Tag Archives: procurement news

WikiLeaks Reveals CIA Interference in iPhone Supply Chain

WikiLeaks has released new information on CIA programs aimed at monitoring Apple device owners. Has the CIA redirected iPhone shipments to its own facilities to infect them with spyware?

President George W Bush visits CIA Headquarters, March 20, 2001.

For many readers of the latest data dump from the controversial website WikiLeaks, two surprising facts stood out:

  1. The CIA has been hacking iPhones, Macbooks and other Apple products for a decade
  2. To install the malware, the CIA requires physical access to “factory fresh” machines. WikiLeaks suggests this is done through redirecting Apple’s supply chain through their own facilities

What has the CIA been up to?

According to the documents, CIA’s Embedded Development Branch (EDB) implants malware called NightSkies 1.2, a “beacon/loader/implant tool” that apparently allows the CIA to “gain persistence” (spy) on the device. Notably, this program has been in use since 2008. WikiLeaks also describes a project called “Sonic Screwdriver”, which allows spies to remotely hack a Mac computer from a USB accessory plugged into the machine. The release also contains details of other malware products with striking names such as “DarkSeaSkies”, “DarkMatter”, “SeaPea”, “Triton”, “Dark Mallet” and “DerStake”.

Listen to WikiLeaks’ Julian Assange’s commentary on the CIA’s malware specifically developed for Apple products:

How is the malware installed?

According to the CIA documents, NightSkies 1.2 is physically installed by a CIA operative on “factory fresh iPhones”, or handsets that users haven’t yet interacted with.

The two key words here are “physically” and “factory fresh”. The malware cannot be installed remotely, which means the CIA agent needs to get their hands on their target’s phone to install the program. This brings to mind a Hollywood-style manoeuvre where the operative would somehow pickpocket the target, install the malware with a USB, and return it to the unsuspecting iPhone owner who will never realise they’re being tracked.

However, as the iPhone needs to be “factory fresh”, WikiLeaks believes it’s possible the CIA has redirected iPhone shipments to install the tool. The organisation wrote:

“While CIA assets are sometimes used to physically infect systems in the custody of a target, it is likely that many CIA physical access attacks have infected the targeted organization’s supply chain including by interdicting mail orders and other shipments (opening, infecting, and resending) leaving the United States or otherwise”.

This raises two questions, neither of which are answered in the WikiLeaks documents:

  • Is the CIA infecting Apple products en-masse, or are they only intercepting, infecting and re-sending specific phones that have been ordered via mail by persons of interest?
  • Does the CIA visit the factory floors of Apple’s suppliers to install the malware?

Has Apple responded?

Yes. Apple has released a statement pointing out that nearly 80 per cent of the vulnerabilities exploited by the CIA have already been fixed with security patches (years ago in some cases) and added that it “will continue work to rapidly address any identified vulnerabilities.”

In its statement, Apple did not directly condemn the CIA for interfering with its products, choosing instead to distance itself from WikiLeaks:

“We have not negotiated with WikiLeaks for any information. We have given them instructions to submit any information they wish through our normal process under our standard terms. Thus far, we have not received any information from them that isn’t in the public domain. We are tireless defenders of our users’ security and privacy, but we do not condone theft or coordinate with those that threaten to harm our users.”

In other news procurement news this week…

London Mourns Victims of Westminster Attack 

  • Thousands of Londoners gathered in central London to honour the victims of Tuesday’s terrorist attack
  • On the 22 March, Khalid Masood drove into pedestrians on Westminster Bridge before crashing his rented four-wheel drive into a fence outside parliament
  • He attacked two police officers as he tried to enter the building, fatally stabbing Keith Palmer before he was shot. Five people, including the attacker, died, and at least 50 people have been injured.
  • On Thursday evening, a candlelit vigil was held in Trafalgar Square. In what was a moving tribute to those affected, the Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, addressed the crowd to much applause and a minute of silence was observed.

Read more on BBC

Avian Influenza resurfaces in Asia

  • An outbreak of H7N9 avian flu that has been described as the worst in seven years is dramatically impacting the poultry industry across China, Japan and South Korea.
  • The outbreak has been linked to over 140 human deaths in China in January and February, along with enormous stock culls including 30 million chickens in South Korea alone.
  • Chinese poultry imports are expected to grow by 10%.

Read more on the Wall Street Journal.

Starbucks announces aggressive expansion plans

  • Starbucks will open 12,000 new cafes globally by 2021, including 3,00 new stores in the U.S.
  • The new stores will require a workforce of 240,000, with the company planning to hire 25,000 military veterans and military spouses.
  • Starbucks has also announced it would hire 10,000 refugees in response to Donald Trump’s executive order calling for an immigration ban.

Read more on MarketWatch.

NEC to build world-first information platform for Global Pandemic Supply Chain

When a disease outbreak hits, even the slightest inefficiency in supply chains can lead to a catastrophic loss of human life. A joint initiative of The United Nations World Food Programme and NEC Corporation will greatly improve the supply chain response to the next pandemic. 

The 2013-2016 West Africa Ebola outbreak began in countries of Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone, with smaller outbreaks occurring in Nigeria, Mali and Senegal. Imported cases led to infections being reported in the UK, Spain, Sardinia and U.S. before the outbreak was declared in June 2016. By this point, the World Health Organisation reported a total of 28,616 cases and 11,310 deaths.

According to the UN World Food Programme (WFP), the need for a streamlined and coordinated supply chain response was highlighted through the many challenges encountered during the West Africa Ebola outbreak. They included:

  • Severe warehousing and distributing capacity constraints
  • Limited visibility of the overall supply and demand of critical items
  • Access constraints caused by border closures
  • A lack of public-private sector coordination resulting in duplicate efforts and an inefficient response

Protective clothing (pictured above) is an example of a critical item that must get through to healthcare workers in outbreak areas. A full set of protective clothing includes a suit, goggles, a mask, sock, boots and an apron. Healthcare workers change garments frequently, discarding gear that has barely been used to minimise exposure to the virus. By October of 2014, Ebola suit makers including DuPont and Kimberly-Clark had tripled production to try to cope with demand as health workers used an average of seven suits per bed, per day. The World Health Organisation estimated that three million protective suits were needed over the course of the outbreak. Tragically, healthcare workers represented nearly 10 percent of cases and fatalities due to ebola.

