Tag Archives: procurement recruitment

Big Ideas Summit 2016: Big Idea #26 – Changing Talent Management

Procurement needs to change its approach to talent management or risk losing out with the Millennial Generation.

At the Big Ideas Summit 2016, we challenged our thought leaders to share their Big Ideas for the future of procurement.

From ideas that have the potential to change the very nature of the procurement profession, to ones that got the assembled minds thinking about the profession’s impact outside of the organisation, the response we received was amazing.

Talent Management Approach

The growth of the Millennial Generation in the workforce shouldn’t be viewed by procurement as a threat, but an opportunity. That’s the view of Melani Flores, Practice Leader, Procurement Advisory EMEA at The Hackett Group.

However, Melani also believes that procurement doesn’t have the talent management processes in place to work with this generation. In order to train them, and enable them to work to the best of their ability, procurement needs to change its approach.

Catch up with all the delegates’ Big Ideas from the 2016 Summit at the Procurious Learning Hub.

Want to find out more about Big Ideas 2016? And maybe what we have planned for 2017? You can visit our dedicated website!

If you like this (and you haven’t done so already) join Procurious for free today. Get connected with over 18,500 like-minded procurement professionals from across the world.

My 5 Killer Job Interview Questions

How do you separate the diamonds from the rough in your next recruitment process? Do you have the killer questions to help?

killer questions

When I started all my businesses (The Faculty, The Source, and Procurious) I declared that I was building a culture, not a company.

Culture can’t be forced, but it also doesn’t happen organically. It stems from recruitment. It’s not always the best person, but the right person for the job, that can help foster company culture.

Leadership experience, technical skills and cultural fit are all important here, so how can you recruit someone that ticks all three boxes?

From all my years of playing interviewer, I’ve compiled five killer questions that separate the diamonds from the rough.

1. The “Tipping Point” Question

“What were the reasons for leaving your current job?”

Asking a potential employee why they decided to leave their job provides good insight into what makes them tick. It also highlights their personality and gives you a definite indication of what they don’t want to happen in their new job.

It’s also a good question to ask in exit interviews to ensure your business can learn from its mistakes.

2. The “Leader of the Pack” Question

“Tell me about something you’ve lead – a group, a team, a movement, an initiative…any situation where you were in the lead?”

This question resulted in the most surprising interview response ever. When I first established The Source, my procurement recruitment company, I was interviewing for the Managing Director role.

When I asked this question, one of the candidates paused and then answered, “I once led a revolt against management in a manufacturing company I worked for.” Wrong answer.

3. The “Mentor Me” Question

“Tell me about some people you’ve mentored and what they are doing now?”

If people stumble on this question, they obviously don’t have a track record in developing people. Furthermore, if they can’t talk to what their mentees are doing now, they really weren’t genuinely committed and interested in that person’s development enough to keep track of their progress.

4. The “Question” Question

“Do you have any more questions?”

I always want people to have lots of questions. And not just about them – their pay, their hours, the role and where they’ll sit – but about the business, about the industry, the issues we are facing, about our future.

To be successful in any business, people need to be genuinely concerned about their profession or industry, not just their own career development.

5. The “One Word” Question

One of my mentors gave me this tip. One of her interview questions was:

“If your friends could summarise you in one word, what would that word be?”

This question is great because it allows the candidate to drill down to the one attribute they represent but also aspire to be.

Want to hire someone who describes him or herself as “encouraging” or “meticulous”? Of course you do. Someone who describes him or herself as “Chatty” or “Brilliant”? Didn’t think so.

Reflect on Your Questions

So you’ve asked your questions, the interview is complete and you look to move onto the next candidate. Before you do so, remember the final important step – reflect.

This was a key piece of advice I received from one of our recruitment experts at The Source. It’s important to reflect on the candidate’s responses and behaviour to help determine where they fit in the organisation.

Hiring managers should always consider their current and desired workplace culture, and think about how the candidate fits in.

