Tag Archives: procurement collaboration

You Don’t Have To Be A Procurement Genius

So you think you’re some kind of procurement genius? In this day and age, there ain’t no such thing and that’s ok!

We all like to think we’re geniuses, that we can single-handedly solve all the procurement problems of the world.

We now know that the concept of the ‘solo genius’ is largely a myth. True creativity comes from collaborative partnerships such as Jobs and Wozniak, Lennon and McCartney, or the Wright Brothers. Even the most famous ‘solo’ geniuses – Einstein, Newton, Mozart – didn’t operate in a vacuum, but built upon the work of countless others. Today, we’re lucky to live in a world where all the answers and ideas we need are only a click away.

Let’s face it, procurement’s most pressing issues (slavery, child labour, unsafe work practices, exploitation, neglect for the environment and copyright) are too big for any one person, or even any one company, to solve alone.

Even at the best of times, working in procurement can be a lonely place, even when we’re working as part of a team. You might be the only person managing your category in your company, in your industry, maybe even in your whole country!

Clambering out of Einstein’s basement

If you have a problem that you can’t fix and need some breakthrough thinking, don’t be like Einstein and barricade yourself in a basement waiting for genius to strike.

Remember that you are part of a vast, virtual, global procurement team full of millions of talented professionals with ideas – help is only a click away.

Get yourself out of isolation, onto the global playing field and ask the universe for inspiration.

Solving the world’s problems, together.

Over five thousand Procurious members visit our discussion board every month to share ideas and offer advice to their peers. Our blogs spark debate, with members feeding their own commentary and ideas into the global community.

The three hottest topics on Procurious in the past two years have been the Tianjin Port disaster, the Trump election and, most recently, the Grenfell Tower fire.

We are still seeing the ripple effects of these events with high levels of member engagement and interaction within the community; the feeding back of vital intelligence on alternate sourcing, suppliers, freight, logistics, on-the-ground contacts and changing regulations.

The hurried and helpful responses to these challenges by the global procurious community has proven that many hands make light work of disruption.

It’s clear that we want to talk online about the issues affecting procurement and are keen to help each other. It would seem that global “team procurement” is alive and well – but are you part of the flow?

Leveraging the Power of 23,000

There are now 23,000 Procurious members across 145+ countries, all with different strengths, weaknesses and experiences. Somewhere, out there, is someone who has had the same experience as you and some wise words to share.

Leveraging the wisdom of the crowd is the beauty of social media. By building your online presence and contacts you can craft a network of thought-leaders, influencers, and experts around you, to provide fantastic ideas and insights.

Even if you have a truly unique problem, there will be someone who can provide a fresh perspective that creates a lightbulb moment for you.

Take the lead

As a successful leader, you don’t have to have all the answers – but you do need to have the best questions….and know who to ask for the answers!

Whichever business icon or “genius” you admire – whether it be Steve Jobs, Richard Branson, Elon Musk………you know they are not the only person providing the brain power to conjure their vision, there are teams working day and night to deliver the dream.

Like me, you’re probably “blown away” (pardon the pun) by the rapid progress of the SpaceX program. But as you admire Elon’s vision, just remember this is not solo genius, no one talented employee finding all the answers – there have been thousands of people working over decades to get these game-changing rockets to the launch pad who have been collaborating globally online to solve a millions of small and large challenges on the journey to space.

It’s exactly the same story in procurement. Behind every apparent genius (aka Global CPO), there’s a team of procurement pros behind the scene helping come up with solutions. Even if you don’t have a real team helping you – you have a secret weapon – you can consult your global team of procurement buddies to help you find the answer.

Be the smartest guy in the room

To shockproof our profession and become the smartest guys in the room, we need to move out of our silos and work together.

Procurement needs to be ahead of the curve – to be agile, to be savvy and to be bold. We are the avengers, the rock stars, the movers and shakers negotiating the deals that guarantee supply, quality, cost, ethics and sustainability. But we can’t do it on our own.

When you’re next faced with a challenge or struggling with the beginnings of a great idea. Don’t just sit there. Do Something. Get online and ask questions. The answer is only a click away.

Collaborate to proliferate!

Make it happen!

Why Indirect Procurement Fails to Deliver Savings to the Bottom Line: Fear

Fear of numbers, and using the language of finance is holding back indirect procurement teams from delivering real value and bottom line savings.

Fear

This article was first published on LinkedIn.

