Tag Archives: procurement news

Technology Is The Answer. But What’s The Question?

Companies everywhere are super-keen to invest in technology and an eye-watering $3.49 trillion will be made available in 2017 for this purpose – but how can CPOs and IT buyers ensure they make the right decisions? 

If you ask any CPO what their main priorities are for the next five years, you’re almost guaranteed to receive an answer involving technology. Spend for software and IT services is rising at a dramatic rate, and is expected to increase by an incredible 29% in 2017 to $3.49 trillion in the U.S. alone.

The urgency for harnessing cutting-edge technology is understood, and the good news is that business are making the money available. But how do you make sure you’re investing in the right tools?

Here’s the secret: you need to make sure you’re asking the right questions

Supply management professionals will gather in Washington, D.C. on March 22-24 for ISM Tech 2017, where they will gain access to the knowledge required to make intelligent technology investment decisions for the unique needs of their organisations. IT procurement experts will reveal new possibilities and cost-saving efficiencies in areas including advanced analytics, manufacturing 4.0, the role of robotics, going digital and utilising augmented reality.

Keynote speakers include Rick Smith, CEO of Fast Radius, who will be presenting on “Our 3D-printed future”, while Silicon Valley Entrepreneur and bestselling author Martin Ford will deliver a keynote titled “How data is driving the transportation revolution”. Other big names include Abtin Hamidi, Co-Founder and Executive Vice President of Cargo Chief; Amanda Prochaska, Vice President Procurement Program Management Office, MGM Resorts International; and Tom Martin, Director of Learning Solutions at ISM.

What questions will Tech 2017 help you to answer?

  • How can robotics streamline my business processes?
  • What’s the best way to use the Internet of Things (IoT) in the supply chain?
  • How can my organisation use technology innovations to capture digital customers?
  • How can I leverage analytics to align planning with demand?
  • How should I mitigate technology-related risks?
  • What capabilities will my team require to keep up with technological advancements?

As with every ISM Event, Tech 2017 is all about the networking. Attendees will have the opportunity to meet scores of innovative suppliers and exchange ideas with representatives from top providers in the field, strategizing with experts on their technology needs to identify new ways to tackle existing challenges and future growth opportunities.

This is one event where just about any conversation taking place in the Exhibition Hall is likely to make fascinating eavesdropping. Instead of the usual procurement “chatter” around traditional practices such as sourcing, contracts and requisition-to-pay, attendees will discuss cutting-edge concepts like cognitive analytics, 3D printing, digital reporting, artificial intelligence and machine learning.

As you network, keep in mind that IT procurement experts have been tipped to be the CPOs of the future. According to Procurious founder Tania Seary, the profession is now looking to this highly-skilled group for leadership, and IT experts are on the fast-track to leadership due to five key advantages:

  1. IT experts already control an important chunk of their organisations’ strategic spend.
  2. Soon everything we buy will include an element of technology.
  3. IT procurement experts know how to drive change.
  4. They are innovation scouts.
  5. They understand cyber security.

Don’t miss out – ISM Tech 2017 will take place at the Gaylord National Resort and Convention Center, Washnigton D.C. from March 22-24, 2017.

Fasten Your Seatbelts: You’re Going Global!

The Big Ideas Summit, powered by Procurious, is embarking on a world tour. And you’re all invited! 

Register as an online delegate for The Big Ideas Summit in London here.

Fasten your seatbelt, fold away your tray table and return your seat to the upright position – we’re taking you and your procurement career on an epic journey!

Funding might be tight and you can’t even remember the last time you had a spare second to give to your career development but, in 2017, everything changes!

Procurious will be bringing you the best in procurement thinking from our events around the world. And the best news? You’ll be able to access all of the content for free and at your leisure; whether it’s from your desk, on the go or in the comfort of your own home.

19,000 Procurious Members On Tour

For the past two years, Procurious has hosted The Big Ideas Summit, the world’s first digitally-led procurement event, in London.

The event has earned a global reputation as the most innovative leadership event for the procurement profession and 2017 promises to be just as exciting and thought provoking as we officially go global!

This year, we’ll be taking you around the globe with events taking place in London, Singapore, Sydney, Chicago and Dubai.

Wherever you are in the world you can fully participate for free by registering for each individual event as a digital delegate. You’ll be joining a community of 19,000+ procurement professionals, from 140+ countries, on Procurious to connect, learn, discuss and innovate together.

What is the Big Ideas Summit?

The Big Ideas Summit is an interactive, online event where up to 50 senior executives, industry thought-leaders and CPOs come together to connect with digital delegates from across the globe via our social media platform to discuss and test strategies and solutions for real world change.

2017 looks set to be a huge year for procurement thanks to rapid technology developments including advancements in cognitive tech and Industry 4.0. Surely there’s no better time to expand The Big Ideas Summit by sourcing ideas from top thought leaders not just in London, but around the world.

The procurement function must adapt and evolve to accommodate these technology changes and be ready to embrace what we’re calling Procurement 4.0. The question is: Are We There Yet?

The Flights Are Booked! Where Are We Going?

The Big Ideas Summit, London – 23rd February 2017 

Procurement 4.0: Are We There Yet?

We’ve got a jam packed agenda lined up for the primary event of the year. Our speakers will include:

  • John Macfarlane: Chairman, Barclay’s PLC
  • Linda Yueh: Fellow in economics, Oxford University,  Adjunct Professor of Economics at London Business School
  • James Bannerman: Creative Change Agent, Author of Genius
  • Mark Stevenson: Futurist, Author of An Optimist’s Tour of the Future

Nexus, Singapore – 30th March 2017

Navigating Procurement’s interface between cost and risk. Singapore’s NEXUS event will focus on managing the critical interface between growth and cost.

