Tag Archives: procurement jobs

Will Autonomous Procurement Cost Me My Job?

Autonomous procurement is no science fiction. It will happen. How can you expect it to change the nature of procurement as a discipline and a career path?


Nottingham, England, 1811: at a time when wages were being depressed to starvation levels and skilled artisans put out of work by the introduction of machinery operated by unskilled labor, weavers led by the mythical General Ned Ludd organised a campaign of smashing machinery. They became known as the Luddites. Ever since, the term Luddism has come to mean opposition to industrialisation, automation, computerisation, or new technologies in general.

More than two centuries of technological advances later, nobody smashes up machines. Because, unlike in 1811, automation is not destroying a way of life. Sophisticated levels of automation are accepted as the norm in manufacturing industry and other sectors as diverse as agriculture and finance. Generally speaking, the higher the level of automation, the higher the level of salaries. Manufacturing and process plants that use robots or other technology to automate routine tasks tend to have a highly skilled and well-educated workforce. And in future, many tasks will be performed, in part or in whole, autonomously.

Nevertheless, people are uneasy about rapid change and the insecurity it causes. And since the start of the first industrial revolution, the rate of change has accelerated. For the first 200 years, progress was mainly focused on gradual improvements in engineering and mechanisation and the harnessing of different sources of energy. Then came computers, then the Internet, and with them, digitisation. A whole new era. Even so, until now digitization has mainly involved the transfer of manual processes onto computers. Even now automation such as it exists is mainly limited to extremely low-level routine tasks where human activity is replaced by rules-driven robotic process automation.

Further acceleration is on its way with Industry 4.0, because of the sheer volume of data that can drive machine learning and the steadily increasing sophistication of artificial intelligence.

Autonomous production will rely on the harnessing of data and software to move from reactive artificial intelligence to prescriptive. For example, with reactive manufacturing, defects are discovered at the end of the line and the production team responds to correct the observed error. Until then, the factory keeps turning out defective goods. A prescriptive AI system, by contrast, identifies potential errors in advance and makes small changes to avoid future quality failures. These small corrective actions are made autonomously, in anticipation of defects, and thereby reduce the cost of non-quality.

We are now poised to see similar developments in procurement.

From automated procurement to autonomous procurement

How will this progress unfold? Spend Matters has identified four levels in a journey “that starts with technology that that assists buyers in completing tasks and ends with a platform that applies knowledge that is collected from buyers to do the tedious parts of their jobs for them”.

The four levels are:

Level One – Automation built on assistive intelligence

Level Two – Augmented procurement built on augmented intelligence

Level Three – Intelligent procurement built on cognitive intelligence

Level Four – Autonomous procurement built on autonomous intelligence

A truly autonomous procurement solution will not only have cognitive capabilities embedded throughout the platform but will build on those capabilities to automate entire sourcing and procurement processes without any buyer interference whatsoever, when the opportunity arises. Such a scenario is not imminent, but nor is it science fiction. It is something that we are moving towards gradually; our view of the destination is still rather hazy, but we can see it. With this ultimate state, systems will not only learn from humans and adapt their behaviour using cognitive abilities but also learn and adapt to new tasks and situations like an expert would, without always having to surface exceptions for human review.

 Let’s put things in perspective

But even if it does not happen overnight, does this mean procurement professionals will ultimately lose their jobs? There is no short answer, but it is certain that many tedious human tasks and activities will be displaced. There are some tasks that robots and other technology are good at, and others that only humans can do. But let’s put things in perspective. According to a report published by the McKinsey Global Institute in 2017, only 5% of human occupations can be fully automated, although approximately 60% of occupations have at least 30% of technically automatable activities. The activities that it identified as most susceptible to automation are physical ones in highly structured and predictable environments, as well as data collection and processing.

Thus, up to two-thirds of jobs will change to a significant extent. Some jobs will disappear, but will be replaced by growth in other, more interesting activities. Check out this website. Enter “Procurement Clerk” and it will return a 98% probability that the job will eventually be replaced by what it calls “robots”, i.e. digital technology. But enter “Purchasing Manager” and the risk sinks to a virtually negligible 3%: the risk level is “totally safe”. With “Logistician” the risk is even lower, at 1.2%. It is easy to detect the pattern here: the more your job depends on human intellect and the less it depends on routine, the safer you are, even if aspects of your job can and will be automated.

In short, fewer boring activities, more value-adding and strategic activities.

I think there is a recognition that we cannot hold back technological progress, even if we want to, and that technological progress is an imperative in a dynamic, competitive environment. Nevertheless, fears persist. Some have expressed the fear that autonomous procurement will rob procurement professionals of critical activities such as sourcing, contracting, managing, and executing purchases with the suppliers of goods and services. But in my opinion, these are precisely the activities that cannot be handled by technology alone, with the exception of execution, and even here, there will be need for human intervention.

Autonomous procurement will use prescriptive AI to anticipate and correct small “quality defects” in execution before they happen. While each of these corrections is small in itself, they will add up to big benefits in terms of cost savings and performance improvements. But this will not replace the bigger decisions that will still depend on the ability of procurement professionals to make decisions based on a combination of data analysis and experience. In other words, procurement professionals will be freed up to focus on things like identifying new opportunities through category rationalisation. Once these activities are done, autonomous procurement will take care of formerly labour-intensive tasks such as setting up and executing an entire sourcing event from start to finish.