One thing you hear at every procurement event is how hard it is to really achieve indirect savings and bring them to the bottom line. Then the discussion inevitably moves to how finance and business heads just don’t understand the real value impact of the procurement team.

If you could fix this, all would be solved. However, this completely misses changes that procurement itself needs to address first.

While leading a major transformation of a large global indirect team, I was completely surprised by two blockers of a talented and motivated team. While they loved tough, numbers-focused supplier negotiations, there were two hidden fears about numbers that jeopardised their capturing savings.

1. Fear of Using the Language of Finance

The team’s comfort zone for numbers was in spend analysis, supplier pricing, total cost of ownership and benefits from a given negotiation. However, many had bad experiences with finance and business heads who were not interested in cost avoidance and best-negotiated prices, making the procurement group feel unappreciated, misunderstood and not part of the team.

There was immense cost pressure, and through the CFO and other senior leaders, this translated into a drive for year-over-year savings that could be translated into budget reductions. As the leader, I thought this was reasonable and went back to the team explaining that the measure of our performance from now on would be hard savings.

But two issues became clear immediately:

  • The team’s lack of basic financial acumen and the ability to understand and speak about numbers in the same way as the finance colleagues.
  • Their resulting discomfort and fear of not looking knowledgeable.

The journey to addressing this gap started with working together with finance to define the company’s accepted savings definitions. This handbook became the bible for all of the savings and budget reductions. It was also:

  • A training tool for procurement, finance and the business clients.
  • A way to take out the emotion and bad feelings via clear rules and definitions.

Learning by doing was a key part of the change process for the team. With regular and granular numbers reviews, the team had day-to-day opportunities to become familiar with the calculations and fluent in financial language and concepts.

This led to greater confidence in speaking with colleagues and became the new common language of how procurement contributed to the bottom line.

2. Fear of Committing to Accurate Numbers

Although procurement people will tell you that they like being measured on the numbers, what they also often say is ‘it’s better to under commit and over-deliver’. Unfortunately, what this really means is, ‘I can’t predict my performance so I will low-ball my guesstimate’.

This fear of not meeting targets was going to be even more problematic with the sharper focus on year-over-year targets. But it had to be urgently addressed:

  • As savings were being directly linked to and partly taken out of budget up front, being very accurate was an imperative.
  • While it is less bad than under-delivering, over-delivering in November usually means the money has already been spent on something else.

Over optimistically, I thought it was just a matter of explaining why accuracy was so important, and using a sales pipeline approach to enable it all. But as we got into the details, a few things became clear:

  • There was a lack of understanding (back to the topic of financial language) of how to organise projects at a ‘material’ level.
  • The team wasn’t used to thinking about their projects in terms of a pipeline over a longer horizon.
Addressing the Gap

The key to addressing the gap was again to improve the collaboration with finance as well as commit to senior management to deliver against the planned pipeline of projects. In turn, team and individual targets were set accordingly and we got two benefits from this effort.

  • Creating the pipeline got procurement involved in the business discussions much earlier than previously
  • The team learned how to set up a clear and material set of projects which reinforced their new financial knowledge

At the end of the first year, and for the very first time, the team got recognition from all sides. They felt new confidence in speaking about numbers and the increase in visibility from ‘real’ savings based on the clear pipeline. They couldn’t conceive of going back to the days of estimated benefits, fuzzy savings calculations and unclear targets.

Implementing both the formal processes between procurement and finance as well as the needed change management for the procurement team need to be fit for purpose to how the company really works. It might be as simple as agreeing the basic savings definitions or as complex as introducing a full workflow supported process.

Conquering these fears is worth the financial results!

Pauline King is the founder of Rapid Results Procurement focused on working with a company’s existing team to deliver tangible financial results. She is a recognised expert in indirect procurement with deep operational experience in procurement transformation. Pauline also works closely with The Beyond Group AG where she heads up the Indirect Procurement Practice.

Alan Mulally – The Secret to Success in One Slide

“This is everything I know, folks” – Former President and CEO of Ford, Alan Mulally, shares the sum of his knowledge in one slide at ISM2016.

Alan Mulally

ISM’s keynote speaker Alan Mulally has one of those CVs that’s exhausting just to listen to. Alongside his nine-year stint as President and CEO of Ford, he served as Executive Vice President of Boeing, and CEO of Boeing Commercial Airplanes.

He was named to the Google board of directors in July 2014, served on President Obama’s US Export Council, and the advisory board of NASA.