Pivot, Sydney – 17- 18th May 2017

Asia-Pacific CPO forum. Disrupting a decade of Big Ideas in Procurement.

Scrum, Chicago – 28th September 2017

A Procurement & Supply Chain Technology Sprint. Chicago’s SCRUM TM event will focus on the way technology is disrupting the workforce and reimagining how procurement value is delivered.

Reboot, Dubai – 23rd November 2017

Designing the Procurement 4.0 Workforce. Dubai’s REBOOT will focus on the talent and people implications of disruption created by Industry 4.0.

Buckle Up, We’re Ready For Take Off! 

The Big Ideas Global Event Series 2017 promises to light up social media, sparking vigorous discussions and crowd-sourcing ideas for the future of the profession but we can’t do it without you! We need your intput your questions and, of course, your big ideas for procurement.

By Registering As A Digital Delegates You Can…

  • Gain access to insightful discussions via our Big Ideas Summit 2017 groups
  • Connect with our influencers and ask questions live on the day of the events
  • Share big ideas for procurement with the Procurious community
  • Follow the day’s events live via our social media channels
  • Access video content from our speakers and attendees on the day and post-event

Who needs a workplace mentor when you can take your pick from the most exciting procurement influencers that the world has to offer?

You can now register free of charge as a digital delegate for our London event! What are you waiting for? Grab your passport and let’s go!

Meet The New General Secretary of Globalisation

Chinese President Xi Jinping claims world leadership for globalisation while the U.S. moves towards protectionism.

Chinese President Xi Jinping used his address at the World Economic Forum in Switzerland last week to defend globalisation and criticise the rise of protectionism in Western economies.

The speech is the latest in a series of appearances on the world stage where Xi has sought to support the existing economic order that has fuelled decades of unprecedented growth in China. Similar appearances include Xi’s address to the United Nations in 2015, hosting the G20 Summit in 2016 and his speech at the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Summit in Peru in November last year.

De facto Chinese leadership?

With the Trans-Pacific Partnership scheduled for the chopping block when President Obama steps down, Xi now has the opportunity to shape global economic systems to China’s benefit and step into an apparent vacuum for worldwide economic leadership, particularly where free trade and globalisation are concerned. In many ways, the world is now witnessing the situation Obama sought to avoid with his “Pivot to Asia”, designed to maintain American influence in the East.

In a commentary following Xi’s speech, the China Daily referred to the country as now being “the one major power with a global outlook”. “Ready or not, China has become the de facto world leader seeking to maintain an open global economy and battle climate change. In effect, President Xi has become the general secretary of globalisation.”

Xi’s Defence of Globalisation

“There is no point in blaming economic globalisation for the world’s problems because that is simply not the case,” Xi said. “And that will not help to solve the problems.” The problems Xi is referring to are those often referenced by Western populists across the U.S. and Europe, including growing wealth gaps and domestic unemployment related to offshoring. Xi’s speech touched on some of the deeper causes of sluggish world growth, looking to reinforce confidence in global development.

“Protectionism is like locking yourself in a dark room, which would seem to escape wind and rain, but also block out the sunshine,” Xi told the Forum. “No one is a winner in a trade war.” Xi announced that China has no intention to devalue its currency to boost competitiveness, despite ongoing criticism on this point from the new U.S. President.

Can globalisation function without the U.S.?

Despite the nation’s ongoing economic slowdown, the World Economic Forum estimates that China accounted for almost 39% of global growth last year. President Trump’s protectionist tariffs, along with his retreat from trade deals and climate pacts are likely to slow growth further. A similar level of concern is building in India, where the $150 billion outsourcing industry is under threat.

As WorldPost Editor-in-chief Nathan Gardel writes, “The optimal arrangement for making globalisation work is for the U.S. and China to join together as “indispensable partners” based on a convergence of interests to create a world order that works for all. If the world’s two largest economies, though from distinct civilizational spheres, don’t buy in, it won’t work for anyone.”

Read more Huffington Post 

 In other procurement  news…

Britain to purchase 60 trains for HS2

  • Procurement of a fleet of up to 60 High Speed 2 (HS2) trains was officially launched on Friday by Britain’s state secretary for transport.
  • HS2 is a planned high-speed railway in the United Kingdom linking London, Birmingham, the East Midlands, Leeds, Sheffield and Manchester. It would be the second high-speed rail line in Britain, after HS1 which connects London to the Channel Tunnel.
  • The contract has an estimated value of £2.75bn and is due to be awarded by the end of 2019. The overall projected project cost of HS2 is £56bn.

Read more at the Birmingham Mail

GM announces $1 billion investment in U.S. based manufacturing plants

  • GM will invest $1 billion in its existing manufacturing plants, creating or retaining nearly 7,000 domestic jobs.
  • The announcement comes after President Trump criticised GM and other automakers for building vehicles in Mexico and shipping them to the U.S., including a Tweet threatening to tax GM for importing the Chevrolet Cruze.
  • GM’s targeted areas of growth include its subsidiary, GM Financial, and advanced technology divisions.

Read more at Investopedia 

Meals on Robot Wheels

  • Autonomous robot manufacturer Starship Technologies has signed deals with meal delivery companies Postmates and DoorDash to deliver lunches in Washington and San Francisco, beginning in February.
  • The robots are able to autonomously navigate sidewalks and traffic conditions, while customers track their progress via an app as they make the delivery.
  • Each robot weighs approximately 18 kg and can carry three filled shopping bags, while travelling at speeds of 6.5 kilometres per hour.

