Tag Archives: procurement jobs

9 Signs You’re Undervalued At Work

Feeling undervalued at work? If you can’t remember the last time you got a pay rise , haven’t received any formal training since your role commenced and are consistently working unpaid overtime, you probably are!

This article was written by Anna O’Dea, Director and Founder of Agency Iceberg. 

We all have a sense of our personal worth in the workplace, and sometimes it can feel as if our valuable experience, strong commitment and innovative ideas are being taken for granted.

At Agency Iceberg, I meet a lot of people facing this situation. They suspect they aren’t being supported by their managers, they’re being underpaid for their knowledge and input, or are being overlooked for well-deserved promotions.

From my experience working for eight years in the recruitment industry, my team and I have found there are nine key signs that suggest you could be being undervalued by your employer. If they sound familiar, it could be time to speak up or move on!

1) The numbers aren’t stacking up

In the current economic climate, pay rises aren’t vast. But if you’re constantly stuck with getting just the minimum cost of living rise, while your peers get bumped up for a similar job, you might not be getting the financial reward that you should be. With the internet, it’s not hard to compare your earnings with what others in the same role are getting. Do the research and you’ll have tangible evidence to back your case.

Another one to watch is bonuses. Did your colleagues get a flash of cash that you missed? If there’s no logical reason why you were skipped over, there could be unfairness at play.

2) Your performance and pay reviews are constantly postponed

If your annual performance and remuneration review keeps getting put off another week, month, or a few months, with lots of excuses from management (and no guarantee of back pay) you’re being taken for a ride. The longer you don’t get a pay rise, the more you’re working at a higher skill for the company’s benefit.

3) You have to ‘act’ in a higher role before you’re promoted

It’s common to get told you need to step up your responsibilities to ‘prove your worth’. But if ‘acting’ in the next role goes on for too long, the advantage can again pass from you gaining experience, to your employer getting excellent skills for less pay.

4) People are promoted around you

If you’ve got the credentials and factual evidence to deserve a promotion, yet continually miss out, they may not be seeing your true worth. More worrying, and harder to fix, could be signs of favouritism, sexism or ageism.

5) You’re not trusted to be autonomous

If you have to run every move by your manager, or aren’t trusted to manage your schedule or clients your own way, your abilities may not be recognised. In extreme situations, you could be being micro-managed, which can be quite destructive to growth.

6) Your input is curtailed

When you show your talent, such as sharing innovative ideas in meetings, or suggesting positive ways to improve processes, and it’s clear they’re not welcome, it’s a concerning sign. In some cases, insecure managers won’t let you shine, which is not only letting you down, but also the business.

7) Overtime is expected, and you aren’t given time in lieu

We’ve all read that clause in contracts that says ‘extra hours may be necessary’. However when overtime is systemic and with no lieu time offered, the business has you in its claws. We see this when people travel for work – enduring overnight flights or early morning trips with no time off.

8) You can’t be sick on sick days

Sick used to mean staying at home and sweating out the bug. However technology has shifted the expectations of many bosses to be on 24-7. If your boss insists you stay online when you should be recovering, or text messages and countless emails on the weekend from your boss doesn’t sound out of place, it’s a sign you’re being overworked.

9) You’re not getting trained for growth

Every good employer should encourage the development of their employees. If your employer isn’t investing in your training or opportunities, you could be in a one-way relationship.

If some of these signs ring true, take time to consider the next phase of your career. Your professional pride, mental health, sense of purpose and financial future are too important.

Anna O’Dea is a recruitment expert, LinkedIn Top Voice 2016 and Founder and Director of Agency Iceberg. This article was originally published on LinkedIn

10 Ways Social Media Can Get You Hired

You never know who’s watching you on social media, there’s every chance it’s your dream employer. Here’s how to make sure you get noticed and get that job!

We live in an era when we have the ability to access information in a fraction of a second. Technology has allowed us to accomplish tasks and reach out to people in ways we never thought possible, even 20 years ago.

Social media is the beast that holds much power in our success or demise. It can crumble a person’s reputation with a tweet, or catapult it. The bottom line is that the user must navigate with extreme caution.

Searching for the job you want can be exhausting. The whole process is time-consuming and impersonal, and it can be difficult to demonstrate your full range of qualifications.

We’ve come up with ten ways to leverage social media in order to look more desirable to employers.

1. Get On Board!

If you don’t have social media accounts and you’re not close to retirement, get at least one now! LinkedIn is the most popular job search site, where an estimated 95 per cent of recruiters search for their candidates.