New supply chain platform will save lives when the next pandemic comes

Supply chain logistics are a critical part of any emergency intervention. Inadequate logistics can lead to critical delays, cost lives and waste precious resources. NEC’s announcement of a new information platform, which will be part of the Global Pandemic Supply Chain Network, is expected to improve response times, find cost efficiencies and aid in continuous improvement.

The technology has been described as a “logistics visualization system that will enable end-to-end tracking of pandemic response items” – such as protective clothing – within a country facing an outbreak, helping to ensure quick and appropriate delivery of supplies to people in need. Other key functions of the system include reporting, analysis of supply chain inefficiencies, data integration with existing logistics systems and in-country warehouse management.

“It is widely recognised that the global health architecture could be reinforced with an improved supply chain platform to enable better preparation and faster response time for pandemics”, said a spokesperson for the Japanese Government, which committed US$1 million to the development of the new technology.

 Public/private collaboration driving results

Perhaps the most encouraging aspect of this announcement is the demonstration of how effective public and private collaboration can be in solving enormous challenges such as a global pandemic response. Aside from the key collaboration between the WFP and NEC Corporation, a framework for future pandemic response has been developed through an “unprecedented” level of cooperation between public organisations including the UN, WHO, UNICEF, the World Bank; and private sector companies including Johnson & Johnson, UPS Foundation, Becton, Dickinson & Co., and NEC.

 In other procurement news this week…

 White House trade advisor reaffirms administration’s trade goals

  • The U.S. is seeking more reciprocal trade arrangements with key countries to boost growth, reduce the trade deficit and reclaim American production capacity, according to Peter Navarro, director of the White House National Trade Council.
  • Speaking in Washington last week, Navarro singled out nations that have contributed to the current deficit problem, including Ireland, Vietnam, China, South Korea, Taiwan and Switzerland.
  • According to Navarro, the U.S. plan to reduce the trade deficit “is not based on higher tariffs, but rather getting our partners to lower theirs.”

Watch Navarro’s speech here.

Canadian federal procurement processes flagged for an overhaul

  • Addressing an event hosted by the Information Technology Association of Canada last week, Canada’s Public Services and Procurement Minister Judy Foote stressed the need for an overhaul of federal procurement processes to improve accessibility for SMEs.
  • At present, unreasonably complex processes and requirements are resulting in 8000-page responses to RFPs, which small businesses simply do not have the resources to undertake.
  • Ms Foote said that government procurement processes “have the ability to shift markets … (and) launch businesses.”

Read more at Ottawa Business Journal

 

The Flaw At The Heart Of Trump’s America First policy

5.6 million U.S. manufacturing jobs didn’t move to China and Mexico – they simply disappeared with the march of technology. And that’s the flaw in America First! 

Trump’s stunning election win has been linked to his successful portrayal as both a friend of Corporate America and a champion of the working class. His business-friendly policies include large-scale deregulation, slashing tax rates and a huge infrastructure spend, which (in theory) are designed to boost jobs through trickle-down economics.

But the support of Corporate America isn’t enough to remain in power. In order to retain the presidency for another four years after the 2020 election, Trump will have to deliver on the key promise that won the support of the disillusioned working class – bringing industry home and reviving jobs in America’s once-thriving industrial rust belt.

However, there’s a miscalculation at the heart of the rhetoric around bringing jobs back from overseas factories.

Robots, not overseas workers, have taken 85% of manufacturing jobs

A recent study from the Centre for Business and Economic Research at Ball State University found that:

  • Employment in the manufacturing sector fell by 5.6 million between 2000 and 2010.
  • Productivity growth (automation) accounted for more than 85% of jobs lost in manufacturing in this period.
  • Only 13% of the overall job loss resulted from trade (including Chinese imports).
  • Meanwhile, U.S. manufacturing output has risen steadily, growing 17.6% between 2006 and 2013.

Simply put, American factories – and factories worldwide – are producing more goods with fewer people. Automation is rendering millions of low-skilled jobs redundant, yet Trump’s key policy aim to “bring back jobs” seems to be mistakenly focused on increasing trade protectionism.

Protectionism could backfire by further accelerating automation

ABC’s business editor Ian Verrender writes that even if Trump “slaps massive import duties on Chinese goods and forces his country to start producing everything at home via the magic of ‘America First’”, it risks leading to a domino effect where business will be forced to find efficiencies in order to survive.

  1. The loss of access to low-cost labour would drive up the cost of consumer goods, meaning Americans would find themselves unable to afford the goods to which they’ve become accustomed.
  2. This lack of affordability would spark demands for wage rises.
  3. Firms would respond by pushing even further into automation, using robotics and AI to cut costs.

Verrender comments: “Where once corporations scoured the globe for low-cost labour, and duly shifted their operations, they [would] now seek ways to eliminate labour altogether, particularly in manufacturing.”

Accelerating automation is inevitable

The loss of jobs to robots is only expected to broaden and accelerate. A report from two Oxford researchers found that an incredible 45% of U.S. jobs, across all sectors and professionals, are vulnerable to being automated within the next 20 years.

For example, self-driving technology alone could lead to the unemployment of 1,000,000 truck drivers in the U.S., along with approximately 160,000 Uber drivers, 230,000 taxi drivers and over 600,000 bus drivers.

Some of the big names to comment on the coming social disruption include Stephen Hawking, who wrote last year: “The automation of factories has already decimated jobs in traditional manufacturing, and the rise of artificial intelligence is likely to extend this job destruction deep into the middle classes, with only the most caring, creative or supervisory roles remaining.”

In February, Elon Musk asked the audience at the World Government Summit in Dubai: “What to do about mass unemployment? This is going to be a massive social challenge. There will be fewer and fewer jobs that a robot cannot do better [than a human]. These are not things that I wish will happen. These are simply things that I think probably will happen.”

