Tag Archives: procurement conference

Big Ideas Summit 2016: Big Idea #9 – Help Inspire Millennials

Lucy Harding has called on procurement leaders to help inspire Millennials by inviting them to thought leadership events.

At the Big Ideas Summit 2016, we challenged our thought leaders to share their Big Ideas for the future of procurement.

From ideas that have the potential to change the very nature of the procurement profession, to ones that got the assembled minds thinking about the profession’s impact outside of the organisation, the response we received was amazing.

Help Inspire Millennials

Lucy Harding, Partner and Global Head of Practice, Procurement and Supply Chain at Odgers Berndtson, challenged CPOs to open up access to events, such as the Big Ideas Summit, to the Millennials in their organisations.

Lucy argues that such events can inspire Millennials. By accessing thought leadership and innovative events, it can encourage them to sell key message to their generation in their organisations.

Catch up with all the delegates’ Big Ideas from the 2016 Summit at the Procurious Learning Hub.

Want to find out more about Big Ideas 2016? And maybe what we have planned for 2017? You can visit our dedicated website!

If you like this (and you haven’t done so already) join Procurious for free today. Get connected with over 16,000 like-minded procurement professionals from across the world.

7 Key Objectives for Procurement Success

Global procurement professionals are attempting to find new ways to create cost savings, as well as create value. Help is at hand with these 7 key objectives for success.

Key Objectives

ProcureCon Europe is back for it’s 17th consecutive year, answering your challenges in procurement and the future direction of the industry.

As businesses emerge from the recent recession into a fragmented ecosystem, a normal approach to creating value through cost saving is no longer relevant.

Instead, businesses are tasking procurement to effect enterprise-wide change, including implementing process improvement, and operating beyond the contract with suppliers to co-create value, and exploring payment innovation.

ProcureCon Europe has put together seven key procurement objectives you can’t afford to ignore, in order to create an efficient, cost saving and interactive procurement department.

#7: Talent Development

Talent development obtained the least amount of votes in our survey. However, there are few procurement executives who would argue against the importance of having a plan in place to develop the procurement leaders of the future.

#6: Responsible Sourcing

How is this made, and where does it come from? These are important questions on the lips of both procurement professionals and the general public.

Although perhaps less in the spotlight than it was 18 months ago, especially in the public sector, responsible sourcing remains a central pillar for Indirect Procurement.

#5: Taking Advantage of Digitisation

Organisations are rapidly digitising across the board. Procurement is attempting to make the most of the operational advantages implicit in this change.

The move to digitise in many cases means completely overhauling established business processes. This presents a significant opportunity for improvement, and is an essential element of a successful future for Indirect Procurement.

#4: Innovation in Services

Procurement seeks to lead innovation in the way that an organisation uses services, from HR, to IT, Marketing and beyond.

This is an area in which Procurement has the potential to add real value. The fresh availability of external services can mean easy, and comparatively cheap, solutions with minimal risk, which is great for growing companies.

#3: Operational Efficiency

While driving down costs can be done by negotiating better deals, there is also some considerable importance placed on increasing operational efficiency. Doing so means making better use of available resources and ultimately saving money.

#2: Value Delivery

Just like beauty, value is often in the eye of the beholder. That being said, those with a progressive approach to indirect procurement increasingly look to consistently add tangible value to the categories in which they work, and actively measure themselves on their ability to do so.

#1: Cost Leadership

Perhaps unsurprisingly the number one area of importance for Indirect Procurement is in the area of cost leadership. A strong stance on cost leadership can help to drive significant improvement to the bottom line. This is key when Indirect Procurement is expected to demonstrate its ability to drive meaningful savings.

Agility and Technology

These 7 key procurement objectives provides companies with guidance, in order to have an effective procurement department.

However, procurement must stay agile. Factors such as innovation and digitisation are constantly changing. Procurement professionals, particularly those in growing companies, should be taking advantage of available technology to further their reach.

The ProcureCon event series brings together a unique blend of Procurement, Purchasing and Supply Chain experts from across all industries to share their experiences and knowledge with a team of people who truly embrace the strategically important field of Procurement.

