Tag Archives: procurement news

Corruption & Slavery Threaten to Overshadow Olympics

As the 2016 Olympics kick off in Rio, ongoing corruption and slavery scandals threaten to overshadow the event.

Brazil Corruption Slavery

The 2016 Rio Olympics opened on Friday evening with a lavish opening ceremony, watched by a global audience of billions. Over the next two and a half weeks, 10,500 athletes from 207 countries will compete for medals in 28 sports.

However, the Olympics could be overshadowed by corruption and slavery scandals currently engulfing Brazil.

Corruption Scandal Widens

There has been widespread criticism of the money being spent to hold the Olympics in Rio. Much has focused on where money could have been spent to tackle poverty and social issues present in the city.

However, one scandal that has rolled on for over a year relates to massive corruption in the awarding of contracts. Petrobras, Brazil’s national oil company, and it’s ruling Workers’ Party (PT), are at the centre of allegations of one of the largest corporate frauds in history.

Petrobras was nationalised between 2002 and 2010, with the PT appointing its own candidates to high-level executive positions. These executives secretly diverted funds, valued at up to 3 per cent of all new oil contracts, to the PT and its coalition partners.

Senior Politicians Implicated

The corruption probe, nicknamed “Operation Carwash“, continues to widen. Plea deals have now implicated more than 480 politicians and executives.

It is alleged that these individuals received over $6 billion in bribes from a cartel of Brazil’s biggest builders. The money was traded in exchange for at least $50 billion in Petrobras contracts.

Suspended President Dilma Rousseff has been found guilty of budget fraud by a senate committee. Her predecessor, former President Lula da Silva, has been ordered to stand trial by a federal judge for money laundering and hiding assets.

Rousseff’s campaign strategist, Joao Santana, was also arrested for allegedly receiving $7.5 million in bribes from Petrobras. However, due to delays in Brazil’s legislature system, it could be a while before these cases are heard.

Slavery Rife in Brazilian Cities

Alongside the corruption and fraud in Brazil, new figures released this week suggests that slavery is still a major issue in the country.

The Walk Free Foundation has reported that there are an estimated 161,000 people working in slavery conditions in Brazil. This figure is up nearly 4 per cent from 2014.

Brazil has seen an influx of immigrants over the past decade from other Latin American, and African, countries. The issue is most prevalent in rural areas, but instances are occurring in major cities too. There have been more slavery cases reported in urban areas than countryside since 2014.

Official statistics show the mining sector accounts for 31 per cent of slavery cases discovered in Brazil, followed by construction (18 per cent) and agriculture (15 per cent).

“Blackballing” Companies

However, the Brazilian Government has earned some positive press in the way it is tackling slavery. They have created a “dirty list” of 300 companies who could lose access to public contracts as forced labour has been found in their supply chains.

The list was briefly suspended in March this year, although it was reinstated in May. The dirty list, and strategies that go along with it, have helped to free over 50,000 people from slavery conditions between 1996 and 2013.

At a time when the eyes of the world are on Brazil, and Rio, the ongoing work to free workers caught in forced labour conditions represents a glimmer of hope in an otherwise bleak political climate.

Are you in Rio for the Olympics? Or have you been involved in procurement or supply chain for the Games? We’d love to hear your experiences and showcase them on the Blog.

We’ve been collating all the major headlines from the past week to keep you up to date…

UK Interest Rate Cut Bad For Savers & Pensions

  • The Bank of England announced a decrease in UK interest rates to 0.25 per cent, the lowest rate ever.
  • It comes at a time of lower than expected growth in the UK economy.
  • The cut heaps further pressure on pension schemes already facing huge deficits from the shrinking economy.
  • It also means that a greater number of accounts, including business accounts, are expected to not see any form of interest on savings.

Read more on The BBC

Mercedes-Benz Vans to Open New South Carolina Plant

  • Construction on a new plant began last week in North Charleston, South Carolina, to produce Mercedes-Benz’s iconic Sprinter Vans locally.
  • The move will significantly cut lead-times for the German automotive giant. Previously US-based plants only assembled vehicles from ‘kits’ sent over from Germany.
  • Parts suppliers including the Auto Truck Group and the Knapheide Manufacturing Company, are expected to establish production sites in the region.
  • Mercedes-Benz reported delivery of approximately 28,600 vans to US customers last year.

Read more at Automotive Logistics

Brexit Leads UK Retailers to Source More Home-Grown Products

  • Fashion industry publication Just-Style reported that one-third of British retailers predict they will source more from domestic suppliers following the Brexit vote.
  • Research published by Barclays has found that 52 per cent of retailers also expect to increase supply chain activity in India.
  • 43 per cent of British retailers have indicated they anticipate a reduction in goods sourced from the EU.  
  • Despite the Brexit vote, European manufacturing actually improved over July. According to data firm IHS Markit’s Purchasing Managers Index, figures rose to 53.2 in July from 53.1 in June.

Read more at Just Style

Phone Battery Life Could Be Used to Track Users

  • The battery status API, introduced in August 2015, has been found to be capable of tracking individual users online.
  • API allows site owners to see the percentage of battery life left in a device, as well as the time it will take to discharge or recharge.
  • Although currently being used to enable low-power versions of websites, researchers have proved that it could be used to spy on users.
  • Privacy campaigners have argued that companies could use this data to also monetise battery levels, with users making different decisions when faced with a low battery.

Read more at The Guardian

Investor Confidence & Debt – A Study in Trans-Atlantic Contrasts

It’s a time of contrasting fortunes for trans-Atlantic businesses, as high investor confidence is matched by high debt.

Investor Confidence

Trans-atlantic businesses are always going to see some contrasting fortunes, given the diverse nature of the market environments. However, two new reports published this week suggest that these contrasting fortunes may have more impact than usual.

Despite a period of ongoing uncertainty in the UK, a new study has shown that investor confidence in UK SMEs remains high. Over 50 per cent of UK investors have stated they will support SMEs through private investment, even as confidence drops in shares, bonds and property.

However, in the US, another report suggests that companies are failing to maximise favourable conditions to lower their debt levels. A lack of improvement in supplier payments, and inventory management, has left overall working capital performance at its lowest level since 2008.

UK SME Investor Confidence

Despite the uncertainty surrounding financial markets and a variety of investment products, the majority of British investors are resoundingly confident in the country’s SMEs as an investment vehicle.