Bill Gates commented: “You cross the threshold of job-replacement of certain activities all at once. Warehouse work, driving, room clean-up – there’s quite a few things that are meaningful job categories that, certainly in the next 20 years, [will go away].”

What’s the answer?

Marc Benioff, chief executive of Salesforce.com, warned the World Economic Forum in Davos of the “digital refugees” that would be created by AI. “This is the moment … when we have the highest level of anxiety because we can see advances in AI that are beyond what we had expected,” he said. “It’s happening at a rate and a capability that we are worrying about how it will impact the everyman, the broad range of workers around the world . . . There is no clear path forward”.

One hopeful sign is that a public discourse on the disruptive effects of automation has begun. Thought-leaders have already put forward some solutions, although they may seem politically unpalatable at present. Elon Musk recommends that the U.S. adopts a universal basic income (such as that being trialled in Finland) to keep the economy going and guarantee a standard of living for the millions of workers expected to be displaced by automation. Bill Gates has suggested taxing robotic workers to recapture some of the money displaced workers would have paid as income tax. Education, too, will need to transform to equip future generations with the skills needed to find work in a highly-automated future.

Although Trump appears to be currently focused on the wrong job-stealing “villain” (China), there is hope that leaders will listen to the likes of Bill Gates and Elon Musk and start planning ahead for the social upheaval of what has been dubbed the fourth industrial revolution.

In other news this week:

France passes “duty of vigilance” supply chain law

  • Last week, France passed a law that pushes for accountability for multinational companies sourcing from global supply chains.
  • The “duty of vigilance” law requires companies to establish safeguards designed to ensure that labour rights and other human rights are respected in the production sites they source from.
  • The law requires large companies based in France to create a document that sets out their procedures for evaluating suppliers and mitigate human rights abuses. Violating the “duty of vigilance” law can lead to a penalty of up to €10 million.

Read more at Supply Chain Dive

Trump seeks historic increase in military spending

  • President Trump’s first budget seeks to boost military spending by $US54 billion. The US currently spends about $US584 billion annually on defence.
  • If passed by Congress, the 9% increase will be funded by cuts to non-defence spending, including environmental programs, diplomacy and foreign aid.
  • Last year, the rest of the world combined spent a total of $US317 billion on defence. The highest-spending countries under the US were China ($US146 billion), Saudi Arabia ($US82 billion), Russia ($US66 billion) and the UK ($US56 billion).

Read more at ABC News

A Noble Cause: CIPS CEO David Noble’s Enduring Legacy

From his fight against modern slavery to his campaign to licence the procurement profession, Procurious highlights the enduring legacy of the late CIPS CEO, David Noble.

David Noble’s professional accomplishments were many and varied, both within his role as CIPS Group CEO and during his stellar career beforehand. After his sudden and untimely passing late last week, however, there have been tributes from procurement leaders around the world. The tributes emphasised two of Mr Noble’s stand-out achievements.  Firstly, his fight against modern-day slavery and secondly, his work in promoting and licensing the procurement profession.

The crusade against modern slavery

In an interview with Procurious before his appearance at the Big Ideas Summit, David Noble stressed that the profession is in a unique position to drive the eradication of modern slavery. “Whether it’s child labour, inhumane working conditions, forced labour or slavery, there is no doubt that the procurement and supply profession has a unique opportunity to step up to this challenge as a professional community and effect real change”.

Mr Noble believed that in terms of corporate social responsibility, procurement has come to a significant crossroad and needs to adapt to survive in the face of rapidly-changing parameters, starting with accountability.

“Accountability for inadequate or exposed supply chains now goes right to the top, with the company’s reputation on the line. Good corporate supply chain governance demands accountability, and to have accountability means the appropriate authority and capability to act.”

The  2015 Modern Slavery Act

2015 was a watershed year for Mr Noble and his crusade against modern slavery, with two significant milestones taking place. Firstly, the UK Government signed into law the 2015 Modern Slavery Act, after seeking considerable guidance from CIPS while the Act was being created. CIPS was sought out as a subject-matter expert due in no small part to its 2013 partnership with Traidcraft and Walk Free, which led to the creation of the Ethical and Sustainable Procurement Guide. The Guide helped procurement professionals identify suppliers who subjected workers to poor wages, inhumane conditions or forced labour, and advised them on how to put preventative measures in place. Following the release of the Guide, CIPS also created an ethical e-learning course and test, which covered corruption, fraud, bribery, exploitation, human rights and forced labour.

After the Modern Slavery Act was signed, Mr Noble’s message to the profession was again focused on accountability: “For too long supply chain transparency has been overlooked, and we hope that this legislation sends out a clear message to business leaders that they are accountable for all discrepancies, no matter how far down the chain.”

Vatican City declaration  to eradicate modern slavery

The second milestone that took place in 2015 was Mr Noble’s invitation to Vatican City to witness a historic signing by faith leaders of a joint declaration to eradicate modern slavery. Leaders from the Buddhist, Christian, Hindu, Jewish and Muslim faiths signed the declaration, which had been developed by Andrew Forrest’s Global Freedom Network. Mr Noble was invited as a guest of Andrew Forrest and also by the Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby, in recognition of CIPS’ work in addressing modern slavery and the integral role supply chain management will play in the ongoing campaign.

Many of the tributes to Mr Noble published on Procurious called out this aspect of his career, beginning with CEO ISM Tom Derry, who wrote that “[David’s] moral vision and leadership was instrumental in CIPS’ crucial role in the passing of the U.K.’s Modern Slavery Act in 2015.”

CIPS General Manager for the Asia-Pacific region, Mark Lamb, wrote: “He was particularly vocal about ethical procurement, eradicating bribery and corruption, and ensuring that supply chains are free from modern slavery.” Similarly, The Art of Procurement host and producer Philip Ideson wrote about Mr Noble’s “leadership of efforts to eradicate slavery across the supply chain, impacting millions of workers without their own voice”.