To do this, I often ask myself:

  • What were the energy levels like? Did the candidate have energy – physical, mental and spiritual (I know, sounds spooky…but think about it!)?
  • Did the conversation flow? Was the candidate both interesting and interested? Did I struggle to follow what they were sharing? Was the conversation stilted?
  • Would the person be a good representative of the team? Here, I’m talking about their values and approach, as well as the way they communicate and present.

With these interview questions in your repertoire plus some “reflection” time, you will be on your way to recruitment success.

Ask Not What You Can Do for Your Organisation

But what your organisation can do for you. And these tips should point you in the direction of a great employer.

jfk organisation

For a decade or more, the economy has very much been a hiring manager’s market. A number of economic events culminating in the GFC made it increasingly difficult for even the most qualified candidates to find a position. But not anymore.

Thanks to a host of economic upturns, more and more jobs are appearing. Finally applicants can ask: “What can an organisation do for me?”

These days, it is important for employers to consider how they can work to better their workforce. Career management is no longer the sole responsibility of the worker; companies must consider how to lend their employees support.

As a job candidate, you should look for organisations that are eager to learn your goals and aspirations, and provide backing and encouragement to help you achieve them. More specifically, you should search for an employer willing to do the following for the sake of your career:

Understand Your Intended Path

As a human being, you have personal and professional goals. Often, those goals include a specific career path culminating in a prestigious job title with important responsibilities and generous benefits.

From the very beginning of your employment, your employer should be eager to learn your goals and pave the way for you to achieve them.

As you endure the job-hunting process, you should explain your personal and professional plan to every prospective employer. The most promising employers will respond with information on career paths through their organisations, available career-boosting tools or programs, and (most importantly) a commitment of support for your goals.

Those who seem uninterested in your goals will not do anything to help you achieve them.

Adapt Roles and Responsibilities

Though you might not expect an entry-level position to be handcrafted to match your abilities and interests, as you head into your mid-career, your employer should begin adapting your role and responsibilities to suit your preferences and skills.

In fact, ideal organisations will be able to assess your strengths and weaknesses and provide opportunities for you to develop those abilities you will need to enhance your career and achieve your professional goals.

During the interview process, you might ask about the possibility of you gaining a hand in the development of your work responsibilities as you gain experience within the organisation.

Offer Necessary Resources

Regardless of your career goals, your organisation can dramatically improve your chances of success by connecting you with valuable resources.

Perhaps most importantly, your employer should have a programme to support the continued education of its staff. This can be through workplace seminars or tuition reimbursement.

Flex time will help you pursue advanced education, like a master’s of organisational leadership degree, that could qualify you for top positions at your organisation while also improving your skill set for the company.

Additionally, you might look for an employer that boasts a mentorship programme. This way, you can build relationships with important figures at your company and gain career-boosting opportunities.

Be Respectful and Compassionate

It is entirely likely that your goals will change during your career. It’s imperative that you find an employer who won’t disrespect your choice, or react extremely and destroy your opportunities for success.

Employers should recognise the value of investing in employees, who will undoubtedly become valuable assets or allies in their future positions – regardless of whether those positions are inside or outside the organisation.

It isn’t difficult to identify companies who lack compassion for their workers. You can often find evidence of poor treatment on ratings websites like Glassdoor.

Most organisations think first of the profit margins, second of the customers, and third of their employees. In years past, companies had little reason to worry about workers leaving for better jobs, because the potential for finding alternative reliable employment was low.

However, if we expect the current trend of job growth to continue – which it should, given the strength of the economy and imminent retirement of baby boomers – employers must begin to consider the health and happiness of individual employees.

Being kind and supportive, having tools for personal and professional improvement, and remaining flexible in roles and rules are the hallmarks of organisations that treat their workers well. You should keep an eye out for job opportunities with companies like these.