Read more at CIO 

Colin Powell To Complete Stellar Keynote Line-Up At ISM2017

The fact that the Institute for Supply Management can attract keynote speakers of this calibre offers proof that the profession truly has come of age.  

ISM has announced that the former U.S. Secretary of State, General Colin Powell, will join former UK Prime Minister David Cameron to deliver a keynote at the year’s biggest conference in Supply Management, ISM2017.

General Powell will inspire and motivate ISM2017 attendees with stories of leadership under fire – and how to deliver complex supply systems when facing immovable deadlines.

As former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Powell assembled a multibillion dollar supply chain involving 42 nations during Operation Desert Storm in the Persian Gulf. Powell and his team pulled together millions of coordinated supplies: military goods, machinery, food, weaponry, and critical spare parts.

“As Secretary of State, General Powell used the power of diplomacy to build trust and create alliances, while also having the grit and experience forged by his military career in delivering results when it matters most,” said Tom Derry, ISM CEO. “Powell’s insight will be critical to ISM members and other purchasing and supply chain professionals as they focus on the challenges of working in a tough, ever-changing global economy.”

David Cameron, former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, who stepped down from the position in 2016 in the wake of the Brexit decision, will also keynote ISM2017 conference attendees about his experience navigating geopolitical and public policy issues and their impact on the global supply chain. He will address a range of events in Europe and worldwide, and what they could mean to supply managers everywhere.

Powell and Cameron’s keynotes share a theme that will resonate with supply managers everywhere – how to deliver effective short-term solutions – and leadership during a time of crisis. The inclusion of two political veterans is particularly apt in 2017 as Europe continues to adjust to the effects of Brexit and the U.S. recovers from one the most divisive presidential races in recent memory.

Registrations are now open for ISM2017, which will be held May 21–24, 2017, at the Disney Coronado Springs Resort in Orlando, Florida.

Focused on “Critical Insights, Powerful Results,” the event expects to draw more than 3,000 attendees from around the world. ISM 2017 features keynotes, learning tracks, and sessions about leading in times of stress. More than 75 interactive sessions will be part of six learning tracks at ISM2017, and executives from firms such as Google, Toyota, Pfizer, Direct Energy, Zimmer Biomet and others will present.

Find out more about ISM2017

What Would You Do If The President-Elect Criticised Your Supply Chain?

Major US organisations are starting to rethink their manufacturing strategies for fear of being labelled “un-American” by the President-Elect. 

Every US-based supply manager with outsourced supply chains should follow Donald Trump on Twitter. Why? Because for major companies with overseas manufacturing operations, there’s every chance that the President-Elect will label your organisation “un-American”.

Since November 2016, Trump has criticised companies including Ford, Toyota, GM, United Tech and, more recently, pharmaceutical organisations including Johnson & Johnson, Pfizer and Bristol-Myers for moving U.S. jobs abroad. His focus appears to be on companies outsourcing to Mexico and China, where historically low-cost labour enables organisations to manufacture their products at a competitive level.

Companies changing plans

According to a report from Reuters, boards of a number of U.S. companies that manufacture overseas have directed their public relations teams to plan a response in case the President-Elect singles them out on Twitter.

Similarly, some companies are reportedly re-thinking mergers and other moves that would involve outsourcing to China for fear of being cast as “anti-American” by the President-Elect. Ford has backed away from plans to build a $1.6 billion plant in Mexico, while United Tech has announced plans to keep half of the 2,100 jobs it was shifting over the border. Reports have also emerged of dozens of major organisations contacting government relations and PR advisors to assess if they have any “red flags” that would draw Trump’s attention and lead to a damaging Tweet being sent.

New risk metric: weighing national interest

According to the Reuters report, “corporate leaders can no longer focus only on maximising shareholder value; they must now also weigh national interest.” Essentially, being labelled as un-American has become a new risk metric that needs to be weighed against the cost benefits of overseas manufacturing.

Trump’s aggressive rhetoric against China may also lead to a reduction of outsourcing to the manufacturing powerhouse as the relationship between the two countries is expected to decline. Trump has also flagged high tariffs as another way in which he plans to move manufacturing jobs from China back to the U.S.

The effects of a Trump Tweet cannot be downplayed. Lockheed Martin lost $4 billion in value as share prices feel immediately after Trump criticised the organisation on Twitter, while Toyota saw $1.2 billion in value wiped in five minutes following a similar Tweet. Developers have even created an App to alert investors to Trump’s market-moving Tweets. This week, the nine biggest pharmaceutical companies that use manufacturing plants in Europe, Asia and Africa lost roughly $24.6 billion in 20 minutes during a news conference in which Trump singled out the industry.

Alongside potential losses in share value, coming under fire from the soon-to-be President puts organisations at risk of brand damage and consumer boycotts.

It is unclear whether Trump will continue to use Twitter to drive his “Made in America” agenda, or use more traditional tools to affect change such as policies and import tariffs.

What do you think about “Made in America”? Are organisations right to be wary of a tweet from Trump?  Let us know in the comments below. 

We’ve kept one eye on the news headlines from around the world this week…

Proliferation of “non-human workers” accelerates

  • Amazon reportedly placed 15,000 robots across 20 fulfillment centres in 2016, increasing its machine workforce by 50%.
  • Similarly, iPhone manufacturer Foxconn has replaced 60,000 Chinese employees with robots, while Wal-Mart is automating up to 7000 jobs, including roles in the accounting and invoicing departments.
  • In the U.S. alone, up to five million jobs are expected to be replaced by robots by 2020.

