Tag Archives: procurement news

Standard, Express, or Flying? Why supply managers need to be ready for delivery drones

Flying delivery drones will soon take over the last mile of your supply chain. Have you started planning ahead for a drone-filled future? 

“Alexa, re-order Doritos from Prime Air.”

Blink, and you’d miss it. Amazon purchased 10 seconds of the year’s most expensive advertising space last week to introduce the U.S. Super Bowl audience to two of its latest tech products: Amazon Echo and Amazon Prime.

Disgusted by her partner’s finger-licking, a tech-savvy woman directs her request for a second bag of Doritos to the IoT-enabled smart speaker in front of her television. The speaker (“Alexa”) in turn places an order with Amazon Prime, resulting in a delivery drone making a graceful touchdown in the yard outside.

Meanwhile in the U.K., a Youtube clip featuring former Top Gear presenter Jeremy Clarkson explains the ordering and drone delivery process in much greater detail:

Drone delivery services are swiftly approaching the commercial market, with Amazon taking a clear lead in the development race. In December, Amazon made its first successful go-round in a rural corner of England, where it has been beta-testing. While there’s still a significant weight restriction, the benefits of drone delivery are clear:

  • The 30-minute delivery time is an enormous improvement from the standard 24-48 hour wait customers currently experience when ordering online.
  • Drones can reach a height of 400 feet and fly for 24 kilometres at a stretch. They  avoid traffic and potential obstacles using laser, sonar and other technology.
  • Environmentally, battery-operated drone delivery ticks a lot of boxes as they’ll eventually replace many fuel-burning delivery vehicles currently on the road.
  • Finally, the full autonomy of drone delivery will mean there’ll be very little need for human interference, leading to enormous efficiency gains for delivery companies.

After the successful beta-tests in England, drone confidence is rising in the US, although the Federal Aviation Authority (FAA) has been slow to react. A report from December 2016 claimed the FAA has yet to begin drafting rules around flying drones over populated areas.

Testing, however, is taking place, with examples including UPS making a medical supply drop to an island off the coast of Massachusetts, while Alphabet’s drone delivery initiative (Project Wing) sent a hot dinner to students at Virginia Tech. Both the U.S. Postal Service and Britain’s Royal Mail have expressed keen interest in drone delivery as the cost of traditional delivery methods continue to rise. In Europe, DHL similarly completed a round of drone testing last year.

The process of delivery drones

Using a GPS system, delivery drones can quickly generate the most efficient route and even communicate with each other. Users can use communicate with delivery drones via smart phones, selecting delivery options such as: “Bring it to Me,” “Home,” “Work,” and “My Boat.” Additionally, if the customer relocates, the drones can redirect mid-route.

While apartment buildings are still too complicated for drone routes, doorstep delivery throughout rural and suburban neighbourhoods has been mastered.

Allison Crady, Marketing Specialist at CDF Distributors, has followed the rise of drone deliveries closely. She comments that drone delivery will only be applicable to a limited number of products at first: “Giant screen TVs will still require a typical truck delivery, but drone warehouses are currently ideal for light-weight purchases such as tech gadgets or snacks. As drone weight options increase through future development, their useful applications will extend far beyond simple convenience deliveries.”

What can supply managers do to prepare? 

Regulatory bodies such as the FAA move slowly to make drone deliveries a reality.  Supply managers can take advantage of this delay by planning ahead for a drone-based future. This means reviewing your current delivery arrangements (in-house or outsourced) and measuring:

  • the number of light-weight products currently delivered by truck that could be carried by drone
  • current delivery timeframes versus potential drone delivery speed
  • traditional price structures and operating costs against drone delivery
  • the human workforce required to run a delivery fleet versus autonomous drones
  • your current ability to deliver to difficult/remote locations
  • environmental benefits of taking fuel-burning cars off the road in favour of delivery drones.

In other  procurement news this week…

Huawei announces IoT Partnership with Deutsche Post DHL 

  • Huawei and Deutsche Post DHL Group will collaborate on innovation projects to develop a range of supply chain solutions for customers using industrial-grade Internet of Things hardware and infrastructure.
  • The group  is expected to make its IoT devices and network infrastructure accessible to DHL to assist in incorporating greater sensing and automation capabilities into warehousing, freight, and last-mile delivery services.
  • A  spokesperson from Huawei, Yan Lida, commented, “This partnership opens up an opportunity to improve the efficiency, safety and customer service offered by global supply chains in previously impossible ways, and defines how the Internet of Things will shape the fortunes of the logistics industry in the next few critical years of innovation.”

Read more at Logistics Magazine. 

Remote Australian supply chains cut by flooding

  • Floods in Western Australia closed major road transport routes for three days last week. Meanwhile, rail movement into Perth was delayed for five days.
  • The Newmont Mine in the Tanami desert has been closed for over a month due to the flooding. Delivery company Toll has been issued permits to use the flood-damaged roads to deliver fuel, food and emergency supplies to the community at the mine.
  • Parts of the Stuart Highway and Carpentaria Highway have also been closed. This is  impacting on the movement of heavy trucks in the region.

