Tag Archives: procurement management

The Human Side of Procurement Decision Making

No matter the sources available, procurement professionals trust above all else peers when it comes to information and supplier intelligence.

Peer Recommendation Supplier Intelligence

Earlier this year, I participated in research that explored current trends in supplier intelligence. More specifically, tealbook wanted to know what sources of information are the most trusted when finding new suppliers.

Here is what they learned:

Procurement professionals trust their peers, whether internal or industry colleagues, over any other source of information or intelligence.

In fact, 83 per cent of the survey participants held this opinion. Not only does this finding indicate that procurement should find and invest in efficient ways to access and centralise the knowledge of their peers, it offers procurement a secondary lesson about our own stakeholders and the best way to reach them.

Procurement can be an ‘acquired taste’ for some functions and business units. We can put out mission statements, tie our objectives to theirs, and endlessly share positive results and sometimes they still don’t come around to our way of thinking.

Are We Effective Message Carriers?

Maybe the problem isn’t the thought process. Perhaps, as we learned in the research about trusted sources of supplier intelligence, the issue is the messenger.

If that is the case, how can procurement go about finding other, more effective carriers for our message?

I am a huge fan of the town hall meeting format. Town halls are an effective way to speak to the organisation at large about strategic sourcing and procurement and emphasise that we are a collaborative partner ready and willing to add value.

About 6 months after I joined FORMA, I had a procurement town hall I presented as a ‘Lunch and Learn’. People either called in, participated via video conference, or sat in the auditorium area.

Our main messages to them were: “Here are some of the things that procurement has done. Here is how you can engage with us. Here is how you work with procurement.”

The Power of Testimonials

By far, the most impactful statements in the town hall were not made by procurement at all. They were testimonials made by procurement’s key internal stakeholders directly to their peers.

I had invited five key stakeholders at the VP level and Senior Director level, very high level representatives in the organisation, to come up and talk about what their experience had been with procurement.

They shared where they had found benefit, how had procurement helped them, and under what circumstances they would actively engage us again.

Those testimonials spoke louder, and reached further, than anything that I, or my team, could have said to help us with stakeholder engagement.

Once the audience members began to hear and understand the different ways procurement was able to provide support, they became more creative in their thinking. “Well, you know what? I have this project that’s coming up next week, or two months from now…”.

Or, “Here’s an initiative I never thought you could help me with, but I guess you can…”. It created a lot of momentum and opened a lot of doors. It was an extremely positive way of enticing engagement from our stakeholders.

Trusted Sources of Supplier Intelligence

Mary Kachinsky
Mary Kachinsky

When a town hall meeting isn’t a possibility, technology can often be called in to bridge the gap. This is why platforms such as tealbook fill a unique gap for many procurement teams. They offer a place where teams can store supplier provided information with their own notes and opinions.

This sits alongside commercial data from Dun & Bradstreet’s global database and aggregated intelligence on suppliers from industry peers. Having all of this information in one place is like being able to call a town hall to order anytime and any place. And there’s the additional bonus of not having to provide lunch!

The fact of the matter is, people want to get information and opinions from the people they know and trust. It is true in the case of procurement and it is also true with our internal stakeholders.

At the end of the day, we are all people that put more faith in recommendations from our peers than we do in a distant process mandate or firm that says, “This is the supplier to work with” or “Procurement has your best interests in mind – trust us”. We ultimately want to hear from our peers.

If you are interested in more about tealbook’s research into supplier intelligence, knowledge and discovery, you can download it here.

Mary Kachinsky is a member of the tealbook Advisory Board, and Vice President of Strategic Sourcing and Operations for FORMA Therapeutics

She brings over 25 years’ experience as a strategic partner and business leader in the research, development and manufacturing procurement functions spanning across the pharmaceutical, biotech and consumer electronics industries. Mary is a Certified Professional in Supply Management (CPSM) and a Lifetime Certified Purchasing Manager (C.P.M.).