Employers also look to social media sites like Instagram, Facebook and Twitter to get a more personal take on a candidate and make sure that they fit in with the culture of their company.

2. Maintain Your Account

You should set up a strong profile and use keywords that highlight skills that potential employers may search for.  As you develop new skills or complete certifications, let them know!

Potential employers want to see that you keep active on your profiles, but you don’t need to get overwhelmed trying to show your activity every single day on every single site. Just a little something every few days goes a long way.

3. Become a Social Butterfly

Remember, you have a choice of what to entertain and engage in, so choose wisely. You don’t have to put your entire personal life out there just to make yourself seen. In fact, that disposition has the potential to deter prospective employers and only serves as a distraction. Instead, it’s best to like, share, comment, tweet and retweet relevant information in your field and follow sites that interest you professionally.

The more you get your name in front of businesses, the more it’ll stick and show them that you are relevant and up to speed in the industry.

4. Use Discretion

By all means, be authentic, but if you desire to use social media as an avenue for potential employment, you must remember that once it’s out there, it stays out there. Photos, comments and posts can come back to haunt you with a vengeance.

It’s important to be mindful of the persona you illustrate online. Companies want someone who can represent them professionally at all times and not compromise their reputation. If you do post highly personal photos, you should keep your account private.

5. Make an Impact

Use your social media platform to gain followers by posting information that your audience will appreciate. Gaining followers will not only show employers that you have something to say and can influence the community, it will also give you the confidence to continue to make an impact.

6. Keep It Positive in the Job Search Process

It’s not easy being unemployed (or underemployed). It can take a toll on your self-confidence and your ability to land a new position, so why remind yourself of that?

Avoid using the word “unemployed” and instead highlight what it is that you are looking for. Your profile will sound much more ambitious and will remind employers that they need you as much as you need them.

7. Read Between the Lines

Actually, employers are the ones that will read between the lines, so be sure to cross your T’s and dot your I’s. Using the correct punctuation and grammar on your page and in your comments will show your potential employer how well you actually communicate.

Everyone loves to highlight their “excellent written and verbal communication skills” on a resume, then fail to proofread a comment left on a company Facebook page or description paragraph on their profile. Make sure to stay consistent with whom you describe yourself to be.

8. Get Endorsed

Since LinkedIn is one of the top job search engines, it is important to get endorsements from other professionals within the network. Your connections are allowed to endorse you, or legitimise your skill set. You can ask former bosses or coworkers to write recommendations for you, and you can certainly return the favor.

Creating several symbiotic professional relationships online can only help you. The more high-quality references you can get, the better.

9. Keep It Simple

We know … you have so many awesome qualities it’s hard to narrow it down. But simplicity is key in a great professional social media page. Narrow down your descriptors to what you want employers to know.

You may think you are offering readers a way to get to know you better, but all the extra words serve as a distraction. Get down to the essentials and stick with it.

10. Dress for Success

This seems simple, but you’d be surprised at how many people fall short with this. Your attire should lean toward the conservative, business casual side.

Social media has become a place of validation in our society, and many users look for approval from others in the looks department. Professionally, it’s an entirely different ballgame. Again, be authentic and be yourself, but err on the side of caution.

The Social Media Payoff

If leveraged correctly, social media can distinguish you from your competition without having to even step foot outside of your home. You can make yourself the most sought after in your field, or you can get lost in the shuffle of mediocrity.

If social media overwhelms you, it’s OK. You don’t have to do it all. Simply pick whichever social site works for you and stick with it. Something is better than nothing, and as with almost anything else, you get out what you put in.

This article was written by Nicola Yap and originally published on Eminent SEO. Follow @EminentSEO for more top tips! 

Contingent Workforce: Why Procurement Still Hasn’t Found What It’s Looking For

In some ways the procurement profession is in a stronger position than ever before. But in others, in the words of great philosopher Bono, we “still haven’t found what we’re looking for” when it comes to the contingent workforce.  

Different Categories, Different Organisations, Different Value

Is our role really about cost reduction when it comes down to it? Or are we moving into a brave new world where the small, but perfectly formed, procurement function is focused on extracting innovation and competitive advantage from key supply markets?

Clearly, “value” is a word that has to feature, but saying procurement is about value is a bit of a truism;  of course it is! And so is everything else that an organisation does.

This in itself doesn’t help us to progress very far in the debate but one useful thought might be this: Every spend category within our organisation contributes value to the organisation in a different way; and for any given spend category, that value will differ from organisation to organisation too.