Read more at Fully Loaded. 

The Samsung Smartphone Debacle: Suppliers Pushed Too Far, Too Fast?

Samsung has apportioned some of the blame for its exploding Note 7 phones to two of its battery suppliers. But who is ultimately responsible? Is the pressure to innovate at all costs leading to unsafe development and testing time-frames?

Esa Riutta/Shutterstock.com

What Went Wrong?

Samsung  has begun the long task of rebuilding consumer trust in its smartphones. But questions remain.   Why didn’t Samsung pick up design and manufacturing faults before they sold 1 million unsafe devices to customers? The cause appears to lie in Samsung’s rush to beat its arch-rival Apple to market. This led to a failure to properly test lithium-ion batteries in the Note 7 phone.

The pressure to innovate that tech giants such as Samsung place on their suppliers is immense. Particularly when competitors such as Apple are constantly upping the ante. Every new release on a phone must be demonstrably better than the last.  This means delivering ever-smaller and lighter batteries that customers can charge rapidly and use for a full day and evening.

Battery manufacturers responded to the challenge by using a thin “club sandwich” design. In this battery positive and negative electrodes are stacked and kept apart using layers of separators. Unfortunately, the pressure for an ever-thinner battery meant that the separators were too thin, leading to shorts and subsequent over-heating. A second, unrelated design fault lay in an abnormal welding process. This led to contact between a positive terminal and a negative electrode.

Spreading the blame

The fallout for the exploding smartphones follows a familiar pattern where, although the technical fault lies with a supplier of products and services, the big-name parent company takes the lion’s share of the blame. Even when the parent organisation attempts to publicly offset some of the blame onto its suppliers, consumers typically assign responsibility to the most recognisable brand.

An example of this famously occurred in April 2010 with the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.  The owner of the well, BP, took most of the responsibility (and $54 billion in associated costs), whilst the contracting operators came under considerably less scrutiny. Tellingly, a U.S. District Judge apportioned 67% of the blame for the spill to BP, 30% to Transocean and 3% to Halliburton.

Samsung, to its credit, did accept overall responsibility for the $6.9 billion mistake even while it pointed the finger at battery manufacturers. Samsung Electronics America senior vice president Justin Denison told a press conference: “Ultimately we take responsibility for this. It’s our product, we set the specifications, and it’s up to us to catch the problem before it leaves in one of our devices.”

The long road to brand recovery

Youtube users may have noticed Samsung’s brand-repair efforts have gotten underway, with ads such as the following appearing online:

The South Korean company has invested $170 million into safety.  It is assertively broadcasting its new 8-point safety check which includes a durability test, visual inspection, x-ray test and others. Samsung’s investigation into the Note 7 failures included over 700 R&D engineers. These engineers tried to replicate the issue by testing 200,000 phones and 30,000 standalone batteries.

But, in a further unfortunate setback for the brand, one of the affiliates responsible for manufacturing the faculty batteries – Samsung SDI – experienced a factory fire last week in Tianjin, China, with 110 firefighters and 19 trucks responding to the blaze.

Senior executives from Samsung have commented that they’ve learnt an enormous amount about crisis management in the past few months. Observers, too, can draw some valuable lessons around the dangers of rushing new innovations to market and the ineffectiveness of attempting to apportion blame to suppliers.

Read more about Samsung’s smartphone battery issues.

In other procurement news this week…

Boeing’s Space Taxi to include 3D printed components

  • Boeing has commissioned 600 3D printed components from Oxford Performance Materials for use in its Starliner space taxi.
  • Boeing expects the spacecraft to fly unmanned in June 2018. and will have a first crewed test flight in August 2018. It will ferry two astronauts to the International Space Station for the first fully operational flight in December 2018.
  • The inclusion of 3D components marks a first for 3D technology usage in spacefaring technology, with increasing recognition that printed plastics perform well under the pressure of launch and in a temperature of absolute zero.

Read more at Supply Chain Dive.

New research reveals CEOs still don’t “get” procurement

  • Consultancy firm 4c Associates released the findings of a poll of 521 CPOs, managers and procurement personnel to understand how procurement is perceived by the C-Level.
  • 48% of participants claimed their boss “doesn’t get what the procurement team does, or can do”. 55% said the C-Level regards procurement as a support function. It exists to cut costs, rather than add strategic value to the organisation.
  • Mark Ellis, senior partner at 4c Associates, commented that procurement needs to proactively highlight the services they can provide beyond cost cutting. “If all the function does is speak in terms of savings, then that’s how it will be perceived: as a cost cutter”, Ellis said.

Claim Your 60 Seconds of Fame: What’s Your Big Idea In 2017?

Looking for a way to build your personal brand and market yourself as a global procurement superstar? Here’s your chance to share your Big Idea with over 19,000 colleagues on Procurious! Get ready to launch your reputation as an influencer and help shape the global conversation for 2017.    

The Big Ideas Summit 2017 in London takes place on 23rd February. Register as a digital delegate here

Put yourself in the frame

In the lead-up to the world’s most innovative procurement event, we’re putting out the call for members of the Procurious community – that’s YOU – to share your Big Ideas via a 60-second video.