Tiffany Rowe is a marketing administrator who assists in contributing resourceful content throughout the World Wide Web. Tiffany prides herself in her strong ability to provide high quality content that readers will find valuable.

Getting the Smartest Guys in the Room

Is it just me, or does it feel like procurement is forever running in circles? We’re spending a lot of time worrying about whether we are ‘at the table’, when the real question might be, “Are we on the menu?”

albert-einstein smartest people in room

Last year I had a one of those rare “A-ha!” moments. I was chatting to a CFO of a global company, with 50,000 people working across more than 30 countries.

He was in the middle of a major cost transformation and I asked him whether procurement was playing a leading role. He said he didn’t know.

More than a little surprised, I asked him politely how was it that he didn’t know. He responded:

“Well, when we have our team updates it’s usually via Halo and all I see is a group of faces. I really don’t care whether they’re from HR, Operations, Finance or Procurement. All I care is that I’ve got the smartest guys in the room, solving our problems.”

And that was my A-ha! moment.

Quality Rises to the Top

Procurement shouldn’t fret about promoting its brand or carefully crafting a value proposition because ultimately, the quality of our people will speak for itself. What we need to ensure is that we get the smartest people onto “Team Procurement”.

Today at ProcureCon Europe I’m sharing three short, sharp “big ideas” for how procurement can get the smartest guys in the room.

1. Set Daring Talent KPIs

The power of KPIs has become a hot topic among the Procurious community with discussions about how metrics can be used to influence procurement’s perception within the business.

In my blog article ‘Measuring the Unmeasurable‘, I suggested we ought to measure how many members of the Procurement team are promoted to enterprise-wide leadership development programs. You know, those rising star or high potential programmes. (When I was working in corporate, we called it “charm school”).

If CPOs were brave enough to call out this KPI as your bold aspiration for their team, it would have a double-whammy effect. Firstly, it would promote procurement internally as a source of real leadership talent. Secondly, it would increase procurement’s level of attractive proposition for ambitious candidates looking to really ‘get somewhere’ in their career.

2. Find a Millennial Mentor

If you want to attract the brightest stars, you need to understand how the next generation of talent thinks. One of the best ways to doing this is to find yourself a millennial mentor.

I have had more than a few millennial mentors in recent years who have taught me two important lessons. One, there is enormous power in social media. And, two, why job selection is more about their boss and how likely they are to champion and influence on their behalf, rather than the company itself.

At Procurious, we believe there is a direct correlation between the strength of your online brand and the calibre of millennial talent you attract to your organisation.  Put simply, in the minds’ of millennials: “If you’re not online, you don’t exist”.

3. Incubate Intrapreneurs

Leading global CPOs are not paid to reduce costs – they are paid to drive change. But implementing ‘big ideas’ in big companies is not easy, as we were reminded last year at The Big Ideas Summit by Rio Tinto’s Finance Director, Chris Lynch.

If you want to get the smartest guys in the room, you need to find and develop people who think and act like entrepreneurs, but can still work and importantly, get things done in a corporate environment.

Some questions worth asking yourself:

  • What are you doing today to promote the image of your team as “entrepreneurial”?
  • Are you attracting candidates who can innovate?
  • Do you have a culture that will enable ‘intrapreneurs’ to thrive and gain momentum?
  • Are your stakeholders willing to embrace entrepreneurialism?

What’s your plan for getting the smartest guys in the room?

Big Ideas Summit 2016: Big Idea #19 – Challenging Traditional Recruitment

One procurement recruiter says the onus is on them to change traditional recruitment practice to uncover new talent.

At the Big Ideas Summit 2016, we challenged our thought leaders to share their Big Ideas for the future of procurement.

From ideas that have the potential to change the very nature of the procurement profession, to ones that got the assembled minds thinking about the profession’s impact outside of the organisation, the response we received was amazing.

Time to Change Traditional Recruitment

Lee Gudgeon, Client Engagement Director at REED Global, says that the increasing role of procurement has highlighted a shortage of candidates with the right skill sets available to come into the profession.

