinks in the PM, many universities and service organisations host free seminars and lectures to update the audience on case studies and industry updates.

To stay updated, subscribe to the mailing lists (for Universities) and let your service provider know you’re interested in attending information events.

Needless to say it’s a great way to network, as well as an information gathering exercise to support your category management.

  1. Learning communities – online courses

Along the same lines, there are free online courses hosted by universities though websites such as ‘Future Learn’.  Some upcoming courses include ‘Management & Leadership: Leading a Team’ and ‘Business Process Management: an introduction to process thinking’ – both from Queensland University of Technology.

Other institutions hosting courses include University of Aberdeen, Cardiff University, and the University of Auckland. Program topics span across management, medical, social enterprise – the courses are constantly updated.

Sign up, give it a go. Most courses provide a certificate of participation to wave in the face of your development plan checklist.

  1. YouTube It

YouTube is riddled with hilarious cat videos and fluffy pink unicorns jumping on rainbows. It’s also a great source of inspirational and educational videos – Procurious even has a YouTube channel!  It’s free and not time intensive.

Ted-Ed videos are usually 3-5 minutes, however they are highly addictive. We can also learn new skills to make our work more effective, get technology tips, and learn how make ‘Word’ number formatting cooperate. Remember to reward yourself with another cute cat video. 

  1. Library isn’t just for books

When was the last time you stepped foot – physically – in a library?  You’ll be please to know that you don’t need to leave the comfort of you couch to benefit from your local library these days.  Libraries are technology hubs and, generally speaking, you should be able to access e-books from your local council library.

If you are keen on that rewarding feeling of turning a page, you can find a whole selection of top books here, recommended by Procurious members.

  1. Stand in the spotlight

A friend recently told me that out of the YouTube viewing population, only 0.1 per cent produce the content.

I can’t validate the statistic but let’s consider a procurement conference with 10 presenters and 100 delegates. That means we’re learning from 10 per cent of the population.

Surely you have something great to share! Nominate yourself to present at a conference, write an article – choose a method to tell us what you know.

Depending in the rules you follow, these activities may contribute to your CPD hours and/or your development plan. So go forth and be better than before.

Let the Procurious community know below if you have more ideas to achieve CPD hours and achieve your professional development plan in a fun, budget friendly way.

5 Career Lessons From a 75-Year-Old London Cabbie

Inspiration can often come from an unusual source. And you should never be too closed off to learn career lessons from a wide variety of people!

Cab Career Lessons

On my way to the Productivity in Pharma meeting in London yesterday, as is often the case, my cab got stuck in traffic.

As we edged our way across Westminster Bridge, I got chatting to my taxi driver, and discovered that I was going to be his very last customer after a 45-year career as a London taxi driver.  His plan was to drop me off, return his cab to the depot, and catch a bus and train combination back to his wife in Surrey.

Not one to miss an opportunity to learn, I quickly thought through what this wonderful man’s life and career lessons could mean for procurement professionals.

A Quick Side Note!

But before I share my learnings, let me tell you how much I love London cabs! I’ve always wanted the opportunity to share my love in one of my blog articles, so I’m very happy to now have the chance! These unique, purpose-made vehicles can turn on a dime, and accommodate five passengers, as well as luggage. Amazing.

According to Wikipedia, many black cabs have a turning circle of only 25ft (8m). One reason for this is the configuration of the famed Savoy Hotel. The hotel entrance’s small roundabout meant that vehicles needed a small turning circle in order to navigate it.

That requirement became the legally required turning circle for all London cabs. Also, the custom of passengers sitting on the right, behind the driver, provided a reason for the right-hand traffic in Savoy Court, allowing hotel patrons to board and alight from the driver’s side. I love these types of London stories!

Back to Career Lessons

Anyway, back to the career lessons learned from my septuagenarian chauffeur.  Here’s what came to mind –

1. Don’t sweat a couple of hiccups early on in your career

Don’t worry if you have to go over a couple of speed bumps early in your career – my cabbie got fired twice early in his.

He had a lot of fun in his very first job, which was being the doorman at the very exclusive Dorchester Hotel. A highlight he shared was when Zsa Zsa Gabor dropped her towel and exposed herself as he made a delivery to the room. His photo also blessed the Daily Mail, when the famous Hollywood actress Jayne Mansfield rewarded his good work with a kiss. Maybe as a result of these heady experiences, one day he fell asleep on the job and was summarily dismissed.

He tried couple of other jobs, including being a bus conductor, but when he threw his supervisor off the bus, he realised he wasn’t really meant to work for others. Despite these small set-backs, this gentleman still enjoyed a 45-year career.

Which brings me to my next point…

2. Your career is a marathon, not a sprint

I know that during the first decade or two of my career, I was convinced that the faster and harder I worked, the faster my career would progress. To a certain degree, this may have been the case.  Even now, I am probably working at a slightly unsustainable pace, but I am learning that sometimes you have to slow down in order to go faster.

While chatting as we edged our way along, it dawned on me that this gent was someone who was in extremely good shape.  At 75 years of age, he still had a full head of hair, was highly animated and spoke lovingly about his children, grandchildren and wife of 52 years (“who kept him young”).

He was obviously a man who enjoyed good health and had a positive life. As much as we feed our self-esteem through career success, we need to remember that our health, happiness and support of our family and friends are really what will sustain us on the long haul.

3. Do what you love

People who have been successful in their career often say things like “I’ve been very lucky”. But what you normally find is that they have worked hard at a job they love.

Make sure you are passionate about what your career – it will reflect in everything you do and will help buoy your success. Being in procurement is a great head start, because you’re working in the most exciting profession in the world…right?!

4. Know your stuff

One of the defining characteristics of the London taxi drivers is their in-depth knowledge of London’s streets and their ability to navigate their way to the desired destination through the congestion and chaos London is so well known for! All without the help of a sat nav.

This is because London taxi drivers go through stringent training to obtain their licence. They need to pass “The Knowledge”, a test which is among the hardest to pass in the world. The drivers need to memorise every possible route through the 25,000 city streets, and know all 20,000 landmarks. Apparently, it takes the average person between 2 to 4 years to learn the knowledge. And it shows – these guys really know their stuff!

So no more complaining about studying for your MCIPS or ISM qualification! Knowledge will give you the credibility you need to achieve your career success.

5. Trust the universe

Amazingly, in his long career (which must have included literally tens of thousands of customer trips), he only had a handful of people not pay their fare. To me, this really reinforced that the universe is actually quite a good place.

There are more good people than bad and in the large majority of cases, people are honest and do the right thing. A cause for us all to remain optimistic!

Safe travels!

The Productivity in Pharma Think Tank brings together a conclave of senior procurement leaders from the Pharmaceutical industry, creating a unique, mini-MBA style environment, where the most pressing issues facing the function are explored in detail and, from which, key insights and applicable takeaways are derived.

You can find out more about this event at The Beyond Group website, and connect with the event hosts and facilitators Giles Breault (@GilesBreault) and Sammy Rashed (@RashedSammy) on social media.