Why? Because we’re flexing our 19,000-strong community muscle to crowdsource innovation directly from our members! By sharing Big Ideas, we’ll break down competitive barriers, learn from colleagues with unique insights into procurement, and come away energised by a rush of new concepts that will launch the profession into new and exciting territory.

Amplifying your Big Idea is not only important for the profession, but it’s very good for your career. Although it’s not quite Hollywood, putting your video up in lights on Procurious offers an unprecedented chance to grow your profile as a thought-leader and a true influencer in procurement.

Join an all-star line up 

At the Big Ideas Summit 2016, we asked the thought-leaders gathered in the room to record their Big Ideas live on camera for the world to see. The result? We now have a remarkable library of Big Ideas available to all members under the Procurious Learning tab. The quality of ideas was amazing, and the range of viewpoints was even more so. From Guardian Journalist Lucy Siegle talking about fast fashion…

To RBS CPO, Laura Faulkner, on why procurement needs to focus on people…

… the scope for fresh, innovative ideas is unlimited! But Big Ideas videos aren’t just for the superstars appearing at the Summit itself – it’s over to you to help build on this groundswell by creating a 60 second video that will make YOUR mark on the profession.

Who can contribute?

Anyone and everybody! Whether you work in indirect or direct procurement, whether your focus is manufacturing, technology or logistics, whether you’re a CPO or a student – your ideas deserve to be shared. That’s because every procurement professional possesses unique insights based on differences in personal background, role, industry, and business type.

It’s super easy to create a 60-second video via your computer, phone or YouTube. You’ll find our recommendations on the best ways to create and share your video with Procurious at the end of this article.

Need more inspiration? Check out this 2016 Big Idea video from one of our community members (and competition winner), Kelly Barner:

How to submit your Big Idea

It doesn’t matter whether you film your Big Idea on your phone, tablet, laptop or PC- we’re not picky! But, to help you out, we’ve put together a list of some of our recommended methods for reaching out to us. Once you’ve completed your film, you can reach us by email ([email protected]) or on Twitter (@procurious_).

Youtube

Alternatively, if you have always dreamed of being an Internet star, YouTube might be the tool for you.

  • Head over to https://www.youtube.com/uploadand either select a readymade video to upload, or hit ‘Webcam capture’ to film your piece on the spot.
  • Select ‘Start recording’ to get the camera rolling (remembering to tick ‘Allow’ should you be prompted by YouTube’s Privacy Settings)
  • When done press ‘Stop recording’ followed by ‘Continue’.

Don’t be daunted by filling-out the ‘Basic info’ – all that’s required is a title, short description, and some tags. For your title we’d suggest using something along the lines of: My Big Idea is… [insert here]

In order to make your video easy to find, we’d recommend using the #BigIdeas2017 and Procurious tags – but feel free to add more!

Click ‘Publish’ when you’re happy and remember to send us the YouTube URL when it’s live.

Email and phone

Want to submit your video using a good old-fashioned email? We’ll accept that too! Did we mention we’re not picky?

Attach your video to an email with the subject line ‘My Big Idea Video’ and send to [email protected].

If you’re using an iPhone or iPad you can also record your video using iMessage. Android and Windows Phone users can choose to use Skype (Windows Phone has Skype already built-in)

We look forward to sharing your videos with our Procurious community of 19,000+ members! Happy shooting, and be sure to register as a Big Ideas Summit digital delegate so you can catch the wave of Big Ideas in 2017.

What’s It All About? The Big Ideas Summit 2017 FAQs

From Mumbai to Melbourne; and Paris to Poughkeepsie, you can take part in the world’s largest procurement event – free.

ESB Professional/Shutterstock.com

Register as an online delegate for The Big Ideas Summit in London here.

Last week, we announced that the Big Ideas Summit 2017 is going global with events in London, Sydney, Chicago, Dubai and Singapore. If you’re interested in getting involved but still not entirely sure what’s going on, look no further! We’ve compiled a list of our most frequently asked questions to get you fully up to speed!

What is it?

The Big Ideas Summit is a unique online event uniting procurement and supply chain professionals from around the globe to drive innovation and inspire change.   

When is it?

We kick off the global tour in London on 23 February 2017. But a lively conversation has already begun on Procurious! Expect to see most of the action between 09.00 – 17.00 (GMT) as we share video insights, quotes, photos and summary articles direct from London.

If you can’t join the action live, not to worry.  The thought-provoking discussions and debate will continue long after, and we’ll be sharing video footage of all our Influencers Big Ideas throughout February and March on Procurious. 

Where is it?

First stop, London! Although our Top Influencers will be meeting in Soho, due to its digital nature Procurious members across the world can get involved from the comfort of their office, armchair or even from the beach!

Procurious members can also use our iOS App to follow the action. It’s available in the Apple iTunes store and is free to download. 

How can I join in?