Find out more about how ProcureCon Europe is helping procurement professionals to solve their main challenges at on the event website. You can also follow ProcureCon Europe on LinkedIn and Twitter.

Plants (Nuclear) and Treehouses – Growing Procurement at UPMG2016

With an eclectic agenda ranging from a keynote on nuclear energy, to a discourse on treehouses, UPMG2016 is shaping up to be a highly informative conference.

Treehouses UPMG2016

The 85th Annual Utility Purchasing Management Group (ISM UPMG) is just on the horizon. The conference has grown significantly in the past decade, and has come to be recognised as one of the premier educational events within the utility supply chain industry.

As ever, the agenda is an eclectic mix of topics. As well as some fascinating sounding keynotes on nuclear power and treehouses, attendees will be discussing issues from sustainability to leadership, politics to human behaviour.

Here’s a small taste of the line-up in store at UPMG2016.

Industry Trends and Nuclear Delivery

Much like ISM’s annual conference, it’s not all about procurement and supply chain. There are plenty utilities-specific sessions to visit.

  • Power Industry

An important session, and one of the main reasons the UPMG conference exists. This session will cover industry trends and how they will affect power industry spending and resource demands over the next 12 to 24 months.

Britt Burt from Industrial Info Resources will also explore spending within industry segments for gas, coal, nuclear, and renewable generation, along with transmission and distribution projects.

  • Human Side of Power Generation

Similarly, this session will look at the human side of power generation. Experts from Associated Builders and Contractors, Alabama Power Project, and TVA, will explore the demand outlook for skilled craft labour supporting the US Power generation fleet.

This will include the cyclic demands of outage seasons, and the unique solutions utilities, contractors and labour are putting in place to meet peak requirements.

  • Delivering the Nuclear Promise

Anthony R. Pietrangelo, Senior Vice President and Chief Nuclear Officer of the Nuclear Energy Institute, will present a session on how the industry is advancing safety, and its reliability and economic performance.

Pietrangelo will also speak about the key role nuclear power has to play in environmental sustainability.

Essential Knowledge and Skills

Sessions that cover essential knowledge and skills relevant to the wider profession include discussions on:

  • mergers and acquisitions
  • inventory analytics
  • the changing source-to-pay technology landscape
  • vendor rationalisation
  • leveraging data
  • best-practice contracting and channel strategies.

Presenting organisations include Oniqua, SAP Ariba, IBM, PwC and leading utilities providers.

Leadership & Treehouses

Alongside the industry and sector specific keynotes, there are a few others that are sure to capture attention.

  • “The Treehouse Guy”

“The Treehouse Guy” Pete Nelson is the star of Animal Planet’s ‘Treehouse Masters’. With a reputation for limitless imagination and incomparable skills, Nelson is known as the best treehouse builder in the world. He lives by the inspirational motto “if you dream it, you can build it”.

  • The Science of Leadership

Huffington Post columnist Vanessa Van Edwards is the lead investigator at Science of People, a human behaviour research lab. Her session, “The Science of Leadership”, delves into the latest neuroscience, behavioural economics and phycology research to uncover whether leaders are born or made.

  • Political Climate – Campaign ’16

Hawthorn Group Chairman and CEO, John Ashford, will give a veteran political insider’s look at the 2016 US election campaigns and victory prospects in the race for President, Senate, House and Governor.

Build Your Network

As every conference-going procurement professional knows, one of the most exciting aspects these events is the opportunity to build your network.

Attendees will rub shoulders with colleagues, industry experts, thought-leaders and suppliers on the golf course, in Nashville’s bars and restaurants, and at the conference itself. 

Are you planning to attend UPMG2016? The Procurious community would love to hear from you after the conference about your key takeaways from the event.

The Utility Purchasing Management Group’s 2016 conference will be held in Nashville from 11th – 13th September. You can register here.

Leadership & Chicken – Reflections on SAPICS 2016

Visibility, leadership and SRM in chicken sourcing – highlights from the 38th SAPICS Conference in South Africa.

