Tag Archives: procurement news

Buying a better future – Procurement’s sustainability leaders recognised

Once seen as a ‘niche’ part of the profession, sustainable purchasing is fast moving into the mainstream. The misbelief that sustainable solutions cost more is quickly giving way as businesses recognise that competitive advantage lies in developing innovative, sustainable supply chains.

Sustainable purchasing

Evidence of this came this week with the Sustainable Purchasing Leadership Council (SPLC) recognising 12 organisations and one individual who are using their purchasing power to advance the long term health and vitality of society, economies, and the planet.

Winners were recognised across a range of sustainable purchasing initiatives, including cooperative buying contracts for green cleaning products, a week-long zero waste initiative at the Phoenix PGA Open and supplier incubator programs designed at improving environmental performance.

Background on some of the award winners includes:

Leadership Award for Overall Sustainable Purchasing Program (SPLC’s highest honour), presented to The District of Columbia for having put in place a comprehensive sustainable purchasing program that exemplifies the qualities defined in SPLC’s Principles for Leadership in Sustainable Purchasing. DC conducted extensive market research and stakeholder engagement to develop sustainable purchasing guidance and specifications for more than 100 priority products. Hundreds of employees have been trained on the guidance, which DC shares publicly.

Leadership Award for a Special Sustainable Purchasing Initiative, presented to The Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the Responsible Purchasing Network for leading the establishment of a cooperative contract through which agencies in multiple states can now buy independently certified green cleaning products at favourable pricing and with specialised training and outreach.

Leadership Award for Public Interest Advocacy, presented jointly to International Campaign for Responsible Technology and the GoodElectronics Network for organizing the “The Challenge to the Global Electronics Industry”, which has been endorsed by more than 200 organizations and individuals in 40 countries. The Challenge calls on the global electronics industry to respect human rights, workers’ rights, and community rights, including the right to a safe and healthy workplace, and to healthy communities and a safe environment.

This award was also presented to the Initiative for Responsible Mining Assurance for bringing together a coalition of businesses purchasing minerals and metals, mining companies, NGOs, affected communities, and trade unions in order to promote a world where the mining industry respects the human rights and aspirations of neighbouring communities, provides safe, healthy and supportive workplaces, minimises harm to the environment, and leaves positive legacies. Through the many years of collaboration, IRMA has developed the Standard for Responsible Mining, which is currently being piloted.

Leadership Award for Purchasing Innovation
Two organisations were recognised for leveraging sustainability to find and promote innovation: King County (Seattle, WA) for purchasing battery-electric busses for its Metro Transit fleet and documenting significant cost savings and environmental benefits associated with this new technology; and Philips Corporation for innovative procurements that have enabled the company to achieve carbon neutrality in its North American operations while saving money. The Philips’ Procurement and Sustainability groups have collaborated on energy efficiency, onsite renewables, renewable energy certificates, and long-term Power Purchase Agreements for wind power.

Sam Hummel, Director of Outreach and Operations for SPLC, says that the breadth of award categories demonstrates that sustainable procurement is about more than just buying green. “We are talking about human rights, ethical conduct and supplier diversity”, says Hummel. “Sustainable procurement is a holistic approach.”

In other news:

China mandates renewable energy procurement across 11 provinces

  • China’s National Development and Reform Commission has forced grid companies to buy enough renewable power to enable wind farms to operate at least 1800 hours per year, and solar farms to be utilised at least 1300 hours per year.
  • The mandatory procurement is applicable across 11 provinces, including Xianjing and Gansu.
  • Solar capability in China has increased seven-fold and wind has almost doubled since 2012, with China aiming to generate 15% of its power from renewable and nuclear energy by 2020.

Read more at http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-06-01/china-s-order-for-green-power-purchases-lifts-wind-solar-shares

World’s longest – and deepest – rail tunnel opens in Switzerland promising to transform Supply & Logistics in the region

  • The Gotthard rail link has taken 20 years to build, cost more than $12bn (£8.2bn), and is tipped to revolutionise Europe’s freight transport.
  • At 57.1km in length, 4,00,000 cubic metres of concrete were used to create the tunnel, employing 2600 people.
  • Its maximum freight amount is 377,000 tonnes per day, the equivalent of 15,080 shipping containers.

Read more at http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-36416506

Human Rights Watch calls for binding global convention on supply chains

  • HRW has released a report calling for governments to effectively regulate business activity to protect human rights in supply chains.
  • The report highlights abuses including child labour, labour rights, environmental damage, and lack of safety.
  • Juliane Kippenberg, Children’s Rights Director at HRW, said. “It’s clear that a binding standard on human rights in supply chains globally is needed to ensure that businesses live up to their human rights responsibilities.”

Read more: http://www.cips.org/en/supply-management/news/2016/may/binding-international-convention-is-required-to-protect-human-rights-in-supply-chains/

Autonomous taxi startup nuTonomy raises $16 million in funding to compete with Uber

  • Autonomous taxi startup nuTonomy hopes to bring self-driving taxis to the road by 2018.
  • The company counts the government of Singapore as one of its main partners. It runs a fleet of R&D vehicles in Singapore and is the first private company approved to test on public roads.
  • The startup is promising to develop the whole suite for driverless taxis, from autonomous navigation software (nuCore), fleet routing and management, remote vehicle teleoperation, and smartphone-based ride requesting.
  • The firm uses retrofitted Mitsubishi iMiev electric cars and is expected to add Renault Zoe EVs in its autonomous cab service later this year.

Read more: http://futurism.com/a-new-uber-competitor-just-raised-16-million-in-funding-for-complete-autonomous-taxis/

Coupa R15 – delivering agility and measurable value

David Hearn, former CPO Indirect Procurement at Kaiser Permanente, Sun Microsystems and Juniper Networks, talks to Procurious about how Coupa’s latest product releases (Coupa R15) deliver more value to businesses.

Coupa R15 InvoiceSmash

One of the benefits of being a leader in cloud-based spend management solutions is that you can push innovative enhancements to customers rapidly and efficiently. Coupa does so three times per year, with each release being something of an event as customers eagerly await the latest improvements to the platform.

We’re talking with Indirect Procurement guru David Hearn about which of the more than 45 new features he’s most excited about in Coupa Release 15.

Hyperlocalised Languages and Suggest-A-Translation™ (Patent Pending)

People access Coupa in over 100 countries and more than 20 different languages. Coupa has recognised that their customers have unique language requirements, and also that every organisation has a business language of its own. Hyperlocalised Languages allows customers to modify any of Coupa’s 20+ languages for their own purposes, with changes limited to their organisation only and not impacting other customers. Coupa also added Suggest-A-Translation to collect end-user translation suggestions and route to the customer administrator for real-time updates. This personalises the cloud platform in ways never before seen in this industry and is a key reason for the patent pending status.