The research was commissioned by private equity house, IW Capital, and crowdfunding specialist Crowdfinders, and surveyed 1,000 UK investors. The survey revealed that over half (52 per cent) of investors said they would support the UK’s small and medium-sized enterprises through private investment channels in the wake of the referendum vote.

This equates to over 12.9 million potential investors for UK SMEs, and comes at a time where investor confidence in traditional assets, such as shares, Government bonds, and property, has dropped significantly.

The Lloyds Bank Investor Sentiment Index has helped to demonstrate the impact of the post-Brexit economic climate on investor confidence levels across the UK.

In mid-July 2016, the Index fell to its lowest level since it was launched in March 2013. Property (down by 35.3 per cent), government bonds (down 15.5 per cent) and UK shares (down 21.7 per cent) all experienced notable declines in investor sentiment.

Young Investors on the Rise

Encouragingly, 70 per cent of the younger age bracket of investors – 18-34 year olds – said they will consider investing in SMEs post Brexit.

Furthermore, the highest proportion of investors in a regional comparison who would back SMEs post Brexit was based in London. A significant 68 per cent of investors in the capital said they would support small businesses through private investment.

Luke Davis, CEO of IW Capital and Co-founder of Crowdfinders, commented on the report’s findings. “Following Brexit, Britain has been in a state of limbo, with consumers and investors unsure how the economic landscape will change over the coming months and years.

“What we can take from this research is that there is a silver lining from a business perspective as our nation’s investors are willing to support SMEs in the wake of Brexit, something that cannot be said for other investment classes.

“In times of economic uncertainty, ensuring support for the nation’s private sector – particularly the SMEs who make up 99.9% of all private businesses – is of paramount importance.”

US Companies Taking on Debt

Across the Atlantic, the situation was less positive. According to a survey from REL, a division of The Hackett Group, large US companies have increased debt levels, rather than improve working capital performance.

The survey looks at the performance of 1,000 of the largest public companies in the U.S. during 2015. It saw corporate debt rising significantly for the seventh consecutive year, as a result of low interest rates. Debt was up 9.3 per cent in 2015, the equivalent of $413 billion.

Since 2009, the total debt position of the companies in the survey has increased by over 58 per cent.

Working capital performance worsened, with a deterioration of 2.4 days or 7 percent in Cash Conversion Cycle (CCC). It is now at 35.6 days, the worst since before the 2008 financial crisis. These figures suggest major inefficiencies in managing their collections, payables, and inventory processes.

The working capital improvement opportunity of companies in the survey now stands at over $1 trillion, or 6 percent of the U.S. GDP. However, this can only be achieved by the companies equalling the performance of industry leaders.

Oil and Gas Performance 

A significant factor in this year’s overall results were the continuing low oil prices. This caused oil and gas companies to increase reserves, dramatically worsening both inventory and overall working capital performance, and dragging down the performance of the entire survey group.

Commenting on the results, Hackett Group Senior Director Craig Bailey stated, “Once again, low interest rates gave companies a perfect excuse to ignore the hard work of optimising receivables, payables, and inventory. This leaves over a trillion dollars unnecessarily tied up in operations. Instead of doing the hard work of transformation, most simply leveraged their future with more loans.”

Hackett Group Director, Ben Michael, added, “Eventually, interest rates will rise again, and there are signs this may happen soon. Then many companies may find themselves in dire straits, after seven years of growing debt and worsening working capital performance. Smart companies are getting out ahead of the curve now, and starting making the changes they need to squeeze unnecessary cash out of these key areas.”

You can access the full report, and results analysis, plus findings for European companies, on The Hackett Group website.

Want to have your say on these reports? Let us know your thoughts on these two surveys by commenting below. 

Away from the world of investor confidence and company debt, we’ve tracked down the key headlines in the procurement world.

NATO IT Division to “Splurge” on Defence Procurement
  • NATO’s Communication and Information Agency (NCI) has announced it will award €3 billion (US$3.3 billion) worth of cyber, air and missile defence contracts.
  • This is the first time since 2009 that NATO has increased expenditure. 
  • Proposals include a €2.5 billion satellite communications contract, advanced software procurement, and further strengthening of NATO’s air defences.
  • The spending increase comes at a time of scrutiny into NATO finances.

Read more at The Register

Nuclear Supply Chain Collaboration
  • Nuclear supply chain organisations from the US and Canada have signed a memorandum of understanding on cooperation this week.
  • The MoU will help to facilitate collaboration and innovation among nuclear suppliers and research organisations in both countries.
  • Focus areas include the development and deployment of advanced reactors and small modular reactors, job-creation and combating climate change.
  • The agreement comes ahead  of the major annual summit for utilities procurement professionals, who are due to gather in September for ISM’s UPMG2016 conference.

Read more at World Nuclear News

Aerospace Supply Chains Under Pressure
  • Boeing and Airbus supply chains were in the spotlight at the Farnborough air show, as pressure grows on both companies to deliver record numbers of aircraft.
  • This is putting increased pressure on already stretched suppliers, and is leading to concerns about supplier treatment.
  • Suppliers are expected to sign long-term supply agreements, promising both regular price reductions, and accepting unlimited liability should something go wrong, or face losing business.
  • It also comes at a time when Boeing have started delaying payments to some suppliers by up to a month.

Read more at the Financial Times

New UK Nuclear Power Plant in Doubt
  • A project to build a new nuclear reactor at Hinkley Point has been put on hold by the UK Government.
  • Despite EDF directors voting to proceed, the Government has delayed a decision until a further review in the Autumn.
  • The project cost is estimated at £18 billion, but could rise to £30 billion when further subsidies are paid.
  • Much of the debate centres on the guaranteed price for electricity produced by the plant being over double of current electricity prices.

Read more at The Guardian

Read All About It! Procurious Pioneering Conversations in the News

Wherever you look, procurement is in the news. And Procurious is helping to drive this by pioneering conversations in the media. So come, read all about it!

In the News

Here at Procurious, our goal is always to help our community advance. We do this by sharing effective strategies and fresh insights on the latest hot button news, trends, and events shaping the procurement and supply chain profession.

Of course, we do so daily on our platform. But we’re also working to really extend our value in the news media by sharing information that procurement needs on a day-to-day basis.

All this helps to grow awareness of not only the Procurious community, but also the procurement profession as a whole. We don’t want to limit ourselves to just talking procurement. We want people to know the procurement perspective on all the major events happening around the world now.

Here are just some of the topics our founder Tania Seary, and the Procurious team, have been commenting on recently.