SAPICS Conference

Earlier this month, I attend the 38th Annual SAPICS Conference, held in Sun City, South Africa. With the theme this year of “A Concert of Coordination”, the conference focused on bringing supply chain professionals together to network, and to discuss topics and access resources relevant to the supply chain profession.

A number of high-profile individuals and organisations graced the speaker list for 2016, far too many to see in 3 days, let alone cover off in a post-conference article! However, I have picked out three major themes and points that I took away from the conference.

1. Gaps in Supply Chain Visibility

Lora Cecere, the renowned Supply Chain Shaman, was in South Africa this month to share her US survey results and some views on the wide range of topics at the SAPICS Conference.

Of particular interest to the procurement community was her take on the challenges in two of the main identified areas of pain: supply chain visibility, and problems in talent management; the latter being that all-time favourite topic of speakers that has no clear solution.

When comparing the importance of visibility of information on first tier material suppliers vs. their actual performance, respondents acknowledged that there was a big gap between importance (83 per cent) and performance (38 per cent). Almost all respondents (96 per cent) identified that there was also a similar gap in visibility into transportation and logistics networks.

Supply Chain Insight

In some cultures, a shaman is believed to be able to use magic to cure sick people, to control future events, and more. Since Lora Cecere is seen as a shaman, we could look to Supply Chain Insights for help when trying to work out why visibility into first tier material suppliers is such a challenge.

What is also interesting from the research, is that respondents did not identify much of a gap between the importance of visibility and actual performance in second and third tier suppliers. Could that really be the case in other markets?

2. Leadership – a hundred years ago

An interesting parallel was drawn by a speaker, Kate Stubbs of Barloworld Logistics, about styles of leadership 100 years and today.

She was reporting back on the annual study, supplychainchangeforesight 2016which was undertaken in conjunction with Frost and Sullivan. She considered the leadership style of Sir Ernest Shackleton, the 1920’s polar explorer, with the traits and approach required of current supply chain leadership.  Shackleton was:

  • a leader that could create order from chaos.
  • one who had to adapt and change to suit his rapidly changing circumstances.
  • optimistic and had a people-centred approach to success.
  • able to reconsider his path and redirect his goals when he hit serious snags.

Shackleton

Sound familiar?  We often have to change direction mid-stream track due to circumstances, often because of events beyond our control.  Constantly redefining our plan has become the norm.

How much has changed in 100 years?  Men (and women) wanted for hazardous unknown journey, that part’s definitely true. People hope for honour and recognition in the event of success, but it’s not always delivered.

3. Chicken and chips, anyone? Nando’s supply chain

Perinaise

A category manager in the casual dining restaurant business (a more polite term than fast food), has a very different life to the rest of us.  Sourcing electrical parts or software licences is not half as exciting as negotiating for containers of African bird’s eye chillies from Southern Africa, or for the manufacture of bottles of Perinaise.

Nando’s supply chain, although directed from its HQ in Johannesburg, has staff in many of the 30 countries it trades in. Linda Reddy, Supply Chain Director, says that one of their main areas of focus is supplier relationship management, with a major emphasis on continuous improvement. That’s quite important when you have to get fresh-not-frozen chickens from factory to table in less than 8 days.

Next time you are in Nando’s, take time to view the art while you are considering how your hot sauce got to meet your half-chicken. 

References to Powerpoint Presentations at SAPICS:

Lora Cecere: 15 Years Forward: 15 Years Back :  Supply Chain 2030

Kate Stubbs : “supplychainforesight 2016”. Barloworld Logistics.

Have you met the Chief Procurement Officer of the Year?

It’s taken less than two years for Johanne Rossi to implement and lead a major transformation at fuel and oil giant Caltex Australia.

Johanne Rossi

Her goal is to transform the company to become the customer of choice for suppliers. What this means is Caltex gets higher quality, a lower total cost of doing business, priority supplier support and access to the latest innovations.