David says: “The hyperlocalised language feature helps all users of the platform feel included in the management of the tool which is a huge benefit to getting 100% adoption. Language is important, and if an employee in Japan (for example) thinks that an on-screen word doesn’t fit their organisation’s business vocabulary, they can simply suggest a change to better suit their local business needs.”

Unified Platform Innovations and Enhanced Analytics:

Coupa has updated its sourcing recommendations engine to add real-time monitoring expenses, along with a new supplier risk recommendations engine, an inventory trends dashboard and enhanced embedded analytics functionality that adds more visibility and control. The platform embraces ‘suite synergy’, which means applications are fully unified, and the user experience improves with the use of multiple applications.

David says: “I can’t stress enough the importance of having everything seamless on one platform. Having the Coupa platform provide recommendations across all the ways an employee spends money is a game changer. The entire end-to-end process is electronically sharing data and pro-actively prompting procurement teams with new ideas for better sourcing. This enables those teams to focus on being strategic – and that’s a huge value. These latest updates help companies be more agile and make decisions faster”.

Contract Collaboration

Contract Collaboration is a new Coupa application that brings real-time authoring to contracts and extends Coupa Contract Lifecycle Management. It removes the need to use Microsoft Word for redlining documents passed around via email. The new application provides automatic versioning, captures key terms and conditions and transfers them electronically into the ordering system.

David says: “For as long as I’ve been a CPO, we’ve struggled with the entire lifecycle management of contracts. This latest application from Coupa captures the upfront authoring collaboration and links it to the actual transaction – no one has done this before in a unified suite that captures all spending from expenses, to invoices, to requisitions. There’s no longer a need to manually input the contracts terms and conditions into the system; it auto-fills the whole process. It frees up time to focus on better sourcing instead of clerical duties. It also reduces the risk of contract errors.”

Check out Coupa’s great video on Contract Collaboration (watch for the procurement professional smashing up his keyboard in frustration at Microsoft Word). 

InvoiceSmash

While we’re talking about smashing things, Coupa InvoiceSmash enables suppliers to automatically parse emailed PDF invoices so details are auto-filled into Coupa. One of the most exciting aspects of this product is its machine learning, which ensures the same mistake won’t be made twice and minimises the need for human intervention. The application is currently available in an early access program.

David says: “No one wants to use their limited headcount budget to fund clerical duties of manually entering data from invoices.  It’s archaic. Many have tried using OCR for invoice processing, but this is expensive and the human review and rework on invoices is extensive. InvoiceSmash automates this mundane data entry through accurate digital data extraction and means companies can remove most of their clerical team members and re-invest back into the business.”

Coupa released a clever parody video showing AP and AR professionals on the couch with a relationship counselor – their “marriage” can only be saved by InvoiceSmash.

And much more in Coupa R15:

For the full list of R15 updates, visit http://www.coupa.com/newsworthy/press-releases/release-15/

The Double Edged Sword for Fast Fashion Brands

The impact of fast fashion can be seen on the high street and in the newspapers. But the trend may be about to take down one of the world’s most recognisable brands.

Gap Brands

There are few people in the world who wouldn’t recognise Gap’s brands on the high street, in shopping malls, or on the Internet. However, the fashion and retail giant is facing up to major issues thanks to the ever-growing fast fashion trends.

With consumers moving their shopping habits away from in-store purchasing, Gap may seek bankruptcy in order to help it transform its business model and organisational set up.

Sinking Sales

All three of Gap’s major brands – Gap, Old Navy and Banana Republic – have seen sales decrease again in the first quarter of 2016. In April 2016, Gap sales dropped by 4 per cent, Old Navy by 10 per cent, and Banana Republic by 7 per cent.

The company is now on a run of 24 straight quarters without a growth in comparable sales, and 13 straight months of declining sales. In the face of this, Gap’s shares are down by 9 per cent since the start of the year, leading many analysts to suggest that these brands still aren’t learning lessons from fast fashion retailers such as H&M, Uniqlo and Zara.

Gap is yet to successfully match the design-to-shelf timelines of fast fashion, with many of its products still taking up to nine months to hit the shops. This is roughly double the length of time that it takes fast fashion trends to reach consumers on average.

Wider Impact

It’s not just Gap who are suffering from the fast fashion spread. Other US-based brands, including J. Crew, Abercrombie & Fitch, have experienced a sales downturn, while traditional retail icons, such as Sears and Macy’s, have both closed a number of stores this year.

In Australia, Wesfarmers Ltd, the country’s biggest company by sales value, announced its worst yearly profit in two years, and looks set for its first net loss in almost 20 years. The organisation puts its decreasing sales down to the impact of fast fashion brands on its in-country discount stores.

Double-Edged Sword

However, not all is rosy in the garden for the fast fashion retailers. Uniqlo appear to be struggling to gain a foothold in the US market, opening fewer stores than anticipated, and with slower than anticipated sales.

Chief Executive, Tadashi Yanai, has gone to the USA to assess the company’s strategy and to work out how to raise the brand’s profile outside of major cities. The company has consistently lost money in its US operations since expanding there five years ago, but still maintains a plan to open over 100 stores in the country in the coming years.

Could this be a turning point for retail brands? Or is it just the natural progression of a business’ rise and fall, just sped up in line with the increasing pace of change in trends and demands? Whichever it is, it will be interesting to see how the fashion industry changes in the coming years.

We’ve been keeping track of the major stories making the procurement and supply chain news this week…

Procurement “Underpaid and Unrecognised”

  • A new salary survey report from Next Level Purchasing Association (NLPA) has suggested that procurement professionals are being underpaid.
  • The Purchasing & Supply Management Salaries 2016 report has shown that average global salaries for the profession have decreased by 7.5 per cent.
  • This leaves the average global salary around $53,000 USD, although the average covers professionals at all organisational levels, and across six continents.
  • The NLPA has suggested the best way for professionals to combat this is to get themselves recognised for value contributions to their organisation.

Read more at Supply Chain Quarterly

ISM Announces Annual Awards

  • ISM has announced its Persons of the Year, Affiliate of the Year and Affiliates of Excellence Awards at ISM2016
  • The Persons of the Year Awards sit across five categories: Education; Innovation; Leadership; Marketing & Communications; and Volunteer of the Year.
  • The Affiliate of the Year Award, won by ISM Cleveland this year, recognises excellence in core competencies, membership growth, and professional development opportunities.
  • ISM Cleveland was also one of the eight affiliates recognised with Affiliate Excellence Awards, for demonstrating an awareness and distinction in their professional operations.