The Evolution of Procurement and What it Means for Managing Contingent Labour

In our new paper, The Evolution of Procurement and What it Means for Managing Contingent Labour, written in conjunction with Spend Matters, we look at this issue and also touch on other aspects around where procurement might be heading, including the fashionable idea of “procurement as a service”.

Using contingent labour as an example it is possible to illustrate how procurement has evolved and how a category can create value in various ways.

In some organisations, obtaining the right contingent labour, such as highly skilled technicians, creative folk or IT experts, might be a direct source of innovation and, as such, competitive advantage. In other cases, cost reduction and operational efficiency through a super-slick engagement processes for contingent workers might be the key factor.

The key point, however,  is that every procurement professional needs to understand the contribution for their categories in their organisation.

Procurement Must Take A Multi-Pronged Approach To Contingent Labour

(An Excerpt from The Evolution of Procurement and What it Means for Managing Contingent Labour

Any analysis will immediately confirm that procurement must follow different approaches depending on both the category of spend being addressed, and the nature of the business and the drivers of success.

Are the ingredients for a food product important to its success, or is it enough that they are safe to eat? If we spent more on a better quality purchase, would we sell more or be able to charge a higher price?

Considering services spend categories, how important, for instance, is marketing to the success of the firm? If innovation and new products are key drivers, then supporting that by identifying and working successfully with the very best external marketing services providers will be more important than haggling over their margins.

Contingent labour spend may simply be a case of minimising cost at an acceptable level of risk, or it may be much more strategic, with access to hard-to-find talent, and speed of engagement critical to the business.

That was reflected in our roundtable last year when we heard several excellent examples of how the use of contingent labour was truly linked to organisational strategies. “We are looking at scenario planning and resourcing models to help predict blue collar contingent labour requirements.” And the days of the contingent workforce being purely low-level blue-collar or administrative staff are long gone.

“Some of our contingent workforce are key to how we win business from our own customers; they are a strategically important and also scarce resource”.

You can download the full white paper for free here.

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Want That Job? 7 Pitfalls To Avoid On Your CV

This seasoned recruiter skim-reads CVs for an average of two to three seconds before deciding whether to read them in their entirety. How can you make sure your CV doesn’t end up in the bin? 

Even with the digital revolution changing the world, CVs are still the Number 1 way to showcase your skills and achievements to a new employer or recruiter.

Before a prospective employer reads a CV they may well have supporting information in the form of a referral,  LinkedIn profile or a cover letter. But however good any supporting information might be, the CV is still the deciding factor when it comes to getting you a face-to-face meeting.

Recruiters have to place even more credibility on the CV than line managers. I have read over 250,000 CVs in my recruitment career and can skim read a CV in two to three seconds to decide if I want to read it in its entirety. If you are reading 100-400 CVs a day, can you really spare the time to read a cover letter as well? The CV is still king!

My goal whenever I am coaching CV writing is:

To make it as easy as possible for the reader to find the information they are looking for.

Worst case scenario: you have two to three seconds to get someone’s attention, so you need to give them the information they need as easily and accessibly as possible. When you think about your CV from this perspective you will need to make sure you identify your audience correctly to ensure it’s hitting their criteria.

Make sure you don’t fall into these traps:

1. Not Making The Most Of Your Success

Most people avoid talking about success like the plague. But if you’re writing a list of your responsibilities, the very least you need to demonstrate is that you have completed those tasks. Ask yourself:

  • Is it obvious I am successful?
  • Did I deliver this bullet point/responsibility?
  • Could a cynic read this and interpret it as failure?

You spent a whole lot of effort and time doing these things. At least take credit for what you delivered.

2. Inducing Claustrophobia

The majority of CVs look cluttered. Not “easy for the reader to find the information they are looking for”. Make it an appealing document to look at:

  • Decrease your margin widths (1” – 1.5” margins are fine)
  • Use white space

-90% of bullet points should be two lines maximum. If most of your bullet points are longer than that, look at splitting them into two points.

-Don’t have massive blocks of bullet points together. Four to five bullet points is enough. If you have any more than that, split them into sensible headings (Responsibilities and Achievements; Categories and Savings; Projects and Delivery etc).

-Have a small space between roles.