“I came on board to kick off this journey for Caltex procurement at a time when Caltex was transitioning to stay current and create a bright future for itself. We realised that the fuel industry is being challenged with new trends and new competition is entering the market. The entire procurement function and what we stood for as a company needed a complete rethink,” Rossi says.

The process required long-standing internal silos to be broken down so that company teams could integrate and work closer together through the change, challenging the status-quo and doing things smarter.

The confidence and determination she displays in her role with Caltex are some of the key reasons Rossi has been named Chief Procurement Officer of the Year at the 9th Asia-Pacific CPO Forum in Melbourne.

Upon winning the award, Rossi praised the work done by The Faculty’s Founding Chairman, Tania Seary, adding that the innovation and collaboration she’s fostering within the procurement community is vital to ensure the function evolves.

At Caltex, Rossi is responsible for a $1.8 billion spend. She’s led a transformation program of the entire procurement function, leading to a saving of more than $100 million through improved agreements, cost avoidance, process improvement in both Opex and Capex and revenue generation. She is credited with delivering on company-wide strategy, and creating value in key supplier partnerships.

Rossi, meanwhile, came to Caltex after being headhunted for the role. She has a background in FMCG, management consulting, mining, airline industry and also construction with blue-chip companies like Nestle, Qantas and Accenture.

A determined approach to CPO leadership

“I recall during the interview process for Caltex I was asked about whether I was aggressive in my approach and how determined I was. It was a strong indication of what sort of leader they were looking for in the role.”

Rossi has had to rely on these skills to implement far-reaching cost reductions, as well as a major review of what the procurement function encompassed within the company. This has involved re-structuring and organising internal teams in new ways to better partner with stakeholders and supply partners. A global sourcing team has also been set up in Singapore. A procurement innovation manager has been hired to achieve benefits for the company in the longer term, such as finding new, mutual value with supply partners through innovation and implementing efficiencies. The focus of the team is on reducing the total cost of ownership of external goods and services for the company, bringing innovation from supply partners, reducing wastage in dealings with partners, as opposed to just being price focused, says Rossi.

“I believe that a lot of people know how manage and evaluate tenders, but that’s not where we want to spend most of our time – that’s not where the sustainable value lies. As the role of procurement within Caltex evolves, we want to be spending more time in building internal and external relationships, and developing stronger business and commercial skills.”

A supplier relationship program called Catalyst has been developed and is currently being rolled out. It focuses on building mutually beneficial relationships with supply partners, and goes beyond supplier performance management, Rossi says.

“The entire focus for us is to become the customer of choice for our suppliers. To do this, we’ve segmented our supplier base, which consists of about 3,500 suppliers. It’s very difficult to treat each of our suppliers in a special manner, but that’s what we’re working to achieve,” Rossi says.

“We’ve also worked to get closer with internal stakeholders to better understand their growth targets and how we fit into those and bring solutions from our external spend networks. We’ve transformed relationships with our suppliers. We want to have a far more frictionless relationship with them by integrating systems, simplifying the transactional activities, and benchmarking our actions so that our achievements are visible.”

While the transformation process has been under way for more than 18 months, there are still a number of improvement efficiency opportunities that Rossi wants to implement. Conscious of the evolving workforce, she is interested in looking at ways to better organise the procurement function and create new skills to find greater efficiencies, continuously bring new value and anticipate the future, she says.

“My focus is on creating a strong team that will be nimble and adapt to the changing conditions of the market and the company. A team that will develop new capabilities to create its own future, focused on continuously bringing new value.”

“The experiences I’ve had in my career have made me a stronger person. It’s been a tough journey, even though I’m fully aware I have sometimes created my own obstacles. I now want to give back and make the journey more enjoyable for others if I can.”

“Thinking about how you can better support those around you is paramount”, says Rossi. “The world is completely different to what it was a decade ago. It’s incredible to realise how much impact you can have on others’ lives.”

The  2016 CPO of the Year Award is sponsored by Avetta Global.

Editor’s Choice: 5 Big Ideas to energise your day

On April 21st, 50 of the world’s most influential procurement minds joined forces with over 14,000 digital delegates to crowdsource Big Ideas for the future of procurement.