Read more at ISM

Oil Settles Under $50 as Supply Worries Resurface

  • Oil prices touched  the $50-per-barrel mark on Thursday 26 May as production outages brought a faster-than-expected recovery to an oversupplied market.
  • Global benchmark Brent crude oil was down 35 cents at $49.40, having earlier risen as high as $50.51 in intraday trading.
  • Adding to outage concerns, a source at Chevron said the producer’s activities in Nigeria had been “grounded” by a militant attack, worsening a situation that had already restricted hundreds of thousands of barrels from reaching the market.
  • Investors will be watching next month’s OPEC meeting for signs of an output hike now that oil had reached $50.

Read more at CNBC

Adidas Unveils New Robotic Factory in Germany

  • Adidas, the German maker of sportswear and equipment, has announced it will start marketing its first series of shoes manufactured by robots in Germany from 2017.
  • The company is facing rising production costs in Asia where it employs around one million workers.
  • It plans to open similar factories in the UK or France following a test period in the third quarter of this year.
  • Arch-rival Nike is also reportedly developing a robot-operated factory.

Read more at The Guardian

Hyperloop Reveals New Material for Capsules

  • Hyperloop, the revolutionary transportation system and brainchild of Elon Musk, has announced more details on the manufacture of their travel pods.
  • Vibranium, more commonly known as the material used for Captain America’s shield, is the name for a new alloy created specifically for Hyperloop.
  • The material is made of woven carbon fiber, and the company claims it is ten times stronger and five times lighter than steel, and eight times stronger and 1.5 times lighter than aluminum.
  • Vibranium has also been designed to be a ‘smart’ material, able to relay real-time data on temperature, damage, structural integrity.

Read more at Futurism

Automation & Giant Aircraft – Revolutionising Logistics

As new technologies take hold across the supply chain, we take a look at the main disruptors revolutionising the logistics industry around the world.

Revolutionise Logistics

There seems to be two approaches to the next steps for organisations and disruptors revolutionising logistics – go automated, or go huge! From new technology for driverless trucks, to the soon-to-be-largest aircraft in the world taking off in the UK, there are game changing disruptions afoot in the logistics industry.

Plane vs. Blimp

In the past week, the world’s largest freight aircraft touched down in Australia, following a 14,000km journey around the world from the Czech Republic. But, even this huge plane looks set to be usurped by an even bigger aircraft, about to undergo flight tests in the UK.

The Antonov 225 Mriya, weighs in at an astonishing 175 tonnes, is 84 metres in length and needs six engines to help it get off the ground. It’s capable of carrying loads of up to 640 tonnes, and is the only one of its kind. Perhaps most surprising is that this behemoth is nearly 30 years old.

The plane has mostly been used in recent years in the logistics field to transport heavy commercial items, such as heavy mining equipment, around the world. It touched down for the first time in Australia earlier this week carrying a 117-tonnes mining generator to a customer in Western Australia.

However, it’s about to be surpassed in size (although not in load capacity) by a new aircraft hoping to carry out its first UK-based test flight in the coming weeks. The Airlander 10 stands at 92 metres long, and has required the world’s largest hangar to be constructed in order to allow it to be housed.

The key difference about the Airlander? It’s a blimp. While this currently limits its payload to 10 tonnes, it’s hoped that successful flight tests, and commercial use, will enable a larger craft, with a 50-tonnes payload to be manufactured.

While it’s never likely to rival the Antonov for capacity, the Airlander has a number of potential uses in the logistics field, including commercial, military and scientific research.

Driverless Big Rigs

From the giants of the air, to giants of the road, but with a difference. In the past 12 months, Mercedes, Volvo and Daimler have unveiled their own driverless trucks, with the intention of removing some of the potential danger from the trucking industry.

However, they may be overtaken by a new team on the market. Otto, a team formed by former engineers from Google, Apple, Tesla, and including Anthony Levandowski, the former leaders of Google’s self-driving car project, is approaching this issue from the other side.

Instead of designing autonomous trucks, the Otto team and aiming to create technology that can be fitted to trucks already on the road. The technology is aimed at increasing safety by allowing drivers the chance to sleep, while the truck drives itself along the long American highways.

While this might not seem as impressive, there are a number of benefits from this approach:

  • The technology can retrofitted to the majority of vehicles retrofitted to existing vehicles;
  • It’s cheaper than the outlay for a new truck in its own right;
  • It aims to help, rather than replace drivers, meaning there will be human control for some of the journey;
  • It doesn’t fall foul of legislation in a number of US states which require steering equipment, or a driver, to be in the vehicle cab.

The next steps in this area will be fascinating to see, particularly how the major manufacturers react to this, and potentially adapt their offerings to account for it.

Procurement Awards Season Here

We couldn’t let this week pass without congratulating some of the worthy winners of procurement awards around the world.

  • Johanne Rossi, CPO at Caltex, took home the ‘CPO of the Year‘ Award at The Faculty’s Asia-Pacific CPO Forum
  • Rising star Joanna Graham, Strategic Sourcing Manager (Asia Pacific) at BP, received the ‘Future Leaders in Procurement‘ Award at the same event
  • Timothy R Fiore, CPSM, C.P.M., was awarded the 2016 J. Shipman Gold Medal Award, by ISM, in recognition of his distinguished service for the cause and advancement of the supply management profession.
  • Volvo, Flex, Roche and J&J were among the winners at the Procurement Leaders ‘World Procurement Awards‘. See a full list here.

Is bigger necessarily better in logistics? Could we see a combination of both larger size and automation for vehicles in the future? Let us know what you think below.

We’ve been keeping an eye on the headlines this week, giving you something to share over your morning coffee…

Gartner Reveal Supply Chain Top 25

  • Research firm Gartner has revealed its annual Supply Chain Top 25 for 2016, now in its 12th year
  • For the first time, Unilever has topped the list, ahead of McDonald’s (2), Amazon (3), Intel (4), and H&M (5)
  • Previous multiple winners Apple and P&G have been awarded a place on the ‘Masters’ list by Gartner, which celebrates 10 or more years of sustained supply chain leadership
  • New entries to the list include BMW and Schneider Electric, with both HP and GlaxoSmithKline returning after a few years’ absence

Read more at Supply Chain Digital

HP Release “Large-Scale” Manufacturing 3D Printer

  • HP have announced the release of the HP Multi Jet Fusion 3D Printing Solution, the world’s first large-scale manufacturing 3D Printer.
  • The model prints items 10x faster than current machines, and one version offers an end-to-end solution (including software).
  • 9 companies, including Nike, BMW and J&J are currently testing the machines on a large scale
  • Stephen Nigro, who runs HP’s 3-D printing business, said that “Customers are looking at how to transform their (3-D printing) business from prototyping to production.”