He was named in Fortune’s 50 Greatest Leaders list, voted one of Time Magazine’s 100 most influential people in 2009, and voted 2011 CEO of the Year by Chief Executive magazine. Mulally is also a fellow of the UK’s Royal Academy of Engineering. 

One Slide to Say it All

“If it isn’t a Boeing, you shouldn’t be going”, says Mulally. He worked at Boeing for no less than 37 years, notably as a chief engineer for the avionics and flight management systems for a number of major Boeing projects, including the 747 and 777. As CEO of Boeing Commercial, he launched the 787, and was at Boeing during the 9/11 attacks, horrified to see a commercial airplane being used as a weapon.

Boeing was shaken to its core by the event, with production dropping from 620 planes a year to 280. “Not many companies can sustain a loss like that and remain viable”, says Mulally. Eventually, Boeing returned as the number one avionics organisation in the world.

The average airplane has about four million parts, and at the height of a new project, you might have over one million people working on the design. This is where Mulally learned how to develop a skilled and motivated team, and his principles and practices around working together led him to success after success at both Boeing and Ford.

Mulally brings up a one-page chart with 11 bullet points.  “This is everything I know, folks”, he tells the audience, and he means it. Whenever an audience member asks a question, he brings this chart back up on screen, selects the relevant point, and talks to it. Here’s the list in full:

Principles and practices around working together:

  • People first
  • Everyone is included
  • Compelling vision, comprehensive strategy and relentless implementation
  • Clear performance goals
  • One plan
  • Facts and Data
  • Everyone knows the plan, the status and areas that need special attention
  • Propose a plan, positive, “find a way” attitude
  • Respect, listen, help, and appreciate each other
  • Emotional resilience – trust the process
  • Have fun – enjoy the journey and each other.

Making sure “everyone knows the plan” is achieved through colour-coded project charts. “Every Thursday morning, we’d link up everyone around the world and colour-code the charts”, Mulally says. “Red means we’ve identified a problem – which is great – and we’re working on it.”

Ford Motors Turnaround

Mulally took these colour-coded charts over to Ford when he took on the role of CEO at the behest of Bill Ford, grandson of Henry. There he found a very different culture, and at first, people didn’t “get” the colour coding. “We had about 320 different charts”,

Mulally says, “I explained the coding, and the business leaders went away and had their charts colour coded. At the following meeting, I was surprised to see chart after chart all colour-coded green”.

The organisation was forecast to lose 17 billion that year, yet there wasn’t any red or yellow to be seen. The problem, Mulally discovered, was a culture in which business leaders would hide problems, making issues disappear rather than highlighting them as opportunities.

When a leader named Mark Fields was finally brave enough to place some red on his chart (due to a major production issue), Mulally responded by clapping in the leadership meeting. “People were looking at me, looking at Mark, waiting for him to be fired”, he says. “They thought the clapping was a signal for some bouncers to come in and remove Mark from the room!”

But Fields wasn’t fired. Instead, Mulally treated the production issue as a rallying point, showing Ford’s business leaders how to come together to figure out the problem, and also demonstrating that he valued Mark’s honesty by seating him next to the CEO at each subsequent meeting. Mark’s charts went from red, to yellow, to green.

And the following week? 320 beautiful, rainbow charts.

Deep Trouble

When Mulally took over at Ford, the company was in deep trouble with the aforementioned $17 billion loss in 2009. Ford was sized for 26 per cent market share in the US, but only had 16 per cent, losing money on every brand and vehicle. Mulally responded by focusing on the Ford brand over all others and consolidating the nameplates down from 97 to 15.

He launched a restructuring plan to turn around the losses and market share, and his cost-cutting initiatives led to the company’s first profitable quarter in two years.

In 2006, Mulally led the effort for Ford to borrow $23.6 billion, mortgaging all of Ford’s assets to overhaul the company and protect it from recession. This decision meant that Ford was the only company of the “Detroit Three” (Ford, GM and Chrysler) that did not have to take a government loan during the automotive industry crisis of 2008–9.

Value of Procurement

Mulally recognised the enormous value of procurement, especially in his aggressive cost-cutting endeavours. He promoted procurement to a leadership position within the company – something which had never been done at Ford – and ensured all of the business units around the world were working together with procurement.

Suppliers were also a major part of Mulally’s turnaround, and Ford rose from a position of second-last preferred customer, to number three today.