The Truth? Businesses Still Struggle with Indirect Procurement

The procurement industry is evolving at a rapid rate. But it still has broad issues with indirect procurement and how to determine value for money.

Indirect Procurement

No matter where you are in the world, indirect spend is a notoriously difficult area for CPOs to control. Because of this, it presents huge potential for savings for companies.

Direct Procurement refers to the act of acquiring raw materials and goods for production. Indirect Procurement is the act of purchasing services or supplies required to keep the day-to-day business ticking over.

However, there’s a consistent message out there that procurement, and indirect procurement in particular, is under-appreciated by the broader organisation.

Establish Internal Targets

Celia Jordaan is the founder of Australia’s Ichiban Commercial Solutions, which helps businesses with tendering, risk management and procurement solutions.

Over two decades, Jordaan has worked in a number of different countries, locations and cultures. She has experience across procurement, supply chain, contract management, law and risk.

The procurement function often influences the company budget, but doesn’t always entirely control it, she says. The difficulty with indirect procurement or procurement for internal use, is that it’s difficult to determine value for money.

“Indirect procurement is generally seen as soft services that aren’t adding direct value to the cost of production or core business. However, it’s a service that’s vital in order to be able to effectively make the business run,” Jordaan explained.

The downfall in many cases is a clear budget. Professionals need to establish their own internal targets around value created, and qualify what they do and the value they create.

“There’s no real crystal clear way to measure the cost avoidance elements of indirect procurement. It presents a lot of complexities.

Procurement professionals need to sell their own value, and put their own processes in place that helps them demonstrate the value they can create for an organisation, Jordaan says.

Procurement Outsourcing?

David Rae, editor of Procurement Leaders, wrote in ‘Procurement Outsourcing – Managing Indirect Spend’, that change will come when CPOs get involved and influence buying behaviour across the entire organisations, and in every category.

They must also apply the same rigour to the indirect categories as they do to direct materials, he wrote.

“The research shows that, while there is still much work to be done, CPOs are tackling this area. One way of doing so is to engage an outsourcing partner, who can often bring category expertise, greater buying power and improved compliance to an organisation’s indirect spend categories.

“And, while it continues to struggle to match the likes of HR and finance in terms of uptake, there are signs that procurement outsourcing is really taking off,” he wrote in the report.

Under-Investment in Indirect Procurement

Meanwhile, a research report by Proxima explores what procurement can do to redefine how it’s perceived by the broader organisation.

The report says that a vast majority of C-suite executives feel that indirect procurement is under-invested across the UK, Europe, US and further afield.

This prompted Proxima, in conjunction with NelsonHall, to run a research study to uncover perceptions, attitudes and desired outcomes of indirect procurement. It was hoped this would catalyse the common sense that procurement could and should play a greater role in most businesses.

Responses indicated that indirect procurement in some organisations is perceived to have a role that is tactical and administrative. Some respondents advised that it can create process blocks, and can, on occasion, even be antagonistic to specialist suppliers of the business.

Five Key Challenges

The research found five key challenges for the procurement function, impacting on CPOs’ ability to effectively manage indirect expenditure.

These include, as outlined here in the report:

1. Lack of capacity

The indirect procurement team has to focus on sourcing commonly purchased and high volume goods and services, as well as transaction processing.

2. Lack of political clout

CPOs involved in the research study tended to be quite self-critical. This was particularly prevalent in areas such as their ability to introduce process improvement, and to increase the level of spend under contract.

3. Lack of mandate

The primary responsibility for most indirect procurement categories often lies within the business units. For some categories, such as travel, it may not even be clear as to who actually owns the policy.

4. Lack of awareness and low visibility of indirect procurement

Indirect procurement is often seen as less important than direct procurement in the eyes of senior executives. It is seemingly even less important at the business unit level. Many stakeholders view an indirect procurement professional’s role as the ‘rubber stamper’ at the end of the process.