Read more at USA Today

Procurement “Cut Off” Says Report

  • According to a new report, procurement teams in hotels are seen as not collaborating with other departments.
  • The Hotelier Middle East’s Hospitality Procurement Report 2016 shared the perception that procurement were “trying to do it cheap” from members across the region.
  • The report goes on to share some examples of best practice in getting procurement more involved.
  • These included having procurement represented at meetings with key suppliers, as well as in design meetings for major hotels.

Read more at Hotelier Middle East

UK SME Spend “Stalling”

  • A report from the Public Accounts Committee (PAC) has claimed that efforts to direct more public spending to UK SMEs has stalled.
  • The current Government set a target of 33 per cent of overall spend to be with SMEs by 2020, though despite major efforts, it doesn’t appear to be working.
  • One issue the PAC highlighted was a lack of clarity on whether the money was being spent directly with SMEs, or via larger contractors.
  • The PAC has also disputed figures stating that spend with SMEs was up from 6.8 per cent in 2010-11 to 27.1 per cent in 2014-15

Read more at Supply Management

Good News-Bad News Week for Global Tech Giants

The good news is that one of your favourite social networks is booming, the bad news is that one of your favourite tech companies is not.

Good News Bad News

It’s been something of a good news, bad news kind of week for a number of major global organisations this week. On one hand, alongside the success of the Big Ideas Summit 2016 (we couldn’t resist one last mention…), Facebook is bucking the trend for growth in 2016.

On the other hand, continuing (and very public) supply chain issues, as well as declining sales, put Apple firmly in the bad news column. And outside of the tech industry there was bad news in global manufacturing, as it became clear that lessons don’t appear to have been learned in Toyota’s supply chain following recent earthquakes in Japan.

Golden Quarter

At a time when other technology companies are beginning to feel the pinch, and slow growth is causing some real concerns, Facebook appears to be bucking the trend with its good news announcement on its first quarter growth.

Q1 of 2016 was the company’s strongest single quarter growth since 2014, with an overall revenue increase of 51.9 per cent. Combined with an increase in user activity (it’s estimated that two-thirds of Facebook users are on the site or app every day), it served to place Facebook far out in front of its competitors in both the social media, and tech, fields.

The revenue growth has been put down to a marked increase in the sales of mobile advertising on both its original platform, and on Instagram, which it purchased for over $1 billion in 2012.

What’s more, there is plenty potential for more good news, as Facebook is yet to release advertising for it’s other 2 major platforms – its Messenger service, and Whatsapp. There is also the release of Oculus Rift, the company’s virtual reality headset, to be taken into account, although this is unlikely to happen until next year.

‘The Fruit’ in Decline?

Facebook’s good news came as welcome relief for investors and markets, particularly in light of other first quarter announcements from the large technology companies came in under expectations.

Twitter’s earnings fell short of Wall Street predictions, with $595 million, compared to an expectation of over $607 million. Bigger problems for Twitter were a less than expected growth in user numbers, hindering the platform’s ability to drive advertising revenues.

However, the biggest news (though some might say not as surprising) came with the quarterly announcements from Apple. For the first time in 13 years, Apple reported a fall in quarterly sales, at nearly 13 per cent, to $50.6 billion. The tech giant expects this trend to continue in Q2, with estimated sales falling to around $41 billion.

Apple were not alone in feeling the effects of the slowing Chinese economy, where its sales dropped by more than a quarter. However, there was some good news for Apple fans. CEO Tim Cook told analysts that, “The future of Apple is very bright”, with a 20 per cent growth in revenue from Apple Music and App Store areas of the business.

However, many analysts are concerned that, in a market saturated with smartphones, unless the iPhone 7 is a game changer, then this decline could continue. With an announcement, and launch, expected later this year, it seems we will just have to wait and see.

Vulnerable Supply Chains

Technology wasn’t the only bad news area this week either. Toyota have come under fire for not learning the lessons of Japanese earthquakes in 2011, with their supply chain again showing severe vulnerability following earthquakes in the country in recent weeks.

Following the events of 2011, Toyota set out to create an “earthquake-proof” supply chain, working with suppliers to create the RESCUE (REinforce Supply Chain Under Emergency) system, aimed at spreading the risk in the event of future natural disasters.

The new supply chain was put to the test in April, and despite early promise, it seems that the same vulnerabilities in the supply chain still exist. The manufacturer shut 26 of its 30 Japanese production facilities in the middle of April, only reopening 5 at the tail end of the month.

With both Honda and Nissan now operating at full capacity, with minimal shutdowns, it seems that Toyota has yet to learn its lesson.

Do you work in the technology industry? What do you make of the latest announcements from Facebook and Apple? We’d love to hear from you – you can get started in the comments section below.

As ever, we’ve been keeping an eye on all the major headlines just for you…

Congress Votes Yes on Russian Rocket Purchase

  • US Congress have voted to purchase $540 million worth of Russian rocket engines, despite a ban on trading
  • The intention of the 2014 procurement ban was to end US reliance on Russian-made RD-180 rocket engines
  • The US relies on these engines to launch national security satellites into orbit, as the US-built engines are still under development
  • Critics say the $540 million will be spent by Russian on modernising its military

Read more at Space Daily

Japan Fury at Australia-France Deal

  • Australia has awarded France the submarine ‘deal of the century’
  • The $AUS50bn submarine contract is the largest defence deal in Australian history, but the move has infuriated Japan.
  • Japan’s Mitsubishi Heavy Industries and Kawasaki Heavy Industries submarine had been seen as early favourites for the contract.
  • In an unusually blunt criticism, Japan’s defence minister Gen Nakatani described Australia’s decision as “deeply regrettable”.

Read more at The Telegraph

Slow Progress on US-EU TTIP

  • Progress is slow on negotiations for a comprehensive Trans-Atlantic Trade and Investment Partnership, or TTIP, between the EU and the USA
  • Negotiators said they would push for a comprehensive TTIP before US President Barack Obama leaves office in January.
  • Among the deepest divides concern Europe’s food safety rules that exclude American beef raised with hormones, genetically modified foods and Europe’s many local food naming rules.
  • The deal exclude European demands for greater access to US federal, state and local government procurement, which often carries “buy American” or local content standards.

Read more at Euractive

Gorman Failing Overseas Workers

  • Australian fashion brand Gorman has come under fire for not doing enough to protect overseas workers in its supply chain
  • The 2016 fashion report by Baptist World Aid Australia graded Gorman as an ‘F’ for policies on preventing exploitation of workers in overseas factories
  • Although the organisation has an ethical compliance statement on its website, fans and wearers of the brand have reacted angrily to the company’s alleged lack of action
  • The company’s founder, Lisa Gorman, has now stated that they will be publishing supply chain audit reports on its website in the coming months to help prove transparency

Read more at The Guardian

Modern Slavery Act Will Force SMEs to Step Up to the Plate

With new changes to the Modern Slavery Act coming into effect as of April 1st, we ask how much progress has been made since 2015?