You’ll need to be a registered member of Procurious – join here for free if you haven’t already. Then simply access the Big Ideas Summit Group to soak-up thoughtful opinions, participate in insightful discussion, connect with our Influencers, access exclusive podcasts and interviews and share your own Big Ideas with the Procurious community.

We’ll also be live tweeting throughout the day, so make sure you’re following @procurious_ to share and respond to our tweets using the hashtag #bigideas2017.

Do I have to be a member of Procurious?

Yes. Participation as a Digital Delegate is free and open to all members of Procurious. By joining Procurious, you will not only have access to all the exclusive Big Ideas Summit content, but you will join a community of 19,000 like-minded procurement peers and gain access to all Procurious’ free resources, including being able to:

  • Upskill on the move with 80+ eLearning modules
  • Get your procurement questions answered by experts
  • Find out about relevant professional events around the globe
  • Become a digital delegate in the global think-tank, Big Ideas Summit 2017

Will Big Ideas be live-streamed?

Procurious boasts a global audience of 19,000+ procurement professionals, from more than 140 countries. If we were to cater to all of these time zones, it would be a tough job – so rather than live-streaming (and keeping you awake at awkward hours), we’ll share exclusive video and podcast interviews with Digital Delegates.

We will be using Periscope to live stream short videos from the day, but these videos – and all the Big Ideas videos  and podcast interviews – will be made available to you in the days that follow exclusively on Procurious.

I’m on the fence – why should I take part?

Here are five compelling reasons to join your fellow Procurians and stake your claim to the wealth of knowledge on offer:

  1. An audience with 50 of the world’s top procurement influencers
  2. Get your questions answered by world-class experts
  3. Make powerful new contacts around the globe
  4. Share your own Big Idea and make your voice heard
  5. Access exclusive content & learnings 

Who are the ‘Top Influencers’?

The term ‘influencers’ refers to the our 50 face-to-face delegates who attend in each city respectively: London, Sydney, Chicago, Dubai and Singapore.

Our experts span the worlds of procurement, technology, social media, journalism, social media, economics and academia.

Who are the sponsors and media partners?

The Big Ideas Summit is made possible by our partners IBMISMThe Hackett Group, and GEP

I’ve got a Big Idea of my own…

Great to hear! You can Tweet us your Big Ideas @procurious_ remembering to use the hashtag #BigIdeas2017.

Leave your Big Idea on Facebook – you can find us at www.facebook.com/procurious .

And of course you can tell the Procurious community all about it by joining the Big Ideas Group page and posting it to the community feed. 

Who is behind Procurious?

You can read all about us in Our Story.

 Join the conversation and register as a digital delegate for Big Ideas 2017 in London.

Keen on the Internet of Things? Beware of IoT Botnet Zombie Attacks!

Everyone’s talking about the Internet of Things and all of the exciting things it can do for us! But just how much have we considered the possible security risks? 

What’s All the IoT Fuss About?

CPOs are becoming ever keener on enhancing hyper-connectivity within their organisations using the Internet of Things. This is unsurprising given the potential opportunities for procurement teams; warehouses that can tell you what parts you’re running out of and reorder them for you, more efficient processes and the chance to revolutionise how they manage supply chains.

Of course, it’s not just businesses that will benefit from IoT. Early adopters are already using IoT in their homes with smart fridges, smart toasters and smart collars for their pets. Experts predict that by 2020, more than half of new organisations will run on IoT.

Given all of these benefits, you might well ask what’s not to love? Well, judging by recent events, it might be prudent for us all to exercise a little more caution as far as IoT is concerned. As it stands, the process is wide open to cyberattacks.

Botnet Zombie Attacks

Individual devices pose almost no threat to any computer or data centre but what happens if millions of them were taken over at once? IoT devices are likely to have weaker security (research suggests that default usernames and passwords for devices are rarely changed), which makes them an easy target. Hackers will pre-program their malware with the most commonly used default passwords in order to hack multiple devices.

Back in October, an IoT botnet, Mirai, attacked a number of the internet’s websites including Spotify, Netflix and PayPal. The botnet works by consistently searching for accessible IoT devices protected by default passwords. Once these have been identified, the malware turns them into remotely controlled bots and is able to use them for large-scale network attacks – think robot zombie army!

This week, computer security journalist Brian Krebs posted an article on his blog, Krebs on Security, revealing the identity of Mirai author to be Paras Jha, owner of a DDoS mitigation service company ProTraf Solutions and a student of Rutgers University. Whilst Mirai has only been used mischievously so far, to shut down certain sites, the actions have brought to question what damage could be inflicted by real cybercriminals.

The Worst Case Scenario

Whilst the Mirai October attacks were relatively harmless and only resulted in some websites crashing, some tech commentators are regarding it as a test-run. It’s concerning that the next botnet attack could be aimed at data theft or physical asset disruption.

As Krebs stated in his blog “These weapons can be wielded by anyone – with any motivation – who’s willing to expend a modicum of time and effort to learn the basic principles of its operation.” Someone with a grievance against a particular website could easily have it taken offline or simply employ a hacker to do it for them.