Lee argues that procurement recruiters also need to up-skill to drive new practices. This will allow them to recognise relevant skills and capabilities required in procurement, in other functions, and open up the market to people that might otherwise have been overlooked.

Catch up with all the delegates’ Big Ideas from the 2016 Summit at the Procurious Learning Hub.

Want to find out more about Big Ideas 2016? And maybe what we have planned for 2017? You can visit our dedicated website!

Change Your Career Thinking

Did you enjoy Lee’s Big Idea? Are you thinking about a change in career? Then take a look at the Procurious Career Boot Camp.

Our Career Coaches are challenging procurement professionals to make a positive change to their careers. You can hear all our podcasts, and read all our great content by enlisting here.

Catch up on topics from becoming a CPO, and taking your conscience to work, to increasing your cultural intelligence in procurement, and many more.

If you like this (and you haven’t done so already) join Procurious for free today. Get connected with over 17,500 like-minded procurement professionals from across the world.

Big Ideas Summit 2016: Big Idea #12 – Millennial Talent Response

The Millennial generation has greater expectations in relation to job roles. Only by changing the way they engage Millennials can organisations meet these expectations.

At the Big Ideas Summit 2016, we challenged our thought leaders to share their Big Ideas for the future of procurement.

From ideas that have the potential to change the very nature of the procurement profession, to ones that got the assembled minds thinking about the profession’s impact outside of the organisation, the response we received was amazing.

Meeting Millennial Expectations

Nic Walden, Director – Procurement P2P Advisor at The Hackett Group, talks about the greater expectations that Millennials have for job roles.

These include expectations from on working on CSR projects, and building sustainable relationships, to the technology that they will be working with.

Nic argues that procurement needs to change the way it engages with the Millennial generation in the workplace to meet these expectations.

Catch up with all the delegates’ Big Ideas from the 2016 Summit at the Procurious Learning Hub.

Want to find out more about Big Ideas 2016? And maybe what we have planned for 2017? You can visit our dedicated website!

If you like this (and you haven’t done so already) join Procurious for free today. Get connected with over 16,000 like-minded procurement professionals from across the world.

What Can Procurement Professionals Learn From Young Professionals?

Generational stereotypes are frequently unfair and unkind. From traditionalists to young professionals, there is much to learn from each other.

Young Professionals

This article was written by Dee Clarke, Davidson Projects & Operations.

With people living and working longer, the days of two to three generations making up a workforce will soon be a thing of the past. For the first time, we will start seeing workplaces with around five generations working side-by-side.

Loosely, Forbes Magazine defines the five generations that will soon be working together as:

  • The Traditionalists (born prior to 1946);
  • Baby Boomers (1946-1964);
  • Gen X (1965-1980);
  • Gen Y (now referred to as Millennials); and
  • The iGeneration (born after 1997).
Generation Stereotypes

Interestingly, Millennials, Gen. Y, Digital Natives (whatever you want to call the generation born between 1980 and 2004), represent almost a third of the global population today. They will comprise 75 per cent of the global workforce by 2025.

There are plenty of stereotypes about each group. The Baby Boomers who scorn social media, the Gen. X who don’t like authority, the Millennials who are impatient about promotions and getting ahead, and the iGeneration who are attached to their smartphones.

While there are some consistency in these traits, Jeanne Meister, co-author of ‘The 2020 workplace’ says that it is important as managers to move beyond the stereotypes, and get to know each person as an individual.

Mindful of Millennials

This could not be truer than within the procurement sector. As someone who specialises in sourcing talent in this sector, I have lost count of how many conversations I have had of late with clients and candidates regarding the hot topic of age.

And millennials are the hot topic of the moment.

There seems to be a general consensus in the media and public that Millennials are lazy, entitled, self-absorbed and will unlikely stay in any job for long. Personally, I believe there are many great exceptions to this mass generalisation, and hiring managers within procurement need to be mindful of this.