5. Organisations lack the skills required for effective stakeholder management

A common perception held by CPOs and CFOs is that the indirect procurement function has to find ways of working more effectively alongside the various business units and stakeholders within each business unit.

How Does it Feel to Be a Supplier to You?

Being a customer of choice in procurement is important. Ensuring your supplier feels part of the team is also important.

Supplier to You

As procurement professionals we care about the quality, delivery, cost, innovation and sustainability performance of our suppliers. These are usually wrapped up in Key Performance Indicators (KPIs), a key tool within the procurement community.

Now that we as a population are facing resource scarcity, what sort of questions should we start asking ourselves to ensure that we continue being the ‘customer of choice’, and make the supplier feel that they are a prime source of value to our organisation?

Why ‘Customer of Choice’ is Important

Every day, news headlines and scientific reports reflect a world increasingly impacted by unsustainable trends and catastrophic climate events.

Oceans are becoming more acidic, with devastating results on coral and connected ecosystems. The air in major cities is full of dangerous particulates. Crop-growing regions for key commodities are shifting. Sea levels are rising.

All this could potentially lead to resource constraints and risk in the supply chain which procurement, amongst others, should mitigate.

The essential questions procurement should be asking itself are:

  • How can organisations possibly develop a ‘single point of truth’, which is reliable and up to date?
  • How can they manage contracts and monitor KPI’s?
  • How can they handle data and information and avoid rework and duplication and look at the relationship from the supplier’s perspective?

Key Questions for Your Supplier

It starts with the sourcing process where the supplier is evaluated, perhaps even audited, and then at the end when a contract is developed with them. Suppliers will evaluate whether these selection processes run fairly and competently.

In the on-boarding and the execution part of the relationship, the supplier will most probably evaluate how the communications went, how easy it was to create and implement changes to the administrative routines, and how the on-boarding was tackled.

When the relationship starts out, the evaluation will typically be how time consuming or complicated it is to deliver goods and services, and whether the same information is requested by different people.

When it comes to the strategic relationship, a key question to ask yourself is whether you ask your suppliers their opinions about issues that might affect them, including issues around risk.

And then, when you ask them, are you then open to new ideas, new products, and new ways of doing things?

Organisational Benefits

How would this benefit organisations? The time it takes to manage the relationship should become more effective. So should the visibility from spend analysis to sourcing exercises to strategic relationship management.

As a result it should help drive better relationships and help achieve competitive advantage for both parties. And this should of course be linked to your company’s sustainability journey.

eCatalogues are Just Spreadsheets, What’s the Big Deal?!

How many times have you heard someone compare eCatalogues to spreadsheets? It’s time to clear up the differences!

eCatalogues on Tablet

This article was originally published on Suppliers Matter.

That’s what the owner of a small office supply company asked me back in 1999. I was an independent supplier enablement consultant, and it was taking me longer than he wanted to create his first electronic catalogue in Ariba for his largest customer.

Here are the ten things I wish I had said as to why electronic catalogues aren’t “just spreadsheets”. I’ve also added a handful of insights that some newer eProcurement solutions now have to offer when it comes to eCatalogues.

The end result may “simply be a spreadsheet”, but it’s ensuring what’s in this spreadsheet that requires due diligence.

1) Appropriate Selection

eCatalogues need to contain all things that the customer buys from you, and none of the things you’re not supposed to sell.

If you have the contract to sell office supplies, and you’ve been given explicit instructions to only include office supplies, then you can’t include the kitchen sink.

When it’s time to export item information from the back end system, it should be just for your customer’s desired items.

Some larger suppliers have been known to insist their eCatalogues can’t be filtered, in an effort to sell more stuff. You don’t want to play those games.

2) Accurate Pricing

Obviously the prices for these items has to be accurate. Sometimes the calculation of the sell price can get complicated. For example, if it’s X per cent off list for one type of item, but Y per cent off for another. Or if there’s a list of most commonly ordered items that are more highly discounted than the rest.