Showing the Value of Your Profession

As the conversation around procurement grows online, and CPOs increasingly command a seat in the boardroom, it’s more important than ever for procurement professionals to be bold and share information that demonstrates the value that procurement brings to an organisation.

That could be something as simple as using positive words and imagery in discussions online. Or as complex as a CPO defining value metrics around a key business issue. These conversations can help draw a direct, positive link between what procurement are doing, and what the C-suite is concerned about.

Having the Courage to Drive Global Change

The procurement profession is being challenged to recalibrate its thinking and skills around new realities facing our world.

To add the most value to their organisations, leaders must be agile enough to handle unexpected global events like Brexit; master futuristic technology such as cognitive procurement; turn innovations like 3-D printing into business opportunities, and more.

Today’s procurement professionals must be willing to take new risks to tackle these challenges together. This can happen through social collaboration and online conversations with their teams and stakeholders. None of us can go it alone! By tapping into the broader procurement community, we can summon the courage we need to drive global change.

Winning the War for Talent

The supply chain has grown increasingly complex and global. With this comes more demand for workers who have greater technical skills to tackle these changes head on.

Procurement needs professionals who can specialise in one area, but also understand the broader businesses issues and can have conversations with stakeholders.

The true test for organisations is ultimately attracting those individuals, which comes down to having a responsive and engaging presence on social media.

Stay Tuned for More News!

As a profession, we need to stay dedicated to educating people outside of our community on what procurement is all about.

Stay tuned for additional “New and Noteworthy” blogs to hear more about some of the hot news topics and conversations we’re having, to help our profession and community thrive in this changing world.

Celebrating Supply Chain – The Organisation’s Unsung Hero

It exists in the background. When it works seamlessly, you wouldn’t know it was there at all. But the supply chain really is the unsung hero of the organisation.

Unsung Hero

Alice Catherine Evans. Dr. Megan Coffee. Gunner the Dog. Rick Rescorla. Heard of any of these individuals? They are just some of the unsung heroes from the past 150 years. They have all made a huge difference to the world, and arguably deserve much more recognition.

While maybe not at the same level, the same could be said for the organisational supply chain. It exists in the background. If it works seamlessly, then people don’t really take any notice of it. But, without it, organisations would grind to a halt. It really is the unsung hero of an organisation (as are all the people working in it!).

This week, supply chains have been in the news for the right reasons. The US Aerospace and Defence Industry and Domino’s Pizza were just a couple of organisations to highlight the good work their supply chains were doing.

However, it wasn’t all good news, as supply chains came under fire again for not doing enough to combat modern slavery.

SMEs the Unsung Hero for A&D

The Farnborough International Airshow, held in the past week, presents a fantastic opportunity of organisations further down the supply chain to present their new technologies and ideas. This year it also allowed the US A&D Industry the chance to celebrate its SMEs.

According to data from the Aerospace Industries Association (AIA), the US A&D Industry has exports totalling $142 billion last year. Of that, the supply chain generated 58 per cent of the exports, a whopping $78 billion.

The numbers go to show the strength of the supply chain companies, as well as the global partnerships they have built across the world. The importance of the supply chain SMEs is clear to the US A&D industry too. They have led the way in building a solid reputation of US technology and innovation across tens of thousands of projects worldwide.

AIA CEO David Melcher also sees a bright future of the SMEs. With trade agreements in place, Melcher argued that “small- and medium-sized companies can generate exports for decades more to keep this equipment operating effectively and efficiently.”

Supply Chain Success

Another unsung hero, at least until this week, was the supply chain for Domino’s pizza. The fast-food giant announced a 12 per cent increase in sales in the second quarter of 2016, beating profit and revenue forecasts.

The company attributed increased supply chain sales, including increased volumes and store growth, as a key reason for this. The supply chain sales themselves also saw a 12 per cent increase in the quarter.

Heroes Required

However, the week wouldn’t be complete without stories of what organisations need to do to combat slavery in their supply chains. A report released this week showed that the ICT industry has plenty to do in this area.

KnowTheChain compared 20 ICT companies, including Apple, HP and Samsung, on their supply chain practices. The results were not pretty, with the majority of the organisations scoring under 50 (out of 100) for efforts to eradicate forced labour, and how transparent their efforts were in doing this.

However, according to a business leader in the cosmetics industry, eradicating forced labour and slavery completely is an on-going battle. Simon Constantine, of British retailer Lush, stated that even though Lush is willing to pay more for ethically sourced goods, the company has still struggled to keep up.

Constantine said, “With the amount of work you need to do to stay on top of things, and everything changing so rapidly…I would never be comfortable saying our supply chain is 100 per cent clean.”

But with new regulations increasingly putting the onus on companies to ensure their supply chains are clean, it’s a battle that is set to be fought just as hard as ever.

Is your supply chain an unsung hero? Why not let us know and we can help you tell your story?

We’ve been pouring over the news and digital media to make sure you don’t miss the key headlines this week…

Brexit Causes “Dramatic Deterioration” in UK Economy
  • The decision by UK voters to leave the EU has led to a “dramatic deterioration” in economic activity in Britain.
  • Markit’s Purchasing Managers Index shows a fall in economic output to 47.7 in July, the lowest since the end of the Global Financial Crisis.
  • Both manufacturing and service sectors saw a decline, though exports were up due to the weakening pound.
  • Chris Williamson, Chief Economist at IHS Markit, said the downturn has been “most commonly attributed in one way or another to ‘Brexit’.”

Read more at The BBC

Turkish Procurement Programme Delays
  • The failed coup attempt to overthrow the national Government in Turkey will delay multi-billion dollar procurement programmes.
  • Members of the coup took senior army officials hostage last weekend, with their actions leading to over 200 deaths.
  • Although incomparable to loss of life, senior officials have admitted that procurement is “nowhere in the military command’s priority list.”
  • It has raised concerns that this will leave the army short of operational resources in the fight against ISIS.

Read more at Defense News

Rio Olympics Highlights Cross-Border Procurement Risks
  • The Rio Olympics, due to start in a few weeks, represents a massive opportunity for cross-border commerce.
  • The organising committee has already procured more than 30 million goods, including sports equipment and accommodation items.
  • However, organisations still need to be aware of the potential risks, such as logistical issues, and currency exchange rate fluctuation.
  • Reggie Peterson, Director of Indirect Supply Programmes at AmeriQuest, highlighted the importance of carrying out due diligence for organisations before getting involved.