It’s especially concerning to imagine the consequences of IoT devices being hacked within critical or high security areas such as hospitals, banking, government, transport etc. Time will tell if we are able to secure IoT before we are subject to further, and perhaps more significant, botnet attacks.

What Can Be Done?

How can individuals and organisations improve their IoT security and prevent cyber attacks? We’ve put together a quick checklist to help you strengthen your security.

  • Use strong login passwords for all your devices and strong Wi-Fi passwords. A strong password contains upper and lower case letters, numbers and symbols.
  • Make sure all the software you use is fully updates – this can fix security flaws.
  • Don’t open mysterious email links or attachments – if you weren’t expecting it, don’t open it!
  • Never reveal card information.
  • Don’t trust anyone who calls you to discuss your computer or devices – hang up the phone.

What do you think about the IoT security risks? Should CPOs halt their investments and wait for the cybersecurity to catch up with the technology? Let us know in the comments below.

Here’s what else has been going on in the world of procurement this week…

Trump Kills TPP

  • President Trump upended America’s bipartisan trade policy on Monday as he formally abandoned the ambitious, 12-nation Trans-Pacific Partnership.
  • In doing so, he demonstrated that he would not follow old rules, effectively discarding longstanding Republican orthodoxy that expanding global trade was good for the world and America.
  • Although the Trans-Pacific Partnership had not been approved by Congress, Mr. Trump’s decision to withdraw carries broad geopolitical implications in a fast-growing region.
  • Trump said American workers would be protected against competition from low-wage countries like Vietnam and Malaysia, also parties to the deal.

Read More on New York Times

Wal-Mart Cuts 1,000 HQ Jobs

  • Wal-Mart Stores began a round of some 1,000 layoffs at its corporate headquarters, with most cuts targeting the retailer’s supply chain operations.
  • The shakeups, which have been expected, suggest that Wal-Mart is willing to undo much of the work in its existing e-commerce operations in favour of Jet’s signature pricing and fulfilment algorithms, which reward shoppers in real time with savings on items purchased and shipped together.
  • The dent in its supply chain ranks could undermine one of Wal-Mart’s core strengths: its highly efficient brick-and-mortar-based distribution system.

Read More on Retail Dive

Samsung’s Exploding Galaxy Note7 Blamed on Battery Suppliers

  • Approximately 2.5 million phones have been recalled by Samsung due to explosive defects of the Galaxy Note since September 2016.
  • Recalls happen all the time, but while the Samsung case rose to infamy due to its flammable and potentially injurious nature, the revelation that Samsung’s primary and backup suppliers independently produced a faulty phone component is equally remarkable.
  • What was a supply chain problem was resolved by an operations solution in this particular case. However, batteries will be subject to more strict quality controls to avoid future issues.
  • Previous analyses also have suggested Samsung’s rush to production — both before and after the first recall — may have also impacted the finished good’s quality.

Read More on Supply Chain Dive

Procurement Salaries On The UP In 2017

  • Procurement professionals can expect to see pay rises averaging 10% in 2017, according to a salary survey
  • However, contractors will get the biggest rises – 15% – while permanent staff can expect to get 4%
  • Sam Walters, associate director at Robert Walters, said: “Across all levels of seniority we have seen demand grow for high quality procurement professionals over the past year, with those with IT procurement experience being particularly highly sought after

Read more at Supply Management

Technology Is The Answer. But What’s The Question?

Companies everywhere are super-keen to invest in technology and an eye-watering $3.49 trillion will be made available in 2017 for this purpose – but how can CPOs and IT buyers ensure they make the right decisions? 

StepanPopov/Shutterstock.com

If you ask any CPO what their main priorities are for the next five years, you’re almost guaranteed to receive an answer involving technology. Spend for software and IT services is rising at a dramatic rate, and is expected to increase by an incredible 29% in 2017 to $3.49 trillion in the U.S. alone.

The urgency for harnessing cutting-edge technology is understood, and the good news is that business are making the money available. But how do you make sure you’re investing in the right tools?

Here’s the secret: you need to make sure you’re asking the right questions

Supply management professionals will gather in Washington, D.C. on March 22-24 for ISM Tech 2017, where they will gain access to the knowledge required to make intelligent technology investment decisions for the unique needs of their organisations. IT procurement experts will reveal new possibilities and cost-saving efficiencies in areas including advanced analytics, manufacturing 4.0, the role of robotics, going digital and utilising augmented reality.

Keynote speakers include Rick Smith, CEO of Fast Radius, who will be presenting on “Our 3D-printed future”, while Silicon Valley Entrepreneur and bestselling author Martin Ford will deliver a keynote titled “How data is driving the transportation revolution”. Other big names include Abtin Hamidi, Co-Founder and Executive Vice President of Cargo Chief; Amanda Prochaska, Vice President Procurement Program Management Office, MGM Resorts International; and Tom Martin, Director of Learning Solutions at ISM.

What questions will Tech 2017 help you to answer?

  • How can robotics streamline my business processes?
  • What’s the best way to use the Internet of Things (IoT) in the supply chain?
  • How can my organisation use technology innovations to capture digital customers?
  • How can I leverage analytics to align planning with demand?
  • How should I mitigate technology-related risks?
  • What capabilities will my team require to keep up with technological advancements?