  • Font

-Make it an easy-to-read font (Times New Roman, Arial, Calibri, Garamond)

-Don’t worry about size too much. People read CV’s on a screen so can zoom in if they need to. (10 – 12 pt is fine)

3. Contact Details Taking Up Your Prime Real Estate

Geoff Molloy BSc (Hons)

132 Partridge Way, Bishops Stortford, Essex, CM23 3XY

Tel 01279 333 444

Mob 07788 111 222

E-mail [email protected]

Most people have their contact details at the top of their CV. You have two seconds to get their attention and you want them to read your phone number? It doesn’t make sense when you think about it unless you think your phone number, address or e-mail address is the single factor that will get them to give you a call!

Move them down to the footer and reduce your address down to town and postcode.

4. Information Above Your Career History/Experience

The problem with adding information above your career history is that it’s hard to make it contextual. Context is the only difference in impact between meeting an

IT Director

or

IT Director for Google

The difference between these two people would probably be significant and, but for a tiny change, you wouldn’t know it.

Try and keep the information above your career history to a minimum. It’s useful to be able to summarise your skills/experience/achievements etc but be aware that it loses impact if it’s not contextualised by the role you were in when you delivered it.

5. Proof-Read, Spell Check

Make sure it’s perfect. Spelling, grammar or punctuation are all indications to the employer. Some people get really irritated by mistakes so make sure you don’t put them off immediately!

  • Your/you’re
  • Were/we’re/where
  • Its/it’s

Get a friend/colleague/pedant to read your CV after you have checked it, and checked it, and checked it.

6. Squeezing Your CV Onto 2 Pages

If your CV is well written, relevant, articulate, demonstrates success and is easy to get the information the reader is looking for, it doesn’t matter how long it is (within reason). “Two pages” is a myth. But, if you’re going over the page make sure you use the next page fully.

If you’re not convinced, look at it the other way. If it’s awful they won’t get to the end of the first page! Make sure your CV is giving them the information they want in an accessible way. They will read it if you are relevant.

7. References

“References available on request” or “Reference Details”. Once you have risen above “School Leaver”, everyone assumes you have references so it adds no value and takes up space. In fact, it probably impacts negatively as it raises some doubt in the reader’s mind. If they want references they will ask you.

About the Author

I set up The Chameleon Career Consultancy to coach CV Writing, Interview Technique and Linkedin Profile writing building on over a decade of corporate recruitment specialising in Procurement and Supply Chain Professionals. During that 11 year period I read in the region of 250,000 CVs (100 a day for 11 years as a conservative estimate!). I made the decision to take a sideways step out of recruitment to help the candidates get the roles they really deserve.

If you would like any advice on any of these areas or more help on your CV feel free to get in touch at [email protected] or www.thechameleon.org or our Linkedin page.

Recruitment Insider: Demand For Temporary Workers Fast Outstripping Supply

Demand for workers is accelerating so fast that it’s outstripping supply. How can organisations find the employees they need without racking up a whole load of extra cost?  Jon Milton explains  the elephant in the recruitment room.

A cursory look at REC jobs market figures show that turnover in the recruitment industry for 2014/2015 was £31.5bn, the highest since records began in 2001/2002.

Permanent recruitment revenues have increased by 58.4 per cent from the recessionary lows of 2010/2011. Temporary or contract revenues are up by 60.1 per cent over the same period. Unemployment is exceptionally low.

What this means is;

  • Demand for workers is accelerating
  • Organisations are turning to recruitment agencies to help them meet it
  • The pool from which to draw workers from is receding

Any situation where demand outstrips supply should result in higher costs. These costs may be reflected in margin, pay rate, expenses or even resource commitment as your organisation searches to find the right worker fit. We have, however, gotten used to paying workers at a certain level and it’s possible to secure low margins from agencies.

How do you deal with this challenge without racking up a whole load of extra cost? Not as you perhaps think – and it’s probably worth addressing that particular elephant in the room first.

The Urban Myth: Exchanging volume with a single agency supplier will solve all my problems.

There are c24000 recruitment agencies operating in the UK, employing about 102,000 recruitment consultants. It’s a massively fragmented supply market that has never responded well when customers with diverse needs have attempted to exchange volume with a single supplier.

In the managed service world, some providers have responded to the challenge of keeping margins low with brute force, transferring workers supplied by incumbent agencies to their own books at implementation, and attempting to fill every requirement that comes along. In the long term this approach inevitably drives off contract buying and significantly reduces quality. This will obviously impact organisational output and competitiveness.