Read more at PYMNTS.com

Facebook Drones Close to Taking Flight
  • Drones, built with the purpose of bringing connectivity to remote regions of the world, are closer to taking flight.
  • Facebook-owned British company, Ascenta, has run a successful test of its drones in the skies above Arizona.
  • The the solar-powered drones will be airborne for months at a time, beaming signals down to users on the ground.
  • The project is in competition with Google’s ‘Project Loon’, which aims to use high altitude balloons for the same purpose.

Read more on The BBC

Gotta Catch Them All! But Is Pokémon Go a Cyber Crime Target?

Pokémon Go is the new craze sweeping the world. It’s just a game, but how does it relate to real-life laws? And could it really be a target for cyber criminals?

Pokémon Go

Last week, Nintendo launched its new ‘augmented reality’ game, Pokémon Go, across the world. Nintendo spread the launch dates out, with the USA, Australia and New Zealand first, and Europe and other parts of Asia launches in the following days.

For the uninitiated (and you’ll be hard pushed to be one of those with the blanket media coverage), the game blends digital characters from the successful Pokémon franchise, with GPS and location based technologies on smart phones.

Global Craze…and Growing

Within 24 hours of its US release last Tuesday, Pokémon Go had already overtaken its competition to be the biggest game of 2016. It moved to number 1 on App Store, and after 3 days had become the biggest mobile game in US history.

The game surpassed Twitter in terms of daily active users, and Facebook in terms of user engagement on its app. It’s also estimated that it may overtake Google Maps as the largest user of Alphabet’s mapping data.

The incredible growth has also helped Nintendo’s market value jump. It marks the end of a difficult period for Nintendo, who’s market value has been in decline since October 2015.

Nintendo’s market value increase by 10 per cent when the game went viral in the first week of July, with a further 25 per cent added by last Tuesday. This equates to nearly $9 billion added to the market value in less than a week.

Safety First!

The new craze has not been without its hiccups, however. In addition to people walking into walls and falling down holes while glued to their phones, there have also been reports of muggings and armed robbery facilitated by the game’s geolocation software.

Police in Australia have also issued a couple of public announcements in light of these incidents. They have asked the public to be aware of their surroundings while hunting Pokémon, that they shouldn’t use the app while driving, and that “I was collecting Pokémon” is not a defence for trespassing.

The final point brings into focus the issue of how augmented reality games will cope with country laws. As users are collecting characters in the real-world, the potential for trespass grows.

How this will be handled by businesses (some of whom are taking advantage of the craze) and locations (like Arlington National Cemetery) in the future will be interesting to see.

Pokémon Go a Cyber Target?

A number of experts have also argued that Nintendo’s launch could leave some users potentially vulnerable to cyber criminals. With a staggered launch, some users may have been tempted to download a version of the app from unverified third-party app stores. This could subsequently leave them vulnerable to malicious apps and malware.

These apps could then allow criminals to access smartphone data, spy on users, or even control phones remotely. Another report by security software company, Trend Micro, highlighted the risk posed by the game to individuals’ data.

Gamers who downloaded Pokémon Go and registered using a gmail account, could inadvertently give third parties access to private data. However, this issue could be mitigated by ensuring the correct privacy settings in the app.

Connected Devices

While the cyber crime risk for Pokémon Go seems fairly low, it may signify the start of a larger issue. The growth of augmented reality games, smartphone technology, and connected devices via the Internet of Things, does pose a cyber security risk.

But what is certain is that as the technology leaps forward, security provisions and investment needs to move forward too.

Have you jumped on the Pokémon Go bandwagon? Do you think talk about cyber crime for these games is realistic? Let us know. 

We’ve dragged ourselves away from virtual creature capture long enough this week to bring you the weekly headlines…

General Motors Deal with Bankrupt Supplier
  • GM’s contract dispute with Clark-Cutler-McDermott Co. (CCM) has forced the parts supplier into bankruptcy protection, with plans to sell its remaining assets.
  • CCM has argued that unprofitable contracts have led them to lose $12 million since 2013.
  • GM will purchase a quantity of critical factory equipment and parts necessary to continue production across their North American factories.
  • The well-publicised dispute in the bankruptcy court has shed light on the uneven power dynamic between car makers and parts suppliers.

Read more at the Wall Street Journal

Retailers Struggling with Reverse Supply Chain
  • Customer returns and product recalls are becoming increasingly common, with the most notable recent event being IKEA’s massive recall of 36 million dressers worldwide.
  • Returns and recalls pose a significant challenge for the retail sector to build a ‘reverse supply chain’.
  • This term can be misleading, as it is not simply the usual supply chain run backwards, but a complex network of transportation and resellers.
  • Retail Industry Leaders Association VP Adam Siegel warns: “You’re not going to succeed if you’re losing money on your reverse supply chain because, inevitably, the reverse supply chain is going to grow.”

Read more at PYMNTS.com

Palm Oil Industry Rife with Human Rights Abuses
  • The palm oil industry has come under further scrutiny for human rights abuses.
  • The Rainforest Action Network (RAN) has released an animated video that highlights the organisation’s largest criticisms of the palm oil industry.
  • The video focuses on the non-compliance of a PepsiCo joint venture and endemic labour abuses in Indonesia. 
  • RAN claims workers at palm oil plantations have been subjected to excessively long work hours for low wages, dangerous exposure to agricultural chemicals, confiscation of passports, and child labour.

Read more at Triple Pundit

IBM Pushes Blockchain in Supply Chain
  • IBM has launched a platform for companies to test “blockchain” record-keeping technology in their supply chains.
  • The service is an attempt to expand the use of blockchain beyond the financial services industry.
  • IBM’s new service lets supply chain customers build and test blockchains using a version of the company’s LinuxOne system.
  • The service is aimed at companies that need to track high-value items through complex supply chains.

Read more at the Wall Street Journal

Australia Next Victim of Political Uncertainty

The political environment in Australia is tense, even as the Liberal Coalition claims victory by the slimmest of margins. How the corporate landscape will be impacted by the outcome is merely a guessing game.

Political Uncertainty

It’s been something of a topsy-turvy year, and couple of months in particular, for political uncertainty around the world. The on-going US election campaigns ahead of the November election have polarised opinion, while in the UK the Brexit vote has individuals and organisations alike trying to uncover the full extent of the changes.

And while there is likely to be more instability in the coming months, the ongoing uncertainty around the Australian election has the business community and procurement leaders watching with baited breath, given that what elements of business trade could be impacted by this is anyone’s guess.