If your customer finds one item that is priced higher than it should be, they’ll lose trust and question all other item prices.

Newer eProcurement platforms now support tiered pricing, bundles, configurable/custom options, etc., which can help when if you sell more complicated products or services.

3) Consistent Names

The item names are the first thing that a customer sees in their search results, so it’s important that they are strong and also follow a consistent naming convention, for example: Widgets, Small, Pack of 20.

Looking at a long list of items that are consistently named makes it easier for the customer to select the right item.

4) Rich Descriptions

This is one area where the initial effort up front can really make a big difference, but it takes investment. If you want to have your items found in search results, and also help your customer make the right choice the first time, you need rich item descriptions that thoroughly describe your items. You should take advantage of as much space as the customer can support. If they allow 255 characters, use them!

Some suppliers simply export the bare minimum item information from their inventory, which is often hard to understand. And what’s frustrating for buyers is that the supplier’s B2C site has often got great rich content. However, suppliers frequently have two separate item databases – one for B2C/marketing and one for B2B/eProcurement.

If you happen to sell items from popular categories, there are now rich content providers that you can use to enrich your information.

5) Granular UNSPSC codes

There are so many reasons to make sure that the UNSPSC codes assigned to your items are granular and accurate.

Granular meaning that you can’t just assign the ‘Office Stationery’ code to all your items, even the office furniture and computer accessories.

And accurate, meaning that if you’re selling a standard office scissor then you need to use the correct code, and not just the first reference to scissors you see when searching the UNSPSC database.

The customer may have purchase requisition approval rules reliant on the codes to determine who should approve the request. IT may need to approve the computer accessory, and facilities may need to approve the furniture. Plus, your customer’s reports will be much more accurate in terms of spend reporting.

A new consideration is eProcurement systems now have browsable category trees that rely on the UNSPSC to assign the item to the most appropriate category. You want your items to fall under the right bucket and not all get clumped into one.

6) Images for Every Product

This is a no-brainer. You have to make sure as many of your items (if not all) have at least one, nice looking image. They should be professional looking, high resolution, hosted on a publicly available webserver, and assigned to the right item.

And if your customer’s eProcurement system supports multiple images, then give them more. Many suppliers don’t take advantage of this, however, and just do the minimum (if that). Make your items shine!

7) Valid Units of Measure

You don’t want to do all this work and have the catalogue not load because your internal unit of measure is “Each” and the customer’s system needs it to be “EA”. You need to ensure that all your items are using the UOMs that your customer supports.

8) Internal Part Numbers for Automation

If you want to automate the fulfilment of the corresponding electronic purchase order and have it flow seamlessly into your system, the part numbers have to be perfect.

You can’t manually create an item in the catalogue file called WIDGET and expect it to work. You need to export the part numbers out of your system, and only use those part numbers in the eCatalogues.

9) Properly Formatted File

All this has to be exported into a properly formatted file that matches the customer’s file format requirements.

  • XLS vs. XLSX vs. CSV vs. XML vs. CIF vs. ETC.
  • Field titles with correct names.
  • Not exceeding each field’s maximum length.
  • Ensure all their required fields are populated properly.

This is where it can get a little technical, but it’s a one time effort.

10) Automating the Update Process

Fortunately, we didn’t have to update static eCatalogues very often, so doing this once or twice a year was acceptable.

New eProcurement systems now support simple CSV files, and allow suppliers to upload securely. This means suppliers are now in a better position to automate the export, any mapping, and upload using relatively simple scripts or product information management (PIM) tools.

Suppliers, what else would you have told him? (Apart from go do it yourself!)

5 Price Analysis Methodologies to Apply to Negotiated Costs

How can you find out if you’ve got a good deal from your negotiation? Here are some price analysis tools that could help you out.

Volume Price Analysis

One of the key performance measures that invariably arises at the end of a negotiation is if the final price achieved is a good one or not.