Modern Slavery

At Procurious, we know it’s crucial to continue focusing on the issue of modern-day slavery, both with regard to tackling existing cases, and to encourage and applaud organisations who are making real efforts to end the practice world-wide.

Last week, it was reported that the majority of small firms are ignorant of the Modern Slavery Act and the impact that the law changes will have on them.

On the flip side, it was announced that the Building Research Establishment (BRE) are launching a standard to help businesses tackle risks around modern slavery.

As the Telegraph reports, with the modern slavery laws set to change again as of this April, ignorance is no longer an excuse.

Modern Slavery Act 2016

New UK legislation, effective from 1st April 2016, requires all businesses with a turnover of over £36 million to prove they have taken steps to remove slave and child labour from their supply chains.

It is currently estimated that between 21 and 39 million people worldwide are victims of modern slavery. The changes to the Modern Slavery Act 2015 will force big organisations to fully audit their supply chains.  

It is expected that, as larger companies begin to investigate suppliers throughout their supply chain, there will be a trickle down effect to smaller businesses, who will be expected to prove they are slavery-free.

Chris Ross, founder of J&K Ross, spoke with The Telegraph stating, “ultimately, big companies will not deal with firms of any size that they don’t feel safe with.” With this in mind, he has begun voluntarily auditing the supply chain of his safety equipment business, to ensure it is fully compliant.

CIPS have released guidelines to help companies below the £36 million threshold voluntarily comply with the act.

SMEs Unprepared

According to research released by The Chartered Institute of Procurement & Supply (CIPS), almost two thirds of SMEs are unaware of the Modern Slavery Act and the impact it has on them. The CIPS polled 263 SMEs.

Despite the changes only directly targeting larger businesses, it is expected that there will be a knock-on effect on SMEs. It is these smaller businesses that are particularly ignorant of how the amendments to the law this April will affect them.

Whilst acknowledging that smaller companies may not have access to the same resources as large organisations to tackle slavery, the report asserts that a number of simple measures can be put in place. These include the formation of partnerships between larger corporations and smaller SMEs.

David Noble, Group CEO of CIPS, asserted that, “Ultimately, modern slavery is not an issue confined to the supply chains of large multinational corporations. On the contrary, SMEs can often have long and complicated supply chains themselves.”

Despite many SMEs claiming to not have found any evidence of slavery or forced labour within their supply chains, it seems this is largely due to ignorance and lack of action. Of the SMEs surveyed, 67 per cent admitted to having never taken any steps to tackle the issue of forced labour, and 75 per cent said they would not know what to do if modern slavery was found in their supply chains.

New Standard to Assist Business

Nigel McKay, former procurement head at HS2, is launching a standard with the Building Research Establishment (BRE), which will assist businesses in tackling risks around modern slavery and other ethical labour issues within their supply chains.

The standard will cater to companies of all sizes, and be applicable across varying industry sectors for three tiers of companies – those with a turnover under £36 million, between £36 and £500 million, and those with turnovers of more than £500 million.

Shamir Ghumra, Associate Director, Head of Responsible Sourcing in the Centre for Sustainable Products at BRE, said that the organisation, “recognised that there is a need to strengthen some of [the work BRE has previously done in this area], and since then Modern Slavery Act has come out. It’s not just about how to comply with the Act, but looking at ethical labour issues as a whole.”

McKay believes that nowadays within procurement, people are more socially and ethically aware – “a lot of conversations are now around the social and ethical issues of procurement and how much good your pound does, not just how cheap something is.”

McKay is realistic about the scale of what they are trying to achieve, acknowledging that changing a company’s approach to its supply chain can can several years. He claimed that “Not every company will be able to do everything in the first year. It takes three, four or five years, to re-engineer a supply chain.”

With the law change effective as of last Friday, it won’t be long until SMEs feel the pressure to take action and start voluntarily assessing their supply chains.

We’ve been keeping up with other procurement news around the world, and have picked out the top headlines for you this week…

Ghana Approves Procurement Bill

  • The Public Procurement Amendment Bill 2015 has been passed by the Ghana’s parliament.
  • The bill will introduce a sustainable public procurement framework for contracting and electronic procurement, and will also bring about a more transparent and accountable procurement system.
  • The 2003 Public Procurement Act has been amended to improve public financial management, and now needs to be signed by Ghana President, John Dramani Mahama, to bring it into force.
  • 2003’s Public Procurement Act “exposed some administrative bottlenecks, delays and imbalances in the procurement structure,” the government statement added.

Read more at Supply Management

Brambles’ Sustainability Goals

  • Brambles, a global supply chain logistics company operating primarily through the CHEP and IFCO brands, has announced its Sustainability Goals for 2020.
  • The company’s goals focus on the most material aspects of the Group’s operations and are closely aligned with the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).
  • Tom Gorman, Brambles’ CEO said “Brambles has made significant progress in delivering continual improvement through our sustainability objectives over the past five years.”
  • You can view the full details of the company’s 2020 goals here.

Read more at Supply Chain 24/7

Manufacturers Trying to Forge Disruptive Supply Relationships

  • Manufacturers operating in high-value sectors, such as the aerospace and automotive industries, are going all out to forge relationships with businesses in other sectors in order to secure a clear, competitive advantage.
  • These businesses are demonstrating how a bit of lateral thinking and a clear sense of what end users want can create some unlikely and yet productive partnerships.
  • It is now business critical to establish supply partnerships that will enable them to work together to innovate new products and services and bring them to market more quickly.
  • Of course, there are significant risks attached to such supplier collaboration relationships, which some businesses may be reluctant to establish.

Read more at Supply Chain Digital

World Bank Report on East Asian Cites

  • East Asian cities could create more than 7m new jobs each year if they boosted infrastructure and improved skills and the regulatory environment, claims a new World Bank report.
  • The report looks at how the world’s successful cities have achieved their growth. It found cities did best by perfecting existing skills rather than completely overhauling themselves.
  • East Asian cities have grown faster than anywhere else in the world in recent years and are likely to keep expanding.
  • The report said linking infrastructure investments with private sector needs, zeroing in on the skills gaps, and making sure private and public sector industries supported each other were all factors which led to cities becoming more competitive.

Read more at Supply Management

What Can National Apprenticeship Week Do for the UK Economy?

Last week was National Apprenticeship Week in the UK. The National Apprenticeship Service uses the week to raise awareness of the fantastic benefits apprenticeships can offer to business, employees and the wider economy.

UK Apprentices with Sajid Javid, Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills
UK Apprentices with Sajid Javid, Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills

It’s great to see UK businesses embracing National Apprenticeship week. Despite the popularity of apprenticeships waning in recent years, the National Apprenticeship Service (NAS) are committed to providing opportunities and relevant training for businesses and employees. The most obvious positive is that more jobs are created for those who wish to have training and gain skills and experience within different industries.