With 80 per cent of the vote counted, we do know that Malcolm Turnbull will be returned as Prime Minister, after opposition Leader Bill Shorten admitting defeat on Sunday, according to recent media reports.

The Liberal Coalition is expected to win just enough seats (76) to form a majority government. But the rest of the line-up could take weeks to finalise. And Turnbull has an uncertain and challenging year ahead, as he faces difficult negotiations with independent members of parliament, a hostile Senate, and potential mutiny within his own party.

Complicated Situation

The election was held against the backdrop of a particularly complicated political environment. Laura Tingle, the Australian Financial Review political editor, helped to outline why in her keynote address to the Asia-Pacific CPO Forum in Melbourne earlier this year.

Back in 2013, Australian voters wanted to get rid of the Labor government, with many viewing it as a “soap opera“, as Julia Gillard first took over from PM Kevin Rudd in 2010, before being challenged by Rudd twice, resulting in Rudd leading Labor again at the 2013 election.

However, Tingle explained that the ‘coup’ in 2013 from Rudd isn’t the only reason the electoral situation was in flux.

“Voters have been utterly disappointed by the Coalition under Tony Abbott, and confused and angered by what has happened since Malcolm Turnbull took over,” she says.

The highly respected journalist and political commentator told forum attendees that it’s rare for there to be a uniform swing across seats in an election, and that she can’t think of an election where there are so many unknown factors at play that could create wild outcomes.

For example, the Melbourne seat of Batman, once considered technically the safest Labor seat in Australia (with margins of 21 per cent), was only just held by Labor during the election. The significant change is due in part to rapidly changing demographics in the seat.

In addition, there was a lack of clarity in the state of Queensland as to how the votes would be cast, with independents including the hard-right Pauline Hanson picking up support from dissatisfied voters.

Political Instability Ahead

Tingle argued that Australia was heading into a period of instability.

“When I say ‘uncertainty’, I mean it in the sense that we really don’t known what the election outcome will be if we judge it purely by the numbers.”

Prior to the election, the question was really about whether or not the electorate really wanted yet another change in prime minister.

“Ironically, I think it is the Coalition – the current government – which is more of a policy unknown that the Labor Party.

“The Coalition has been thrown off course in the last couple of years. First by its political incompetence and lack of policy savvy. The 2014 budget has become the byword for this, but there was much that proceeded it in terms of policy towards business even before the budget was brought down,” she says.

Complex Issue Resolution

Even if the government is returned to power, and it looks likely that it will happen, Tingle argued that the major issues, such as health funding, schools funding, and universities funding, would have to be sorted out one at a time, due to the complexity of the issues in the political environment.

“None of this, in reality, leads you to think that either side of politics can have a real breakthrough moment. There has already been a lot of commentary to the effect that much will depend on the size of the majority Turnbull is able to command in the House of Representatives.”

The most basic measure Tingle has learned covering politics and policy making for so long is the capability of politicians to react to the issues of the day.

“When I say that, I mean it is assessing what you believe their underlying capability is to deal with the stuff that comes along every day when governing a country, rather than the set piece policy positions you draw up beforehand.”

Government Procurement

However, it’s not all bad news, particularly from the point of view of public sector spending and government procurement. Even in the midst of the political upheaval and turmoil, it appears to be a case of “business as usual” for procurement.

The Federal Bureaucracy, which is unelected, and as such unaffected by the election until a result is declared, has assured people that the chaos is mainly isolated to the parliament itself. 

They have stated that since the election, there have been a large number of state and local government authorities calling for tenders, announcements of grants, and new public works projects. In addition to this, there are tender notices still being issued for on-going projects, suggesting that business will continue however the final few seats fall.

What are your thoughts on the Australian elections? How will your business be impacted by the political uncertainty?

Meanwhile, we’ve been keeping track of the all the major procurement and supply chain news headlines this week…

China Cosco to invest in Port of Piraeus

  • One of the largest seaports in the world, the Port of Piraeus, was sold to China Cosco Shipping Corporation for €368.5 million in April this year,
  • The deal represented a major privatisation and was a central plank of the €86 billion bailout deal agreed with Eurozone partners.
  • This week, China Cosco announced its plans for the site, including an investment of over €500 million in the port over the next five years. The company will focus on developing the cruise and shipbuilding industry.
  • Chinese president Xi Jinping said this week, “We are certain that Piraeus will open new prospects for the broadening of Greece-China cooperation in transport, infrastructure, telecoms and shipping”.

Read more at the Wall Street Journal

Estonian Startup Tests Robot Package Deliveries

  • Robot maker Starship Technologies has launched a test programme for their self-driving robots.
  • The test will involve the robots delivering packages, groceries and goods in the UK, Germany and Switzerland.
  • The robots drive autonomously in a 2-3 mile radius and are monitored by human operators. 
  • Rolling on six wheels, the robots find their destination using GPS, radar and camera, and are able to navigate around obstacles and follow traffic rules. Customers open the secure compartment to access the delivery using their phone.

Read more at Engadget and Watch the Robots here

Hackers Use Social Media for Identity Theft

  • The number of victims of identity theft in the UK rose by 57 per cent in the past year, with more than 148,000 victims in the UK in 2015.
  • According to Cifas, the fraud prevention service, hackers are now using social media sites like LinkedIn and Facebook to harvest information on individuals.
  • Names, addresses, dates of birth, and names of banks are some of the information fraudsters are able to piece together from social media profiles.
  • Cifas has urged individuals to look at what information their profiles have on them, and to ensure that security settings on all networks are correct.

Read more at The Telegraph

Hyperloop “Proves” Cost Effectiveness

  • Hyperloop, the high speed transport solution and brainchild of Elon Musk, has released a feasibility study which makes the case for the affordability of the system.
  • The study examines the cost of connecting Stockholm and Helsinki using Hyperloop, and compares it to California’s high-speed rail project.
  • Hyperloop estimates this project to cost $40 million per km, while the rail project is estimated by The World Bank at $56 million per km.
  • The report is considered a significant step in proving the validity of the Hyperloop concept, with the technology due for its first test before the end of the year.

Read more at Engadget

Dubai Securing Its Future Through Innovation

Traditionally a prime hub for trade, logistics and communications, Dubai, the UAE, are looking to secure the future as a hub of business innovation.

Innovation - Expo 2020

On the 27th of November 2013, Dubai was voted as the host city for Expo 2020, an event that aims to bring together a global audience to discuss issues pertinent to every person in the world. Based on central theme of “Connecting Minds, Creating the Future”, Expo 2020 will also cover key sub-themes of sustainability, mobility and opportunity.