I recently had the pleasure of meeting two young professionals who were exceptions to the rule. I met Sandra Silva at a CIPS networking event. As I’m sure you would know, these events are normally attended by procurement professionals, currently working in the industry, to network and discuss market challenges, and perhaps learn something from a key presenter.

A young Sandra was studying her Masters in Supply Chain Management at Queensland’s Griffith University. She had relocated here from Colombia after completing her engineering degree.

What caught my attention was how committed Sandra was to start her career in procurement, and most importantly how determined she was to take the reins when it came to her career planning and progression. She was leaving nothing to chance.

Sandra attends regular industry networking events. She had sought out an industry mentor and was applying for internships, while continuing her studies. A few months later when I met her, she showed her determination and dedication to her career when she told me she had taken on an internship and a part-time entry level procurement position.

Diversifying Talent

The next example was when a colleague asked me to meet with a young man, James Young, who was seeking career advice in my area.

James simply defied every stereotype millennials face. James came to meet me on his lunch break. He presented well and, although he had already secured a contract position with another firm, he was looking at his long term career and direction.

Before finishing high school, James had completed a couple of short internships. While attending university, he attended networking events and connected with people within many different industries to identify the right one for him. On completion of his degree he applied for graduate programs with the big four consultancies.

Through our meeting he listed his plans, and how he was going to diversify himself so he was a valuable asset to any future employers. Most of all he talked about what he planned to do to consistently upskill and further develop his knowledge.

Learning from Young Professionals

Both Sandra and James showed determination, drive and willingness to go above and beyond the normal approach to secure the right career for them.

I believe this determination will not just stop there but will lead their careers to the top, these were not the actions of ‘lazy’ millennials, but two future CEOs.

So what can we all learn from these two young professionals?

Generally speaking, in the past most people ‘fell’ into procurement, starting with backgrounds in engineering, law or accounting to name a few. They then somehow became involved in projects, or saw the opportunity to add value with cost savings in better buying strategies.

While the industry has become more professional, and there are now specific qualifications and university courses, many have just moved from one role to another, letting opportunities dictate their next career move.

Bringing New Ideas

Just like these two young Millennials, we need, as an industry, to take charge of our career, and continue to develop our skills. We need to expand our networks, and not be afraid to take on an ‘internship’ or mentor, to ensure we not only survive, but thrive the future world of work.

Furthermore, we have to stop letting age stereotypes dictate how we approach work, or manage the growing number of generations we will work with.

FCIPS accredited Alan Robertson, who has more than 20 years procurement experience across private and public sectors, said Millennials will bring new ideas to organisations. And we need to listen.

“Otherwise we won’t take advantage of their skills such as online networking/blogging and asking plenty of questions,” Mr Robertson said.

He also added that “a ‘general’ trait of Millennials is that they like to try new ways of working and improvements, so don’t leave them to get bored. Companies will lose them if they don’t let them be free to use their adventurous spirit.”

Dee Clarke has more than 10 years’ experience in recruitment across the Australian and Irish markets. During this time, Dee has forged a strong expertise in Procurement and Contracts and is an Affiliate Member of CIPSA.

Dee is a Senior Consultant within the Projects & Operations team, which delivers the right technical and project expertise for any stage of a project or asset’s life cycle.

How to Get Your CV in Front of a Real Person & Past an Algorithm

As recruiters change the way they filter and select candidates, you’ll need to revolutionise your CV to make sure it lands on their desk.

Digital CV

The Corporate World has changed more in the last 20 years than at any time in history, procurement probably more than most. The Procurement function wasn’t even represented on Boards and certainly wasn’t a strategic, value-add function.

However, the importance of the CV hasn’t changed, and in the wake of the ‘Procurement Revolution’ comes a necessary ‘CV Revolution’.

What’s Really Changed?