The UK isn’t the only place to be positively addressing employment issues this week as New Zealand celebrated an end to zero-hour contracts.

On the flip side, it was revealed that Nigeria have the onerous task of needing to find 40-50 million new jobs to cater to their growing economy.

National Apprenticeship Week

Apprenticeships can provide so many opportunities to different stakeholders including work opportunities and training to employees and employers. National Apprenticeship Week seeks to change the common misconceptions about apprenticeships consisting of low-skilled and badly paid roles and being non-advantageous to employers. The reality is quite the opposite with 1,500  different jobs available across 170 industries.

Unfortunately, many companies don’t realise all of the advantages they can reap from implementing an apprenticeship scheme. For example, as of April 2016, businesses will not have to pay National Insurance for apprentices under 25 years of age.

Whilst many businesses, including CIPS, already have schemes in place, National Apprenticeship Week raises awareness to those that don’t and organisations like the NAS can help to put these in place and expand existing schemes.

The UK Government have committed to improving the apprenticeship system by creating three million new apprenticeships by 2020. The UK, and other nations, should be taking a leaf out of Germany’s book, where apprenticeships are integral to the education system.

Germany has implemented a dual system whereby apprenticeships combine theoretical training with hand-on practical experience in the workplace funded by employers. They also have a highly effective assessment process for candidate selection.

It would be fantastic to see the UK succeed in emulating Germany’s apprenticeship system. National Apprenticeship Week seems like a good place to start.

Zero Hour Contracts in New Zealand

Zero-hour contracts have sparked controversy in recent years and many have campaigned to put an end to them. Those against the contracts claim that they are unfair, exploitative, and only benefit an employer, who can avoid paying for things like annual leave and leave and sick days.

Some, however, would attest to the benefits of the zero-hour contract, arguing that it allows flexibility and minimum commitment. They can certainly come in use to those solely seeking part time work, such as students who might benefit from having weeks at a time with no work hours.

New Zealand has clamped down on the contracts this week as their parliament unanimously voted to abolish them. Having initially sought to only moderate the contracts, the country have now officially banned them altogether.

The Unite trade union, which has named and shamed fast food employers as users of zero-hour contracts, has strongly welcomed the move having campaigned for this result since 2003.

It will now be obligatory for all employers in New Zealand to contract employees with at least some guaranteed hours.

Nigerian Job Shortage

This week, the World Bank released a report which states Nigeria needs to create between 40 and 50 million jobs to sustain their rapidly growing population.

The report, which explains how only a tiny proportion of the country’s population is currently benefiting from high growth emphasised the importance of implementing more relevant technical and vocational education and training.  As ever, it is the women who are most affected by job shortages as there few job options for them.  

It will also be crucial to raise the productivity of agriculture by increasing access to markets, inputs, credit, and technology.

At the moment, a North-South divide is emerging because the northern regions have more difficulty accessing education and employment.

Kathleen Beegle, world bank lead economist said “Nigeria is facing a real challenge when it comes to creating enough good jobs for the many new entrants to the job market.”

We’ve been keeping up to date with all of the procurement news this week. Here’s what has been going on…

Supply Chain Salaries in UAE

  • According to a report by recruiter Morgan McKinley, supply chain professionals are likely to see salaries rise by 4 to 6 per cent in 2016.
  • This is due to increased investment in manufacturing capability in the Gulf region and, with it, the rising prominence of the region’s supply chain professionals.
  • In the UAE and Saudi Arabia, for example, warehouse and distribution managers are in particularly high demand, as there has been strong growth in manufacturing and distribution.
  • According to the report, the outlook for salaries beyond mid-2016 is heavily dependent on oil prices.

Read More at Supply Management

Wildlife Trading

  • Some 40 companies across shipping, airline and transport industries – members of the United for Wildlife Transport Taskforce – signed an agreement at Buckingham Palace on Tuesday which aims to block transportation routes for the illegal wildlife trade.
  • The move could mark a significant milestone in preventing the illegal wildlife trading industry, which according to United For Wildlife is valued at up to $20 billion per year.
  • The initiative also has the backing of key global lobbies such as the WWF.
  • Prince William, who is backing the initiative, said “We have faced up to the fact that if current trends continue the last wild African elephants and rhinos will be killed before my daughter Charlotte’s 25th birthday.”

Read More at Supply Management

UPS Alternative Fuel Investment

  • UPS has announced plans to build an additional 12 compressed natural gas (CNG) fueling stations and add 380 new CNG tractors to its growing alternative fuel and advanced technology fleet.
  • The company is working to meet its goal of logging one billion miles with its alternative fuel and advanced technology fleet by the end of 2017.
  • They plan to use a Rolling Laboratory approach to determine the right alternative fuel solutions to meet the unique needs of route-specific driving environments.
  • UPS was one of the initial 13 leading companies to take the Obama Administration’s American Business Act on Climate Pledge, committing to reduce greenhouse gas emission intensity 20 percent by 2020.

Read more at Supply Chain 247

Why Food Procurement Can Help Climate Change

  • Estimates suggest that food and drink production and distribution contributes 20 per cent of UK carbon emissions every year and is the leading cause of deforestation, land use change and biodiversity loss.
  • It also accounts for 70 per cent of all human water use and is a major source of water pollution
  • The UK Government recognises that procurement can have a considerable impact on the environment. As a result it has introduced the Government Buying Standards.
  • The standards include a set of minimum mandatory standards for inclusion in tenders and contract performance conditions, and apply to all aspects of Government procurement, which of course includes food and catering services.

Read more at Public Health Matters

Why We’re Embracing e-Procurement in 2016

While e-Procurement has been around for a number of years, it seems to have made significant strides in a number of areas recently.

e-Procurement

You might have seen that the Procurious team attended the eWorld Procurement & Supply Conference in London last week. This bi-annual event is the leader for procurement innovation and it was great to be a part of. We’ll be sharing some more content about our experiences there soon.

However, it has been interesting to note that the subjects of e-procurement and technology have turned out to be hot topics all-round in the procurement and supply news over the last seven days.

The Ukraine has introduced e-procurement to help fight corruption; Verian, a software solutions company, has announced the release of its e-procurement solution; and a report by Webexpenses has claimed that UK workers are hindered by outdated technology.

Ukraine Introduces e-procurement

Ukraine are launching a new electronic public procurement system this April which will make procurement in Ukraine more transparent and save money.

The system, called ProZorro, will be mandatory for all public procurement tenders. To date, 15 per cent of public sector buyers, approximately 3000 of them, have signed up voluntarily to ProZorro, as well as 10,000 potential suppliers.

