Tag Archives: procurement influencers

The Age of Influence – Are you a Player?

Could the age of influence be drawing to a close? Or does it now reflect the changing attitudes to advertising and promotion in the social media environment?

Cristiano Ronaldo (186 million followers), Ariana Grande (165 million) and Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson (159 million) have gathered some of the largest audiences on Instagram. But a celebrity status and a huge following doesn’t necessarily lead to great influence. The Digital Marketing Institute has shown that there is a greater level of trust placed in an influencer versus a celebrity.  

But as an “experiencer”, you may have the most engagement of all! 

In the first article of this series I established the context for how the nature of influence is changing the digital age. As people’s consumption of media and social media changes, so does how we perceive people to be ‘influential’ in our lives. Individuals from all walks of life now have a platform to share their thoughts, experiences and daily lives. 

However, the paradox in some ways of this situation is that the younger generation have been able to build larger followings, and greater influence, despite having theoretically less to offer and share. While this is not at the expense of the older generations doing the same, Gen X and Baby Boomers are certainly lagging behind in the circles of “must know” social media influencers. 

There is still an opportunity for these generations to build their own influence on social media, but potentially against a backdrop of the waning powers of influencers as a whole. Cynicism, controversy, commercialisation and over-saturation have all played a part in the erosion of influencers’ status. Far from being an end, however, this may represent the next evolution of the digital age. 

To understand this further, we need to revisit the categorisation of influencers and view this through the lens of a shifting balance of power. 

Waning Influence and Diminishing Returns? 

Micro influencers (those with an audience of 10,000 people or fewer) are likely to be able to command an audience in their niche, irrespective of the changing environment. Many of this group are seen as ‘Experiencers’, the go-to group for recommendations about products, services and experiences.  

It’s in the grouping of the macro influencers, commanding audiences of over 250,000 people and generally found in the world of celebrity, where changes in influence may be felt most keenly. These influencers have traditionally had their seat of power on sites such as Instagram, rather than YouTube or Snapchat. 

As I mentioned in my introduction, Cristiano Ronaldo, Ariana Grande and Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson have gathered the three largest audiences on Instagram. There isn’t an out-and-out digital celebrity in the site’s top 10 accounts and certainly no politicians or other, more traditional, influencers. 

Research has shown that the influence of social media posts differs depending on whether they were posted by an influencer or a celebrity. This is largely down to the question of engagement versus impact. Celebrities may have huge audiences, but products they promote may only be applicable to a small percentage of them (engagement). And while they can reach this audience, they are unlikely to be able to change consumer behaviours (impact). 

Celebrities frequently have their own brands and products to promote, as well as those offered by marketers. All these posts may also be treated with a level of cynicism from the wider audience, part of which can be attributed to the truly eye-watering sums of money being earned for sponsored posts. 

Money = Influence? Or Influence = Money? 

Sponsored posts, adverts, product promotions. If you have a big enough audience on social media and a big enough personal profile, then you might be approached by a brand to help market their products. This can be quite a lucrative opportunity – even if you aren’t as high profile as Kim Kardashian, who reportedly charges over $250,000 for an Instagram photo.  

The greater the audience, the higher the payment (on average): 

  • Instagram: $1,000 per 100,000 followers 
  • Snapchat: starts at $500 per campaign in 24 hours 
  • YouTube: Roughly $2,000 per 100,000 followers (this could go as high as an average of nearly $4,000 with 500k+ followers) 

And these sums are still rising – and at a rate of approximately 50 per cent per year since 2017 according to the Wall Street Journal. Which somewhat flies in the face of the question of declining influence and impact. It may also go some way to explain why 75 per cent of children dream of becoming YouTubers and why many people are aiming for a hyphenated job title including the word ‘influencer’, rather than a more traditional career as experienced by previous generations.  

This is where we can loop back to our original point of why social media influencers are largely from Gen X. They are the ones who appear on reality TV, who are the new generation of footballers who already have a social media following, who understand how best to leverage their own brand and use social media to their advantage. 

Real World Influence 

A brief interlude to discuss influence in the real world. This is not to say that Dwayne Johnson and Ariana Grande don’t operate in the real world, but their influence largely comes through on social media. However, as influence doesn’t necessarily need to be linked to selling of products or promotion of brands. It can be linked to real-world events and the increasing stature of an individual. 

One such recent example can be seen in New York Democratic Governor, Andrew Cuomo. Before March 2020, Cuomo was little known outside of his state and certainly didn’t have a strong influence outside of the USA. However, Cuomo’s leadership in response to the coronavirus outbreak and how hard New York had been hit by it.  

Between January and March 2020, Cuomo’s Twitter following went up by 31 per cent, his Instagram followers by 64 per cent. Not only has his audience increased, but his reception and perception to his message, which has been described as “frank” and “honest”, with his briefings drawing praise from all corners of the political and media spectrum.  

Positive comparisons have been made with the response of other world leaders, including President Trump. Not only has this exponentially increased Cuomo’s influence across the real and digital worlds, but it has raised his profile to an extent that he is being talked about as a future Presidential candidate.  

It just goes to show how digital influence could potentially have a huge real-world impact.  

Ads and Controversy 

It could be argued that many influencers are not sufficiently attuned to the risks associated with their influence, as recent controversies have shown. Fake news, advertising poor or harmful products, not marking posts as ads and marketing goods or services to vulnerable or impressionable audiences (i.e. children) are just some of these. 