Broadspectrum’s Executive General Manager of Procurement, Kevin McCafferty, worked closely with Mr Noble on the development of the Ethical Procurement Guide: “David was instrumental in getting the UK Government to introduce the Modern Slavery Act 2015.” Mike Blanchard, Deputy Chief Executive Operations at the New Zealand Tertiary Education Commission, wrote that Mr Noble’s focus has led to CIPS becoming “a professional body with ethics as a pillar”.

Licensing the profession

When Mr Noble was asked to bring his “Big Idea” to London as part of Procurious’ 2015 Big Ideas Summit, the subject for him was a no-brainer. “My big idea is something we have as a policy statement – licensing the profession,” he told the camera. Watching his comments today, it becomes immediately clear that his drive to license the profession was inseparable from his campaign to improve ethics in procurement and, ultimately, eradicate modern slavery.

The need for CIPS to licence the profession became increasingly apparent to Mr Noble as he received calls from the media after supply chain disasters linked to malpractice or ethical breaches. Reporters asked him the simple question: “Why is the procurement and supply profession allowing this to happen?”

Bringing accountability and consequence to procurement

It was difficult to bring accountability and consequences to those on the front line who were making decisions that led to malpractice and reputational risk. Licensing, said Mr Noble, was therefore the answer. “There’s a huge public good agenda linked to supply chains around the world … [and] companies are increasingly realising that having licensed supply professionals makes a real differentiator to success.”

Licensing brings with it the threat of consequences: “If they behave unethically, they stand to lose that license and they’ll find it difficult to work in the profession again,” said Mr Noble. “But the good side is that it gives them the protection of saying ‘You’re putting my professional license at risk’ if they’re ever asked to do something unethical or wrong.”

CIPS President and former Rio Tinto CEO Sam Walsh noted Mr Noble’s extraordinary achievements in moving forward with the professionalisation of procurement: “His initiatives such as training, licensing of procurement professionals, establishment of standards for anti-corruption, anti-bribery and anti-modern slavery have led to CIPS being highly regard by governments, employers and members.”

Visna Lampasi, General Manager Group Procurement for Woolworths (Australia) also commented on Mr Noble’s “energy behind licensing the profession … and major contribution to procurement’s development”.

 A legacy of thought-leadership

A valued contributor to the Procurious Blog, Mr Noble appeared at the Big Ideas Summit in 2015. His thought-leadership published on Procurious includes:

This article concludes our three-part series honouring the achievements and memory of CIPS CEO David Noble. Readers can leave a tribute to Mr Noble on the Procurious discussion board.

How To Convince Hostile Stakeholders To Adopt New Technology

Simona Pop’s Big Idea provides a recipe for convincing even the most unwilling departmental heads to embrace new technology.

Register as an online delegate for the London Big Ideas Summit 2017 here.

Deciding to adopt a new technology has historically been a pain in the ass. An expensive, dull, prolonged pain nobody wants to deal with. The problem I have is that those adjectives belong to OLD tech. Putting nimble new technology in the same pile with 90s software is like mixing vodka with milk. It may have worked for the Mad Men of the 50s but it is an unnatural association. (I watched Mad Men until the 5th series then lost interest, by the way.)

Here’s the gist of it: people need to be comfortable with the cost and potential risk of adopting new technology. How do you make them comfortable? By providing “proof of concept” and calculating these costs and potential risks. One simple guideline is the 10X rule: if you can expect a return of 10 times your investment, then it’s worth it.

However, with technology – especially if it spans across different departments – you must take into account that your gains will come from any of several improvements, or a combination of improvements:

  • Cost reduction
  • Efficiency improvement
  • Fraud prevention
  • Admin processing speed
  • Mobilising the workforce
  • Product/service enhancement
  • Competitive environment

Your gains will be the sum total of all factors. If adopting a new technology provides an improvement in one factor but it’s at the expense of another factor, it may not be worth adopting. This tends to limit everything to a financial view though. A far better formula includes non-financial factors, some of which will outweigh the financial ones. You need to also remember that some investments in new technology can require at least a year to show their true value.

Managing risk should also be incorporated into your analysis, but remember that you take a risk whether you adopt a new technology or not. The advantages a new technology provides may not be obvious – until a competitor adopts that technology and makes your competitive disadvantage clear. In that case, adopting a new technology reactively will put you on the back foot. Playing catch-up is never a good business move!

Risk Reduction Recipe

Let’s call it – new tech is the unknown. The unknown is typically scary to humans. And since I am all about the H2H in business, working to remove that fear is key to successful tech adoption.

One sure way to reduce the risk is to go for a taster: a proof-of-concept implementation. Starting small & early allows you to identify problems early when they are far easier and less expensive to correct. It also makes it easy to start over if the proverbial hits the fan.

When rolling out new technology across multiple departments, you’re guaranteed to encounter a mixed bag of responses. From enthusiastic stakeholders who “get it” straight away, to nervous – and sometimes downright hostile – departmental heads who are terrified of change, you’re going to have to manage them all.

Here’s the secret – rather than trying to beat hostile stakeholders into submission with the force of your arguments, ask the willing departments to do the job for you. Carry out a proof of concept with your supporters so you have the evidence required to overcome any objection, and go back to the risk-averse stakeholders with your advocates at your side.

Also keep in mind that both organisational and process changes will be needed when bringing in tech. Procedural changes are very common. The reason why you are looking at that tech is typically to improve current processes you have found lacking. You must be aware that tech is here to improve NOT replicate. Trying to fit clunky processes on efficient technology is not only frustrating but a complete waste of time and resource. Changes to previous processes will need to happen and you will have to expect some resistance to those changes. Again, human nature.

The mark of good technology for me is its accessibility and great user experience across the board (from top to bottom, from left to right). Because you are effecting change (and that’s difficult enough), the very last thing you need is that change to come in the form of clunky, pain in the ass – MS-DOS looking software.