While the event will place the country at the heart of an event with an estimated 25 million visitors, it also helps to cement Dubai’s place as a centre for technology and business innovation.

Smart Cities

Dubai is already well on its way to becoming a ‘smart city‘, with huge sums of money being invested in making the emirate a hub for IT and technology. In September 2015, Dubai was named as the second-best city in the world for expats wishing to start a business, while the UAE was among the top 10 countries for expats to work in.

These titles run in line with Dubai’s aim to open its doors to the best and brightest technology innovators and entrepreneurs. As part of its investment in infrastructure during its ‘Year of Innovation‘ in 2015, provisions were made to assist small to medium-sized startups with technological assistance, aimed at creating growth in this sector.

And, as part of this drive to encourage more global technology organisations to come to Dubai, Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice President and Prime Minister of UAE and Ruler of Dubai, announced a $544 million fund to finance innovation in the city.

While the fund doesn’t actually go live in terms of investment until later this year, it is anticipated that it will provide funding to companies based in the UAE, as well as those providing “exceptional innovative ideas“, helping to drive growth and economic development across the region.

Innovation…and Procurement

All of this comes as part of the UAE’s ‘Vision 2021‘, which aims to make the country one of the most innovative in the world. And it’s good to know that procurement and supply chain have a key role to play in this process too.

In the coming months, a huge procurement and contracting effort will be undertaken to award build work for the site, infrastructure and transportation to support the hosting of Expo 2020. Dubai is forecast to spend around $8 billion on infrastructure mega projects in the build up to Expo 2020 including hotels, new metro links and malls.

Kicking it off last week, the RTA awarded a $2.88 billion contract for the construction of its Expolink metro. This will be followed by purchase of trains to service both the new, and existing, Dubai metro lines.

It’s estimated that Dubai’s Road and Transport Authority (RTA) will look to 30 per cent of the project cost through private funding, with public-private partnerships mooted for the remainder.

Is it too much to ask for to have a little innovation in the procurement process? While traditional processes might still hold sway, we can only hope that the profession can get in on the act in the next few years.

Need something to chat about in the tea room? Or something to enjoy with your coffee? Here are the week’s big headlines…

States Come Together for Purchasing Agreement

  • TheNational Association of State Procurement Officers (NASPO) has been formulating a collective procurement agreement which is expected to benefit 34 states in America.
  • The Value Point platform will give states purchasing similar items cooperative buying power as one organisation, rather then by state basis. 
  • The Cloud-based platform will enable information storage and allow for different payment structures. 
  • The final agreement is expected to be signed off in August and will the states to move forward with a cohesive, cooperative approach to procurement.

Read more at Government Technology

Rolls-Royce Announce Robot Cargo Ships

  • The Rolls-Royce led Advanced Autonomous Waterborne Applications Initiative (AAWA) presented their vision of autonomous shipping at the Autonomous Ship Technology Symposium 2016 in Amsterdam.
  • The group is working on a series of virtual decks, where land-based crew would control every aspect of the ship
  • There will also be drones and VR cameras to assist with spotting issues that humans cannot control.
  • Rolls-Royce aims to launch first remote-controlled cargo ship by 2020, with the aim for automated fleets to follow soon after.

Read more at Futurism

New World Bank Procurement Framework Live

  • The new procurement framework at the World Bank was officially launched on the 1st of July.
  • The new Procurement Framework will allow the World Bank to better respond to the needs of client countries, while preserving robust procurement standards.
  • The Framework also enables the Bank to work more closely with country partners in improving their own procurement systems.
  • Hart Schafer, World Bank Vice President for Operations Policy and Country Services, said, “The Bank can now offer a more modern and nimble procurement system to help promote sustainable development.”

Read more at The World Bank

US-Japanese Underwater Cable Goes Online

  • A 9,000km, six-fiber cable linking the USA and Japan, and backed by Google, went online at the end of last week.
  • The $300 million ‘FASTER’ cable is a project backed by a consortium of six companies including NEC, China Mobile, China Telecom, Global Transit and KDDI, aimed at better connecting the two countries. 
  • The cable can deliver up to 60 terabits per second (Tbps) of bandwidth, about 10 millions times faster than standard cable modems.
  • The cable will support Google’s Cloud Platform East Asia region, with dedicated bandwidth supporting faster data transfer and reduced latency.

Read more at Tech Crunch

The EU Referendum – Supply Chain Trade at Stake?

No matter where you are in the world, you’ll have heard about Thursday’s referendum in the UK about its EU membership. Have both sides overlooked a critical point in the debate?

EU Referendum

This article was written for Procurious by Chris Cliffe.

Procurious is a global platform, but wherever you are, you’ll have heard about this week’s referendum in the UK.  Will the UK #RemainIn or #brexit the EU this week?

Far from being specific to the EU, I think it’s a global issue. And one I find myself thinking about sitting on a train…

Referendum & the Supply Chain

No one can agree on the exact figure (£350m-£380m per day), but the UK is a ‘net contributor’ to the EU. In fact, the UK is one of the biggest net contributors along with France and Germany. But what about taking this issue in (very) simple supply chain terms?

Customers pay suppliers for products. Suppliers make profit from product sales. Therefore we can view customers as ‘net contributors’ to suppliers, much like the UK to the EU. What would happen if a supplier were to lose one of its biggest customers?

The loss of that customer’s revenue needs to be mitigated.  Replacing that customer with new business of equivalent size will be difficult, or at least take a long time. Whilst costs may have gone down through no longer servicing that customer, cost reduction is not proportionate to the lost business, leaving an increased cost to be recovered from remaining customers.

What are the options? The supplier can: take the hit; make efficiency savings; increase prices for other customers; or pass on the cost to the supply chain.

So, if the EU loses a large net contribution, other member states will either see a reduction in EU funding, as there is less money to share out, or they will have to renegotiate their contributions to the EU to make up for the shortfall.

Contributions are proportionate, so all member states will either see their contribution increase, or their share of the funding reduced. France and Germany would likely be most affected.

Shifting Issues

The UK might view this as the EU’s problem. However, all that will have happened is the ‘problem’ has just changed.

Assuming France and Germany – two of the UK’s largest trading partners – did pay more into the EU to cover the loss of the UK’s contribution, how will they take the hit? More austerity? Or will they pass on the cost to their customers – particularly if the customer caused their cost increase!