There are site-specific guidelines or requirements to do with the posting of sponsored content, but even with this content can be misleading. Any sponsored content on Instagram, for example, is required to have ‘#Ad’ at the top of the post, but it is frequently either buried in a flood of hashtags on the post or missing entirely. 

There are reports that companies actively dissuade influencers from mentioning that a post is an ad, while many also fail to disclose their paid partnerships with influencers. On the other side, the UK’s Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) has pushed a number of celebrities, including Ellie Goulding, Rita Ora and Alexa Chung, to commit to disclosing payments for sponsored posts on social media. 

This is not to tar all influencers with the same brush. Many follow the regulations as they cannot afford the reputational damage, or to pay back monies earned, when being an influencer is their sole source of income. However, from the outside, these influencers would seem to be the exception rather than the norm which further undermines their credibility and impact. 

Changing the Game 

Could greater regulation assist in this? And could many influencers who already follow the existing regulations benefit from stricter rules? There is always going to be a minority at the very least who seek to circumvent regulations, but these influencers could find themselves squeezed out through a loss of audience and influence for failing to play by the rule. 

This could be the next, much needed, evolution in the social media age. It could arrest any decline in influence and potentially remove the idea that being an influencer is not a “real career”. And by doing so, this would open the opportunity for others to become influencers and bridge the generational gap that appears to exist in the current environment. 

For procurement, it could mean having a market and audience to increase influence, both as individuals and as a profession. How procurement could leverage this changing environment will be the subject of the third and final article in this series, coming soon on Procurious. 

Join Procurious to connect with 40,000 other ambitious procurement professionals and get free access to networking, industry news, training and much more. 

How To Get Buy-In From Others

Ever had a great idea that’s fallen flat? You’ll need buy-in from your stakeholders before anything can properly get off the ground.

When was the last time you had a great idea that you felt went unheard? If it’s frequently you’re not alone. More often than not it doesn’t matter how good our ideas are – if we can’t get buy-in from the people that matter – then we’re wasting our time.

Whether you’re trying to influence stakeholders, speak compellingly in front of an audience, convince others of your ideas in a meeting – or even persuade your spouse or children to try something new, the ability to get ‘buy-in’ from those we are trying to influence is the difference between success and failure.

Real Buy-In? Thinking, Feeling, Believing

So let’s start with the most common myths – real buy-in has nothing to do with how loud you can be, how great your idea is, or even how confident you are of being right.

The key instead is to be crystal clear about one thing – what you want your audience to think, feel, believe or do different tomorrow than they did today.

And, to effectively do this, you’ll need to craft a message based on what your audience are currently thinking, feeling, believing or doing right now.  

How you go about this depends on who your audience is, however it is possible to get a good read on the think, feel, do, believe in any situation.

For example, as a procurement professional, you might want to invest in some research. Select a few key players within your organisation and ask them out for coffee. Then ask them some simple questions around what their biggest challenges, pain points or questions are in relation to your space.

What value do they currently think your department provides? Do they see opportunities to gain even more value from what you know? What would make the biggest difference to their ability to include you in other important conversations?

Once you’ve been through the exercise a few times, break it down: Right now, what are the perceptions about your space? What value do they believe it brings to their world? What’s the gap between what they are doing right now and the actions you want them to take?

Two Ears, One Mouth – For a Reason

When you know this information, it is much easier to craft an argument that will actually convince. Rather than target shooting in the dark and hoping something will land.

However here’s the key – you have to actually listen. By listening I don’t mean nodding in all the right places and waiting for your opportunity to speak. I mean asking questions, clarifying, staying curious and trying to fully place yourself in their world.

This is not only 100 per cent more likely to create a space in which the other person will open up and give you important information. It also leads to one of the key rules of ‘buy-in’ – that people support the ideas they helped to create.

When you listen to someone’s perspective – and then create an idea tailored to their needs – not only do you win their attention but also their trust. That person will then more than likely become and advocate for both you and your ideas in the future. This means the next time you walk into the room ready to present, you’ll have a hidden asset already sold on both your knowledge and commitment.


It doesn’t matter how good your ideas are, without stakeholder buy-in they won’t get any traction. Can you improve this? Check out this other article here.


Collaboration for Change

The truth is that if you take any form of influence – they all boil down to one thing. The attempt to change what another person thinks, feels, believes or does. However, as successful influencers, we first have to start by taking a step back. Understanding the points of view we are trying to change – and then collaborating on better solutions.

So the next time you have a great idea – at work or at home – before jumping to present it in all its glory, start first by listening. Then rather than opponents you need to convince, you’ll have an army of collaborators helping to push it across the line.

Julie Masters is a globally recognised expert in influence, authority and thought leadership. She is the CEO and Founder of Influence Nation and Founder of ODE Management – responsible for launching and managing the careers of some of the worlds most respected thought leaders. Julie is also the host of the soon to be launched weekly podcast Inside Influence. An exploration into what it takes to find and own your voice – and then use it to drive a conversation, an idea, an industry or a Nation. To subscribe check out iTunes or http://juliemasters.com/inside-influence/.

Who Has Influence And How Do You Get More Of It?

Influence comes in all forms and from a variety of different sources. But, in the digital age, is the nature of influence changing? And how might it change further over the next few years?