As with every ISM Event, Tech 2017 is all about the networking. Attendees will have the opportunity to meet scores of innovative suppliers and exchange ideas with representatives from top providers in the field, strategizing with experts on their technology needs to identify new ways to tackle existing challenges and future growth opportunities.

This is one event where just about any conversation taking place in the Exhibition Hall is likely to make fascinating eavesdropping. Instead of the usual procurement “chatter” around traditional practices such as sourcing, contracts and requisition-to-pay, attendees will discuss cutting-edge concepts like cognitive analytics, 3D printing, digital reporting, artificial intelligence and machine learning.

As you network, keep in mind that IT procurement experts have been tipped to be the CPOs of the future. According to Procurious founder Tania Seary, the profession is now looking to this highly-skilled group for leadership, and IT experts are on the fast-track to leadership due to five key advantages:

  1. IT experts already control an important chunk of their organisations’ strategic spend.
  2. Soon everything we buy will include an element of technology.
  3. IT procurement experts know how to drive change.
  4. They are innovation scouts.
  5. They understand cyber security.

Don’t miss out – ISM Tech 2017 will take place at the Gaylord National Resort and Convention Center, Washnigton D.C. from March 22-24, 2017.

Fasten Your Seatbelts: You’re Going Global!

The Big Ideas Summit, powered by Procurious, is embarking on a world tour. And you’re all invited! 

Register as an online delegate for The Big Ideas Summit in London here.

Fasten your seatbelt, fold away your tray table and return your seat to the upright position – we’re taking you and your procurement career on an epic journey!

Funding might be tight and you can’t even remember the last time you had a spare second to give to your career development but, in 2017, everything changes!

Procurious will be bringing you the best in procurement thinking from our events around the world. And the best news? You’ll be able to access all of the content for free and at your leisure; whether it’s from your desk, on the go or in the comfort of your own home.

19,000 Procurious Members On Tour

For the past two years, Procurious has hosted The Big Ideas Summit, the world’s first digitally-led procurement event, in London.

The event has earned a global reputation as the most innovative leadership event for the procurement profession and 2017 promises to be just as exciting and thought provoking as we officially go global!

This year, we’ll be taking you around the globe with events taking place in London, Singapore, Sydney, Chicago and Dubai.

Wherever you are in the world you can fully participate for free by registering for each individual event as a digital delegate. You’ll be joining a community of 19,000+ procurement professionals, from 140+ countries, on Procurious to connect, learn, discuss and innovate together.

What is the Big Ideas Summit?

The Big Ideas Summit is an interactive, online event where up to 50 senior executives, industry thought-leaders and CPOs come together to connect with digital delegates from across the globe via our social media platform to discuss and test strategies and solutions for real world change.

2017 looks set to be a huge year for procurement thanks to rapid technology developments including advancements in cognitive tech and Industry 4.0. Surely there’s no better time to expand The Big Ideas Summit by sourcing ideas from top thought leaders not just in London, but around the world.

The procurement function must adapt and evolve to accommodate these technology changes and be ready to embrace what we’re calling Procurement 4.0. The question is: Are We There Yet?

The Flights Are Booked! Where Are We Going?

The Big Ideas Summit, London – 23rd February 2017 

Procurement 4.0: Are We There Yet?

We’ve got a jam packed agenda lined up for the primary event of the year. Our speakers will include:

  • John Macfarlane: Chairman, Barclay’s PLC
  • Linda Yueh: Fellow in economics, Oxford University,  Adjunct Professor of Economics at London Business School
  • James Bannerman: Creative Change Agent, Author of Genius
  • Mark Stevenson: Futurist, Author of An Optimist’s Tour of the Future

Nexus, Singapore – 30th March 2017

Navigating Procurement’s interface between cost and risk. Singapore’s NEXUS event will focus on managing the critical interface between growth and cost.

Pivot, Sydney – 17- 18th May 2017

Asia-Pacific CPO forum. Disrupting a decade of Big Ideas in Procurement.

Scrum, Chicago – 28th September 2017

A Procurement & Supply Chain Technology Sprint. Chicago’s SCRUM TM event will focus on the way technology is disrupting the workforce and reimagining how procurement value is delivered.

Reboot, Dubai – 23rd November 2017

Designing the Procurement 4.0 Workforce. Dubai’s REBOOT will focus on the talent and people implications of disruption created by Industry 4.0.

Buckle Up, We’re Ready For Take Off! 

The Big Ideas Global Event Series 2017 promises to light up social media, sparking vigorous discussions and crowd-sourcing ideas for the future of the profession but we can’t do it without you! We need your intput your questions and, of course, your big ideas for procurement.

By Registering As A Digital Delegates You Can…

  • Gain access to insightful discussions via our Big Ideas Summit 2017 groups
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Meet The New General Secretary of Globalisation

Chinese President Xi Jinping claims world leadership for globalisation while the U.S. moves towards protectionism.