It is worth mentioning that increasing levels of automation in procurement will play a decisive role in attracting talent into the profession in future. Young talent and tedious, routine work do not mix well! As David McBride, Transformation & Strategy Director at real estate professional services company JLL put it, “Younger procurement professionals entering large organisations now expect to use cutting edge technology.”

In which areas of your role would you find autonomous procurement capabilities most useful?  Let us know in the comments below.

Creating a Procurement Video to Make Your Mum Proud!

Photo by Donald Tong from Pexels

This article was written for Procurious by Sievo. Find out more about them here.

Have you ever had a hard time explaining what you do to friends or family? Do you love your job but get the sense other people find it boring?

We all know sales drives growth, marketing builds brands and the buck stops with finance. Why is it so difficult to explain the excitement and value procurement brings to the table?

According to Wikipedia, procurement is “the process of finding and agreeing to terms, and acquiring goods, services, or works from an external source, often via a tendering or competitive bidding process. Procurement generally involves making buying decisions under conditions of scarcity.”

Yeah, I know! It sounds boring. Compare it to what we came up with to describe procurement analytics. And we promise you, this is NOT just another boring video about procurement.

Time for a Re-Brand

So why did we break the procurement as we know it and create that simple-fun video? We all know that procurement is often introduced in a boring way – it’s no Sales or Marketing.

But if Sales and Marketing can brand themselves well, why can’t procurement? Why is it that when think-ing about sales, people think of smiling businessmen in suits making deals on lunch dates that increase the company’s revenue, and when thinking of procurement it’s something….well…different.

At Sievo we do procurement analytics. It’s arguably the nerdiest, geekiest, most jargon-filled area of procurement. Analytics is tough to explain on its own. But analytics combined with procurement? I’m not going to even put the definition of that here.

But don’t worry – the fact that procurement is boring is not your fault!

You can choose who and what to blame – the fact that procurement professionals are focusing on savings instead of branding or the lack of knowledge about the subject – but one thing is true: procurement has a branding problem.

Our Procurement Video – Sharing the Excitement

A while back we were looking at YouTube videos about procurement to have some inspiration for future projects. Turned out, we weren’t very inspired at all after watching all of the long and technical videos. In fact, we got a bit worried when wondering what our moms would say if they decided to look into what we do for a living.

We decided we had to do something. Anything. We found that there was a clear demand for an interesting and fun video about procurement. Like the one the sales function has where Leonardo DiCaprio shows how to sell a pen. If for no-one else than to finally explain to our partners and mothers what it really is that we do in a way that they wouldn’t fall asleep halfway.

The thing is, procurement and procurement analytics are actually quite exciting. You should know. Sure, it’s not smiling people out on launch dates all the time, but dang it, procurement is an important function. It’s a function that should be portrayed in the exciting way it deserves.

This subject of changing the way we talk about procurement seemed to be close to the hearts of many since there has been an abundance of comments in response to the video.

Check some of those out:

“Definitely going to show this to my family to let them know what I do at work all day!”

Naavie

“Very cool – this video shows importance of procurement analytics to CPOs, cate-gory managers, compliance officers who look for sustainability in procurement process and even legal department!”

Alexandra Shtromberg

“Shared to my network, great vid… procurement analytics, simply explained and fun to watch… ”

Laura Garcia-Hornell

“Interesting and fun video, really liked it. I am all in for procurement analytics because on the best case it helps to support better decisions which lead to better negotiations… ”

Phil Kowalski

Want more? Read here 14 of some of the most creative definitions of procurement analytics by the ex-perts. Who knew procurement analytics could be explained with Tequila, an Indian wedding, and digging up gold?

Comment what you think about our approach and let us know how YOU would rebrand procurement!

Don’t Move! Improve: How the Property Market Should Inspire your Career Choices

Photo by rawpixel.com from Pexels

When you’re considering your career choices, take inspiration from the property market. There are more similarities than you think.

As a nation we are pretty obsessed with house prices – what our property would fetch if we put it up for sale, what the neighbour’s/our boss’s/our ex’s home is worth, how much our ‘bricks and mortar’ has gone up/down in value. Even if we have no plans to sell up, “property porn” is highly addictive.

Well, you might not realise it, but the jobs market is very similar the housing market.

Who hasn’t got bored at work, and scrolled through job boards to see if there is a better paid role elsewhere? Who hasn’t looked at their pay and perks and wondered if they earn more or less than their colleagues and friends?

This is not the only similarity between the jobs and property markets.

Take supply and demand: When there is uncertainty, the supply of candidates drops. This is keeping “values” up with average pay up 3.9 per cent over the last year.

It’s a similar picture in the housing market. Fewer properties for sale is preventing a property price crash as there is less supply. So prices still managed a 0.9 per cent rise in the year to June (although in London they dipped 2.7 per cent).

Both are a Buyer’s Market

Just as homebuyers can negotiate hard – so can candidates. In 2018, employees who stuck with the same firm saw their average pay rise by just 0.6 per cent after inflation. Those changing employers saw their pay rise by seven times as much, up by 4.5 per cent.

However, this can be a risky strategy.