In my quest to empower people through tech, one problem I come across a lot is: “How much resource do I need from our side because we really cannot spare anyone?” This question is proof of a bad reflex left over from dealing with old tech. The type of tech that takes a year just to implement, another year to train for and another to realise it’s not right for you anyway even though it is costing you serious cash. The type of tech that is SO unlike what you know and love in your personal life, it might as well be alien. A vintage alien at that.

Clear communication will help overcome the organisational and process challenges. When people get that you are in fact trying to empower them to work better and easier, they will want to be part of that higher drive.

As Richard Branson says: “Screw it, let’s do it!” Move quickly, find out what works and what doesn’t. Stalling, procrastinating of burying your head in the sand are NOT ways to avoid a pain in the ass.

This article was first published on InstaSupply.

Stay tuned for more Big Ideas from Simona Pop as we lead up to the Big Ideas Summit 2017!

Join the conversation and register as a digital delegate for Big Ideas 2017 now!

Standard, Express, or Flying? Why supply managers need to be ready for delivery drones

Flying delivery drones will soon take over the last mile of your supply chain. Have you started planning ahead for a drone-filled future? 

“Alexa, re-order Doritos from Prime Air.”

Blink, and you’d miss it. Amazon purchased 10 seconds of the year’s most expensive advertising space last week to introduce the U.S. Super Bowl audience to two of its latest tech products: Amazon Echo and Amazon Prime.

Disgusted by her partner’s finger-licking, a tech-savvy woman directs her request for a second bag of Doritos to the IoT-enabled smart speaker in front of her television. The speaker (“Alexa”) in turn places an order with Amazon Prime, resulting in a delivery drone making a graceful touchdown in the yard outside.

Meanwhile in the U.K., a Youtube clip featuring former Top Gear presenter Jeremy Clarkson explains the ordering and drone delivery process in much greater detail:

Drone delivery services are swiftly approaching the commercial market, with Amazon taking a clear lead in the development race. In December, Amazon made its first successful go-round in a rural corner of England, where it has been beta-testing. While there’s still a significant weight restriction, the benefits of drone delivery are clear:

  • The 30-minute delivery time is an enormous improvement from the standard 24-48 hour wait customers currently experience when ordering online.
  • Drones can reach a height of 400 feet and fly for 24 kilometres at a stretch. They  avoid traffic and potential obstacles using laser, sonar and other technology.
  • Environmentally, battery-operated drone delivery ticks a lot of boxes as they’ll eventually replace many fuel-burning delivery vehicles currently on the road.
  • Finally, the full autonomy of drone delivery will mean there’ll be very little need for human interference, leading to enormous efficiency gains for delivery companies.

After the successful beta-tests in England, drone confidence is rising in the US, although the Federal Aviation Authority (FAA) has been slow to react. A report from December 2016 claimed the FAA has yet to begin drafting rules around flying drones over populated areas.

Testing, however, is taking place, with examples including UPS making a medical supply drop to an island off the coast of Massachusetts, while Alphabet’s drone delivery initiative (Project Wing) sent a hot dinner to students at Virginia Tech. Both the U.S. Postal Service and Britain’s Royal Mail have expressed keen interest in drone delivery as the cost of traditional delivery methods continue to rise. In Europe, DHL similarly completed a round of drone testing last year.

The process of delivery drones

Using a GPS system, delivery drones can quickly generate the most efficient route and even communicate with each other. Users can use communicate with delivery drones via smart phones, selecting delivery options such as: “Bring it to Me,” “Home,” “Work,” and “My Boat.” Additionally, if the customer relocates, the drones can redirect mid-route.

While apartment buildings are still too complicated for drone routes, doorstep delivery throughout rural and suburban neighbourhoods has been mastered.

Allison Crady, Marketing Specialist at CDF Distributors, has followed the rise of drone deliveries closely. She comments that drone delivery will only be applicable to a limited number of products at first: “Giant screen TVs will still require a typical truck delivery, but drone warehouses are currently ideal for light-weight purchases such as tech gadgets or snacks. As drone weight options increase through future development, their useful applications will extend far beyond simple convenience deliveries.”

What can supply managers do to prepare? 

Regulatory bodies such as the FAA move slowly to make drone deliveries a reality.  Supply managers can take advantage of this delay by planning ahead for a drone-based future. This means reviewing your current delivery arrangements (in-house or outsourced) and measuring:

  • the number of light-weight products currently delivered by truck that could be carried by drone
  • current delivery timeframes versus potential drone delivery speed
  • traditional price structures and operating costs against drone delivery
  • the human workforce required to run a delivery fleet versus autonomous drones
  • your current ability to deliver to difficult/remote locations
  • environmental benefits of taking fuel-burning cars off the road in favour of delivery drones.

In other  procurement news this week…

Huawei announces IoT Partnership with Deutsche Post DHL 

  • Huawei and Deutsche Post DHL Group will collaborate on innovation projects to develop a range of supply chain solutions for customers using industrial-grade Internet of Things hardware and infrastructure.
  • The group  is expected to make its IoT devices and network infrastructure accessible to DHL to assist in incorporating greater sensing and automation capabilities into warehousing, freight, and last-mile delivery services.
  • A  spokesperson from Huawei, Yan Lida, commented, “This partnership opens up an opportunity to improve the efficiency, safety and customer service offered by global supply chains in previously impossible ways, and defines how the Internet of Things will shape the fortunes of the logistics industry in the next few critical years of innovation.”

Read more at Logistics Magazine. 

Remote Australian supply chains cut by flooding

  • Floods in Western Australia closed major road transport routes for three days last week. Meanwhile, rail movement into Perth was delayed for five days.
  • The Newmont Mine in the Tanami desert has been closed for over a month due to the flooding. Delivery company Toll has been issued permits to use the flood-damaged roads to deliver fuel, food and emergency supplies to the community at the mine.
  • Parts of the Stuart Highway and Carpentaria Highway have also been closed. This is  impacting on the movement of heavy trucks in the region.

Read more at Fully Loaded. 

The Samsung Smartphone Debacle: Suppliers Pushed Too Far, Too Fast?