AFP PHOTO / POOL / Billy H.C. KWOK

Chinese President Xi Jinping used his address at the World Economic Forum in Switzerland last week to defend globalisation and criticise the rise of protectionism in Western economies.

The speech is the latest in a series of appearances on the world stage where Xi has sought to support the existing economic order that has fuelled decades of unprecedented growth in China. Similar appearances include Xi’s address to the United Nations in 2015, hosting the G20 Summit in 2016 and his speech at the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Summit in Peru in November last year.

De facto Chinese leadership?

With the Trans-Pacific Partnership scheduled for the chopping block when President Obama steps down, Xi now has the opportunity to shape global economic systems to China’s benefit and step into an apparent vacuum for worldwide economic leadership, particularly where free trade and globalisation are concerned. In many ways, the world is now witnessing the situation Obama sought to avoid with his “Pivot to Asia”, designed to maintain American influence in the East.

In a commentary following Xi’s speech, the China Daily referred to the country as now being “the one major power with a global outlook”. “Ready or not, China has become the de facto world leader seeking to maintain an open global economy and battle climate change. In effect, President Xi has become the general secretary of globalisation.”

Xi’s Defence of Globalisation

“There is no point in blaming economic globalisation for the world’s problems because that is simply not the case,” Xi said. “And that will not help to solve the problems.” The problems Xi is referring to are those often referenced by Western populists across the U.S. and Europe, including growing wealth gaps and domestic unemployment related to offshoring. Xi’s speech touched on some of the deeper causes of sluggish world growth, looking to reinforce confidence in global development.

“Protectionism is like locking yourself in a dark room, which would seem to escape wind and rain, but also block out the sunshine,” Xi told the Forum. “No one is a winner in a trade war.” Xi announced that China has no intention to devalue its currency to boost competitiveness, despite ongoing criticism on this point from the new U.S. President.

Can globalisation function without the U.S.?

Despite the nation’s ongoing economic slowdown, the World Economic Forum estimates that China accounted for almost 39% of global growth last year. President Trump’s protectionist tariffs, along with his retreat from trade deals and climate pacts are likely to slow growth further. A similar level of concern is building in India, where the $150 billion outsourcing industry is under threat.

As WorldPost Editor-in-chief Nathan Gardel writes, “The optimal arrangement for making globalisation work is for the U.S. and China to join together as “indispensable partners” based on a convergence of interests to create a world order that works for all. If the world’s two largest economies, though from distinct civilizational spheres, don’t buy in, it won’t work for anyone.”

Read more Huffington Post 

 In other procurement  news…

Britain to purchase 60 trains for HS2

  • Procurement of a fleet of up to 60 High Speed 2 (HS2) trains was officially launched on Friday by Britain’s state secretary for transport.
  • HS2 is a planned high-speed railway in the United Kingdom linking London, Birmingham, the East Midlands, Leeds, Sheffield and Manchester. It would be the second high-speed rail line in Britain, after HS1 which connects London to the Channel Tunnel.
  • The contract has an estimated value of £2.75bn and is due to be awarded by the end of 2019. The overall projected project cost of HS2 is £56bn.

Read more at the Birmingham Mail

GM announces $1 billion investment in U.S. based manufacturing plants

  • GM will invest $1 billion in its existing manufacturing plants, creating or retaining nearly 7,000 domestic jobs.
  • The announcement comes after President Trump criticised GM and other automakers for building vehicles in Mexico and shipping them to the U.S., including a Tweet threatening to tax GM for importing the Chevrolet Cruze.
  • GM’s targeted areas of growth include its subsidiary, GM Financial, and advanced technology divisions.

Read more at Investopedia 

Meals on Robot Wheels

  • Autonomous robot manufacturer Starship Technologies has signed deals with meal delivery companies Postmates and DoorDash to deliver lunches in Washington and San Francisco, beginning in February.
  • The robots are able to autonomously navigate sidewalks and traffic conditions, while customers track their progress via an app as they make the delivery.
  • Each robot weighs approximately 18 kg and can carry three filled shopping bags, while travelling at speeds of 6.5 kilometres per hour.

Read more at CIO 

Colin Powell To Complete Stellar Keynote Line-Up At ISM2017

The fact that the Institute for Supply Management can attract keynote speakers of this calibre offers proof that the profession truly has come of age.  

ISM has announced that the former U.S. Secretary of State, General Colin Powell, will join former UK Prime Minister David Cameron to deliver a keynote at the year’s biggest conference in Supply Management, ISM2017.

General Powell will inspire and motivate ISM2017 attendees with stories of leadership under fire – and how to deliver complex supply systems when facing immovable deadlines.

As former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Powell assembled a multibillion dollar supply chain involving 42 nations during Operation Desert Storm in the Persian Gulf. Powell and his team pulled together millions of coordinated supplies: military goods, machinery, food, weaponry, and critical spare parts.

“As Secretary of State, General Powell used the power of diplomacy to build trust and create alliances, while also having the grit and experience forged by his military career in delivering results when it matters most,” said Tom Derry, ISM CEO. “Powell’s insight will be critical to ISM members and other purchasing and supply chain professionals as they focus on the challenges of working in a tough, ever-changing global economy.”