Today, Ford is the number one brand in the US, and the fastest-growing car manufacturer globally. It builds the first, third and sixth best-selling vehicles in the world presently. Mulally attributes this success to his eleven-point slide – in the end, it’s all about building the right culture and motivating your people.

Why the Entire Procurement Profession Needs to Get Social

Tania Seary tells delegates at the Asia-Pacific CPO Forum that procurement needs to get social to drive the profession forward. 

Tania Seary - Get Social

Procurement professionals need to claim their rightful place on the Internet, and get social, by actively participating in social media and blogs for the benefit of the broader industry, the founder of Procurious told a conference in Melbourne yesterday.

Tania Seary, who founded Procurious to connect, promote and support procurement professionals across the globe, told the 9th Asia-Pacific CPO Forum that online visibility has several benefits, but that it’s everyone’s responsibility.

Large portions of the procurement profession are working in isolation, unaware that there is a whole universe of knowledge available to help them do their jobs better and learn, Seary told the audience.

In fact, there are more than 2.5 million procurement professionals in the world, but probably less than 500,000 that the industry can readily connect with, she says.

Share, Share, Share

Procurious was launched two years ago as the world’s first online business community dedicated to procurement and supply chain professionals.

“The procurement profession must share, share and share online to build our collective muscle, amplify attention to our impact, and tackle our thorniest issues together,” Seary says.

This can start by simply sharing your social media profile, your business photo, and by broadcasting your everyday successes.

“Think about what it would mean if a newly-minted company CEO who wants to understand what we do, takes the time to Google ‘procurement’ and sees overwhelmingly positive language in their search results. That CEO can’t help but be inspired and energised by the hype and positivity around procurement,” Seary says.

She also urged all procurement professionals to ask questions and share what they don’t know, saying that without sharing the things you’re concerned about, no action can be built, and there can be no moving forward. Giving back to enrich the wider community, by understanding that everyone has something valuable to share is important too, she says.

Big Ideas 2016

The highlights of Procurious’ Big Ideas Summit, held last month in London, were also shared to the 50-strong audience of procurement leaders. Keynote speakers included IBM, Coupa, ISM, Facebook and The Economist.

“What happened in the conference in London was only a small part of the story. What makes Big Ideas truly unique is that it is a digital conference that is amplified to procurement professionals around the globe.”

For example, the #BigIdeas2016 hashtag was tweeted 1,500 times, reaching a potential audience of 4.3 million individuals, all around the world, in just over 24 hours.

“Let me tell you that the message in the room was clear. Procurement needs to think the unthinkable and certainly rethink the possible,” she told the audience.

The UK is now auditing Supply Chain Purity in the fight against slavery, while Social Procurement is on the agenda in Australia.

Get Social Enterprises on Board

Social Enterprise UK CEO, Peter Holbrook, announced at the Big Ideas Summit the ‘Buy Social Corporate Challenge‘, which will see a group of high profile businesses aim to spent £1 billion with social enterprises by 2020.

The founding partners include heavy hitters like Johnson & Johnson, PwC and Zurich.

J&J are taking action and supporting people often termed ‘furthest from employment’, with the ‘Social Impact through Procurement‘ initiative aiming to create at least 150 jobs for these people by 2020.

“Here in Australia, Social Procurement has been a concept we have been talking about, trialling, but the big ideas summit confirmed that this is now firmly on all major corporation’s agenda.

“Not only is this the right thing to do, but this is the sort of thing that the C-level, annual reports and what Procurement could be famous for. So where are we with Social Procurement in Australia? I will be interested to hear.”

What is the Biggest Challenge Facing Procurement?

From talent management, to ethics and transparency, there are some major challenges facing procurement in the current environment. But which is the biggest challenge?

Biggest Challenge

When considering the potential issues and risks that procurement professionals need to be aware of in their day to day work, it’s difficult to single out one in particular requiring greater focus than the rest.

In fact, if you were to ask the question of what is the biggest challenge currently facing procurement, the chances are high that you would get a considerable number of topics listed. However, that is exactly what Deltabid did with a survey of over 500 procurement professionals. More on this shortly.

Blind Spots

During the Big Ideas Summit 2016, Procurious asked its delegates to tell us what they considered to be procurement’s blind spots, and major areas of risk, in the coming years. Our panel of experts highlighted these areas:

  • Too great a focus on savings
  • Dealing with the wider business
  • Talent attraction and management
  • A lack of ambition in procurement
  • Working with legal teams

A contributor to the Procurement Leaders blog commented that, “CPOs face one of the most complex roles in an organisation”, and highlighted skills required for the future including a focus on strategic relationships, management of global supply chain risk and use of big data.