Big Ideas

By popular demand, we’ve brought together five thought-provoking Big Ideas from some of the biggest names in procurement.

Big Idea – Millennial Talent Response


Nic Walden, Director – Procurement P2P Advisor at The Hackett Group, talks about the greater expectations that Millennials have for job roles.

From expectations about working on CSR projects and building sustainable relationships, to the technology that they will be working with, Nic argues that procurement needs to change the way they engage with the Millennial generation in the workplace.

Big Idea – Maximise Social Impact


Hugh Chamberlain, Commercial Procurement Lead at Johnson & Johnson, challenged procurement professionals to buy from social enterprises in his Big Idea.

Buying from these enterprises can help add value to society, the community and the planet, as well as giving buyers immense personal satisfaction.

Big Idea – Everyone Can Contribute


Nathan Ott, CEO e.g.1 Ltd and Director at The GC Index Ltd, argues that while not everyone is a ‘Game Changer’, everyone is capable of making a game-changing contribution, from the top to the bottom of the organisation.

However, in order to do this, organisations need to create a culture where it is safe to fail, and these ‘Game Changers’ are not seen as disruptive, pigeon-holed, or made to conform. Only by doing this can organisations create real step change.

Big Idea – Harness the Crowd


Lisa Malone, GM – Europe at Procurious, talks about how procurement can lead organisations in harnessing the power of the crowd, and the concept of ‘hackathons’ in order to drive innovation.

Hackathons provide an opportunity to work on the business, rather that in the business. They give employees the chance to take time out and come up with new ideas, and communicate and collaborate with people they would not have the opportunity to do so with otherwise.

Big Idea – Challenging Traditional Procurement


Lee Gudgeon, Client Engagement Director at REED Global, says that the increasing role of procurement has highlighted a shortage of candidates with the right skill sets available to come into the profession.

Lee argues that procurement recruiters also need to be up-skilled in order to recognise the relevant skills and capabilities required in procurement, in other functions, and open up the market to people who might otherwise have been overlooked.

Want to see more Big Ideas? Check out our extensive library containing two years’ of Big Ideas from some of the world’s leading thinkers in procurement.

Inspirational Words from Women in Procurement 2016

The Faculty’s Hugo Britt shares some inspirational words and thought-provoking ideas from the 2nd Annual Women in Procurement conference. 

Women in Procurement 2016 Inspirational Words

Back in March, I attended Quest Event’s 2nd Annual Women in Procurement conference in Melbourne, representing Procurious as the event’s media partner.

Literally within minutes of the conference being opened by NBN Co’s Chief Procurement Officer Coretta Bessi, I was scrambling to keep up my note taking as a flood of ideas, inspirational words and thought leadership came from the podium. And this pace didn’t let up over the two days of the conference.

Why run a conference exclusively for women in Procurement in Australia? Because the numbers are dire.

According to Jigsaw Talent Management’s Trends in Gender Diversity, the average split in the Australian national workforce is 54 per cent to 46 per cent in favour of men. But in the Procurement profession specifically the numbers are much worse – 63 per cent to 36 per cent in favour of men. Let’s not also forget the widening gender pay gap – currently averaging 17.1 per cent.

All of these figures point to an urgent need to drive change through a gathering of minds such as that seen at Women in Procurement.

Rather than try to summarise the content of the key speakers’ presentations, I’d like to share what I took as the most inspirational words and thought-provoking quotes from the conference.

Coretta Bessi, CPO, NBN Co.

“Ask yourself every day: ‘What am I doing today that will make me better tomorrow than I was yesterday?’”

Kelly Irwin, Head of Procurement Australia and NZ, Holcim

“Have the courage to leap out of your comfort zone.”

“A boss depends on authority, but a leader depends on goodwill.”

Jonathan Dutton, Director, JD Consultancy

“The secret to success in procurement is staying relevant to the vision.”

“Corporate Social Responsibility has the potential to change the fabric of our decision-making in procurement.”