Samsung has apportioned some of the blame for its exploding Note 7 phones to two of its battery suppliers. But who is ultimately responsible? Is the pressure to innovate at all costs leading to unsafe development and testing time-frames?

What Went Wrong?

Samsung  has begun the long task of rebuilding consumer trust in its smartphones. But questions remain.   Why didn’t Samsung pick up design and manufacturing faults before they sold 1 million unsafe devices to customers? The cause appears to lie in Samsung’s rush to beat its arch-rival Apple to market. This led to a failure to properly test lithium-ion batteries in the Note 7 phone.

The pressure to innovate that tech giants such as Samsung place on their suppliers is immense. Particularly when competitors such as Apple are constantly upping the ante. Every new release on a phone must be demonstrably better than the last.  This means delivering ever-smaller and lighter batteries that customers can charge rapidly and use for a full day and evening.

Battery manufacturers responded to the challenge by using a thin “club sandwich” design. In this battery positive and negative electrodes are stacked and kept apart using layers of separators. Unfortunately, the pressure for an ever-thinner battery meant that the separators were too thin, leading to shorts and subsequent over-heating. A second, unrelated design fault lay in an abnormal welding process. This led to contact between a positive terminal and a negative electrode.

Spreading the blame

The fallout for the exploding smartphones follows a familiar pattern where, although the technical fault lies with a supplier of products and services, the big-name parent company takes the lion’s share of the blame. Even when the parent organisation attempts to publicly offset some of the blame onto its suppliers, consumers typically assign responsibility to the most recognisable brand.

An example of this famously occurred in April 2010 with the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.  The owner of the well, BP, took most of the responsibility (and $54 billion in associated costs), whilst the contracting operators came under considerably less scrutiny. Tellingly, a U.S. District Judge apportioned 67% of the blame for the spill to BP, 30% to Transocean and 3% to Halliburton.

Samsung, to its credit, did accept overall responsibility for the $6.9 billion mistake even while it pointed the finger at battery manufacturers. Samsung Electronics America senior vice president Justin Denison told a press conference: “Ultimately we take responsibility for this. It’s our product, we set the specifications, and it’s up to us to catch the problem before it leaves in one of our devices.”

The long road to brand recovery

Youtube users may have noticed Samsung’s brand-repair efforts have gotten underway, with ads such as the following appearing online:

The South Korean company has invested $170 million into safety.  It is assertively broadcasting its new 8-point safety check which includes a durability test, visual inspection, x-ray test and others. Samsung’s investigation into the Note 7 failures included over 700 R&D engineers. These engineers tried to replicate the issue by testing 200,000 phones and 30,000 standalone batteries.

But, in a further unfortunate setback for the brand, one of the affiliates responsible for manufacturing the faculty batteries – Samsung SDI – experienced a factory fire last week in Tianjin, China, with 110 firefighters and 19 trucks responding to the blaze.

Senior executives from Samsung have commented that they’ve learnt an enormous amount about crisis management in the past few months. Observers, too, can draw some valuable lessons around the dangers of rushing new innovations to market and the ineffectiveness of attempting to apportion blame to suppliers.

Read more about Samsung’s smartphone battery issues.

In other procurement news this week…

Boeing’s Space Taxi to include 3D printed components

  • Boeing has commissioned 600 3D printed components from Oxford Performance Materials for use in its Starliner space taxi.
  • Boeing expects the spacecraft to fly unmanned in June 2018. and will have a first crewed test flight in August 2018. It will ferry two astronauts to the International Space Station for the first fully operational flight in December 2018.
  • The inclusion of 3D components marks a first for 3D technology usage in spacefaring technology, with increasing recognition that printed plastics perform well under the pressure of launch and in a temperature of absolute zero.

Read more at Supply Chain Dive.

New research reveals CEOs still don’t “get” procurement

  • Consultancy firm 4c Associates released the findings of a poll of 521 CPOs, managers and procurement personnel to understand how procurement is perceived by the C-Level.
  • 48% of participants claimed their boss “doesn’t get what the procurement team does, or can do”. 55% said the C-Level regards procurement as a support function. It exists to cut costs, rather than add strategic value to the organisation.
  • Mark Ellis, senior partner at 4c Associates, commented that procurement needs to proactively highlight the services they can provide beyond cost cutting. “If all the function does is speak in terms of savings, then that’s how it will be perceived: as a cost cutter”, Ellis said.

Claim Your 60 Seconds of Fame: What’s Your Big Idea In 2017?

Looking for a way to build your personal brand and market yourself as a global procurement superstar? Here’s your chance to share your Big Idea with over 19,000 colleagues on Procurious! Get ready to launch your reputation as an influencer and help shape the global conversation for 2017.    

The Big Ideas Summit 2017 in London takes place on 23rd February. Register as a digital delegate here

Put yourself in the frame

In the lead-up to the world’s most innovative procurement event, we’re putting out the call for members of the Procurious community – that’s YOU – to share your Big Ideas via a 60-second video.

Why? Because we’re flexing our 19,000-strong community muscle to crowdsource innovation directly from our members! By sharing Big Ideas, we’ll break down competitive barriers, learn from colleagues with unique insights into procurement, and come away energised by a rush of new concepts that will launch the profession into new and exciting territory.

Amplifying your Big Idea is not only important for the profession, but it’s very good for your career. Although it’s not quite Hollywood, putting your video up in lights on Procurious offers an unprecedented chance to grow your profile as a thought-leader and a true influencer in procurement.

Join an all-star line up 

At the Big Ideas Summit 2016, we asked the thought-leaders gathered in the room to record their Big Ideas live on camera for the world to see. The result? We now have a remarkable library of Big Ideas available to all members under the Procurious Learning tab. The quality of ideas was amazing, and the range of viewpoints was even more so. From Guardian Journalist Lucy Siegle talking about fast fashion…

To RBS CPO, Laura Faulkner, on why procurement needs to focus on people…

… the scope for fresh, innovative ideas is unlimited! But Big Ideas videos aren’t just for the superstars appearing at the Summit itself – it’s over to you to help build on this groundswell by creating a 60 second video that will make YOUR mark on the profession.