Arseniy Yatsenyuk, Ukrainian Prime Minister, said in January that public procurement had been a source of corruption, something ProZorro will prevent. The system will also reduce government spending and lower prices.

Verian Aim to Raise User Engagement

Verian, a US-based cloud spend management and P2P solutions provider, recently announced the release of its winter e-procurement solution, aimed at helping to change user behaviours to gain the benefits of e-procurement such as greater efficiencies and cutting cost.

Businesses will be provided with a configurable solution that allows users to track performance metrics and top performers. It will be possible to see a visual representation of the impact of a user’s individual behaviour on the success of the organisation.

Heidi Murphy, Director of Procurement, YMCA of the Greater Twin Cities commented that, “We wanted these metrics to show users how they were personally impacting the process, and create a common ground for communicating with them on something other than policy adherence.”

Verian are hoping that the latest updates to its software will help with user engagement, long believed to be one of the main barriers to successful e-procurement implementation.

UK Held Back by Outdated Tech

A recent survey on workplace technology has revealed that 85 per cent of UK office workers believe their company’s technology is not up to scratch.

The survey, conducted by Webexpenses, a cloud-based expense management provider, also revealed that the workers believed that if this situation were to change, work would be completed more efficiently.

Over a quarter (26 per cent) of participants specified that it was the IT systems which they felt needed improvement, while 41 per cent thought that the process of managing teams and internal communications could be easily enhanced with better technology.

The report ultimately reinforces how crucial it is for businesses to engage with the latest technologies. Don’t get left behind!

As always, we’ve been on the lookout for more of this week’s top procurement news stories.

Foot and Mouth Disease

  • The US has calculated that an outbreak of foot and mouth disease could cost the livestock industry in excess of USD$188 billion.
  • The Livestock and Foreign Agriculture Subcommittee met to discuss how prepared the US are to handle such an outbreak and determined that there was an alarming gap.
  • Michael Conaway, Agriculture Committee chairman and Republican Congressman, said, “It is essential we have all of the plans and infrastructure in place so we can be suitably prepared against intentional or unintentional introduction of plant or animal pests and disease”.
  • The hearing formed part of a series by the committee highlighting the importance of agriculture to national security.

Read more at Supply Management

Australia to Boost Defence Procurement

  • Australia is to increase spending on defence by AUD$29.9 billion over the next decade, including funding to help SMEs access global supply chain markets.
  • The Department of Defence has published its 2016 Defence White Paper outlining strategic defence priorities and challenges up until 2035.
  • The investment plans include: a continuous naval shipbuilding programme, starting with nine future frigates and 12 offshore patrol vessels and 12 submarines.
  • The government is also creating a new Centre for Defence Industry Capability and a new approach to defence innovation. 

Read more at Supply Management

Apple’s Supply Chain Recovery

  • J.P. Morgan analysts tracking the Apple supply chain issued a note to investors this week, revealing that build projections for the coming months are better than had been anticipated.
  • Having initially forecasted iPhone sales to drop up to 15 per cent quarter over quarter, units are expected to be flat between March and June, at about 45 million units for each.
  • Their visits with the supply chain suggest a build rate of 2 million units for the new 4-inch “iPhone SE” this quarter, growing to 4 million in the June quarter.
  • The  “iPhone 7” update is expected to arrive later this year.

Read more at Supply chain 24/7

India Expands e-Waste Recycling Company

  • Attero, an Indian company based outside New Delhi, has patented a technology which extracts gold and other precious metals from electronic waste.
  • The company collects one million pounds in weight of mobile phones and computers per month in India and resells the precious metals it extracts back to the electronics industry.
  • Attero has won the backing of US investors such as the International Finance Corporation and Draper Fisher Jurvetson to help it expand into the US.
  • It is much cheaper to install Attero’s urban mining centres than the European counterparts and the centres take up less space.

Read more at Supply Management

Denmark’s Out-of-Date Food

  • The first supermarket in Denmark called Wefood selling food beyond its “best before” date has opened to help cut the 700,000 tonnes of food waste produced by the country each year.
  • The food is still safe to eat but would be considered waste by supermarkets because it has passed its “best before” date, has damaged packaging, is labelled incorrectly or too much has been produced.
  • The Danish minister for food and the environment, Eva Kjer Hansen said “A supermarket like Wefood makes so much sense and is an important step in the battle to combat food waste.
  • Similar stores across the country are planned if the first is a success.

Read more at Supply Management

It Takes a Perfect Procurement Programme to Cut Costs

How would you define perfect procurement? We’ve spoken a great deal recently about how saving money or getting the best deal is no longer the be all and end all in procurement.

Perfect Procurement

Customers demand and expect a more transparent, more ethical, and more sustainable supply chain. This ultimately means that procurement priorities vary globally, and across companies. This week, however, we are singing the praises of some perfect procurement strategising which has led to some serious savings.

The Aircraft Carrier Alliance announced savings of $139 dollars on the UK’s two new aircraft carriers, South Africa plans to reform public procurement to save R25 billion, and Australia’s fifteen-year-long infrastructure plan aims to to save the average Australian household $3,000 a year by 2040.

And, under the pressure of a slow economy,  sources have suggested that Russia plans to cut defence procurement by 5 per cent this year.

The Aircraft Carrier Alliance

The Aircraft carrier Alliance (ACA) have just announced savings of £139 million on the construction of two new aircraft carriers at the CIPS Supply Management ‘Best in Procurement‘ event in Manchester. Having initially been tasked with saving £86 million, the ACA significantly exceeded this thanks to their implementation of an effective procurement programme with PwC.

PwC supported a savings delivery team using their procurement cost savings methodology following a five week assessment phase and prioritising of opportunities to cut costs. Currently, savings have come from 67 areas but there are still three years to go on the project.

Ross Elliott, director at PwC said “We had a very robust process, but you have got to take your shareholders with you. As a result [of this project], we have got an organisation that looks for savings and is more cost aware.”

The ACA won 2015’s  Best Procurement Consultancy Project of the Year at the 2015 CIPS Supply Management Awards. The 2016 awards will be announced in April.

South Africa’s Public Procurement Plan

The South African Government is holding talks with suppliers, with the hope of reducing prices and renegotiating contracts for banking services, ICT infrastructure, health technology and learner support materials.

The reforms to public purchasing processes should save the Government R25 billion, out of an annual procurement spend of R500 billion.

South African Minister of Finance, Pravin Gordhan, stated, “It is clear that we can achieve considerable savings to the government, while also ensuring that procurement processes are streamlined and service providers are paid on time.”

Australia’s Procurement Plan

Australia has launched its very first fifteen year infrastructure plan in which procurement has a key part to play.

A report from Infrastructure Australia has detailed a number of reforms to infrastructure to be undertaken by 2040. Among the procurement responsibilities is a suggested increase in competitive tendering.