Dutton’s four big critiques of modern procurement:

  1. An unproductive focus on cost
  2. Organisational isolation with no customer focus
  3. Glacial pace of procurement processes
  4. Acting without enquiry and not asking WHY.

Margaret Ruwoldt, University of Melbourne, speaking on the “Working out Loud” movement

“Hierarchical boundaries are much more permeable in a networked world. You have personal development opportunities that didn’t exist five years ago.”

“’Working out Loud’ is ‘How to Make Friends and Influence People’ meets the internet”

“Don’t wait to be plucked from the crowd – make yourself stand out.”

Jackie Aggett, Head of Procurement, Laing O’Rourke and The Faculty Roundtable member

“Courage, for me, means believing in myself, and believing my ideas are worth sharing.”

Sharon Hoysted, Procurement Manager, Supplier Management, Boeing Aerostructures Australia

“Diversity and inclusion are key to fostering a culture of innovation in your business.”

Nelli Kim, Senior Supplier Management Specialist, Telstra International Group

“If you can get through the self-doubt and give something a try, it’s a win.”

“What are YOU doing to personally manage your development?”

Professor Margaret Alston, Monash University

“Australia’s gender pay gap has grown to 17.1 per cent differential. This is simply not equitable. To achieve the same wage in Australia, women would have to work 64 days extra per year.”

Jennie Vickers, Director Australia and NZ, IACCM

“Don’t be defined by your job title or you’ll find yourself disappearing.”

“Make the case and articulate the benefits of supplier relationship management.”

Honey Meares, Procurement Manager, Supply Strategy, Genesis Energy

On clarity of purpose: “It’s important to know what you are trying to achieve.” 

Sarah Collins, Chief Procurement Officer, NSW Roads and Maritime Services

“Don’t try to change everything at once – rather, concentrate on starting the momentum.”

You can check out the full programme for the event here.

Hugo Britt is a Research Consultant at The Faculty, helping to support The Faculty Roundtable, an influential group of Australian procurement leaders, who gather to share their experiences and insights. The Faculty will be hosting their ninth Asia-Pacific CPO Forum, the region’s premier procurement event dedicated to accelerating commercial leadership at the highest level.

For more information on The Faculty Roundtable or CPO Forum, contact Program Manager, Belinda Toohey.

Disruptors & Cul-de-Sacs: Recapping Big Ideas 2016

Did you fall asleep or oversleep? Get caught in a meeting? Or did you just forget it was on (we hope not!)? To help you catch up, we’re recapping Big Ideas 2016 – and what a day it was!

Many Meetings - Recapping Big Ideas 2016

The team at Procurious HQ would just like to say a quick thanks to everyone who took part in the Big Ideas Summit 2016, both in London, and around the world. We were blown away by the conversation, discussion and interaction last week’s Summit, and are looking forward to sharing even more with you in the coming weeks.

Where were you last Thursday? Did you join in with the discussions and conversation online? While we prepare all our influencers’ videos and content to share soon, we’ve pulled out some of the key moments and are recapping Big Ideas 2016 just for you.

We got started early, setting the scene and introducing our early arrivals to our digital delegates and social media audience.

To provide the context for all our conversations over the course of the day, Barry Ward, Senior Procurement Brand Manager at IBM, spoke about external change, market disruptions and the three key calls to action that CPOs must take notice of.

Barry W - BIS Keynote

Nik Gowing then scared the life out of us talking about the cataclysmic potential of Unthinkable Events.

Having talked about the findings of his excellent ‘Thinking the Unthinkable‘ study, our delegates were invited to think about their unthinkables, and share them with the rest of the room.

Nik G - BIS Keynote

As everyone settled back down again after our morning interlude, Paul Markillie opened our eyes to the potential of the disruptive mega-trends that will change the way supply chains are designed and operated.

Paul talked about new materials being used in the manufacturing process, how BMW are leading the way in this field with their manufacturing process for the i3 model, and how 3D Printing is finally coming of age.