The UK will want to continue to trade with the EU member states.  That will be possible, and the member states will want to trade.  However, having left and caused those very same member states to see higher costs as a result, I’m struggling to see why we aren’t more concerned about potential ‘tariffs’ which may be applied.

The risk is that the EU will want to recover the ‘cost’ it suffers from a Brexit. Furthermore, the EU will debate and agree their stance on this. And guess what – the UK won’t be at that table.

Supplier Perspective

From a supplier perspective, losing a large customer simply to find that customer still wants your product, but just didn’t want to pay for it is frustrating enough. But what example would you set to your other customers if you actually agreed?

Of course, suppliers will be happy to supply those products, and even though the commercials of the deal might change, you’ll inevitably be charged the same (or more as the deal is no longer standard and will have introduced complexity, risk and cost). Other customers will be watching you.

But the UK isn’t just a customer, it’s a supplier too. Exiting the EU may mean higher costs for the UK’s customers, meaning they have less money to spend. They may want to trade, but could buy less, or need lower prices to compensate.

Let’s consider Framework Agreements. Frameworks are really useful commercial vehicles (a separate debate!) to access products and services without complex, lengthy advertised procedures.

Typically, a set of suppliers are appointed to a Framework for a fixed period. Suppliers who are not appointed to the framework cannot trade through it, and consequently find it more of a challenge to trade with the public sector, who want to use the ‘easy’ route.

Think of the EU as a framework, and the member states as the suppliers appointed. The UK could be about to give up its hard fought position on the framework. In doing so, the UK will be making itself more difficult to trade with, and it will be natural for current EU customers to look at other, less complex, sourcing options.

So, if the referendum goes for #Brexit, does the UK become just a country geographically in Europe, but in the ‘no longer free to trade’ area? Is the UK’s slice of the EU trade pie more at risk than either campaign have realised?

Well, I conclude that…my train has arrived on-time! Don’t forget to  vote if you’re eligible!

Want something to take your mind off the referendum? Here are the week’s procurement and supply chain headlines…

Starbucks Names New Supply Chain Chief

  • Hans Melotte, former Johnson & Johnson CPO, and current Chairman of the ISM Board of Directors, has been appointed by Starbucks as its new Executive Vice President of Global Supply Chain.  
  • Starbucks has approximately 16,000 suppliers and operates in over 70 countries and has recently announced plans to open a 20,000 square-foot roastery in New York.
  • Mr Melotte will oversee supplier relationships, distribution, transportation and store delivery, and is expected to transform stores’ distribution channels in line with company expansion.
  • Mr. Melotte also featured in Procurious’ recent article on the use of the term ‘strategic’ in the profession.

Read more at the Wall Street Journal

World Day Against Child Labour

  • The ILO’s World Day Against Child Labour took place on Sunday 12th June, with this years’ focus on child labour in supply chains.
  • An estimated 168 million children are found in supply chains across the world, in every sector and region.
  • “The time for excuses is over”, said ILO Director General Guy Ryder. “With redoubled from governments, employers, workers organisations and enterprises, child labour in supply chains can be stopped.”
  • The ILO has developed a new app designed to help business managers and auditors to create checklists that will help ensure a child labour-free operation.

Read more at the International Labour Organisation

M&S Unveils New Supply Chain Mapping Technology

  • M&S released its first online supplier map alongside its inaugural human rights report last week, showing 1,231 factories in 53 countries.
  • The interactive map has the capability to zoom in on individual facilities to see the address, number of workers on site, and gender of those workers.
  • The data for the map comes from supplier-reported information and third-party audits.
  • The mapping technology is expected to greatly improve supply chain visibility, and can be tailored to include more data.

Read more at Green Biz

How one tweet from Elon Musk wiped $580 million from Samsung SDI

More than half a billion dollars was wiped from Samsung SDI’s market capitalisation this week in response to a single tweet from Elon Musk about Tesla’s supply chain. 

Musk

Rumours were swirling earlier this week about Tesla’s supply chain for its lithium-ion battery packs. Investors believed that the official supplier, Panasonic, may not be able to produce enough batteries for the much-anticipated Model 3, and that Samsung SDI (Samsung’s battery and display division) would be brought in to meet production targets.

Elon Musk set the record straight on Tuesday with the following tweet, clarifying that the arrangement with Panasonic is exclusive.

Musk

The effect of Musk’s tweet was immense – Samsung SDI’s shares plummeted by US$580 million (or 8%) on Wednesday, while Panasonic added $800 million to its market value on the same day.

Tesla’s Model 3 is slated to be a comparably affordable electric car with a range of at least 215 miles (346 km) per charge. At $35,000, it’s Tesla’s first step away from the luxury space into a price range affordable by mid-level buyers. It’s expected to be an enormous success, leading to significant interest from investors who follow Tesla news very closely indeed. This has led to a situation where a single tweet from Musk can cause huge disruptions in the share market, comparable to the shockwaves caused when Apple makes announcements about its supply chain.

A similar situation occurred in April when shares for Taiwan’s Hota Industrial Manufacturing, Tesla’s sole supplier of gearboxes, plunged rapidly as news broke that Tesla may be looking for a second supply source.

Stock market shocks are compounded by Wall Street firms’ usage of high-frequency trading, where computers use algorithms to comb through the internet to read news items (including tweets), executing thousands or millions of small trades per second based on that information.

Gizmodo’s Matt Novak has observed that if Musk’s Twitter account has so much power, the consequences of a hacking could be disastrous. “We hope he has a strong password and two-factor authentication turned on … If Musk ever got hacked, it could send markets into a minor tailspin.” Novak gave the example of a fake tweet that caused a $130 billion stock market crash in 2013, when hackers used the Associated Press Twitter account to announce that Barack Obama had been injured in an explosion at the White House.

Musk has a longstanding partnership with Panasonic, which invested $30 million in Tesla in 2010. This investment is now estimated to be worth more than $300 million, and Panasonic holds a supply agreement for 1.8 billion cells through to 2017 for Tesla’s luxury Models S and X. Panasonic is also playing a significant role in Tesla’s Gigafactory in Nevada, which will supply 500,000 Tesla cars per year with lithium-ion battery packs by 2020.

Tesla has since tweeted that Samsung may still be involved in making Tesla Energy products, namely its Powerwall and Powerpacks (stationary batteries used in homes). 