At the 9th Annual Asia-Pacific CPO Forum, The Faculty will be discussing the need for procurement to leverage supplier-enabled innovation, and a focus for procurement on SRM in order to make this a reality.

And when you consider the prevalence of stories and news reports on sustainability and supply chain transparency, it seems we are reaching a point where not only can we not reach a consensus on what the biggest challenge is, but also facing a lack of understanding about how we tackle these challenges.

Making Progress?

The other issue to consider is whether or not the procurement profession is making progress dealing with its biggest challenges. A quick search reveals a number of articles from the past couple of years asking a similar question of procurement leaders, including this one from Spend Matters.

In it, the top 5 challenges for CPOs are highlighted, including mitigating spend creep, the visibility of realised savings, compliance, technology, and procurement skills and capabilities to deliver on strategies. Starting to sound familiar?

What procurement must do is set out to tackle these challenges, and actually make some progress on them, instead of moving on to the next thing. And also to realise that these challenges don’t go away – it’s going to be a continuous process.

Biggest Challenge

This circles back to being able to identify the biggest challenge facing the profession, and perhaps assessing an order for them to be in, and a plan of attack for meeting them head on. This is where Deltabid’s research can help.

A survey of over 500 procurement professionals found that the biggest challenge was supplier-related issues, including finding and qualifying suppliers and maintaining consistent supply, with strategy selection, and cost reduction making up the top three. You can see the full results in the infographic below:

Procurement Biggest Challenge

While the results may not be surprising, they go some way to helping generate a consensus on the biggest challenge facing procurement. It’s now down to the profession as a collective entity to work out the best way to tackle these challenges.

One of the best ways of doing this is by collaborating openly, sharing knowledge, information, and lessons learned, and flexing our collective muscle in order to change the profession for the better.

If you have any comments, ideas, thoughts, or anything else you would like to share, please let us know in the comments below. If you have also had successes in dealing with any of these challenges, then we would love to tell your story!

Procurement Needs More Positivity in an Online World

In our online world, where knowledge and information is at the touch of a button, it pays to share. And it’s time for procurement to share in order to demonstrate the value it brings to the organisation.

Share Share Share

Sometimes the biggest and best ideas are the simplest ones. Whether it’s a new way of looking at an old problem, or just showing others how to take the first of many steps, the simplest ideas often have the power to cut through the noise and change the way people think.

This is my big, simple idea: the procurement profession needs to share.

Have you ever looked into how Google works? The search engine performs approximately 100 billion searches per month through over 60 trillion individual pages. Google navigates the web by ‘crawling’, or following links from page to page, sorting the pages and keeping track of it all in the 100-million-gigabyte ‘index’. As you search, algorithms work in the background to understand what you want and pull relevant documents from the index.

Results are then ranked using over 200 factors, including site quality, spam removal, freshness and user context – all in 1/8th of a second. Google is becoming incredibly sophisticated, taking keywords into account as part of a wider interpretation of the data on your website, to form its own conclusion about what your site actually delivers.

Language Matters

I found this out, predictably, through a Google search. My point is that as the amount of web content and chatter about procurement grows exponentially all over the world, we need to keep in mind that the language we use matters.

The profession has to optimise the picture that is being painted about procurement because the more positive words and imagery that are put out there, the more we will be discovered and our value understood.

The good news is that influential advocates for the profession are doing exactly that – in the past 48 hours we’ve had positive keywords and phrases used to describe procurement (here on Procurious and elsewhere) including:

  • Avenger
  • Rock-star
  • Thinking the unthinkable
  • Millennial-led disruption
  • Leadership in the digital age
  • Unleash the superhero
  • Procurement evolution
  • Changing the business model
  • Collaborating to inspire

Think about what would mean when a newly-minted CEO, who wants to understand what we do, takes the time to Google ‘Procurement’ and sees overwhelmingly positive language like this in their search results. That CEO can’t help but be inspired and energised by the hype and positivity around procurement.

Forget re-branding – focus on reinforcing the value of procurement

There’s been some discussion recently about re-branding procurement, abandoning the title of CPO and adopting language such as ‘Commercial Operations Director’, or even ‘Chief Relationship Officer’. Further down the chain, only one-third of 99 different job titles used by procurement professionals include the term “procurement”.