Read more at Supply Chain Dive 

Blood supply chain faces an uncertain future

  • Due to changes in medical practices, hospital demand for blood has been dropping steadily for the past decade.
  • The strong supply and weak demand for blood has led to a 10 percent drop in the cost of a unit of red blood cells in the US, with overall revenue for the blood banking industry dropping to US$1.5 billion per year in 2014, down from $5 billion in 2008.
  • S. blood banks are expected to lose 12,000 jobs in the next few years, or roughly a quarter of its workforce.

Read more at  The Conversation

 

Flying Warehouses & Fashion Buyouts – Amazon Dominates Headlines

No sooner had 2017 started than Amazon appeared in the news in a big way. From flying warehouses, to buyouts of fashion chains, no-one dominates the headlines quite like the online giant.

flying warehouse

Disruption. It was a buzzword of 2016, and even if the word is falling out of favour, the activity looks set to continue this year. And the company at the forefront (again) of this disruption is Amazon.

The online giant has proven time and again it’s not content to rest on it laurels. So when the company appeared across the news headlines for a variety of reasons, you might not have been surprised. However, when you consider the headlines it was making, you might think again.

Flying Warehouses – The New Reality

Many companies will consider the cost of new facilities to meet demand trends in their strategies. Amazon, however, appear to have bypassed the real estate question with their proposed flying warehouse.

The company submitted patents late in 2016 for these warehouses, which would be serviced by a fleet of drones. The purpose of the “airborne fulfilment centre” would be to visit spectator-heavy events (think music festivals, sports events) where they could sell in-demand goods.

Analytics firm, CB Insights, were responsible for finding the flying warehouse patent, originally filed in 2014.  Additional patents serve to outline other plans in line with the warehouses too. These include a fleet of shuttles to keep warehouses stocked, the creation of an interconnected network of drones, as well as docking stations for drones to allow them to be picked up by the shuttles.

A diagram from Amazon’s patent (image courtesy of South China Morning Post)

The idea might sound a touch fantastical, but there are serious potential benefits that Amazon could realise. Not only would it save Amazon money in building warehouses, but it would also save on energy costs. Drones would be able to glide down to deliveries before being picked up.

Add to this using the airships as flying billboards, and Amazon could sell advertising space above some of the world’s biggest events.

This could represent a huge step change in the retail environment, with Amazon at the forefront. And you wouldn’t bet against them making it a reality. After all, it wasn’t long ago they completed the first drone delivery – something people dismissed when the idea was first proposed.

The Fastest Fashion of All?

It’s not just logistics and warehousing that Amazon are interested in disrupting either. There are strong rumours in the USA that Amazon are set to purchase American Apparel out of bankruptcy.

The clothing retailer went into bankruptcy in November for a second time. Now, with bids submitted late last week, it is suggested that Amazon might come out victorious. The move would fall in line with Amazon’s strategy to add to it’s nascent fashion arm.

The buyout would help to protect 4,500 jobs in America, and allow them to access American Apparel’s 100 plus stores across the country. It could also give Amazon a political boost following heavy criticism of its practices from President-elect Donald Trump.

Throughout his Presidential campaign, Trump criticised Amazon (amongst others) over its tax payments and business model. However, by purchasing American Apparel and maintaining its ‘Made in America’ promise, it’s thought that it may help smooth tensions between the company and the future President.

Technology Trends

Finally, Amazon has also been making headlines in the technology world. Even without attending the CES gadget show in Las Vegas, Amazon is making its presence felt.

Not only is Amazon’s ‘Alexa‘ AI assistant gaining in popularity, it’s also the chosen system for many other companies. Prominent companies, including Ford, LG, and Lenovo have all opted for Alexa as the AI interface in some of their products.

Increasing number of products are integrating voice commands, and Amazon’s decision to release an Alexa developer kit last year appear to be paying off. The company is seen as the early mover in this space, and looks set to continue its dominance over its rivals.

Even if there is still potential for glitches in the system delivering unwelcome surprises!

Do you think Amazon will make its flying warehouses a reality? Is this the next step in retail? Let us know in the comments below.

With the new year flying past, we’ve saved you some time by searching out this week’s top headlines…

Tesla’s Gigafactory Begins Mass Production of Battery Cells

  • In partnership with Panasonic, Tesla has begun producing lithium-ion battery cells for energy storage products and the Model 3 vehicle.
  • The Gigafactory is being built in phases, with manufacturing beginning inside finished sections. It is expected to be the largest building in the world when completed.
  • The current structure is only 30 per cent complete, yet houses 4.9 million square feet of operational space.
  • Tesla anticipates cost reductions through increasing automation, process design, locating most manufacturing processes under one roof and economies of scale.  

Read more on the Tesla website

Trump “Personally Involved” in Procurement Decisions

  • An analysis of Donald Trump’s campaign promises and policies has revealed that he is unlikely to make significant changes to U.S. Defence procurement policy.
  • However, he will seek to be personally involved in the negotiation of major acquisitions.
  • The President-elect tweeted about cost overruns of the Lockheed Martin F-35 fighter jet, and encouraged Boeing to compete with its F-18 Super Hornet.
  • Trump’s focus appears to be on technology that is immediately available rather than future research and development, and leans towards Airforce and Navy investment rather than Army.

Read more at Defense News 

Top Supply Chain Universities Ranked in U.S.