If we, as buyers, have purchased the product or service for a number of years, we can rely on our experience. But we have all faced a situation when we have to deal with an unfamiliar product. What do we do then?

I have outlined the pros and cons of some different approaches to price analysis. There’s no magic formula we can apply to confirm if the negotiated cost is accurate to the market price.

Each price analysis method has its own strengths and weaknesses. Knowing them will help us to understand which one to apply in which situation.

Price Comparison

The most basic method. You take the final price, and compare it against the prices quoted for the same product by other suppliers in the market place. This is the most common method, and it’s usually applied to common products, or those with transparent pricing.

Pros:

  • Doesn’t require too many resources.
  • Relatively easy to find out if the cost is over the market average.

Cons:

  • It can only be applied to common products – it should not be used, for example, for the cost of a lab analysis service, or customised goods.
  • You have to work with updated costs – in some areas, like electronics, a 6 month old cost may be obsolete.
  • You have to compare exactly the same product, under the same circumstances – not, for example, two different mobile phones, or services from two different countries.
Cost Structure

If it’s not possible to find equivalent market prices for the products or services, procurement can use the approach of a detailed cost structure analysis.

In order to do it, we ‘only’ have to replicate the manufacturing process, and assign an estimated cost to each stage. We can then benchmark this result against the cost provided by the supplier.

With a service, rather than a product, the process requires disaggregation of the service into its constituent parts (salaries; materials; equipment), and a cost assigned to each.

Pros:

  • Provides a detailed view of costs.
  • Can be used as a basis for supplier partnerships, and to visit supplier facilities to look at the manufacturing process.
  • Allows for negotiation on each constituent part of the good or service, increasing potential for savings.

Cons:

  • In-depth knowledge of the manufacturing processes and costs is needed.
  • Resource heavy.
  • Without supplier input, manufacturing process costs will be estimated, increasing the error margin exponentially.
Price Index

If the product has a published price index, then it is logical that the index will be a good guide to check if the negotiated cost is a good one. It would then be a matter of comparing the negotiated and index price to see if the negotiated cost was good or not.

The process is a bit more complex than that, but for the purposes of this article, there is no need for further explanation.

Pros:

  • Price indices usually are available on the Internet under paid subscription. As an added value, these sites usually offer forecast analysis that could be helpful for ongoing procurement strategy.
  • Can show trends and provide a comparison to the cost the last time the product was purchased. For example, if a product index has decreased a 5 per cent, but the supplier has only offered a 2 per cent cost decrease, then it’s clear that there is room for further negotiation.

Cons:

  • The indices are just a guide, there is a more complex cost structure which has to be considered. For example, other factors, such as a trader’s fee, would not be expressed as part of the product cost.
  • Indices only have a partial influence on the final price. A drop of 30 per cent on a factor, such as petrol price in the plastics market, wouldn’t necessarily mean a 30 per cent drop in the product price.
  • Markets can fall victim to speculation, or an issue that distorts the index. Being unaware of these issues prior to a negotiation could lead to a higher than expected cost.
Unit Price Analysis (UPA)

The Unit Price Analysis (UPA) is a mathematical model which predicts the right cost that a product or service should have based on its specific properties or details. It’s like a price calculator.

Pros:

  • We have access to a goal cost before starting negotiations.
  • Companies have developed their own UPAs based on non-linear regression statistical analysis. You can hire their services in the same way as you sign up for Price Index sites.
  • They are quite helpful when calculating complex project costs, and provide an accurate cost result for EPC projects.

Cons:

  • Building this model from scratch is expensive. Nearly all companies outsource this service.
  • You must be sure that data comes from a trustworthy source before using it for a negotiation.
  • UPAs are unitary prices based on a specific volume. The data doesn’t support different volumes.
Conclusion

In addition to the price analysis tools outlined above, there are a number of other, less common, ones. They are less used as they can only usually be applied to very specific cases.