In my opinion, re-branding procurement is a distraction, especially since we’ve made enormous progress in educating businesses about what procurement does. Rather than having to re-educate the C-Suite about what a Commercial Director or Chief Relationship Officer does, that energy could be better spent actually showing people what we have and can achieve.

In line with why we created Procurious to begin with, we know that the procurement and supply chain profession has struggled to overcome outdated stereotypes, so it’s time we join forces to become collectively valued. By empowering future procurement leaders, we can change the face of the profession from the inside out, rather than worrying about the label itself.

Share, share, SHARE!

Procurious Founder Tania Seary shares her Big Idea for 2016

Modern wisdom has it that if you don’t exist on Google, you don’t exist at all. If we can’t collectively raise our voice and optimise procurement through positivity, then there is a real danger that the CPO role will become increasingly irrelevant and, eventually, forgotten.

So, how do we go about it? Through constant positive reinforcement. The more positive stories, photographs and other uplifting imagery out there, the more it will help us. Specifically, you can:

  • Share your social media profile, your business photo and broadcast your everyday successes.
  • Ask questions and share what you don’t know – without sharing the things we’re concerned about, there can be no action built and no moving forward.
  • Give knowledge back to enrich the wider community – everyone has something valuable to share.
  • Share your vision for the profession, and most importantly, your big ideas.

Let’s stick with the label we’ve got and continue to build upon it, because the momentum is with us as a profession. Remember, the more we flex our collective muscle, the stronger we become. My call to action to all you avengers, rock-stars and superheroes out there is to get behind one word – and that word is “procurement”.

Even although the event itself is over, there’s still time for you to get involved with the Big Ideas Summit 2016. Visit the Big Ideas Summit website, join our Procurious Group, and Tweet your thoughts and Big Ideas to us using #BigIdeas2016.

In the coming weeks, we’ll be sharing exclusive and unique thought leadership, Big Ideas, and discussion that will shape the future of procurement. Don’t miss out – get involved, register today.

5 Ways Slack Can Help Build a Better Procurement Function

Charting the stratospheric rise of Slack, and investigating how it can be used to increase collaboration and conversation in procurement.

slack icon macro

For those who don’t know, Slack is an online communication tool, built around both group and a one-to-one chat. But it’s much more than that. Unlike any other system, Slack can talk to pretty much any other tool through the magic of APIs and webhooks.

These integrations make it a mind-numbingly powerful tool, because it becomes a platform for pretty much anything you need, and can be the focal point of many aspects of your business.

It drastically reduces the number of systems you need to consult to get the information you need to do your job. If something is noteworthy, it should be pushed to Slack.

This incredible value has allowed Slack to grow very fast. We don’t have any startup in our surroundings who doesn’t use it. But it is also increasingly used in larger organisations, for example, NASA, Dow Jones and Salesforce. Plus, all the major news outlets talk about it or even use it.

Their progress is staggering. After less than 2 years there are more than 2 millions active users of Slack globally. And it’s only the beginning.

Slack usage

Does Procurement really need it?

Does Procurement need to collaborate or be more nimble? Can it use Slack as part of its digital transformation?

Yes, of course! And here’s why:

1. Collaborate, Collaborate, Collaborate

With your team, your stakeholders and your suppliers. It’s easy to create topical channels and invite people to join them. Even if they are outside of the company.

Imagine: you no longer have to ask IT to create a dedicated section on the intranet, or setup a “secure room” to exchange documents. Slack can host everything from documents to discussions, and it’s available for anyone with access to the channel. It’s the end of information trapped in someone’s mailbox.

That’s how you’ll get smooth collaboration with your stakeholders or your suppliers.

2. Make Life Easier by Knowing What Happens Everywhere

Slack has this incredible ability to integrate easily with pretty much anything.

Twitter, Dropbox, Google Docs, or anything that can respond to a URL, can be integrated with Slack. This means that when something noteworthy happens, you get a notification in Slack and not cluttering your inbox. One more step towards inbox zero!

And a new range of Procurement tools can also be integrated and send notifications to inform you about new purchase orders or new negotiation projects.

Soon, the days of email notifications and logging into 5 different systems to know if something has happened, will be gone.

3. Kill (internal) emails

This is probably the last step towards inbox zero. We have set a rule in our company that basically says, “if there is no recipient outside of the company, then don’t send an email. Use Slack instead”.