The audience were then treated to an insight of a revolution currently taking social media by storm. Elizabeth Linder used her wealth of experience to build on the concept of the Conversational Century.

Needless to say, it got people thinking, and more than a couple of senior procurement leaders in the room considering how their teams could be leveraging social media more effectively.

Elizabeth L - BIS Keynote

Probably the keynote with the most profound human and empathetic impact of the day came from Lucy Siegle. Lucy pricked our social consciences while discussing the impact that supply chains, particularly those in the fashion industry, were having on a global population.

From consumer behaviour, to the forgotten people in supply chains, Lucy got us all considering what we individually and collectively could do to make a real difference in the world.

Sustainability Panel

Lucy was joined on stage by Peter Holbrook, CEO at Social Enterprise UK, and Timo Worrall, of J&J, to discuss social and sustainable procurement.

It was a fascinating discussion and generated some great takeaways for our procurement leaders. Take a look here at some of the topics our experts discussed.

Gabe P - BIS Keynote

Fancy yourself as a Chief Spend Officer? If Gabe Perez and Coupa have their way, then procurement’s remit could expand to include all organisational spend. Here are a few top insights from his session.

Online collaboration is something all the members of our next panel know about in great detail. Martin Chilcott, founder of 2degrees, Chris Hancock, founder of Source2Fund, and our very own Procurious GM, Lisa Malone, discussed the power of online collaboration in procurement.

Read our thoughts on it here.

Next up, procurement heavyweight and ISM CEO, Tom Derry. Tom talked about how ISM are helping procurement professionals equip themselves for the future by ensuring that they have the right skills. The ISM Mastery Model has already helped train over 60,000 procurement professionals, and it certainly felt like there were a few more converts in the audience!

Tom Derry - BIS Keynote

Tom was then joined by two heavy hitters in the UK CPO recruitment space in Lucy Harding and Lee Gudgeon to discuss what skills procurement leaders need to succeed in the future.

Lucy urged the delegates to help “challenge the notion that procurement is a career cul-de-sac“, and showcasing all the best aspects of working in procurement.

Big Data, predictive analytics and forecasting will enable procurement to be more agile in a volatile environment. This was the view of Chris Sawchuk, the Hackett Group, during the final keynote of the day.

Finally, we asked some senior procurement leaders to tell us what they thought procurement’s blind spots were, and how they should be dealing with them.

There were some great, tough questions from the audience, and from our social media audience, producing some great insights for our delegates to take away.

Continuing Online

The day itself may now be over, but the debate and discussions are still being amplified online. You can see all our content from the day on the Big Ideas Summit website, plus check out all the conversation from the day on Twitter too.

You can find all our Periscope recordings of the keynotes and panels in the Big Ideas 2016 Group, as well as accessing our Digital Goodie Bag, which all our sponsors have contributed to.

Plus we’ve just started to release our first few videos from the event, in which our thought leaders shared their own Big Ideas. You can find them in the Learning hub on Procurious.

And if that’s not enough reading material for you, here’s a handy list of related stories you might have missed on Big Ideas 2016:

The Big Ideas Summit 2016 Is Underway!

We’re off and running here in London but there are still ample opportunities to get involved in Big Ideas Summit as a Digital Delegate!

Big Ideas Summit Speaker Banner

It feels like revisiting an old friend – familiar faces in the room, influencers and keynote speakers, a fabulous location at the Soho Hotel, and a buzz of excitement for things to come.

Yes, that’s right, the Big Ideas Summit – the world’s largest procurement online think tank event, is back and after weeks of planning, discussions and anticipation, we’re less than half an hour from our first keynote of the day.

With a nutrition-free breakfast now packed away (or do danishes and coffee count as ‘clean eating’?), Procurious’ Founder, Tania Seary, is welcoming our delegates, setting the ground rules and pointing our delegates towards the Procurious iOS App so they can engage with you – like, right now!

Setting out our Stall

As with the Big Ideas Summit 2015, there are just 50 Top Influencers here at The Soho Hotel. However, the unique nature of this online event means that all 13,500+ Procurious members are invited to shape the agenda, steer the conversations and share their own Big Ideas.