We’ve been keeping track of the major stories making the procurement and supply chain news this week…

Amazon’s massive investment in logistics

  • Amazon continues to make aggressive capital investments, with some observers claiming the company is positioning itself to take over the last mile of delivery from UPS, FedEx and the U.S. Postal Service.
  • Recently, Amazon purchased an air cargo network previously owned by DHL, purchased thousands of 53-foot trailers, and is leasing 20 Boeing 767s at a cost of $300,000 per month.
  • The organisation has built over 100 global fulfilment centres between 2009 and 2016, with 125 million square feet of global warehousing. The warehouses themselves contain 30,000 Kiva Robots (acquired by Amazon for $775 million).
  • Amazon’s founder and CEO Jeff Bezos said his company’s goal is to “heavily supplement and support”, rather than take over, peak season fulfilment.

Read more: https://logisticsviewpoints.com/2016/06/06/does-amazon-have-a-first-mover-advantage-in-logistics/

 World Bank to launch modernised procurement framework

  • The World Bank will launch a new procurement policy on July 1, 2016, modernising an outdated framework that has remained unchanged for decades.
  • Moving away from a rules-based procurement system to one that focuses on performance and achieving development goals, the new framework allows for much greater flexibility.
  • Changes in the new framework include a sharper focus on achieving value-for-money, an increased number of procurement methods and approaches, greater streamlining, more attention to contract management, and enhanced support for borrowers in low-capacity environments.

Read more: http://blogs.worldbank.org/governance/imminent-transformation-world-bank-s-procurement-framework

 Johnson & Johnson: Controls need to be in place when buying digital ad placements

  • Johnson & Johnson was recently alerted by shocked customers that one of their baby product ads was played before a video about paedophilia, leading senior digital marketing strategic Louisa Thraves to comment that more responsibility needs to be taken. The issue is caused by automated keyword matching, such as “baby” or “children”, and can be remedied by creating a watch-list of topics to avoid being paired with.
  • Thraves used cold and flu remedy Codrol as an example of a brand that could be damaged by erroneous media placements, which she said could never be associated with alcohol in an advertising environment.
  • Marketing procurement professionals must ensure they know where and when digital ads will be played, and what other content they will be associated with.

Read more: https://mumbrella.com.au/jj-marketer-says-clients-need-take-responsibility-brand-safety-series-shocking-ad-placements-372929

Have you met the Chief Procurement Officer of the Year?

It’s taken less than two years for Johanne Rossi to implement and lead a major transformation at fuel and oil giant Caltex Australia.

Johanne Rossi

Her goal is to transform the company to become the customer of choice for suppliers. What this means is Caltex gets higher quality, a lower total cost of doing business, priority supplier support and access to the latest innovations.

“I came on board to kick off this journey for Caltex procurement at a time when Caltex was transitioning to stay current and create a bright future for itself. We realised that the fuel industry is being challenged with new trends and new competition is entering the market. The entire procurement function and what we stood for as a company needed a complete rethink,” Rossi says.

The process required long-standing internal silos to be broken down so that company teams could integrate and work closer together through the change, challenging the status-quo and doing things smarter.

The confidence and determination she displays in her role with Caltex are some of the key reasons Rossi has been named Chief Procurement Officer of the Year at the 9th Asia-Pacific CPO Forum in Melbourne.

Upon winning the award, Rossi praised the work done by The Faculty’s Founding Chairman, Tania Seary, adding that the innovation and collaboration she’s fostering within the procurement community is vital to ensure the function evolves.

At Caltex, Rossi is responsible for a $1.8 billion spend. She’s led a transformation program of the entire procurement function, leading to a saving of more than $100 million through improved agreements, cost avoidance, process improvement in both Opex and Capex and revenue generation. She is credited with delivering on company-wide strategy, and creating value in key supplier partnerships.

Rossi, meanwhile, came to Caltex after being headhunted for the role. She has a background in FMCG, management consulting, mining, airline industry and also construction with blue-chip companies like Nestle, Qantas and Accenture.

A determined approach to CPO leadership

“I recall during the interview process for Caltex I was asked about whether I was aggressive in my approach and how determined I was. It was a strong indication of what sort of leader they were looking for in the role.”

Rossi has had to rely on these skills to implement far-reaching cost reductions, as well as a major review of what the procurement function encompassed within the company. This has involved re-structuring and organising internal teams in new ways to better partner with stakeholders and supply partners. A global sourcing team has also been set up in Singapore. A procurement innovation manager has been hired to achieve benefits for the company in the longer term, such as finding new, mutual value with supply partners through innovation and implementing efficiencies. The focus of the team is on reducing the total cost of ownership of external goods and services for the company, bringing innovation from supply partners, reducing wastage in dealings with partners, as opposed to just being price focused, says Rossi.

“I believe that a lot of people know how manage and evaluate tenders, but that’s not where we want to spend most of our time – that’s not where the sustainable value lies. As the role of procurement within Caltex evolves, we want to be spending more time in building internal and external relationships, and developing stronger business and commercial skills.”

A supplier relationship program called Catalyst has been developed and is currently being rolled out. It focuses on building mutually beneficial relationships with supply partners, and goes beyond supplier performance management, Rossi says.

“The entire focus for us is to become the customer of choice for our suppliers. To do this, we’ve segmented our supplier base, which consists of about 3,500 suppliers. It’s very difficult to treat each of our suppliers in a special manner, but that’s what we’re working to achieve,” Rossi says.

“We’ve also worked to get closer with internal stakeholders to better understand their growth targets and how we fit into those and bring solutions from our external spend networks. We’ve transformed relationships with our suppliers. We want to have a far more frictionless relationship with them by integrating systems, simplifying the transactional activities, and benchmarking our actions so that our achievements are visible.”

While the transformation process has been under way for more than 18 months, there are still a number of improvement efficiency opportunities that Rossi wants to implement. Conscious of the evolving workforce, she is interested in looking at ways to better organise the procurement function and create new skills to find greater efficiencies, continuously bring new value and anticipate the future, she says.

“My focus is on creating a strong team that will be nimble and adapt to the changing conditions of the market and the company. A team that will develop new capabilities to create its own future, focused on continuously bringing new value.”

“The experiences I’ve had in my career have made me a stronger person. It’s been a tough journey, even though I’m fully aware I have sometimes created my own obstacles. I now want to give back and make the journey more enjoyable for others if I can.”

“Thinking about how you can better support those around you is paramount”, says Rossi. “The world is completely different to what it was a decade ago. It’s incredible to realise how much impact you can have on others’ lives.”

The  2016 CPO of the Year Award is sponsored by Avetta Global.