What does influence look like in your life? Who are the main influencers? Depending on a great number of factors, including your values, norms, gender, race and age (amongst many others), the people who have influenced your life to this point represent a very diverse cross-section of society. And it’s likely that these influencers will change over the course of your lifetime.

How people find and consume information has changed drastically in the past decade. The relentless growth of social media and digital channels for data, news and opinion has provided new sources for people to use. This has, in turn, led to the growth of digital and social media ‘influencers’, all of whom offer something slightly different and command a different audience.

In this series of articles, I’ll look at what influence is and who the influencers are in the digital age and why this might seem paradoxical. I’ll cover the notion that the power of influencers may be on the wane, before concluding by looking at the divergence of this versus procurement influencers, and how procurement can leverage this thinking to grow influence in the right places.

The Context

There has been plenty written about influence in the past (including articles here on Procurious), including looking at how individuals can measure and increase their own. To provide a bit of context for the whole series, first we need to provide some definitions on our key terms.

The Cambridge English dictionary defines ‘influence’ as, “the power to have an effect on people or things, or a person or thing that is able to do this”. When we consider influence in our lives, what does this look like? It could be things we read, see and engage with on a day-to-day basis, or something that resonates with us.

Influences are usually delivered or underpinned by an ‘influencer’ – “someone who affects or changes the way that other people behave”. In our lives, this could be anyone from parents, family and friends, to colleagues, peers, celebrities and/or global figures.

It could be argued that this definition is more traditional, yet not necessarily outdated. In the digital age, the term might be better defined as, “a person with the ability to influence potential buyers of a product or service by promoting or recommending the items on social media”. We might not all be consuming a product, but the influence is there nonetheless.

What does this mean for individual people and how they are influenced? Is it changing the nature of influence? This is still up for debate.

The Changing Influence Environment

Consider the public’s consumption of information 50 years ago. This is long before the advent of the Internet and 24/7 connectivity and long before social media was even first considered. There was the print media and the original three channels on the TV. What seemed like a broad spectrum at the time now looks very narrow.

Influencers at this time would probably have been local or national, rather than international. The range would have been limited to those people who were well-known, who appeared on TV or radio frequently and were considered as experts in their fields. We’re talking here about politicians, celebrities, businesspeople or personalities.

In 2020, we have a world of information at our fingertips all hours of the day and night. We can connect with individuals in all walks of life, discussing and sharing about more topics than we could think of. These new influencers are freely accessed on social media and can create a large-scale, global audience fairly easily (comparatively to 50 years ago anyway).

News, Media & Video

The changing nature of how we consume media and content has enabled more individuals to gain traction in the social media environment. YouTube is a massively popular platform for the new generation of influencers. Ad sales alone in 2019 generated $4.7 billion (£3.62 billion) for parent company Alphabet.

It’s easy to see why when research shows that two-thirds of Millennials prefer YouTube to traditional television, and that there are over 1 billion hours of online content viewed daily. For an individual to get started, all they need is a computer, a social media account, a camera and/or microphone, some basic editing skills and a ‘hook’.

It better be a good ‘hook’ though – 20 per cent of social media users admit that they will stop watching a video if it hasn’t hooked them in the first 10 seconds.

For influencers this means that they need to know how to attract and retain their audience, but also produce quality content. For some, it will be enough to share their knowledge. Others will only gain a small audience, or a larger audience over a longer period. But a minority will gain thousands of followers quickly, and become recognisable ‘influencers’.

Social Media – Gen Z’s World?

Which brings us to our individuals and influencers-to-be. On social media, they are categorised in three groups:

  1. Micro influencers – offer authority on a specific and narrow niche, generally with smaller audiences (10,000 people or less). They can be a useful group for marketers as they are more affordable and have higher levels of engagement.
  2. Power middle influencers – have audiences ranging for 10,000-250,000 people and likely already have experience working with brands.
  3. Macro influencers – these are the digital celebrities on social media, with an audience of over 250,000 people. Their potential reach is huge, but they are more costly for marketers and have a lower engagement rate.

If celebrities make up a large percentage of the ‘macro’ influencers, then we can consider the ‘power middle’ as the new generation of influencers. And this new generation is largely made up of younger Millennials or Gen Z (those born since 1997). In 2018, the top 10 highest earners on YouTube were all, apart from 2, under 30.

The highest earner was Ryan Kaji, who stars in the ‘Ryan’s World’ channel, with earnings of $22 million. He’s 8 years old. It’s no wonder that children and teenagers galore think that being an influencer is a career route they want to take.

Does this then give credence to the idea that the world of social media and digital influence belongs to Gen Z? It’s an interesting question that provides us with an interesting paradox.

A Matter of Gravitas? Or Consumption?

If influence in the past has been related to experience, knowledge, gravitas and global renown (not necessarily traits only found in older people), then how is there more prominence for younger influencers despite having (theoretically) less to offer?

Consider this list of the “must know” influencers in 2019. You could argue that older generations are being squeezed out of influencer circles in the digital world. This could easily be linked to how younger generations consume their media and content. You could also argue that, in the digital world, there is room for all to exist. An older generation of influencers could attract an older generation of followers, assuming these followers consume their content digitally.

However, this generation may already have missed the boat as social media influence shifts again. As the digital world continues to evolve, so does the nature of influence and its perception. So, is this generation too late? Or could they stand to benefit just as much as the game changes again? We’ll cover this and more in the next article in this series.