There is no, one correct method. The specific circumstances of each sourcing activity will determine which method can be best applied to the post-negotiation benchmarking activity.

Why Supplier Discovery Must Become a More Agile Process

In order for procurement to remain strategic, manually intensive processes, such as supplier discovery, need to become more agile and intuitive.

Supplier Discovery

Doesn’t it seem like procurement reaches a new strategic milestone every day? These are amazing times to work in this field. We’ve been pushing towards this point for so long! Now that we’re here, we need to make sure we keep up the momentum.

None of procurement’s less strategic work is going away anytime soon, so if we’re going to avoid being dragged back down, we need to look for opportunities to streamline our processes. Anything that takes procurement away from working with suppliers and stakeholders should be a prime target for change.

Streamlining Supplier Discovery

One of those processes – supplier discovery – is long overdue for a makeover. Given today’s time constraints and better places to invest effort, there is no reason for procurement to be limiting the potential of a sourcing project by web-surfing to find prospective suppliers.

As Chris Silva, former Senior Director of Sourcing & Procurement at Synageva BioPharma Corp., recently told us, “Initial due diligence varies significantly from hours to months, depending upon many factors including data availability on the supplier, the supplier’s availability and response, the availability/completeness of third party data, and the complexity and completeness of the requirements, to name a few.”

Not only is the process inefficient for the reasons Chris points out, there is not really a good way to know if you’re missing a prime supplier candidate. The Internet doesn’t usually reflect the perspectives and opinions of your colleagues, and despite how popular online reviews and feedback are for consumer purchases, they just haven’t caught on in the B2B world.

Teresa Fiore, Associate Director of Global Sourcing for Marketing and Sales at Boehringer Ingelheim USA Corporation, pointed out the need to synthesise multiple sources of information, saying that finding new suppliers is “a combination of our internal sourcing knowledge combined with our internal marketing clients’ knowledge.”

Pulling relevant information from these multiple sources without adding time to the process is the first challenge to be addressed when streamlining supplier discovery.

Supplier Discovery – The Real Story

In November, ProcureCon surveyed 40 procurement execs like Chris and Teresa to find out what they really think of supplier discovery. The results tell an interesting story about the role of knowledge management in procurement today:

  • 83 per cent of searches take one to six weeks (or more) to identify the right suppliers and contact information prior to running an RFP.
  • 78 per cent of respondents share supplier information with their internal partners in person, and 70 per cent share through email. Only 25 per cent said they use online portals.
  • 70 per cent of procurement and sourcing professionals report that the most credible source of supplier intelligence comes from their internal peers.
  • 62 per cent of the respondents indicated they have little satisfaction with the technology solutions they use to gather supplier information and manage category intelligence today.

Clearly, there are real challenges around finding suppliers and then managing the organisation’s knowledge about them. One to six weeks to identify qualified suppliers? That hardly meshes with procurement’s agile, responsive new brand.

If you can go to Procurious and search their members for skills and sharing activity, why shouldn’t the same be possible on the supplier side? It’s not as if the technology doesn’t exist. We just have to prioritise supplier discovery and knowledge management so that they get fixed – fast.

If you’re interested in learning more about the research, including quotes from follow up interviews done with industry leaders, click here to download and read the whitepaper: Improving Strategic Supplier Discovery Through Technology.

Stephany Lapierre is Founder and CEO at tealbook, intuitive platform that mutually benefits companies and their supply partners by improving access to instant and trusted supplier intelligence, discovery, and identification.

Why Predictive Analytics is Changing Procurement’s Future

The opportunity for predictive analytics and Big Data in procurement goes well beyond spend.

Predictive Analytics in Procurement

Hackett’s 2016 Procurement Key Issues Study shows that increasing agility is a critical development area for organisations. It also shows that predictive analytics and forecasting tools are identified as having the greatest transformational impact on procurement in the future.