  • SCM World has released the results of a survey ranking the top institutions for Supply Chain courses in the U.S.
  • Practitioners were asked to list their top three institutions that are “markers of supply chain talent”,
  • The top five places went to: Michigan State University; Western Michigan University; Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Penn State University; and Arizona State University.
  • Connection to industry, through practical education and internships, was also flagged as an important factor in the results.

Read more at Forbes

Apple Removes New York Times from App Store

  • Apple has removed the New York Times App from its Chinese app store, in compliance with a request from the Chinese Government.
  • The Chinese Government began blocking the NYT website after a series of articles on then Prime Minister, Wen Jiabao, in 2012.
  • An Apple spokesperson stated the reason for the removal was “that the app is in violation of local regulations”.
  • Both Apple and Chinese authorities declined to comment on what regulations had been violated, or if the app would reappear in the future.

Read more at the New York Times

Trade War Against China? A Supply Chain Perspective

Comments made by President-elect Trump last year sparked talk of a trade war with China. But what impact will this have on supply chains?

This article was originally published on My Purchasing Center.

The Chinese government recently raised a “tit for tat” challenge to new U.S. President-Elect Donald J. Trump over a potential trade war against China, in an editorial published on China’s international state news outlet Global Times.

The op-ed states that “[a] batch of Boeing orders will be replaced by Airbus. U.S. auto and iPhone sales in China will suffer a setback, and U.S. soybean and maize imports will be halted…” if Trump decides to impose a proposed 45 per cent trade tariff.

A Special Trade Relationship

To overstate the significance of the U.S.-China trade partnership is quite difficult.

In 2015, they accounted for $659.4 billion in bilateral trade, of which $161.6 billion were Chinese imports of U.S.-produced goods. As the largest, and yet still one of the fastest-growing consumer markets in the world, China is vital to the strength and prosperity of America’s export economy.

Most notably, of the American-made products included in the Global Times statement, agricultural products ($20 billion), aircraft ($15 billion), and vehicles ($11 billion) are amongst the highest value U.S. export categories. They are therefore critical to the success of American companies operating in these industries.

From China’s perspective, it is no longer the emerging market economy of decades past. It can instead rely on its own considerable production capabilities, rather than sit by the wayside as the U.S. attempts to push a trade agenda through its considerable economic muscle.

iPhone Impact

Amongst the multi-billion-dollar trade categories, the iPhone may seem like a curious inclusion. However, despite FY2016 sales of nearly $50 billion in China market, Apple’s Chinese revenues are still projected to grow.

Beyond the obvious consequences of an iPhone sales freeze, or a 45 per cent trade tariff on Apple’s top line, there are also significant economic implications behind China’s statement from a supply chain perspective. In particular, from the viewpoint of a procurement specialist.

As the most valuable company in the world, Apple’s tremendous growth in recent years has primarily been driven by sales of the iPhone. The device made up over 63 per cent of Apple’s FY 2016 revenues.

Analyst estimates of the iPhone’s profit margins have put it at over 70 per cent of retail value. This makes it by far the most lucrative amongst Apple’s products, and likely across the spectrum of consumer technology products.

According to a recent report by BMO Capital Markets, the iPhone took an astonishing 103.6 per cent of smartphone industry profits in Q3 2016. What enables the iPhone to reap such staggering margins is largely due to Apple’s global supply chain. It entails near end-to-end cost minimisation, and an integrated procurement strategy from its hundreds-strong global supplier network.

Value Chain Activities

Apple’s value chain, from its inbound logistics and manufacturing through outbound logistics and marketing, all go through China in one way or another. Procurement plays a central role in providing each activity with the necessary resources to operate efficiently and at low cost.

A proposed 45 per cent Chinese trade tariff would fundamentally alter how, and from where, Apple procures the majority of these resources. It would also significantly drive up costs and logistical complexities throughout the whole of its global supply chain.

It is important to note that very few companies possess the in-depth supply chain practices of Apple. Therefore, integrating a centralised procurement structure into such companies’ supply chains becomes even more critical.

The prevalence of global supplier and distribution networks, like Apple’s, across modern manufacturing companies relays the important role of procurement specialists in the development of integrated strategies. These strategies must not only generate value, but also mitigate the multitude of risks associated with maintaining international supply chains.

In the event of significant geo-political and economic shocks, such as a potential U.S.-China trade war, procurement can work closely with companies to ensure manufacturing processes are harmed as little as possible.

This means that across affected countries, companies can rest assured that their sourcing, manufacturing, distribution and sales activities can be substituted quickly and cost-effectively through alternative sources, while maintaining similar levels of cost and operational efficiency.

Ultimately, no one can say for sure whether President-elect Trump will initiate a trade war with China. Or to what extent Apple and companies like it will be affected. However, companies with an established supply chain and sound procurement practices can sleep in comfort knowing that they will be prepared to face similar challenges that may come their way.

Yahoo Breaks Record – For The Biggest Hack in History

The biggest hack in history – it’s certainly not an award to be envious about. But Yahoo broke the record after announcing a major breach from 2013.

hack record

It’s been a bad week for embattled internet giant, Yahoo, as the company announced details of a huge cyber security breach from 2013. The hack impacted over one billion accounts, twice as big as the previous largest breach.

Yahoo was also the victim of the previous hack ‘record’, which it announced in September. It means that user data from over 1.5 billion accounts has been stolen from the company between 2013 and 2014.

Both the FBI and the New York Attorney General are investigating the hack. However, the company is likely to suffer as trust in its security and systems falls.

Hack Included US Officials

The first, and largest, of the hacks occurred in August 2013. Yahoo have said that data such as usernames, passwords, phone numbers and security questions were all stolen. The company is taking steps to contact users affected by the hack, asking them to change passwords and security questions.