The report cites how Sweden has increased competitive tendering in public procurement, leading to lower subsidies and 20 per cent cost savings, and calls for the same approach in Australia.

In addition to this, infrastructure projects should take account of the government’s Indigenous Procurement Policy which will “contribute to growing indigenous businesses and increasing employment through remote infrastructure procurements.”

Throughout the plan, whole-of-life costs will be accounted for in procurement when new infrastructure projects are commissioned, including future maintenance costs as well as initial capital expenditure. It is estimated that the plan will save the average Australian household AUD $3,000 by 2040.

Defence Procurement Cuts in Russia

Sources have suggested that the Russian government might be pushed to make a 5 per cent cut in defence procurement spending this year. Despite President Vladimir Putin making military growth a national priority, it seems that the slowing economy could put a halt to his plans.

Russia has entered into its second year of recession as oil prices continue to decline.  Four official sources have said that the cut proposals are to be put forward for discussion at a cabinet meeting.

The finance ministry have argued that Russia can no longer afford a multi-billion-dollar revamp of the armed forces, so will consider the realisation of this plan to be a significant victory.

In today’s current climate saving money is definitely the aim of the game. Perfect procurement might not be possible all the time. But, as proven by this week’s news, a methodical and meticulous procurement plan can make all the difference and ensure money is saved in the right places without compromising quality or ethics.

We’ve scoured the net to keep you updated with some more top procurement news stories from the past week.

Procurement Plans at the zoo

  • Hyderabad zoo animals are soon to find new partners thanks to the biggest procurement plan the state has ever seen.
  • The Central Zoo Authority accepted proposals put forward by the state forest department which permits animal exchange as well as procurement of them.
  • The Nehru Zoological Park (NZP) will soon be procuring a whole host of new animals to complement its existing residents including a pair of barking deer, an Otter, a hyena and an Indian wolf.
  • The NZP’S assistant director said “With the upcoming exchange and procurement, most of the single animals will be complemented with partners.”

Read more at New Indian Express

Deliv Partners with UPS

  • Same-day delivery startup Deliv Inc. is getting a funding boost from an unlikely source: United Parcel Service Inc.
  • As more and more commerce moves online, retailers must match the next-day and even same-day delivery speeds made commonplace by Amazon.
  • Surveys indicate that just by having the option of same-day delivery increases purchase conversion during the checkout process by 20-30 per cent.
  • Deliv, which offers enterprise-grade integrations into point of sale, has completed a $28 million Series B round of funding, adding a key strategic partner and investor in UPS. The company looks set to be the platform that powers this new on-demand future.

Read more at Supply Chain 247

Jacobs’ Procurement Pilot

  • California-based technical services provider Jacobs Engineering Group (Jacobs) has confirmed it is fronting a procurement programme in Australia
  • The programme features a new contracting model designed to enhance efficiencies in military acquisitions.
  • The model is centred on tasking original equipment manufacturers with overseeing project management activities from the funding approval stage through to programme closure.

Read more at Janes

Procurement to help ex-offenders

  • Procure Plus has been awarded a five-year contract to help ex-offenders access employment and training.
  • The not-for-profit organisation, which buys goods and services for several housing associations in the North West of England, will place 24 ex-offenders into employment, apprenticeships or training with contractors in its supply chain every year.
  • Ann-Marie English, senior regeneration manager at Procure Plus, said: “What’s different about our approach [to helping ex-offenders] is a focus on the long term, via sustained career opportunities and support.”

Read more at Supply Management

Bite-size procurement takeaways for the time-poor

Gordon Donovan provides his insights into procurement-related articles and news stories.

I am a principal consultant with The Faculty a management consultancy specialising in procurement. I have been involved with the profession for 25 years as a practitioner, consultant, trainer and coach. I am passionate about procurement, and am one of the few that made a conscious choice to go into procurement. It was a choice made when I witnessed my father (who was a sales manager for many years) dealing with buyers –  and I thought I’d much rather be on the other end of that conversation. In later years it made for some very interesting dinner conversations…

Gordon Donovan on procurement

In this blog series I will trawl the news and provide you with my personal procurement take-aways.

First up is an article I found on LinkedIn on why the supplier selection process is dying [read it here]. It is written for selecting marketing or creative agencies, but I think its just as relevant for selection of any strategic supplier of goods and services.

To summarise it suggests that the “traditional way” of selecting (RFI, Shortlist, RFT, Shortlist, Presentation/trial, Award) isn’t working and fails to find a supplier that’s best suited for the organisation about 50 per cent of the time.

This reminds me of an article written some time ago which stated that 80 per cent of the things we buy are from distorted supply markets, yet 80 per cent of the tools we use are for competitive markets.

Don’t get me wrong, I think that RFT/P/Q are great tools, but we should use them where they are the most effective, or at least do some groundwork to ensure that they are effective when we use them. They rely on competition (or the illusion of competition) to be successful. The worry for me is that ignore can be bliss; we don’t really know when we don’t get the value unless our preparation is good enough.

Talking about preparation brings me to the second article that caught my eye. This is for a podcast I subscribe to by AT Kearney (yes it’s a procurement podcast, don’t judge me!)

Download ‘Wave of the Future’ from iTunes

This episode is all about why Googling isn’t enough. It hits a nerve with me as I hear a lot of my workshop delegates chime “well we will just Google it”.

The podcast says that while Google has made things quicker and simpler, it doesn’t give you the breadth or depth of information that you really need to fully understand supply markets.

According to ATK, 60 per cent of information is in commercial online databases. Some tips provided within include:

  • Use the advanced search feature rather than the vanilla search. Click the cog icon to select this mode.
  • Disable the personal settings. As a default it will look at your previous searches and location and customise the results – especially useful if you’re trying to source a supplier from overseas.
  • Compliment with other more traditional methods (such as interviewing subject matter experts.
  • When reviewing a web site think about who wrote it, for whom and why.

Finally, I came across an interesting article from Mckinsey about different sourcing strategies.

It’s not ground-breaking but contains some interesting insights.

My main takeaways are:

  • The vast majority of onshoring initiatives were in manufacturing.
  • A two-thirds decline in the US price of natural gas since 2008 is attracting some manufacturing industries that use gas as direct fuel or feedstock.
  • Strategic offshoring of IT and business processes retains the promise of reducing costs, hedging production risk, and increasing access to talent by employing a network of offshoring locations.
  • American International Group (AIG), is moving ahead with the creation of nearshore centres in multiple regions.
  • Many companies are discovering that sourcing decisions cannot simply be made based on the notion that ‘noncore’ business activities can be offshored.

I trust that you find these articles and insights useful, and if you wanted to discuss please feel free to contact me via Procurious, join my network, or follow me on Twitter @gdonovan1971