A confluence of high volatility, technology-led innovation, and hyper-competitive market conditions, has accelerated the rate of change in business to unprecedented levels. Agility is the key to success in this environment. In a procurement context this has four attributes:

  • Proactive Decision Making: Leveraging information and predictive analytics to improve the quality and timeliness of decision-making.
  • Value Chain: Industry leadership in digitising their value chain, including supply and demand chains, as well as internal operations.
  • Planning: Customer-centric planning processes and day-to-day business decisions.
  • Operational responsiveness: Permitting swift response to changes in the supply chain, customer preferences, the competitive landscape, and business strategy.

Overcoming Obstacles

However, accessing this data, information and market intelligence is a significant obstacle that must be overcome.

Becoming information-driven should be a primary focus area for procurement. The function must develop the tools and skills that will allow staff to apply market data and intelligence to decisions on spending and sourcing strategies. Creating deep, consultative working relationships with business leaders, demands that procurement bring this valuable expertise to the table.

This level of insight requires high-quality, real-time market intelligence. However, over half of the Key Issues Study respondents lack a formal market intelligence program or are in the very earliest stages of adoption. At the same time, establishing data governance and building a continuous improvement culture for data management and quality, are also tactics increasingly adopted by organisations.

Access to market intelligence, and ensuring that sourcing and supplier relationship management teams are using high-quality category and supplier intelligence, are prerequisites for agility.

Transformative Impact of Predictive Analytics

As procurement’s role matures from transactional facilitator to trusted business advisor, proficiency with the next generation of analytics – a.k.a. “big data” – will be a key enabler. Big data has been a game changer when it comes to customer analytics, offering an unprecedented ability to quickly model massive volumes of structured and unstructured data from multiple sources.

Good examples from the digital world include Google’s insight into customer behaviours and preferences, and Amazon’s ability to anticipate orders and ensure on hand stock to meet demand.

Source: The Hackett Group Key Issues Study 2016
Source: The Hackett Group Key Issues Study 2016

Predictive analytics refers to the use of statistical and mathematical techniques to predict the probability of future events occurring.

The predictive analytics and forecasting use case for procurement can be an increased focus on business outcomes, through greatly enhanced forward looking decision support capability; and automated and real-time information and analysis availability. Both of these are underpinned by greatly improved data quality.

Combining predictive analytics with cognitive tools will allow, for example, upgraded end-user buying experiences and automated sourcing actions to anticipate supplier and market events. It will also allow for forecasting of and acting to mitigate the impact of supply chain disruptions, and reduction of the severity of supplier risk events.

How do we respond?

As procurement leaders this situation poses challenging questions:

  1. What are the business outcomes and specific use cases for predictive analytics?
  2. How can we accelerate the organisation towards a single view of data and segmentation?
  3. Do we need to access new sources of meta and domain data?
  4. What is the value from faster, more frequent and higher quality information and insight?

Taking advantage of advanced analytical tools and methods requires appropriate staff with the skills to use them, as well as new technology roles, aligning business agendas, and elevating the overall level of technology knowledge. Future talent management plans should reflect the importance of training and hiring staff to handle the sophisticated analytical tools and methods, to deliver the full potential of Big Data.

Analytical projects are not without challenges. Procurement leaders who have not already started down this path should use the high-stakes competitive environment of 2016 as a burning platform.

About Hackett’s Procurement Key Issues Study

The results of this annual study are gathered from executives from over 180 large and global companies operating in the US, Europe and rest of the world, with annual revenue of $1 billion or greater. Find out more at the Hackett Group website.

Chris Sawchuk will discuss why procurement needs to be more agile during his keynote address at the Big Ideas Summit on April 21st.

If you’re interested in finding out more, visit www.bigideassummit.com, join our Procurious group, and Tweet your thoughts and Big Ideas to us using #BigIdeas2016.

Don’t miss out on this truly excellent event and the chance to participate in discussions that will shape the future of the procurement profession. Get Involved, register today.