Recruitment fees have been halved in the last 10 years with RPO’s, Procurement, and internal recruitment teams, all driving down costs. This has meant that recruiters (either agency or internal) have had to become agile and change methodologies.

They need to be quicker, and better, at identifying good candidates. Unfortunately, this has driven more and more investment in IT, rather than the human factor. This means CVs need to be different now to 10 years ago.

Digital CV Searching Now the Norm

To stand out, a CV now needs to be readable by a human, but first by an algorithm, or search software, to get it on the longlist. It’s vital that your CV is set up to pass the algorithm test.

The good news, though, is that if you know the rules, you can use it to your advantage. With some small changes to your CV, you can end up on more longlists, giving you more chance, not less, that decision-making humans will be reading your CV (or LinkedIn profile).

Whether you are looking to optimise your CV or LinkedIn profile, the first thing you need to do is put yourself in the mind of the searchers. Whether it’s HR managers, internal recruiters, external recruiters or line managers, they should be searching for similar things. But you need to understand what they are looking for, and how they are looking for it.

Manually added codes or keywords are the only 2 ways of searching LinkedIn and CV databases. Manual codes are added by the person viewing your CV, so are purely subjective. But if your CV is focussed enough, it should be coded right by anyone that knows their business.

Getting your keywords right is the silver bullet to either scenario.

Keywords – What are Mine?

Keywords for CV searches are exactly what you think. They can be anything, depending on what the searcher could be looking for. They might be specific or vague (BSc Hons vs Degree; MCIPS vs CIPS). Or they might include category, industry, level, achievement, or team size, or similar.

To work out what your keywords are, you need to think about what the searcher will be looking for when recruiting the role:

  • Categories
  • Industry sectors
  • Management level
  • Competencies
  • Technical skills
  • Software
  • Languages
  • Education level
  • Qualifications

Some of these are simple, but if you’re struggling to come up with keywords for tougher questions, come at it from a different angle:

  • Which are the things you are most proud of?
  • What is your boss and business happiest with?
  • What projects have you been on?
  • Do you have old appraisals or what did you discuss in them?
  • If you’ve been applying for jobs what are the similarities (and therefore keywords) between them?

Once you have your keywords, you need to add them fluidly into your CV. Some keyword searching software counts the amount of keywords and rates the CV appropriately, so don’t be afraid to add them 3 or 4 times (where appropriate).

And so it doesn’t stand out as overkill, spread the critical ones through your summary, a job title and a job overview.

Word Configuration Oddities – Beware

Depending on the software’s (and searchers’) complexity and skill, it may search in a number of ways. Don’t assume these are Google-level algorithms – they absolutely aren’t. Some engines and searchers will search for a specific word string which will not be flexible.

For example, if they search for “Marketing Category Manager” then “Category Manager Marketing” wouldn’t come up.

There are ways to search for these strings (or any other configuration), but you should set your CV up on the basis that it’s being read by the cheapest, simplest system possible, run by the least IT literate searcher. Plan for the worst and hope for the best.

To get around this, make sure you vary the word order through your CV, so you will catch whichever configuration they are searching.

Multiple Category Job Titles

For the same reason, make sure you shake up your technical skills.

  • IT/Telco Procurement Manager
  • IT/Telco Category Manager
  • Hardware/Software Category Manager
  • Procurement and Supply Chain Manager

In these examples, if someone does a basic search for IT Category Manager, IT Procurement Manager, Hardware Category Manager or Procurement Manager, then you won’t appear in the search. Make sure you vary it, switching it around in job titles, your personal summary and job overviews.

This gets harder as you get to an executive level but play around with the idea.

Natural Text

Never forget that you are trying to make your CV as easy to read as possible. Don’t shoehorn keywords in – the holy grail is to get your keywords in your CV without anyone noticing what you’ve done.

Natural text is critical. There’s no point getting past the algorithm hurdle to get rejected because it doesn’t make any sense to a human. Thankfully we are still a way away from the robots rising up and making these decisions for us!