To hear from top procurement influencers, be sure to join up and be part of the Procurious network. With 37,000 members, this is the place to gain knowledge and insights into the latest procurement and supply chain matters.

How to Get Stakeholder Buy-In

It doesn’t matter how good your ideas are, without stakeholder buy-in they won’t get any traction. Can you improve this?

buy-in
Photo by S O C I A L . C U T on Unsplash

True innovation comes from true influence. However, the painful reality is that it often doesn’t matter how good your ideas are. If you can’t get buy-in from other people, from the stakeholders in your organisation, then it will end up at the bottom of the pile.

Whether you are trying to implement a new program, in a difficult meeting at work, or attempting to convince your spouse or children of a different point of view, getting buy-in, or being able to influence others, is often the difference between success and failure.

Yet getting buy-in has nothing to do with how loud you are, how great your idea is, or even how confident you are of being right. So what does it involve?

Getting Crystal Clear

Like all important things the key to ‘influence’ is simple – but not easy. It means getting crystal clear on what you actually want your audience to ‘think’, ‘believe’ or ‘do’ differently.

However, in order to do this effectively, you need to craft a message based on what your audience are thinking, believing or doing right now.  

How you go about this depends on who your audience is, but it is possible to get a good read on the think, believe, do in any situation.

For example, as procurement professionals, you have a multitude of stakeholders. So you might want to start by investing in some market research. You might start by inviting some of those key people to lunch, then asking them what their biggest challenges, pain points or questions are in relation to your world.

Crafting the Message

Once you’ve been through that important exercise, break it down: Right now, what do they believe about your value? What are they thinking? What are they doing?

When you know this information, it is much easier to craft a message that speaks their language. However more importantly than that – a message with a clear and engaging path to action.

Once you become experienced in this process you can apply it to any topic. For example: What does marketing need to know right now in terms of procurement trends? Start there – ask the right person (or people) about what they are currently thinking, believing and doing in relation to the topic. Then use that language to bridge the gap between their current reality – and the reality you want to create.

Illuminate a Path

One of my favourite interviews for my Inside Influence podcast was Nancy Duarte. Nancy is a global communication expert, CEO and bestselling author. While discussing her core advice for those looking to become compelling communicators or storytellers – she explained something I wanted to shout from the rooftops.

She said that if you want to create real engagement – rather than a short burst of attention – then turn that engagement into actual action – your primary role is to ‘illuminate a path’. What does she mean by that? She’s saying that it’s not enough to tell people what to do – you also need to give them a compelling enough ‘why’ – followed by a clear pathway to action.

A clear pathway to action doesn’t have to be huge. In fact, going for a ‘simple yes’ is far more likely to result in action that a complex plan of execution. It could be something as simple as: ‘If you want to talk more about some of the possible results we could get from this idea – let me know when you’re free for a brief phone call’. Or ‘In order to take full advantage of this procurement trend we would need to do three simple things…’

An Idea to So Much More

It’s a simple path to action (what you want them to think, believe or do differently) that takes our communication from being ‘just an idea’ to so much more.

So what’s next if you want to increase your buy-in – or influence – in any situation? First become a student of the world of your target audience. Ask the right questions, of the right people – and then use that language to illuminate a path to the promised land.

Julie Masters is a globally recognised expert in influence, authority and thought leadership. She is the CEO and Founder of Influence Nation and Founder of ODE Management – responsible for launching and managing the careers of some of the worlds most respected thought leaders. Julie is also the host of the soon to be launched weekly podcast Inside Influence. An exploration into what it takes to find and own your voice – and then use it to drive a conversation, an idea, an industry or a Nation. To subscribe check out iTunes or Julie’s website.

Why You Need to Hyper-Specialise – Best of the Blog 2019

The days of the generalist are over. Today, the most influential people in your organisation are those with the ability to hyper-specialise.

experts hyper-specialise
Photo by Rita Morais on Unsplash

This article was written by Julie Masters, and was first published in February.

When I first started working in the world of influence and influencers, it was possible to own a massive space; whether it was leadership, real estate, finance, money or health. There were very few “gurus” who had access to a platform from to talk about their wide area of expertise.

Today, however, everybody has a platform. The internet is crowded with blogs, podcasts, Youtube channels and social media influencers, with the result that there’s way too much noise to own a huge space anymore. Now, the future belongs to micro-influencers; micro-authorities who hyper-specialise.

When stakeholders need help from a procurement professional, they need to be able to find you fast. They want to know – straight away – whether the space that you own aligns exactly with their situation and needs. An IT professional, for example, doesn’t want advice from a procurement generalist. They want to talk to an IT purchasing specialist – someone who understands the challenges involved and is well-known as an expert in that space.

Do you own your space on Google?

When was the last time you Googled yourself? Take a minute to do so now. What did you find out – do the search results make it clear what space you own?

According to Harvard University, over 50% of decisions are now made before we ever making contact i.e via what I would call “Google stalking”. When you first make contact with a talent prospect, a supplier or a potential consultant, one of the first things they will do (I guarantee it) is Google stalk you. If what they find is irrelevant, not specific to their needs or if they can’t find it fast enough, then you’ve lost that race.

To become an influencer, you have to own your space – but you can’t own a space unless you are clear on what space it is that you want to own.