Who can contribute?

Anyone and everybody! Whether you work in indirect or direct procurement, whether your focus is manufacturing, technology or logistics, whether you’re a CPO or a student – your ideas deserve to be shared. That’s because every procurement professional possesses unique insights based on differences in personal background, role, industry, and business type.

It’s super easy to create a 60-second video via your computer, phone or YouTube. You’ll find our recommendations on the best ways to create and share your video with Procurious at the end of this article.

Need more inspiration? Check out this 2016 Big Idea video from one of our community members (and competition winner), Kelly Barner:

How to submit your Big Idea

It doesn’t matter whether you film your Big Idea on your phone, tablet, laptop or PC- we’re not picky! But, to help you out, we’ve put together a list of some of our recommended methods for reaching out to us. Once you’ve completed your film, you can reach us by email (Procurious@Procurious.com) or on Twitter (@procurious_).

Youtube

Alternatively, if you have always dreamed of being an Internet star, YouTube might be the tool for you.

  • Head over to https://www.youtube.com/uploadand either select a readymade video to upload, or hit ‘Webcam capture’ to film your piece on the spot.
  • Select ‘Start recording’ to get the camera rolling (remembering to tick ‘Allow’ should you be prompted by YouTube’s Privacy Settings)
  • When done press ‘Stop recording’ followed by ‘Continue’.

Don’t be daunted by filling-out the ‘Basic info’ – all that’s required is a title, short description, and some tags. For your title we’d suggest using something along the lines of: My Big Idea is… [insert here]

In order to make your video easy to find, we’d recommend using the #BigIdeas2017 and Procurious tags – but feel free to add more!

Click ‘Publish’ when you’re happy and remember to send us the YouTube URL when it’s live.

Email and phone

Want to submit your video using a good old-fashioned email? We’ll accept that too! Did we mention we’re not picky?

Attach your video to an email with the subject line ‘My Big Idea Video’ and send to Procurious@Procurious.com.

If you’re using an iPhone or iPad you can also record your video using iMessage. Android and Windows Phone users can choose to use Skype (Windows Phone has Skype already built-in)

We look forward to sharing your videos with our Procurious community of 19,000+ members! Happy shooting, and be sure to register as a Big Ideas Summit digital delegate so you can catch the wave of Big Ideas in 2017.

What’s It All About? The Big Ideas Summit 2017 FAQs

From Mumbai to Melbourne; and Paris to Poughkeepsie, you can take part in the world’s largest procurement event – free.

Register as an online delegate for The Big Ideas Summit in London here.

Last week, we announced that the Big Ideas Summit 2017 is going global with events in London, Sydney, Chicago, Dubai and Singapore. If you’re interested in getting involved but still not entirely sure what’s going on, look no further! We’ve compiled a list of our most frequently asked questions to get you fully up to speed!

What is it?

The Big Ideas Summit is a unique online event uniting procurement and supply chain professionals from around the globe to drive innovation and inspire change.   

When is it?

We kick off the global tour in London on 23 February 2017. But a lively conversation has already begun on Procurious! Expect to see most of the action between 09.00 – 17.00 (GMT) as we share video insights, quotes, photos and summary articles direct from London.

If you can’t join the action live, not to worry.  The thought-provoking discussions and debate will continue long after, and we’ll be sharing video footage of all our Influencers Big Ideas throughout February and March on Procurious. 

Where is it?

First stop, London! Although our Top Influencers will be meeting in Soho, due to its digital nature Procurious members across the world can get involved from the comfort of their office, armchair or even from the beach!

Procurious members can also use our iOS App to follow the action. It’s available in the Apple iTunes store and is free to download. 

How can I join in?

You’ll need to be a registered member of Procurious – join here for free if you haven’t already. Then simply access the Big Ideas Summit Group to soak-up thoughtful opinions, participate in insightful discussion, connect with our Influencers, access exclusive podcasts and interviews and share your own Big Ideas with the Procurious community.

We’ll also be live tweeting throughout the day, so make sure you’re following @procurious_ to share and respond to our tweets using the hashtag #bigideas2017.

Do I have to be a member of Procurious?

Yes. Participation as a Digital Delegate is free and open to all members of Procurious. By joining Procurious, you will not only have access to all the exclusive Big Ideas Summit content, but you will join a community of 19,000 like-minded procurement peers and gain access to all Procurious’ free resources, including being able to:

  • Upskill on the move with 80+ eLearning modules
  • Get your procurement questions answered by experts
  • Find out about relevant professional events around the globe
  • Become a digital delegate in the global think-tank, Big Ideas Summit 2017

Will Big Ideas be live-streamed?

Procurious boasts a global audience of 19,000+ procurement professionals, from more than 140 countries. If we were to cater to all of these time zones, it would be a tough job – so rather than live-streaming (and keeping you awake at awkward hours), we’ll share exclusive video and podcast interviews with Digital Delegates.

We will be using Periscope to live stream short videos from the day, but these videos – and all the Big Ideas videos  and podcast interviews – will be made available to you in the days that follow exclusively on Procurious.

I’m on the fence – why should I take part?

Here are five compelling reasons to join your fellow Procurians and stake your claim to the wealth of knowledge on offer:

  1. An audience with 50 of the world’s top procurement influencers
  2. Get your questions answered by world-class experts
  3. Make powerful new contacts around the globe
  4. Share your own Big Idea and make your voice heard
  5. Access exclusive content & learnings 

Who are the ‘Top Influencers’?

The term ‘influencers’ refers to the our 50 face-to-face delegates who attend in each city respectively: London, Sydney, Chicago, Dubai and Singapore.

Our experts span the worlds of procurement, technology, social media, journalism, social media, economics and academia.

Who are the sponsors and media partners?

The Big Ideas Summit is made possible by our partners IBMISMThe Hackett Group, and GEP

I’ve got a Big Idea of my own…

Great to hear! You can Tweet us your Big Ideas @procurious_ remembering to use the hashtag #BigIdeas2017.