Keeping rates sustainable – making it worthwhile for the agency

The rate paid to an agency is sustainable if it covers their cost of sale and generates a reasonable profit. Cost of sale is important here; agencies typically pay their temporary workers at the end of the previous week worked and get paid by the customer in arrears. As such, prompt and efficient payment is crucial; agencies only get paid once they have filled a role successfully. Providing a decent level of opportunity on a level playing field is extremely important; and they are a vital component in delivering the temporary workforce so it is important to allow them to be heard (and not just through email) and responded to.

In terms of return, it’s important to pitch rates at the right level. Instinctively you may distrust agencies if you have stung by high spot fees in the past, but there are boundaries beyond which margins simply don’t work and render the fee payable non-profitable. Clearly it’s important to push these boundaries where the market dictates, but you will need to develop a strong understanding of the market to do so.

In our own managed service model suppler relationship management is a key component of our service and one that has helped us to address these issues. If you’re considering the managed service route, do talk to your agencies and ask them to give their views on different managed service providers – it will be an interesting conversation and one that should form part of your market approach.

Keeping rates sustainable – making it worthwhile for the worker

Whilst demand for skilled workers is currently outstripping supply it’s easy to think that the amount that you pay for those workers will have to go up, but this is not necessarily the case. Whilst pay rate is of course important, a workers decision on where to work is also led by a number of other factors. The includes the work itself, length of assignment, departmental profile and culture, amenities and work-life balance.

Keeping rates sustainable – managing expectations

Over the last 24 months we have been regularly canvassing the views of our agency suppliers to understand market dynamics, and one consistent theme has been of expectations. In an uncertain economic market where there is an abundant supply of skilled workers, the chances of recruiting someone who meets all your criteria are relatively high, so conversely with the market going full circle, expecting the same now can lead to disappointment.

The best way to address this is to allow agencies to manage the expectations of your line managers for you. This will help your managers to focus on their required outcomes rather than their perception of what they need. It will enable them to benefit from the recruiters’ knowledge of the market and what skills are available.

Whether you allow a managed service provider to manage this on your behalf or not, what is of paramount importance is that these relationships are strictly governed.

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5 Things To Know When Looking for a Job Abroad

Moving and finding a job abroad is something that many people do during their lives. But what do you need to know before you start looking?

Job Abroad

Leaving your home, friends and family behind and moving to another country, where everything that surrounds you is completely different from that to which you are used to, is not an easy task.

New countries have different people, different cultures, different food and sometimes even a different language.

However, for some people leaving their country of origin and traveling to settle down for a while on the other side of the planet represents a personal goal or even a milestone they need to achieve.

In order to get established in a new country, there are some important things you will need to take into account: finding a job, a house, a room or an apartment, learning the native language, basic cultural norms, and so much more! But let’s focus on finding a job for now.

Follow these simple recommendations and you will be well on your way to successfully finding a job abroad:

1. Do your research

Before applying for a job abroad, you need to be informed about how they manage resumes in the country you are moving to. Do you need a cover letter? Short or long resume? Do you need to attach your certificates? Or is your resume acceptable as is?

In some countries including a photo is the norm, in others it is frowned upon. In some cases, you will need to translate and notarise your degree and other certificates, so it is very important to do your research.

2. Spread the news

Once you make a decision about the place you are going to be living next, tell every single person you know. This way, you will probably meet people who went through a similar experience or that are native of the country you chose.

Your aunt will always have a friend of a friend who spent their summer in a far away and exotic country.

3. Consider all your possibilities

Before quitting your job and booking the first ticket to Timbuktu, find out if the company you are currently working for offers exchange programs, or if you have the possibility of being transferred to another branch.

Other options are searching online for a job abroad, as well as searching your alumni networks and social network connections. Volunteering is also a great way to work abroad – it’s also a very rewarding experience.

4. Be smart

Always let the employer know, in your cover letter or during the interview, that you have done your research about the different aspects of their country and that you are willing and prepared to start working. Furthermore, assure them that you are flexible enough so as to adapt to a foreign environment.

5. Don’t be scared, relax

You have done your research, and have talked to every person you know about working abroad. You have looked for jobs online, and you know everything there is to know about your target country. And you have saved enough money to survive at least two months without a job. You are officially ready.

Of course it is scary to live somewhere completely new, but it will probably be the most exciting adventure of your life. So go for it!

Vanessa Fardi is the Leader of US, Central America, and Latin America Team for Canadian startup neuvoo. Neuvoo is a job search engine that indexes jobs available online in one unique platform, without any charge for the source of the job. It was created in 2011 and is currently available in more than 60 countries.