Yes, you tend to earn more by switching jobs but it’s not the only way to increase your earnings.

If you stay put and “improve” your job prospects, you won’t have all that uncertainty – not knowing if a new job is really for you, worrying that you won’t pass the probationary period and (even worse) waiting until your first day to discover that the job description could be something written by an estate agent (i.e. it bears very little resemblance to reality).

How to Improve Your Job

There has been a fivefold increase since 2013 in the number of homeowners choosing to improve rather than move. So, why not take a leaf out of their book and do the same with your career choices.

· Start with a Valuation

Just as with a house move, many of us wonder if we would be better off with a job move. But how do you know for sure? Well, check out salary benchmarking websites.

Check out Michael Page’s Salary Comparison tool, which compares pay for a number of procurement roles by sector to see if you are underpaid or not. Also check Glassdoor and scour a few job websites to check advertised salaries.

· The Best Improvements to Make

Look at the LinkedIn profiles of people who are one-step-up the career ladder to see what attributes they have that add to their value.

Just as bi-fold doors and open-plan living are desirable in the property market, there are some skills that really stand out among successful people (whether that it is soft-skills such as leadership or hard-skills like proficiency in the latest tech).

Check out job adverts too – are there any skills that seem to be in high demand, that you don’t have?

· Can you get away with a bit of DIY?

If your tech skills are lacking or you need a bit of CPD to bring you up-to-date with latest developments in your sector, online learning is an easy solution. You can learn in your own time, invest in the courses that work best for you and then have something to prove your worth to your employer.

When negotiating a pay rise, showing that you have invested your own time, money and effort in your own success – which could also help boost productivity – is a great bargaining chip.

· Or do you need Professional Help?

Sometimes a bit of DIY is not going to add value. In some cases it can even be a waste of time and money. So, this is where you may need to get professional help, perhaps studying a postgraduate or professional qualification with a recognised provider.

For this you are going to need finance. You can get postgraduate student loans (a bit like a home improvement loans, only for your career). These are similar to student finance for a first degree and you can borrow up to £10,906. Go here for more information.

Or you could simply ask your employer. Many professionals are reluctant to put in a training request (partly because they worry that they will appear as though they need training).

However, this is about career development – doing a better or bigger job – so sell the benefits. It is less of a big ask right now.

According to recruiters Robert Half the biggest talent management concern for senior executives is “employee retention and training” which will be a priority for 31 per cent over the next 12 months. Attracting talent comes in second at 29 per cent – showing that firms see greater benefit in up-skilling their staff than hiring new ones.

· Get Someone Else to Market You

Despite those online property platforms offering to sell your property for less, most homeowners still favour traditional high-street estate agents. Paying someone else to sell your property is not only easier, they are professionals so should (in theory) be able to get you a higher price.

Do the same for your career. If you can find someone else to champion your career, you might not have to ask for that promotion or pay rise – you could be identified as a “potential highflyer” and approached instead.

Seek out mentors, who can help guide your career but who also have currency within your organisation. Perhaps a manager in a different department or even the person who first hired you (and has an interest in you doing well).

Also, reach out via LinkedIn – post thought-provoking and intelligent ideas, link to senior professionals and build your brand through endorsements and connections.

· Get a New Valuation

Finally, prepare your career for the market – declutter your social media, spruce up your online presence and update your particulars (your CV). Now ask for a chat with your line manager (tell him or her what it is about) and go in with a clear asking price (use your research to determine your value). Then see what offers are made.

If your improvements do not yield results, it’s not the end for your career choices. At least you are ready to put yourself on the market!

Want to get your wheels turning towards a supply chain career one could only dream of? Then don’t miss our upcoming Career Boot Camp with IBM – a free 5-part podcast series with some of the very best of the best. Check it out here: https://www.procurious.com/career-boot-camp-2019

George Clooney Is Not The Only One In A Catch 22 – Jobseekers Are Too

While nearly nine in ten UK professionals are considering moving jobs right now, according to CV-Library, many are doing nothing about bagging themselves a better paying job.

By Denis Makarenko/ Shutterstock

You want to earn more. (Who doesn’t?)

But the only way to get a significant pay rise is to move jobs.

However, that is risky – what if it doesn’t work out?

Also, there’s a lot of competition.

So even after all the hard work of looking around for a new role, you might be left disappointed.

And if your current boss finds out you are applying elsewhere… well, that might not reflect well on you.

It’s a paradox – a Catch 22 – with seemingly no escape.

We’re feeling trapped

So, while nearly nine in ten UK professionals are considering moving jobs right now, according to CV-Library, many are doing nothing about bagging themselves a better paying job.

Just under six in ten say they aren’t doing so because they believe the salaries on offer aren’t high enough. Although they might be wrong on that score (it’s often hard to find out what you could get paid, unless you apply and get an interview).

In addition, around three in ten are stuck where they are because they don’t feel confident enough to apply for a new role – with younger employees worried they don’t have enough experienced.

The pay paradox

Yet, those who are brave enough to take a risk and jump ship should reap the rewards.

Pay is on the up – by 3.4 per cent – on average for all UK employees. So, it’s great that most people are enjoying above inflation pay rises.

However, if you look for a new role you should be able to earn more.