You have no idea how much this reduces the number of emails we receive on a daily basis. If the information is meant to be shared with one person only, you can use the direct messages, otherwise, it can be posted in a relevant channel. Easy!

The Per Angusta Team's Slack
The Per Angusta Team’s Slack Channel

4. Towards “Conversational Procurement”?

Recently, there has been a lot of talk about the concept of conversational procurement. In essence, people in your company would no longer visit your e-Procurement tool to buy things, but would instead talk to an automated system that would understand their needs, gather relevant information and run the process of validating and ordering.

Think of it as Procurement meets Siri, or Google Now if you’re an Android person (or Cortana if you’re…oh wait no-one is a Windows Phone person…).

And that’s exactly what bots are in Slack. An interface for the user to interact with a system in a loosely structured way. Of course, this would mean that a system in the background would have to understand your request, but at least the user-facing part is taken care of.

5. Have Some Fun

Besides all the serious things you can do in Slack, there is also the #random channel, which acts as a sort of virtual water cooler,  a place to just relax and post some funny stuff.

Again, the fact that Slack is so easily integrated with a number of services will let you post nice animated gifs everywhere.

So what are you going to do next?

We suggest you register with Slack and create a room (or possibly talk to IT first…). Don’t worry, it’s free, and you will only start paying if you have more than 10 integrations. And if you reach that point, then it probably means that you will be happy to pay for the service.

Just be aware that Procurement and Digital Procurement are already taken!

ISM & Procurious: Leveraging Social Media in Procurement

Ahead of his keynote address at the Procurious Big Ideas Summit 2016, ISM CEO Tom Derry discusses ISM’s new partnership with Procurious, as well as the power of leveraging social media in procurement.

Leveraging Social Media

ISM and Procurious recently announced a new partnership, as ISM became a Procurious Foundation Partner. This will increase Procurious members’ access to ISM’s highly regarded research, events and educational offerings, from certification programs to the newly launched ISM Mastery Model™. ISM members will also benefit from the rich educational resources and networking opportunities on Procurious.

Leveraging Social Media

Over the last several years, social media has become crucial for connection professionals in all fields — especially procurement and supply chain. I honestly don’t see how anyone can expect to be successful in this day and age without leveraging social media.

Social media gives you access to a broader network than could ever be obtained face-to-face. You have the opportunity to tap into the global repository of procurement knowledge. Why would anyone choose to miss out on this competitive advantage?

Not only that, social media can serve as a news channel providing real-time updates and alerts. How powerful is it that you can be updated on market trends, natural disasters, geopolitical events and much more — all with a tool you keep in your pocket. It’s the agile organisation that survives and thrives in today’s environment, and you can’t be agile if you’re not plugged in to real-time events.

Procurious and ISM

When I first learned of Procurious, I felt it was a no-brainer. Procurious enables the supply management professional to leverage the immediacy of a social network in a in a professionally appropriate medium.

With the focus solely on supply chain, this platform connects professionals working on similar projects and initiatives globally. This adds value in two distinct ways: your building your own knowledge base, but also your personal professional brand.

When I tell colleagues about Procurious, I often hear, “How is it different from LinkedIn?” While there are many similar features, Procurious provides additional advantage for procurement and supply chain professionals. In addition to connecting you globally with those in the field, it gives you the upper hand through education, blogs, event calendars and my favourite — the Discussion board.

Discussions and Communication

I think we have all experienced our work being halted by a roadblock we have not faced before. As procurement professionals, we are often the experts in our organisation, making it feel like this is our mountain to climb alone. Instead of banging our head against the wall, we have somewhere to turn.

Whether you are looking for the right SRM system or a need career advice, the discussion board immediately connects you with others who may have the answer you need. There is strong, practical value in the communication on the discussion boards. One recent post was looking for advice on how to manage stakeholder expectations on procurement lead times.

Professionals from around the globe weighed in with advice on how to communicate the value procurement adds beyond simple considerations of speed and price. It’s just one example of how practitioners can leverage the experience of their peers to facilitate real results.

Looking to the Future

ISM is becoming more engaged with Procurious. We will be launching an ISM group this month. This group will add another place for those connected with ISM to go for networking and and for those new to ISM to discover and connect with us.

I am looking forward to watching the ISM community grow and develop on this platform. I see this being a great place for our members and nonmembers to connect. With more than 50,000 ISM members globally, there is a great opportunity to be had from potential collaboration.