Influence Intersections

But how do you find out the niche that you want to own? How do you discover the hyper-specialisation that will set you apart from everybody else?

Let me introduce a concept that I call Influence Intersections. Picture a Venn diagram: the first of the two circles is a world in which you have mastery, insights or experience. Then you overlay this with another world where you have mastery, insights or experience. The intersecting space in the middle is the space that only you can own. The space where your expertise will stand out.

Two celebrity influencers who hyper-specialised

Take Jamie Oliver – when he first started out there were many celebrity chefs from six-star hotels and restaurants. Then Jamie came along, and what did he have? He had mastery, experience, and insights into the high-end world of cooking, but he also had personality. The personality he brought to the front was that he understood families and what it’s like to cook for your children on a budget quickly in a healthy way. The place in the middle between those two spaces was a place that only Jamie could own.

Steve Jobs is another famous example. He took the world of engineering and computers and overlayed this with another world he knew – the world of the creative innovator. That space in the middle then became the key Apple needed to dominate the marketplace.  

Why should a procurement professional hyper-specialise?

One word – influence. Procurement professionals are typically frustrated by their lack of influence (or “seat at the table”) within their organisations, but building up your profile and becoming known as the go-to expert in your space will lift your influence and cause others to seek out your advice. Imagine, then, a whole team of hyper-specialised procurement professionals, each one famous in the organisation for owning their space. How influential would that department become?

It’s also a great tool to keep in mind for your next career move. If you begin hyper-specialising today with the aim of becoming known as the guru in your particular space, you might just be in a job interview situation one day where the interviewer says, “I’ve heard of you – your expertise is a perfect fit for this opportunity”.

Remember, the days of the generalist are over. Generalists rarely become voices of authority. In addition to not being renumerated as well as perceived ‘experts’ they also receive less engagement and fewer opportunities. People who hyper-specialise, on the other hand, receive more credibility, more respect, more opportunities and more influence. 

What are the two worlds you can overlay to find – and own – your space?

“It’s Not About Me” and Other Myths About Becoming an Influencer

Want to be an influencer in your space? And still think it’s not about you? Then think again – because it really is.

being an influencer
Photo from Tookapic on Pexels

“It’s not about me”.

That’s one of the sentences I hear most when working with people who want to become an influencer in their space.

It usually comes hand in hand with, “I know I need to stand out more. I know that the best way to a seat at the table is to focus on contributing as an authority. I know that I need to step out from behind my role and own my space as a thought leader.”

Then I usually hold my breath and wait for the next line.

“I just…don’t want it to be all about me”

Unfortunately, influence, like leadership, comes with one golden rule. It’s always about you. Now, I’m not talking about narcissism or arrogance, or stealing the spotlight or conversation away from other people who deserve the recognition. I simply mean it comes with responsibility. The willingness to stand behind your words and ideas, to take full ownership of the vision as well as the possible consequences.

Basically to step in the arena without the safety of the crowd.

However, just as important as that is another golden rule. For any idea, company or movement to be its most compelling, it needs a human face. Think about where Tesla or SpaceX might be now if Elon Musk, who is basically an introverted engineer, didn’t take the stage at any point to talk about his vision? Or the impact of the recent climate change protests without the courage of Greta Thunberg?

Here’s a simple framework for stepping out into the arena and building influence as a procurement professional without gambling with your integrity:

Accept That It Is About You

Here’s the rub. If you want to be a thought leader in your space, it is going to be about you. You are going to need to stand up and own a unique point of view and take responsibility and drive a conversation.

And that, at its very essence, is going to be about you – your ideas, your DNA, your unique standpoint.

Try this for a useful reframe: “What is the highest contribution I can make here?” By asking that question it becomes less about your identity – and more about your experiences, everything you’ve learned and what you can see that others might miss. It also gives you permission to speak from a place of high integrity – focusing on contributing something useful – rather than simply seeking attention.

So, what’s the highest contribution that you could make right now inside your organisation? To your stakeholders, or to potential talent that might be looking to join your team? It’s by answering those questions that we begin to build trust as an authority.

Remember It’s About Us Too

Now that you’ve thought of the highest contribution you can make as an expert. How can you then pull in members of your team – or other talented people in your organisation or network? Shining a light on their ideas and combining your voices and make an even bigger impact?

Your voice alone might be compelling enough – but combine that with other experts, other perspectives from other fields. Not only will the volume of your voices be louder, but the combined network (and collective influence) you bring to the table will be exponentially larger than going it alone. Not to mention the amount you will learn on the journey.

So, who can you collaborate with either internally or outside your organisation in order to drive a more powerful conversation? What credible perspectives would you need to get the right people’s attention? Who already has a network you need to tap into?

In this day and age the people we look to most as an influencer are the ones who can pull together the best information and sources – and then convert that knowledge into clarity.

Let It Be All About Them

When you start thinking about contributing to a conversation in your industry, first think about the questions your target market are currently asking. What pain is your organisation currently experiencing? What opportunities are out there that aren’t being capitalised on?

Take these and compile a list of the top five questions important to your target audience about the space in which you operate.

Now here is the most important part of this approach – avoid using jargon. Often the moment we feel people’s eyes glaze over when we present new ideas. It has nothing to do with the content and 100 per cent to do with the language we’re using.

Every target market has what we would call ‘charismatic language’ – which is basically the words and phrases they use in relation to this topic. Figure these out and you’re well on your way to cut through.