Talent shortages mean that pay rises for new jobs are 5.8 per cent higher than a year ago with new recruits are seeing higher salary hikes than existing hires.

Much depends on where you live.

Certain UK cities are witnessing well above-average growth in pay for advertised roles.

            Top cities for highest annual hikes in advertised salaries

  1. London – pay up by 16.1 per cent
  2. Hull – pay up by 15.8 per cent
  3. Edinburgh – pay up by 12.8 per cent
  4. Portsmouth – pay up by 10.7 per cent
  5. Nottingham – pay up by 9.5 per cent

Competition is hotting up

So, firms are so desperate for the right candidate they are having to up their advertised salaries significantly. That’s the good news.

The bad news is that everyone else is beginning to get the same message.

As a result the number of job applications is soaring in many cities according to CV-Library.

            Biggest jump in job applications year-on-year

  1. Bristol 27.2 per cent
  2. Brighton 22.1 per cent
  3. Edinburgh 20 per cent
  4. Manchester 19.7 per cent
  5. London 19.6 per cent

Hiring is slipping

Brexit is taking its toll – with many firms adopting a wait-and-see approach. As a result, there has been a 3 per cent drop in the number of job vacancies year-on-year according to CV-Library.

The Recruitment and Employment Confederation (REC) UK Report on Jobs, produced with KMPG, has been tracking this trend.

The number of people placed into permanent job roles has fallen in four out of the past five months and the growth in vacancies hit an 80-month low in April (rising slightly in May – but still subdued).

Once again, much depends on where you live. The Midlands has been seeing permanent staff appointments decline while the North has seen them increase.

            So what does this mean?

More candidates + less vacancies = tougher competition.

Time to be more Clooney

So how do you become the George Clooney of jobseekers – standing out above all those other candidates?

With competition for roles increasing, you need an escape plan:

  • Avoid the scatter-gun approach: Applying for anything and everything is not going to land you a role worthy of your skills. Identify your ideal jobs and employers and then target them specifically – even if a job is not being advertised you can always make an approach. Let them know you want to join their team and believe you will be an ideal fit. You will then be first in mind when a vacancy arises.
  • Network your way to a new job: Referrals, recommendations and introductions are now one of the most popular ways to find new recruits. It really is a case of “who you know” as well as “what you know”. So, boost your social profile (at sites like Procurious and LinkedIn), link to the right people and make sure you are visible.
  • Get the right tailoring: I don’t mean the right suit (although looking the part is important). This is about tailoring every CV and cover to every role and employer. Make it appear that you are only applying for this one job … and this is one that you are not only uniquely qualified to do, but this is THE one you really want.
  • Stand out from the crowd: There will be other candidates… so how do you make sure that you are the preferred one? Well, the first step is to get an interview. For that, your CV needs to stand out. Learn new skills (investing in your own success shows you are a go-getter), be more of a mover and shaker (post blogs, join networking groups, raise your profile) and be very specific in the wording you use on your CV (demonstrate every requirement of the job on your CV). You can also grab the attention of recruiters by including some big numbers (I raised sales by 20 per cent, worked on a £40m project etc).
  • Do your research: Failure to find out about the employer, the work they do, their clients and their values, is one of the main reasons why candidates do not get the job. It’s easy. While you are at it, research yourself online (a bad social media profile can cost you a job).
  • Believe in yourself:  If you’ve ever missed out on a job offer to a less-qualified rival, you’ll know that getting hired is about being the perfect fit rather than having the perfect CV. Practice your interview techniques with friends and family – people work with people. So aim to come across as someone they’d like to work with.

A Brief Overview Of The 2019 Procurement Job Market

So far this year, most organisations have been more actively hiring procurement employees on a permanent basis as opposed to on contracts.

By Rawpixel.com / Shutterstock

How has the supply chain & procurement hiring landscape been over the first half of 2019?

As all contracts with suppliers from the European Union continue to be reviewed as part of Brexit contingency planning, the first half of 2019 has revealed an increased level of permanent recruitment compared to the hiring of contract or temporary supply chain & procurement professionals. As cost savings remain key in the City, the market has remained extremely buoyant, with a strong preference from hiring managers for individuals possessing experience in IT or tech. The thirst for data is continually increasing and with procurement in mind, lots of emerging solutions that provide procurement and vendor dashboards are always needed. Therefore, these roles have frequently been recruited for.

Across Financial Services, Banking and Insurance, organisations are still busy and hiring. More specifically, the mid-tier and SME businesses have been busier than the larger tier 1 banks, as they seek to reduce their spend and ensure contract risks are minimal in these uncertain times.

Procurement is a money driven profession and salaries are particularly competitive at present, so bonuses and benefits packages can be crucial deciding factors when professionals are looking for new roles. From the perspective of hiring organisations, they have to be prepared to exercise flexibility in terms of salaries or day rates if they want to bring professionals with the right skill sets to the business. 

How to keep the workforce motivated and attract new employees

A large number of professionals are now requesting an element of flexibility in their role or the opportunity to work remotely.  The 9 – 5 working day is no longer how professionals in the UK operate. Flexible working, in terms of hours or being able to work remotely, is expected by the majority of employees in the UK. Organisations have to offer a level of flexibility if they want to attract high quality applicants in what has become a highly competitive marketplace.  