Conversations among Digital Delegates have already been lively with procurement pros the world over submitting questions for our Influencers via Twitter and sharing their own Big Ideas 60 second video challenges on Procurious.

Here in London, we’ll be tackling the thorniest issues for procurement, from the true cost of retail fashion supply chains, to procurement’s blind spots, and why traditional models of leadership are failing us.

We have an amazing speaker and influencer line-up for 2016, with thought leaders, senior executives and experts from world-renowned organisations.

I had the chance to catch up briefly with IBM’s Mike Murphy O’Reilly – one of the first movers on Procurious nearly two years ago – and no prizes for guessing he’s most excited to hear from Elizabeth Linder, Facebook’s Government Communication specialist.

“Like Social Media, Procurement, continues to evolve and the importance of collaborative sharing  events like Big Ideas allows us to harness the collective knowledge and information to further their careers and the function,” Mike told me over coffee before revealing his own Big Idea will be on The Information of Everything!

(Remember: You’ll be able to catch Mike’s and all our Top Influencers’ Big Ideas videos on Procurious in the coming days)

How can I Participate?

Screen Shot 2016-04-19 at 17.29.25

If you’ve got any questions for any of the influencers here or your fellow Digital Delegates, get in touch and we’ll do our best to get you an answer. We also have a number of other ways that you can get involved:

  • Download the App – By popular demand, we’ve just launched the Procurious iOS App! It’s  available free through the iTunes store so you can stay up to date with Big Ideas and connected with Procurious on the go!
  • Keep your eyes peeled – The group will be the place for a digital delegate to get updates from London as they happen.
  • Check out our Twitter feed – We’ll be live-tweeting from the event all day, keeping you up to date with all the discussions. Join in and Tweet us your questions and ideas @procurious_ using #BigIdeas2016
  • Like our Facebook page – If you’re a keen Facebooker, you can get all the day’s updates via our Facebook page, including photos of behind the scenes action as our Influencers take to the Big Ideas film studio. If you haven’t already, you can like Procurious on Facebook here.
  • Follow us on LinkedIn – If LinkedIn is your platform of choice, you can follow Procurious, and join our company Group too. We’ll be sharing our content on LinkedIn with our followers and looking for even more people to get involved.

We’re looking forward to a great day – we hope you are too!

Showcasing Your Big Ideas – Volatility as an Opportunity

Kicking off the day of the Big Ideas Summit, we’re looking at another of your Big Ideas. Mike Robertson shares his thoughts on why volatility represents an opportunity to procurement.

At the Big Ideas Summit 2016 today, we will be asking our speakers and attendees to record their ‘Big Ideas’ live on camera for the whole of our Procurious community to see.

But we also believe that every single procurement and supply chain professional has a unique vantage point in the industries, communities and businesses they work in. Thank you to all who have submitted their Big Ideas to us – we think they have been great!

Mike Robertson, CEO of POD Procurement

According to Mike, markets are more volatile than ever before, and this volatility is now impacting bottom line profits. Traditionally, procurement has looked at volatility as a risk within contracts.

However, Mike’s Big Idea focuses on changing the way procurement addresses volatility, from viewing it as a risk, to viewing it as an opportunity.

How to Submit Your Big Idea

There’s still time for you to send us your Big Idea for procurement! We don’t mind if you film your submission on your phone, tablet, laptop or PC. However, to help you out we’ve compiled a list of some of our recommended methods for reaching out.

Once you’ve completed your film, you can reach us by email ([email protected]); on Twitter (@procurious_) or via Google Drive or Dropbox (using [email protected]).

You can find all the information you need on recording and submitting your Big Idea here.

You can still register for the Big Ideas Summit 2016, which takes place today! Visit www.bigideassummit.com, join our Procurious group, and Tweet your thoughts and Big Ideas to us using #BigIdeas2016.

Don’t miss out on this truly excellent event and the chance to participate in discussions that will shape the future of the procurement profession. Get Involved, register now!