It’s an embarrassing turns of events for Yahoo, who are already struggling to keep pace in the tech industry. It’s the second hack the company have announced this year. To further their embarrassment, it has come to light that 150,000 of the affected accounts belonged to US Government Officials.

According to a Bloomberg report, the data stolen from the officials in the hack could be a threat to national security. Data could allow cyber criminals to identify officials, target them, and further hack personal and professional accounts.

Organisations affected included:

  • Current and former White House staff;
  • FBI agents;
  • US Congressmen and their aides;
  • Officials at the NSA and CIA;
  • Current and former US diplomats; and
  • Every branch of the US Armed Forces.

Trouble on the Verizon?

The two breaches, and the high-profile nature of the accounts included, come at a bad time for Yahoo. In recent months CEO Marissa Meyer has come under increasing criticism for how the company is performing.

The hacks may also have a major impact on the deal Yahoo currently has to sell its core internet assets to Verizon. The deal, currently estimated to be worth $4.8 billion, has still to be finalised. And while it’s likely to still go ahead, Verizon have already said it will be looking for a lower price.

In October, when the first hack was announced, Verizon stated that it was “reviewing the deal“. It’s unlikely that a second breach will assist Yahoo’s negotiation position much either. With shares prices falling 6.5 per cent in Thursday trading last week, the deal valuation is likely to be put back on the table.

However, some experts believe that the deal will still be closed at its original price. The impact of the breaches will not be seen for some time, and certainly not in a way that would show any monetary damage. But at a time when a smooth deal was top of the priority list, Yahoo will need to work very hard to recover consumer confidence.

What Should I Do?

While you will be contacted by Yahoo if you are impacted by the hack, we’ve pulled together some things you can do in the mean time.

  • Log into your e-mail account and change your password

Make it a brand new password, with upper and lower cases, special characters and numbers. No dates of birth!

  • Check accounts the e-mail is linked to

Like most people, you’ll use your e-mail to log into other online accounts. Check all these accounts to make sure there’s no unusual activity. Change your passwords.

Once you’ve done this, check for any password reset requests that you haven’t asked for in your e-mail. Report anything suspicious to the site in question.

  • Check Sent Mail for Spam

Your account might have been used for sending spam mails to your contact list. Do a quick check of your sent mail for this.

  • Two Factor Identification

In light of the increasing number of hacks, sites have begun to introduce two factor identification. This works alongside your password as part of the logging in process. Register for it where you can.

You’re never going to be 100 per cent safe from a hack. But by using strong passwords (different ones for different sites), you can help to minimise the impact and possibility.

While we frantically try to remember all our passwords, we’ve looked out some of the top headlines for this week…

Trump Holds Silicon Valley Tech Summit

  • Silicon Valley tech heavyweights sat down with President-elect Donald Trump for two hours last week.
  • The leaders including Apple’s Tim Cook, Facebook’s Sheryl Sandberg and Amazon’s Jeff Bezos.
  • Topics discussed included vocational education, trade with China, and the need for data analysis technology to detect and reduce government waste.
  • The tech industry and Trump were frequently at loggerheads during the election. Trump also singled out a number of them for criticism on non-US supply chains.

Read more at the New York Times

Amazon in Drone Delivery First

  • Amazon made history last week with its first delivery by a fully-autonomous flying drone.
  • The delivery, containing a TV remote control and a bag of popcorn, was made to a customer in Cambridge, U.K.
  • The delivery took 13 minutes from Amazon’s local warehouse to the customer’s home. Amazon intends to extend the trial to hundreds of users.
  • Packages must weigh five pounds or less and can only be delivered during the day and in clear weather.

Read more at the Wall Street Journal and watch the video here 

Mexican Government Deploys Troops for Shipment Protection

  • As many as 1000 troops have been deployed along rail lines in Mexico to protect automotive cargo from thieves.
  • Thieves have been boarding trains to steal tyres, batteries and other automotive parts.
  • Mazda and General Motors are among the companies that have been impacted by the thefts.
  • American Honda has also been affected, and takes the damage into account when deciding between rail and sea-borne deliveries.

Read more at Automotive Logistics

UK Falling Behind on Timber Requirements

  • The UK faces a future timber shortage thanks to delays in planting of forests.
  • In order to meet Government requirements of 10-12 per cent increase in woodland areas in England, 11 million tree need to be planted between now and 2020.
  • However, the Chief Executive of Confor has highlighted serious delays due to inefficiencies in the grant system for planting.
  • The highly bureaucratic process means it can take up to three years before permission is granted to plant trees on a large scale.

Read more at Supply Management

Are We Witnessing the End of the Fairtrade Movement?

Mondelēz International have chosen to pull the Fairtrade label from all Cadbury branded products. Are we witnessing the beginning of the end for the movement?

fairtrade movement

In 1997, the formation of FLO International brought ‘Fair Trade’ labelling to shops for the first time. Later rebranded as Fairtrade International, it was recognised as the global leader in fair trade standards and labelling.

Since that time, hundreds of organisations have hosted the Fair Trade label on their products. While the labelling was voluntary, organisations and the general public viewed this movement as a great step forward for developing countries.

However, in the past week, Mondelēz International have taken the decision to bring all of its fair trade policies in house. And it’s left many people wondering about the future of the movement in its current state.

What is Fairtrade?

Fairtrade is just as it sounds. The aim of the movement is to create better working and living conditions for farmers and workers in developing countries. This includes paying better prices for crops (which don’t fall below the market price), and embedding local sustainability.