Some organisations continue to lean towards implementing tools or programmes for learning and development that are tailored specifically to procurement professionals. This shows an increased effort to bolster their candidate attraction and retention in these key business areas. In turn, this empowers employees to increase their knowledge in areas such as ‘best practice procurement’, sourcing methodologies and stakeholder engagement. This has become a real talking point, showing the right business highly prioritises procurement and its people.

What has made a Supply Chain & Procurement CV stand out?

Category Management remains a key area of hiring, so upskilling in this is hugely beneficial for all procurement professionals. Those candidates possessing detailed Category Management experience, including spend, savings and projects have been highly sought after by hiring managers. The increase in specialist IT category roles was category specific, mainly consisting of infrastructure, applications and digital transformation spend areas.

Any candidates who upskill in these areas will put themselves in a strong position. Having a good level of experience in any of these will make you stand out against other applicants. Businesses have also continued searching for tendering specialists who can help them mitigate risk on their EU contracts amid all the Brexit confusion. Those with transformation experience is sought after as businesses will require such support to guide them through the uncertainty of Brexit.

How can supply chain & procurement job seekers stay motivated over the slower summer months?

It is not looking like things are going to slow down for Procurement professionals during the summer months – it is a busy time for the industry. For those job seekers actively engaged in any processes, it’s important to keep in touch with your recruitment consultant. Call in weekly to make sure you are hearing about all suitable opportunities; this will keep you at the forefront of your consultant’s mind.

Procurement specialists need to develop their wider skills to implement in negotiations to ensure ‘compliant contracts’ that mitigate risk without over-engineering a low risk engagement – robust frameworks to manage third party engagements could inhibit flexibility for a negotiator.

This article was written by Natalie Limerick, Director – Morgan McKinley

Where Are All The Great Procurement Jobs? Broaden Your Vision

Looking for a new procurement job? The good news is that there are a whole load available that are yours for the taking… you just need to broaden your vision!

Do you have your eye on an exciting opportunity in international category management, predictive data analytics, or do you have a passion to make sourcing more sustainable?  The good news is that new job roles like these are emerging in procurement and they are waiting for you.  Conventional manual processes are disappearing as we automate routine tasks, even contract management is deemed at risk: artificial intelligence and algorithms are already being used to draw up “smart” contracts.

Where are all the great jobs?

Corporate companies

Traditionally the most desirable careers were to be found in the big multinationals that have mature procurement organizations; this still holds quite true.  Some of the companies in the fast-moving-consumer-goods (FMCG) sector are leading the way in strategic procurement.  Unilever, P&G, Amazon and Coca-Cola are listed in Gartner’s Top 25 companies in supply chain.  Any one of these companies may be a good place to get a foot in the door and gain solid early experience.

Procurement solutions providers and consultancies

With the development of software solutions for procurement functions such as strategic sourcing, contracting and supplier management, many companies are outsourcing some functions to technically proficient service providers.  These problem solvers service a range of industries, locations and functions. Spend Matters publishes a list of the top 50 solutions providers To Know and another top 50 to Watch.   This list includes some consulting firms, both big and small.  Phil Ideson of the Art of Procurement says that this type of experience can be valuable if you want to go back into a corporate leadership role.  He says “I am a believer that procurement is a service provider to our stakeholders and not a function. Being with a solutions provider really helps you experience the need for customer centricity.”

Not-for-profit and Public Procurement 

Public sector procurement is a real job option.  Don’t disregard the experience that you can get from working on big-ticket items and major projects that positively affect your region or your city. It may not seem as cool as working for Apple Inc. but it may be more rewarding.  There is some perception that working for a non-profit organization means a drop in pay, not so.  Love to travel?  Opportunities to work abroad abound in the many divisions of the United Nations, the World Bank and the Red Cross, at market-related salaries.

Should you get certified or get a degree?

Unlike in finance and legal, there isn’t a license to practice in procurement. However, most employers prefer candidates with a least a bachelor’s degree in business or a professional certification in supply chain or procurement. Which one depends on whether your targeted employer has a preference for certification over a formal degree and what your desired end-game is.

1. Getting certified

Many of my colleagues without a professional certification have never felt that that impeded their career growth or work opportunities.  However, in the early stages of a career, it may be useful especially in locations where professional certifications are held in high esteem. CIPS, CAPM, IACCM and ISM are examples of certifications and affiliations that you could follow. In the UK and in Australia the push for certification and affiliation is stronger than in some other parts of the world.

2. Educational qualifications

Formal degrees in procurement are actually quite rare but there are lots of possibilities in supply chain management (SCM), of which procurement is a key element.  Leading employers source their talent from the best-ranked colleges internationally that offer supply chain advanced education and from the top UK universities with registered supply chain degrees.  If you are thinking it is too late to start, it really isn’t.  Many of these degrees are available online. Always take advantage of an offer of financial or other educational assistance from your employer.

Sometimes it’s all about the piece of paper, sometimes it’s about the affiliation.

“If I knew then what I know now”

I asked some mature and experienced colleagues what they would tell their 21-year old self and this is what they said:

  1. Be curious

Soak up everything. Read widely to stay on top of new trends, changes in regulations and advances in technology.   Don’t always accept commonly held positions, beliefs or strategies as absolute truths.  Question what you see and what you hear. You can look at everything with a fresh pair of eyes.