Leave your Big Idea on Facebook – you can find us at www.facebook.com/procurious .

And of course you can tell the Procurious community all about it by joining the Big Ideas Group page and posting it to the community feed. 

Who is behind Procurious?

You can read all about us in Our Story.

 Join the conversation and register as a digital delegate for Big Ideas 2017 in London.

Keen on the Internet of Things? Beware of IoT Botnet Zombie Attacks!

Everyone’s talking about the Internet of Things and all of the exciting things it can do for us! But just how much have we considered the possible security risks? 

What’s All the IoT Fuss About?

CPOs are becoming ever keener on enhancing hyper-connectivity within their organisations using the Internet of Things. This is unsurprising given the potential opportunities for procurement teams; warehouses that can tell you what parts you’re running out of and reorder them for you, more efficient processes and the chance to revolutionise how they manage supply chains.

Of course, it’s not just businesses that will benefit from IoT. Early adopters are already using IoT in their homes with smart fridges, smart toasters and smart collars for their pets. Experts predict that by 2020, more than half of new organisations will run on IoT.

Given all of these benefits, you might well ask what’s not to love? Well, judging by recent events, it might be prudent for us all to exercise a little more caution as far as IoT is concerned. As it stands, the process is wide open to cyberattacks.

Botnet Zombie Attacks

Individual devices pose almost no threat to any computer or data centre but what happens if millions of them were taken over at once? IoT devices are likely to have weaker security (research suggests that default usernames and passwords for devices are rarely changed), which makes them an easy target. Hackers will pre-program their malware with the most commonly used default passwords in order to hack multiple devices.

Back in October, an IoT botnet, Mirai, attacked a number of the internet’s websites including Spotify, Netflix and PayPal. The botnet works by consistently searching for accessible IoT devices protected by default passwords. Once these have been identified, the malware turns them into remotely controlled bots and is able to use them for large-scale network attacks – think robot zombie army!

This week, computer security journalist Brian Krebs posted an article on his blog, Krebs on Security, revealing the identity of Mirai author to be Paras Jha, owner of a DDoS mitigation service company ProTraf Solutions and a student of Rutgers University. Whilst Mirai has only been used mischievously so far, to shut down certain sites, the actions have brought to question what damage could be inflicted by real cybercriminals.

The Worst Case Scenario

Whilst the Mirai October attacks were relatively harmless and only resulted in some websites crashing, some tech commentators are regarding it as a test-run. It’s concerning that the next botnet attack could be aimed at data theft or physical asset disruption.

As Krebs stated in his blog “These weapons can be wielded by anyone – with any motivation – who’s willing to expend a modicum of time and effort to learn the basic principles of its operation.” Someone with a grievance against a particular website could easily have it taken offline or simply employ a hacker to do it for them.

It’s especially concerning to imagine the consequences of IoT devices being hacked within critical or high security areas such as hospitals, banking, government, transport etc. Time will tell if we are able to secure IoT before we are subject to further, and perhaps more significant, botnet attacks.

What Can Be Done?

How can individuals and organisations improve their IoT security and prevent cyber attacks? We’ve put together a quick checklist to help you strengthen your security.

  • Use strong login passwords for all your devices and strong Wi-Fi passwords. A strong password contains upper and lower case letters, numbers and symbols.
  • Make sure all the software you use is fully updates – this can fix security flaws.
  • Don’t open mysterious email links or attachments – if you weren’t expecting it, don’t open it!
  • Never reveal card information.
  • Don’t trust anyone who calls you to discuss your computer or devices – hang up the phone.

What do you think about the IoT security risks? Should CPOs halt their investments and wait for the cybersecurity to catch up with the technology? Let us know in the comments below.

Here’s what else has been going on in the world of procurement this week…

Trump Kills TPP

  • President Trump upended America’s bipartisan trade policy on Monday as he formally abandoned the ambitious, 12-nation Trans-Pacific Partnership.
  • In doing so, he demonstrated that he would not follow old rules, effectively discarding longstanding Republican orthodoxy that expanding global trade was good for the world and America.
  • Although the Trans-Pacific Partnership had not been approved by Congress, Mr. Trump’s decision to withdraw carries broad geopolitical implications in a fast-growing region.
  • Trump said American workers would be protected against competition from low-wage countries like Vietnam and Malaysia, also parties to the deal.

Read More on New York Times

Wal-Mart Cuts 1,000 HQ Jobs

  • Wal-Mart Stores began a round of some 1,000 layoffs at its corporate headquarters, with most cuts targeting the retailer’s supply chain operations.
  • The shakeups, which have been expected, suggest that Wal-Mart is willing to undo much of the work in its existing e-commerce operations in favour of Jet’s signature pricing and fulfilment algorithms, which reward shoppers in real time with savings on items purchased and shipped together.
  • The dent in its supply chain ranks could undermine one of Wal-Mart’s core strengths: its highly efficient brick-and-mortar-based distribution system.

Read More on Retail Dive

Samsung’s Exploding Galaxy Note7 Blamed on Battery Suppliers

  • Approximately 2.5 million phones have been recalled by Samsung due to explosive defects of the Galaxy Note since September 2016.
  • Recalls happen all the time, but while the Samsung case rose to infamy due to its flammable and potentially injurious nature, the revelation that Samsung’s primary and backup suppliers independently produced a faulty phone component is equally remarkable.
  • What was a supply chain problem was resolved by an operations solution in this particular case. However, batteries will be subject to more strict quality controls to avoid future issues.
  • Previous analyses also have suggested Samsung’s rush to production — both before and after the first recall — may have also impacted the finished good’s quality.

Read More on Supply Chain Dive

Procurement Salaries On The UP In 2017

  • Procurement professionals can expect to see pay rises averaging 10% in 2017, according to a salary survey
  • However, contractors will get the biggest rises – 15% – while permanent staff can expect to get 4%
  • Sam Walters, associate director at Robert Walters, said: “Across all levels of seniority we have seen demand grow for high quality procurement professionals over the past year, with those with IT procurement experience being particularly highly sought after

Read more at Supply Management