Crops range from coffee and cocoa, to bananas and cotton. It also includes products you might not immediately link to it, like flowers, gold and wine.

Some facts and figures around the movement are (courtesy of the Fairtrade Foundation):

  • More than 1.65 million farmers and workers work for Fairtrade certified organisations
  • 56 per cent of these farmers grow coffee
  • There are 1,226 certified Fairtrade organisations across 74 countries
  • $106.2 million was paid to Fairtrade producers in 2013-14
  • 26 per cent of all farmers and workers in the organisations are female
  • Organisations invested 31 per cent of their Fairtrade premiums on productivity or quality improvements; 26 per cent was invested in education

The movement has clearly helped millions of farmers and workers around the world, giving them a better deal for their crops. And, as social consciousness has grown, so have consumer tastes for Fairtrade products.

The UK is one of the largest markets in the world for Fairtrade products. In 2012 (more recent figures are hard to come by), UK consumers spent more than £1.3 billion on these goods.

Is It Really Fair?

However, unfairly or otherwise, the movement has been dogged by criticism about how fair it actually is. As far back as 2007 (and beyond), critics were questioning how good a deal these farmers and workers were getting.

Some critics have argued that by being affiliated with the movement, farmers are actually limiting their markets. Others have argued that it doesn’t account for mechanisation in production and doesn’t give the opportunity to improve production processes.

And a report in 2014 by the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) in London raised concerns that some workers were actually earning less than non-Fairtrade workers.

Some products don’t quality for Fairtrade labelling, and specialist brands are likely to miss out. Additionally, it’s often difficult for farmers to join the movement, with fees and a lack of organisation frequently cited.

And despite its position in the public eye, Fairtrade isn’t the only organisation offering this service. The Rainforest Alliance is one such organisation, but perhaps suffers from being less well-known.

Companies Changing Strategies

All of which brings us back to the change about to be undertaken by Mondelēz with its Cadbury brands. The global organisation plans to bring all of its certification in-house, under its ‘Cocoa Life‘ fair trade scheme.

While the company maintains that the move won’t impact the percentage of fair trade products it produces, it’s raising concerns about the future of the Fairtrade movement.

When Cadbury joined Fairtrade in 2009, it prompted many of its competitors to do likewise. Critics are concerned that its move away from Fairtrade might see other organisations follow suit. There are concerns that ethical standards may drop, even although Fairtrade will continue to monitor Cadbury’s work.

The company has committed to ensuring that its supply chains retain the protection they currently have. And even Fairtrade International have welcomed the move, seeing it as a company taking accountability for its supply chain and sustainability efforts.

Whether this ultimately means the end for Fairtrade is unclear. It’s highly unlikely that the movement will cease to be, but it may have to change to remain relevant. Public social consciousness will only increase, and manufacturers will need to be able to prove the transparency and legitimacy of their supply chains.

In that respect, whether it’s in-house, or done by an external NGO, sustainability labelling will continue to exist. And Fairtrade will still be seen as the cornerstone in the movement.

What do you think about the move by Mondelēz? Do you think it will make a major difference? Let us know in the comments below.

While we take some time out to evaluate our food purchases, we’ve compiled some top headlines for your consideration.

Pentagon Buries Evidence of Bureaucratic Waste

  • The Pentagon suppressed the results of an internal study which exposed huge levels of administrative waste.
  • A dramatic report from The Washington Post revealed the extent of the waste to be an estimated $125 billion.
  • Reporters believe the Pentagon feared Congress would use the findings as an excuse to slash the Defence budget.
  • The study was originally requested to help make the Pentagon’s back-office more efficient and reinvest any savings in combat power.

Read more at the Washington Post

Apple Supply Chain “On Move to USA”

  • A large part of the Apple supply chain may be on the move back to the USA, according to one report.
  • Foxconn, one of Apple’s key producers, currently carries out the majority of manufacturing in Chinese factories.
  • However, the company is in talks about expanding its US-based operations to iPhone and other product build.
  • The move comes following strong criticism of the company by President-elect Donald Trump during the US elections.

Read more at the Wall Street Journal

Trump Air Force One Tweet Sends Markets into Chaos

  • The social media habits, and impact, of President-elect Trump were highlighted again last week.
  • A tweet calling for the cancellation of an order for a new 747 Air Force One, built by Boeing, caused chaos in US markets.
  • Immediate effects included a sudden plunge in Boeing’s stock, which recovered as clarity emerged around the true budget – $1.65 billion. Boeing currently has a $170 million contract with the Air Force.
  • Trump and the CEO of Boeing have since spoken by phone regarding the order and the tweet.

Read more on ABC News

Fujitsu and DHL to Use IoT to Disrupt Logistics

  • Fujitsu has announced a partnership with DHL Supply Chain UK which will focus on using the Internet of Things in logistics.
  • The two companies plan to share expertise to jointly develop innovative solutions for supply chains, and also emergency services.
  • One example of wearable technology is UBIQUITOUSWARE which helps emergency services track individuals.
  • The technology provides real-time tracking insights, as well as ensuring timely responses in emergency situations.

Read more at Supply Chain Digital

Peak Oil – From Global Catastrophe to Global Opportunity

Modern economics is a matter of supply and demand. And when it comes to ‘peak oil’, it’s the difference between catastrophe and opportunity.

peak oil

Since the early 20th Century, scientists, experts, and economists have been predicting the manifestation of ‘peak oil’. For years, many people viewed ‘peak oil’ as a herald of global catastrophe, and the end of major economies.

However, in recent years, the supply and demand situation for oil has turned in favour of supply. It now appears that peak oil demand is what organisations and countries need to be aware of.