Influencer: Contribution Not Attention

So – the bottom line. It is about you. However it’s also about us – and about them.

The most compelling influencer isn’t in the business of seeking attention. Instead their focus is on contributing to the highest level, driving forward important conversations and collecting a variety of points of view to shed new light on the space they own. Focus on that – and whether it’s about you or not will no longer feel important.

Julie Masters is a globally recognised expert in influence, authority and thought leadership. She is the CEO and Founder of Influence Nation and Founder of ODE Management – responsible for launching and managing the careers of some of the worlds most respected thought leaders. Julie is also the host of the weekly podcast Inside Influence – an exploration into what it takes to find and own your voice – and then use it to drive a conversation, an idea, an industry or a Nation. To subscribe check out iTunes or via Juliemasters.com.

How To “Flip” Fear As A Driver To Greater Influence

Everyone – without exception – lives with fear. But only a few know that fear and anxiety can be turned to your advantage. Influence guru Julie Masters discusses the keys to dealing with fear with former Navy SEAL Brandon Webb.

Whether we’re in critical negotiations with suppliers, asking for a raise at work or presenting in front of our peers, fear is one of those unwanted emotions that we find ourselves encountering all too often.

Like it or not though, fear is something we have to deal with, and the sooner we can make it work for us, the more effective and influential we can be in our own lives.

Recently I was fortunate enough to interview Brandon Webb on the Inside Influence podcast to talk about doing just that.

Webb is a former US Navy SEAL sniper who worked as an experimental aircraft pilot, helicopter Search & Rescue swimmer and an Aviation Warfare Systems Operator.

After completing four deployments to the Middle East, you would be forgiven for assuming that Webb is as close as they come to being fearless.

It’s surprising to learn then, that Webb had to deal with his own fears and anxieties throughout his entire military career, gradually teaching himself how to identify and change the conversation that took place in his head.

Webb has since left the military and has gone on to become a successful entrepreneur and New York Times bestselling author, sharing the journey he has had with fear and the methods he has used to overcome it in his book Mastering Fear.

Webb’s message is applicable to anyone facing fear, no matter the context – whether it’s being involved in a life-or-death situation, or standing up in front of work colleagues to deliver a presentation.

Here are Webb’s five tips on mastering fear to increase your influence.

Redirect the momentum

If you see fear as the enemy, you’ve already lost.

Fear can never be overcome, beaten, or evaded. The feeling of fear is part of our physiology and treating it as an adversary will only set you up for failure.

Rather than treating fear as a wall that you need to break through, Webb suggests using the power of fear as a force to harness and redirect.

Try to observe and acknowledge the feelings that come up – the adrenaline, the nerves, the tension – and use those feelings to propel you to achieve the task that’s in front of you.

It’s the difference between telling yourself “I’m not scared”, versus admitting “I am scared, but I’m going to use these feelings to help me move through this situation.”

Imagine what you could achieve if you stopped fearing fear itself. How many times would you put your hand up to speak? Offer your expertise or ideas? Request that seat at the table – confidently backed up with all the reasons you can add significant value?

Flip the mental switch

We’ve all been told that staying at our peak is more about mindset than it is about our physical state, and mastering fear is no different.

Monitoring, recognising and changing your internal dialogue – the mental chatter in your own head – is a key step in mastering fear.

This often involves taking a step back from the situation that’s brought up those feelings, recognising those feelings for what they are, and making a conscious decision to take a different direction rather than remaining overwhelmed.

Despite what we may think about what it takes to be a Navy SEAL, Webb points out that mastering fear isn’t about being stronger, tougher or more aggressive. It’s simply about being able to change the conversation going on in your head – something anybody can do. 

The most influential people I have ever met – in industries, politics and organisations – all have that ability in spades. The ability to identify the internal story that keeps them – or their idea – on the sidelines. Then shift it to one of empowerment.

As a place to start, ask yourself these questions: What currently stops me from making the highest value contribution I could make to this space / industry / conversation? What would be the first step in letting that story go? How would I feel if I did?

Use the charge

A typical adrenaline rush (a hormonal symptom of fear) can briefly turn us into superhumans – our heart rate increases, our blood pressure spikes, we can take in more air, and our blood is quickly redistributed to our muscles for increased strength.

Webb likens these physical changes to a “static charge” that can be harnessed to electrify rather than paralyse us.

Successful procurement professionals proactively seek out this charge as one of nature’s best tools to sharpen their abilities when they’re under pressure, especially in tough negotiation settings.

Harnessing this energy is a great way to take fear and proactively use it to move forward, rather than remaining paralysed when the going gets tough.

So the next time you feel the charge – stop, feel it – and then consciously decide to channel it as the super human burst of energy it was designed to be.

Use fear in rehearsal

When Webb was working as a search and rescue helicopter pilot, he very nearly lost his life when a mission went wrong.

One of the two pilots he was on a flight with suddenly suffered from vertigo, dropping the helicopter from altitude and plunging its bottom half into the ocean.

The pilot was overwhelmed by fear – unable to act or respond to the crew screaming at him to regain altitude.

The co-pilot, however, was able to calmly lift the helicopter out of the water and back into the air, saving the lives of Webb and the other crew members.