  1. Get wide exposure

Take advantage of any job rotation that you are offered,  opportunities to get exposure to many industries and many categories don’t come along every day.  Be open to change and chances to diversify your skills. Transitioning between functions helps you build your knowledge and helps you to better understand your stakeholders.

  1. Find a mentor

It may be useful to get guidance from someone who has been through a similar experience.  A well-chosen mentor provides advice and helps navigate you through the trials and tribulations of your career.  Gordon Donovan (FCIPS), of Epworth Healthcare, says a mentor can come from anywhere, even another industry.

  1. Ask for feedback (and act on it!)

Actively seek feedback on the things that you do well and things that need improvement. Sometimes it’s hard to take criticism but it can help develop both your technical and behavioural skills.

  1. Network

Networking does not come naturally to everyone but it is worth developing some skills in this area.  Meeting new people is so important because you never know when it’ll be someone who can help you to open doors or change your direction. Tanya Seary is a champion of networking, you can follow her example here. 

6. Job descriptions are not cast in stone

Many advertised jobs that you come across may be cut-and-pasted from descriptions used in previous recruitment activities.  Too many times employers and recruiters look for what they looked for last time, not what they need now.  If you think you would fit their needs, go for it, there’s nothing lost.

What the under 30’s say

Most under 30’s surveyed agreed with the boomers talking to their 21-year-old selves.  They suggested working hard to keep learning and gaining new qualifications and ask lots of questions.  As Christina Gill, one of the “30 under 30” stars with over a decade of experience in supply chain, said, “This is an exciting time in your career. Be open, be adventurous, be a sponge, listen, learn, and take risks in your career.”

A final thought: organisations that focus on supplier collaboration, unlocking innovation and making the best use of their precious data make attractive employers.

Hold The Phone! Procurement Pay Increase Smashing The Average Salary

Both ISM and CIPS have released their annual salary surveys. Read on for a short summary of the similarities and differences in salaries across the Atlantic.

Salary surveys make for interesting reading. They reveal much about the perceived value of procurement and supply management, and provide a very helpful data set to have at your disposal the next time you ask for a raise.

If you haven’t seen them already, the two most comprehensive salary surveys for 2018 are available here:

Let’s look at 5 of the most interesting findings across the two surveys:

  1. Average salaries for the profession

  • ISM has announced that the average overall compensation for participating supply management professionals was US$117,425, while CPOs earnt an average of US$263,578.
  • CIPS reported an average salary of £46,422 for procurement and supply professionals, with CPOs earning an average salary of £124,000.
  1. Salary increase smashing the national average

  • In the U.S., ISM reported that supply management salaries rose an average of 4.1% over 2016 salaries, versus 3% for U.S. professionals generally.
  • CIPS found that 68% of procurement professionals received an average 5.1% increase in salary, versus a 2.2% increase for the UK national average.

Paul Lee, Director of ISM Research & Publications, offered the following explanation:

“In today’s global economy, excellence in supply management improves both top- and bottom-line performance, and advances companies’ leadership on the worldwide stage. Supply management professionals’ higher-than-average wage growth reflects the significant value they add every day”.

  1. Certifications DO boost salaries:

  • ISM: Those with the ISM Certified Professional in Supply Management (CPSM) certification averaged 14.7% higher salaries than those without any certification.
  • CIPS: The data reveals that MCIPS and FCIPS professionals have increased earning power, with an average 12% salary disparity between MCIPS and non-MCIPS, and an average of 11% disparity between FCIPS and non-FCIPS across all job levels.
  1. Most important factors when considering a new job

We’re a mercenary bunch. “Salary” has once again come out at the top of both ISM and CIPS’ research into what people consider when evaluating job opportunities. Beyond the money, however, are some other factors that employers should note:

ISM top 6 factors:

  • Salary: 85%
  • Job satisfaction: 81%
  • Improved work/life balance: 80%
  • Benefits package (medical/dental/vision): 79%
  • Pension/retirement plan/401(k) or similar: 78%
  • Organisational culture/work environment: 75% percent

CIPS top 6 factors:

  • Salary: 74%
  • Location: 71%
  • Content of the work: 65%
  • Career progression opportunities: 62%
  • Company reputation: 59%
  • Company commitment to training and development: 58%
  1. Gender gap disappointment

  • ISM’s data reveals women are paid less than men across every level in U.S. supply management, with male CPOs earning 26% more than female counterparts, male VPs earning 52% more than women, and male Emerging Professionals earning 13% more than women.

CIPS reports that the most striking pay disparity exists at the Advanced Professional level, where men earned 33% more than women, a pay gap that has widened since the previous year’s (25%). Pay disparity at the Professional and Managerial levels is also considerable, at 14% and 11% respectively

9 Signs You’re Undervalued At Work

Feeling undervalued at work? If you can’t remember the last time you got a pay rise , haven’t received any formal training since your role commenced and are consistently working unpaid overtime, you probably are!

lassedesignen/Shutterstock.com

This article was written by Anna O’Dea, Director and Founder of Agency Iceberg. 

We all have a sense of our personal worth in the workplace, and sometimes it can feel as if our valuable experience, strong commitment and innovative ideas are being taken for granted.