What’s more, some experts are predicting that this demand will happen sooner than expected. And global oil and gas organisations need to consider their next move in order to stay competitive.

What Do We Mean By ‘Peak Oil’?

Peak Oil‘ describes a situation where global oil production hits its peak, then is in perpetual decline. The first prediction of this was in 1919, and an expectation that peak would be reached by the mid-1920s.

Throughout the last century, a number of geoscientists have continued to make predictions. And these predictions have all been proved to be wrong. However, some experts believe this peak may already have happened without anyone really noticing.

Studies have shown that in North America, the volume of oil discovered has dropped consistently since the 1930s. In addition, production of oil in the region has dropped year on year since the 1970s. That’s not to say that overall fossil fuel production has dropped – we’ll come to that shortly.

What people have agreed upon is that the concerns over ‘peak oil’ have abated, or disappeared entirely. The expected global economic collapse is unlikely to take place (or at least be a result of running out of oil).

Supply Outstripping Demand

So what has changed? Well, there are three reasons that keep appearing in a lot of the articles written about ‘peak oil’. They are:

  1. A huge increase in the volume of shale oil being produced. The oil is produced differently, but can be a direct substitute for crude oil.
  2. The US-Iran deal signed in 2015 has lifted sanctions on the oil-rich Middle-Eastern country.
  3. OPEC, which accounts for 43 per cent of global oil production, has, until recently, refused to cut supply. This surplus of supply was the reason the price of a barrel of oil dropped dramatically earlier this year.

This has shifted the thinking on a surplus of demand for crude oil, to a surplus of global supply. Or from ‘peak oil’ to peak oil demand.

Simon Henry, the Chief Financial Officer at Royal Dutch Shell, has predicted that this could happen in as little as five years. Henry stated that, “peak may be somewhere between 5 and 15 years hence…driven by efficiency and substitution.”

This view is at odds with many of the other major global oil producers, however. Exxon Mobil is anticipating a 20 per cent rise to 2040, while Saudi Arabia, the world’s largest crude oil producer, has argued that demand will rise on the back of increased consumption in emerging markets.

But, as some experts point out, even these predictions are built of shifting sands. The global trade slowdown, combined with the events of 2016, could adversely impact demand in developing countries.

Consumers & Organisations Shifting Focus

Whether it’s five years, or fifty years, what is clear is that oil is still a finite resource. Production will eventually diminish, and consumer requirements will change alongside this. This is where the global opportunities come in, but only for organisations willing to keep pace with change.

Public interest in renewable energy is increasing rapidly, and consumer buying habits are changing too. Even industries traditionally driving oil consumption, like the automotive industry, are seeing massive change.

In the UK alone, sales of electric cars have increased by 48 per cent in the past year. Sales of hybrid cars during the same period have increased a whopping 133 per cent. There are large solar panel fields being built around the world, and Ikea is even selling them to consumers in the UK.

Shell and BP are just two of the organisations expanding their portfolios into renewable energy sources, such as biofuels and natural gas. Greater investment in the renewables industry by major organisations has also helped to reduce costs associated with it. And as costs fall, demand from organisations and individuals will inevitably rise.

It would be foolish to make predications given how difficult it is to predict correctly about oil and energy. It’s a topic that is unlikely to go away any time soon, and one that organisations and wider supply chains need to be keeping up to date with.

Do you have a view on ‘peak oil demand’? Do you think it’s time to focus more on renewable energies? Let us know what you think in the comments below.

Like a treat behind each door of your advent calendar, we’ve found the tastiest procurement headlines this week.

Robotic Exoskeleton Gives Workers Super-Strength

  • SuitX, a Californian robotics company, has unveiled a new Modular Agile Exoskeleton for manual workers.
  • The suit is expected to greatly improve worker productivity and limit exposure to long-term health risks such as back injuries.
  • The exoskeleton is comprised of three modules – backX, shoulderX, and legX – which can be worn separately or as a single system.
  • The exoskeleton supports the body, reducing the amount of effort required to perform tasks such as lifting heavy weights.

Watch the video on THOMASNET

U.S. CEOs Face Consumer Backlash over Trump Victory Response

  • US Corporate CEOs have not hesitated to make their political views known in light of Donald Trump’s election victory.
  • Responses have ranged from congratulatory, to calls for unity, and commitments to company diversity policies.
  • Statements in support or against President-elect Trump have put brands at risk of consumer backlash.
  • Some CEOs who have spoken out have seen calls for boycotts of their brands on social media. Other CEOs have experienced backlash from their own employees on the other side of the political spectrum.

Read more at the Washington Post

Bank of England Seeking £5 Note Solutions

  • The supplier for the new £5 is looking for solutions to the make-up of the note’s base polymer following a backlash this week.
  • It was revealed that the note’s polymer contains animal fat in the form of beef tallow.
  • A petition on behalf of groups including vegetarians, vegans, and religious groups garnered more than 100,000 signatures in two days.
  • The Bank of England has said that their supplier, Innovia, is working with its supply chain to come up with a resolution.

Read more on Supply Management

Maersk Line Acquires Hamburg Sud

  • A.P. Moller-Maersk has agreed a deal to acquire German shipping line Hamburg Sud from the Oetker Group.
  • It’s estimated that the deal is worth over $4 billion, after Maersk won out in the bidding process.
  • The deal brings Maersk’s share of the global container market to 18 per cent, and it hopes to use the deal to return to profitability.
  • It’s the latest in a long line of mergers and acquisitions in the shipping industry, thanks to a huge downturn in 2016.

Read more on Supply Chain Dive