Webb’s theory is that the panicked pilot had, until that point, rarely experienced a level of adversity or stress throughout his life – that would have allowed him to work through the situation in his head. He had effectively ‘frozen up’.

His co-pilot however, had come from a lifetime of adversity. He had been bullied at school when he was younger and had grown up having to mentally work through his fears in order to carry on successfully.

Webb recommends that even people who have led a comparably stress-free life can artificially rehearse the feeling of fear – by role-playing frightening situations and having to move through a level of decision-making to get to an effective outcome.

You might be familiar with role-playing at work – usually practicing ideal scenarios – but how many of us role play difficult scenarios? Where we’re really challenged to make tough decisions and actually work through our fears?

So what now?

While we’re all undoubtedly going to experience fear throughout our lives – especially in the quest to become more influential. The tools that we have on hand to deal with that experience can make all the difference when it comes to cracking under pressure or rallying successfully.

So as a first step – start recognising fear as an energy source that can be harnessed, that we can make work for us in incredible and unlimited ways. If you can master that – you will have truly ‘flipped’ the power of fear to your advantage.


Like what you’re reading? As a procurement or supply chain professional, we truly value your opinion. And that’s why we want you to tell us what you want (what you really, really want) to see on Procurious. Click here to take our ten-minute survey and help us, help you!

7 Procurious Influencers Who Are Smashing Modern Slavery

Not all heroes wear capes! But surely there are few people more deserving of a superhero’s recognition than the procurement pros fighting against modern slavery day in, day out….?

Last week, a heavy-hitting list of 100 modern-day abolitionists was splashed across social media following the 2018 Annual UK Top 100 Corporate Modern Slavery Influencers’ Index Recognition Dinner in London – and the team at Procurious was delighted to see at least seven Procurious members featured in the Index.

Developed by BRE and Sustain Worldwide, the #Top100Index recognises individuals from all business sectors, media and academia who are influential leaders in raising awareness to end modern slavery and labour exploitation; those who advocate for robust ethical sourcing and human rights recognition and practices in UK direct business operations and global supply chains.

The Index was based on a combination of influence on social media (as measured by Klout scores) and advocacy – policy impact, speaking and media engagements – in public life, aggregated via a proprietary algorithm and verified by an independent panel.

Influence is the key word here. While only a few of the Top 100 would be physically involved in busting modern-day slavery at the coalface, this group is arguably making a greater impact through addressing the source of the problem by raising public awareness and getting cut-through with he decision-makers in government and business who can really make a difference.

Procurement and supply management is well-represented in the Top 100, even though the scope of the award went well beyond this profession. This proves, once again, that any efforts to eradicate modern slavery must involve – and often be spearheaded by – procurement and supply professionals.   

Who are the Procurious members in the #Top100Index?

Congratulations to the following members of our online community. Connect with these highly influential professionals here on Procurious by following the links below.

  1. Andrew Wallis OBE of UnSeenUK
  2. Andy Davies of Greater London Authority (GLA) Group
  3. Dax Lovegrove of Swarovski
  4. Katie Jacobs of Supply Management
  5. Professor Jacqueline Glass of Loughborough University
  6. Rob Knott of Virtualstock
  7. Olinga Ta’eed, Entrepreneur

More from Olinga Ta’eed on Procurious:

In other news this week:

Deadline Passes with no renegotiated NAFTA

  • Parties to the NAFTA renegotiations have failed to reach a deal before the Congressional deadline of May 17 passed last week.
  • The deadline was in place due to the upcoming Mexican presidential election, which may introduce a new set of variables depending on the winner’s stance on trade.
  • US House Speaker Paul Ryan has said Congress is willing to vote on a deal within a few weeks, but commentators predict the negotiations are likely to drag on into next year.

Read more: https://www.supplychaindive.com/news/NAFTA-May-17-deadline-talks-extend/523811/

Gig economy in the spotlight

  • New research has revealed the explosive growth of the gig economy in the UK since 2010, with ‘non-employer businesses’ (businesses that only hire on a gig-by-gig basis) growing by 8,431% in the transportation and storage sector, and 1,464% in the accommodation and food service sector.
  • The number of self-employed people in the UK has risen by 41% since 2001, with 15% of the UK labour force classed as self-employed last year. The private sector has seen a 25% increase in non-employer businesses since 2010.
  • Recommendations from the Taylor Review of the gig economy include ensuring a balance between worker’s rights and those that are self-employed, sectoral strategies to ensure people do not face insecurity, and stronger incentives for firms to treat “dependent contractors” fairly.

Read more: https://www.premierline.co.uk/knowledge-centre/the-gig-economy.html

US-China Trade War “On Hold”

  • China and the US have agreed to drop tariff threats while working on a wider trade agreement, according to US Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin.
  • Washington has demanded that China narrows the $US335 billion annual US goods and services trade deficit and has proposed tariffs of $US50 billion on Chinese goods. China responded with its own measures targeting US agriculture.
  • The two economies have reportedly agreed to set up a framework for addressing trade imbalances in the future.

Read more: Washington Post

Who Are Procurement’s Most Influential Thinkers?

The Big Ideas Summit 2016 brings together some of procurement’s most influential thinkers to discuss the future of the profession.

Influential Thinkers

The Big Ideas Summit 2016 will take place in London on the 21st of April. Procurious have invited around 50 the most influential thinkers from the world of procurement, supply chain, media and technology to discuss the future of the profession.