David Cameron, former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, who stepped down from the position in 2016 in the wake of the Brexit decision, will also keynote ISM2017 conference attendees about his experience navigating geopolitical and public policy issues and their impact on the global supply chain. He will address a range of events in Europe and worldwide, and what they could mean to supply managers everywhere.

Powell and Cameron’s keynotes share a theme that will resonate with supply managers everywhere – how to deliver effective short-term solutions – and leadership during a time of crisis. The inclusion of two political veterans is particularly apt in 2017 as Europe continues to adjust to the effects of Brexit and the U.S. recovers from one the most divisive presidential races in recent memory.

Registrations are now open for ISM2017, which will be held May 21–24, 2017, at the Disney Coronado Springs Resort in Orlando, Florida.

Focused on “Critical Insights, Powerful Results,” the event expects to draw more than 3,000 attendees from around the world. ISM 2017 features keynotes, learning tracks, and sessions about leading in times of stress. More than 75 interactive sessions will be part of six learning tracks at ISM2017, and executives from firms such as Google, Toyota, Pfizer, Direct Energy, Zimmer Biomet and others will present.

Find out more about ISM2017

What Would You Do If The President-Elect Criticised Your Supply Chain?

Major US organisations are starting to rethink their manufacturing strategies for fear of being labelled “un-American” by the President-Elect. 

Every US-based supply manager with outsourced supply chains should follow Donald Trump on Twitter. Why? Because for major companies with overseas manufacturing operations, there’s every chance that the President-Elect will label your organisation “un-American”.

Since November 2016, Trump has criticised companies including Ford, Toyota, GM, United Tech and, more recently, pharmaceutical organisations including Johnson & Johnson, Pfizer and Bristol-Myers for moving U.S. jobs abroad. His focus appears to be on companies outsourcing to Mexico and China, where historically low-cost labour enables organisations to manufacture their products at a competitive level.

Companies changing plans

According to a report from Reuters, boards of a number of U.S. companies that manufacture overseas have directed their public relations teams to plan a response in case the President-Elect singles them out on Twitter.

Similarly, some companies are reportedly re-thinking mergers and other moves that would involve outsourcing to China for fear of being cast as “anti-American” by the President-Elect. Ford has backed away from plans to build a $1.6 billion plant in Mexico, while United Tech has announced plans to keep half of the 2,100 jobs it was shifting over the border. Reports have also emerged of dozens of major organisations contacting government relations and PR advisors to assess if they have any “red flags” that would draw Trump’s attention and lead to a damaging Tweet being sent.

New risk metric: weighing national interest

According to the Reuters report, “corporate leaders can no longer focus only on maximising shareholder value; they must now also weigh national interest.” Essentially, being labelled as un-American has become a new risk metric that needs to be weighed against the cost benefits of overseas manufacturing.

Trump’s aggressive rhetoric against China may also lead to a reduction of outsourcing to the manufacturing powerhouse as the relationship between the two countries is expected to decline. Trump has also flagged high tariffs as another way in which he plans to move manufacturing jobs from China back to the U.S.

The effects of a Trump Tweet cannot be downplayed. Lockheed Martin lost $4 billion in value as share prices feel immediately after Trump criticised the organisation on Twitter, while Toyota saw $1.2 billion in value wiped in five minutes following a similar Tweet. Developers have even created an App to alert investors to Trump’s market-moving Tweets. This week, the nine biggest pharmaceutical companies that use manufacturing plants in Europe, Asia and Africa lost roughly $24.6 billion in 20 minutes during a news conference in which Trump singled out the industry.

Alongside potential losses in share value, coming under fire from the soon-to-be President puts organisations at risk of brand damage and consumer boycotts.

It is unclear whether Trump will continue to use Twitter to drive his “Made in America” agenda, or use more traditional tools to affect change such as policies and import tariffs.

What do you think about “Made in America”? Are organisations right to be wary of a tweet from Trump?  Let us know in the comments below. 

We’ve kept one eye on the news headlines from around the world this week…

Proliferation of “non-human workers” accelerates

  • Amazon reportedly placed 15,000 robots across 20 fulfillment centres in 2016, increasing its machine workforce by 50%.
  • Similarly, iPhone manufacturer Foxconn has replaced 60,000 Chinese employees with robots, while Wal-Mart is automating up to 7000 jobs, including roles in the accounting and invoicing departments.
  • In the U.S. alone, up to five million jobs are expected to be replaced by robots by 2020.

Read more at Supply Chain Dive 

Blood supply chain faces an uncertain future

  • Due to changes in medical practices, hospital demand for blood has been dropping steadily for the past decade.
  • The strong supply and weak demand for blood has led to a 10 percent drop in the cost of a unit of red blood cells in the US, with overall revenue for the blood banking industry dropping to US$1.5 billion per year in 2014, down from $5 billion in 2008.
  • S. blood banks are expected to lose 12,000 jobs in the next few years, or roughly a quarter of its workforce.

Read more at  The Conversation