At Agency Iceberg, I meet a lot of people facing this situation. They suspect they aren’t being supported by their managers, they’re being underpaid for their knowledge and input, or are being overlooked for well-deserved promotions.

From my experience working for eight years in the recruitment industry, my team and I have found there are nine key signs that suggest you could be being undervalued by your employer. If they sound familiar, it could be time to speak up or move on!

1) The numbers aren’t stacking up

In the current economic climate, pay rises aren’t vast. But if you’re constantly stuck with getting just the minimum cost of living rise, while your peers get bumped up for a similar job, you might not be getting the financial reward that you should be. With the internet, it’s not hard to compare your earnings with what others in the same role are getting. Do the research and you’ll have tangible evidence to back your case.

Another one to watch is bonuses. Did your colleagues get a flash of cash that you missed? If there’s no logical reason why you were skipped over, there could be unfairness at play.

2) Your performance and pay reviews are constantly postponed

If your annual performance and remuneration review keeps getting put off another week, month, or a few months, with lots of excuses from management (and no guarantee of back pay) you’re being taken for a ride. The longer you don’t get a pay rise, the more you’re working at a higher skill for the company’s benefit.

3) You have to ‘act’ in a higher role before you’re promoted

It’s common to get told you need to step up your responsibilities to ‘prove your worth’. But if ‘acting’ in the next role goes on for too long, the advantage can again pass from you gaining experience, to your employer getting excellent skills for less pay.

4) People are promoted around you

If you’ve got the credentials and factual evidence to deserve a promotion, yet continually miss out, they may not be seeing your true worth. More worrying, and harder to fix, could be signs of favouritism, sexism or ageism.

5) You’re not trusted to be autonomous

If you have to run every move by your manager, or aren’t trusted to manage your schedule or clients your own way, your abilities may not be recognised. In extreme situations, you could be being micro-managed, which can be quite destructive to growth.

6) Your input is curtailed

When you show your talent, such as sharing innovative ideas in meetings, or suggesting positive ways to improve processes, and it’s clear they’re not welcome, it’s a concerning sign. In some cases, insecure managers won’t let you shine, which is not only letting you down, but also the business.

7) Overtime is expected, and you aren’t given time in lieu

We’ve all read that clause in contracts that says ‘extra hours may be necessary’. However when overtime is systemic and with no lieu time offered, the business has you in its claws. We see this when people travel for work – enduring overnight flights or early morning trips with no time off.

8) You can’t be sick on sick days

Sick used to mean staying at home and sweating out the bug. However technology has shifted the expectations of many bosses to be on 24-7. If your boss insists you stay online when you should be recovering, or text messages and countless emails on the weekend from your boss doesn’t sound out of place, it’s a sign you’re being overworked.

9) You’re not getting trained for growth

Every good employer should encourage the development of their employees. If your employer isn’t investing in your training or opportunities, you could be in a one-way relationship.

If some of these signs ring true, take time to consider the next phase of your career. Your professional pride, mental health, sense of purpose and financial future are too important.

Anna O’Dea is a recruitment expert, LinkedIn Top Voice 2016 and Founder and Director of Agency Iceberg. This article was originally published on LinkedIn

10 Ways Social Media Can Get You Hired

You never know who’s watching you on social media, there’s every chance it’s your dream employer. Here’s how to make sure you get noticed and get that job!

We live in an era when we have the ability to access information in a fraction of a second. Technology has allowed us to accomplish tasks and reach out to people in ways we never thought possible, even 20 years ago.

Social media is the beast that holds much power in our success or demise. It can crumble a person’s reputation with a tweet, or catapult it. The bottom line is that the user must navigate with extreme caution.

Searching for the job you want can be exhausting. The whole process is time-consuming and impersonal, and it can be difficult to demonstrate your full range of qualifications.

We’ve come up with ten ways to leverage social media in order to look more desirable to employers.

1. Get On Board!

If you don’t have social media accounts and you’re not close to retirement, get at least one now! LinkedIn is the most popular job search site, where an estimated 95 per cent of recruiters search for their candidates.

Employers also look to social media sites like Instagram, Facebook and Twitter to get a more personal take on a candidate and make sure that they fit in with the culture of their company.

2. Maintain Your Account

You should set up a strong profile and use keywords that highlight skills that potential employers may search for.  As you develop new skills or complete certifications, let them know!

Potential employers want to see that you keep active on your profiles, but you don’t need to get overwhelmed trying to show your activity every single day on every single site. Just a little something every few days goes a long way.

3. Become a Social Butterfly

Remember, you have a choice of what to entertain and engage in, so choose wisely. You don’t have to put your entire personal life out there just to make yourself seen. In fact, that disposition has the potential to deter prospective employers and only serves as a distraction. Instead, it’s best to like, share, comment, tweet and retweet relevant information in your field and follow sites that interest you professionally.

The more you get your name in front of businesses, the more it’ll stick and show them that you are relevant and up to speed in the industry.

4. Use Discretion

By all means, be authentic, but if you desire to use social media as an avenue for potential employment, you must remember that once it’s out there, it stays out there. Photos, comments and posts can come back to haunt you with a vengeance.

It’s important to be mindful of the persona you illustrate online. Companies want someone who can represent them professionally at all times and not compromise their reputation. If you do post highly personal photos, you should keep your account private.