Just in case you’ve missed all the announcements (where have you been?!), you can catch up on all the details you need here.

Our influential thinkers and thought leaders will be tackling a number of Big Ideas, including unthinkable events, social and sustainable procurement, technological megatrends, and many more, during a packed day full of interviews, debates and panel sessions. 

The good news for all of our Procurious members is that we’ll be capturing all of the day’s events on video. This means you’ll be able to watch all the discussions as they unfolded on the day, and make sure that you don’t miss a single minute.

Taking Part

The Big Ideas Summit is open to all Procurious members. It doesn’t matter where you are in the world, we want you to help shape the agenda. Register your attendance in our Procurious Big Ideas 2016 Group.

On Twitter? You can also submit your questions by tweeting us @procurious_ using the hashtag: #BigIdeas2016

For more information about the day head on over to our bespoke event site at www.bigideassummit.com.

Who are some of the 2016 Influential Thinkers?

Tom Derry – Institute for Supply Management

Tom DerryTom Derry is CEO of the Institute for Supply Management (ISM) in Arizona. Prior to this, he spent nine years as COO with the Association for Financial Professionals (AFP), a US$23 million professional association serving 17,000 corporate treasury and finance professionals.

Tom is chairman and president of ISM Services, the for-profit consulting arm of ISM, a member of the Dean’s Council for the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University, and is a member of the board of directors of the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM).

Chris Sawchuk – The Hackett Group

Chris SawchukChris Sawchuk is Principal & Global Procurement Advisory Practice Leader at The Hackett Group. He has nearly 20 years of experience in supply management, working directly with Fortune 500 and mid-sized companies around the globe and in a variety of industries to improve all aspects of procurement, including process redesign, technology enablement, operations strategy planning, organisational change and strategic sourcing.

Gabe Perez – Coupa

Gabe PerezGabe Perez is Vice President of Strategy and Market Development at Coupa. He is responsible for emerging market development and analyst relations, and evangelising for Coupa across the globe. Prior to his five years at Coupa,  he worked at Ariba where he participated in many global rollouts of their software.

Lucy Siegle – The Observer

Lucy Siegle - True CostLucy Siegle is a journalist and broadcaster. In her written work she specialises in environmental and social justice issues and ethical consumerism, and is devoted to widening their appeal. She joined The Observer in 2000 and created the Observer Ethical Awards (OEAs), dubbed the Green Oscars. Now in their eighth year, Lucy chairs and presents the final awards.

Lucy was also Executive Producer on The True Cost, a film highlighting the major in sustainability and worker rights issues in the global fashion supply chain.

Peter Holbrook – Social Enterprise

Peter HolbrookPeter Holbrook is chief executive of Social Enterprise UK, the national body for social enterprise and a membership organisation supporting social enterprise advocacy and development within the UK and across the world. Under Peter’s leadership SEUK was a critical proposer, supporter and advocate of the Public Services (Social Value) Act, a private members bill which was entered onto statute in 2012.

Peter was recognised for services to social enterprise with a CBE in the 2015 New Year honours list.

Dapo Ajayi – AstraZeneca

Dapo AjayiDapo has enjoyed a long career with AstraZeneca, holding a variety of senior Operations and Commercial roles. In April 2014 Dapo assumed the role of AZ Chief Procurement Officer accountable for the company’s external spend and supplier base across the end to end value chain. She has a pharmacy degree and is a member of the Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain.

Martin Chilcott – 2degrees

Martin ChilcottMartin is the founder and CEO of 2degrees – the world’s leading collaboration platform and service. He helps business leaders in major global brands including Unilever, Asda Walmart, GSK and the Royal Bank of Scotland, to think differently about how to adopt the principles of sustainable business and use collaboration to transform the resilience, profitability and competitiveness of their operations and whole value chain.

Lucy Harding – Odgers Berndston

Lucy HardingLucy Harding is a Partner and Head of the Global Procurement & Supply Chain Practice at Odgers Berndtson based in London. Lucy has significant experience operating in the procurement and supply chain search environment following 10 years operating in a leading boutique firm. Lucy is also a member of the Advisory Board for the Supply Chain Faculty at Cranfield University.

Elizabeth Linder – Facebook EMEA

Elizabeth LinderElizabeth Linder is Facebook’s Politics & Government Specialist and brand ambassador for the Europe, Middle East & Africa region. As the founder and head of her division in EMEA, Elizabeth trains and advises politicians, government officials, civil society leaders, and diplomats on using Facebook to effectively communicate with citizens.

Tania Seary – Procurious

Tania SearyTania is the Founding Chairman of three companies specialising in the development of the procurement profession – The Faculty, The Source and Procurious.

Four years ago, Tania founded The Source, a specialist recruitment firm for the procurement profession. In 2013 she moved to London and founded Procurious, the world’s first online community for procurement professionals to connect, share and learn. Since it’s launch in May 2014, Procurious has already attracted more than 12,500 members from 140+ countries worldwide.

These are just a selection of the influential thinkers from the world of procurement and supply chain who will be appearing at Big Ideas 2016.

If you’re interested in finding out more, visit www.bigideassummit.com, join our Procurious group, and Tweet your thoughts and Big Ideas to us using #BigIdeas2016.

Don’t miss out on this truly excellent event and the chance to participate in discussions that will shape the future of the procurement profession. Get Involved, register today.