5. Make an Impact

Use your social media platform to gain followers by posting information that your audience will appreciate. Gaining followers will not only show employers that you have something to say and can influence the community, it will also give you the confidence to continue to make an impact.

6. Keep It Positive in the Job Search Process

It’s not easy being unemployed (or underemployed). It can take a toll on your self-confidence and your ability to land a new position, so why remind yourself of that?

Avoid using the word “unemployed” and instead highlight what it is that you are looking for. Your profile will sound much more ambitious and will remind employers that they need you as much as you need them.

7. Read Between the Lines

Actually, employers are the ones that will read between the lines, so be sure to cross your T’s and dot your I’s. Using the correct punctuation and grammar on your page and in your comments will show your potential employer how well you actually communicate.

Everyone loves to highlight their “excellent written and verbal communication skills” on a resume, then fail to proofread a comment left on a company Facebook page or description paragraph on their profile. Make sure to stay consistent with whom you describe yourself to be.

8. Get Endorsed

Since LinkedIn is one of the top job search engines, it is important to get endorsements from other professionals within the network. Your connections are allowed to endorse you, or legitimise your skill set. You can ask former bosses or coworkers to write recommendations for you, and you can certainly return the favor.

Creating several symbiotic professional relationships online can only help you. The more high-quality references you can get, the better.

9. Keep It Simple

We know … you have so many awesome qualities it’s hard to narrow it down. But simplicity is key in a great professional social media page. Narrow down your descriptors to what you want employers to know.

You may think you are offering readers a way to get to know you better, but all the extra words serve as a distraction. Get down to the essentials and stick with it.

10. Dress for Success

This seems simple, but you’d be surprised at how many people fall short with this. Your attire should lean toward the conservative, business casual side.

Social media has become a place of validation in our society, and many users look for approval from others in the looks department. Professionally, it’s an entirely different ballgame. Again, be authentic and be yourself, but err on the side of caution.

The Social Media Payoff

If leveraged correctly, social media can distinguish you from your competition without having to even step foot outside of your home. You can make yourself the most sought after in your field, or you can get lost in the shuffle of mediocrity.

If social media overwhelms you, it’s OK. You don’t have to do it all. Simply pick whichever social site works for you and stick with it. Something is better than nothing, and as with almost anything else, you get out what you put in.

This article was written by Nicola Yap and originally published on Eminent SEO. Follow @EminentSEO for more top tips! 

Contingent Workforce: Why Procurement Still Hasn’t Found What It’s Looking For

In some ways the procurement profession is in a stronger position than ever before. But in others, in the words of great philosopher Bono, we “still haven’t found what we’re looking for” when it comes to the contingent workforce.  

Different Categories, Different Organisations, Different Value

Is our role really about cost reduction when it comes down to it? Or are we moving into a brave new world where the small, but perfectly formed, procurement function is focused on extracting innovation and competitive advantage from key supply markets?

Clearly, “value” is a word that has to feature, but saying procurement is about value is a bit of a truism;  of course it is! And so is everything else that an organisation does.

This in itself doesn’t help us to progress very far in the debate but one useful thought might be this: Every spend category within our organisation contributes value to the organisation in a different way; and for any given spend category, that value will differ from organisation to organisation too.

The Evolution of Procurement and What it Means for Managing Contingent Labour

In our new paper, The Evolution of Procurement and What it Means for Managing Contingent Labour, written in conjunction with Spend Matters, we look at this issue and also touch on other aspects around where procurement might be heading, including the fashionable idea of “procurement as a service”.

Using contingent labour as an example it is possible to illustrate how procurement has evolved and how a category can create value in various ways.

In some organisations, obtaining the right contingent labour, such as highly skilled technicians, creative folk or IT experts, might be a direct source of innovation and, as such, competitive advantage. In other cases, cost reduction and operational efficiency through a super-slick engagement processes for contingent workers might be the key factor.

The key point, however,  is that every procurement professional needs to understand the contribution for their categories in their organisation.

Procurement Must Take A Multi-Pronged Approach To Contingent Labour

(An Excerpt from The Evolution of Procurement and What it Means for Managing Contingent Labour

Any analysis will immediately confirm that procurement must follow different approaches depending on both the category of spend being addressed, and the nature of the business and the drivers of success.

Are the ingredients for a food product important to its success, or is it enough that they are safe to eat? If we spent more on a better quality purchase, would we sell more or be able to charge a higher price?

Considering services spend categories, how important, for instance, is marketing to the success of the firm? If innovation and new products are key drivers, then supporting that by identifying and working successfully with the very best external marketing services providers will be more important than haggling over their margins.

Contingent labour spend may simply be a case of minimising cost at an acceptable level of risk, or it may be much more strategic, with access to hard-to-find talent, and speed of engagement critical to the business.

That was reflected in our roundtable last year when we heard several excellent examples of how the use of contingent labour was truly linked to organisational strategies. “We are looking at scenario planning and resourcing models to help predict blue collar contingent labour requirements.” And the days of the contingent workforce being purely low-level blue-collar or administrative staff are long gone.

“Some of our contingent workforce are key to how we win business from our own customers; they are a strategically important and also scarce resource”.

You can download the full white paper for free here.

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