Alarm Bells

If you’re getting lots of calls for completely irrelevant roles, you may well have the wrong keywords on your CV, or the wrong codes on their system.

Feel free to ask how they searched for your details. If they use codes, ask what codes they have, and feel free to help them correct them if you feel they’re wrong.

Make sure your keywords are clear. There are a number of categories that could be mistaken for other roles (Marketing and IT are a couple). Make sure it’s obvious in these areas that it’s procurement you are responsible for, and not marketing as a department.

I hope this helps you tweak your CV and make it appear in more, better, searches.

Building on over a decade of corporate recruitment (and reading in the region of 250,000 CVs), Andy Wilkinson set up The Chameleon Career Consultancy to coach CV Writing, Interview Technique and LinkedIn Profile writing. 

If you would like any advice on any of these areas or more help on your CV feel free to get in touch by e-mail, or visit the Chameleon website or LinkedIn page.

5 Things To Know When Looking for a Job Abroad

Moving and finding a job abroad is something that many people do during their lives. But what do you need to know before you start looking?

Job Abroad

Leaving your home, friends and family behind and moving to another country, where everything that surrounds you is completely different from that to which you are used to, is not an easy task.

New countries have different people, different cultures, different food and sometimes even a different language.

However, for some people leaving their country of origin and traveling to settle down for a while on the other side of the planet represents a personal goal or even a milestone they need to achieve.

In order to get established in a new country, there are some important things you will need to take into account: finding a job, a house, a room or an apartment, learning the native language, basic cultural norms, and so much more! But let’s focus on finding a job for now.

Follow these simple recommendations and you will be well on your way to successfully finding a job abroad:

1. Do your research

Before applying for a job abroad, you need to be informed about how they manage resumes in the country you are moving to. Do you need a cover letter? Short or long resume? Do you need to attach your certificates? Or is your resume acceptable as is?

In some countries including a photo is the norm, in others it is frowned upon. In some cases, you will need to translate and notarise your degree and other certificates, so it is very important to do your research.

2. Spread the news

Once you make a decision about the place you are going to be living next, tell every single person you know. This way, you will probably meet people who went through a similar experience or that are native of the country you chose.

Your aunt will always have a friend of a friend who spent their summer in a far away and exotic country.

3. Consider all your possibilities

Before quitting your job and booking the first ticket to Timbuktu, find out if the company you are currently working for offers exchange programs, or if you have the possibility of being transferred to another branch.

Other options are searching online for a job abroad, as well as searching your alumni networks and social network connections. Volunteering is also a great way to work abroad – it’s also a very rewarding experience.

4. Be smart

Always let the employer know, in your cover letter or during the interview, that you have done your research about the different aspects of their country and that you are willing and prepared to start working. Furthermore, assure them that you are flexible enough so as to adapt to a foreign environment.

5. Don’t be scared, relax

You have done your research, and have talked to every person you know about working abroad. You have looked for jobs online, and you know everything there is to know about your target country. And you have saved enough money to survive at least two months without a job. You are officially ready.

Of course it is scary to live somewhere completely new, but it will probably be the most exciting adventure of your life. So go for it!

Vanessa Fardi is the Leader of US, Central America, and Latin America Team for Canadian startup neuvoo. Neuvoo is a job search engine that indexes jobs available online in one unique platform, without any charge for the source of the job. It was created in 2011 and is currently available in more than 60 countries.

How to Draft the Perfect CV

A good CV is critical to getting your foot in the door in the recruitment process. A perfect CV can help you get the job of your dreams.

Perfect CV

When it comes to finding a job, besides having the will and disposition to do it, it is essential to know how to present yourself! That is why you should be thinking very carefully about drafting the perfect CV.

A CV is a document that summarises detailed information about you. The importance of having a good CV generally lies in the fact that it is the first requirement when applying for a job. Your CV will be the main source of information —and first impression— that the company will receive from you.

The Perfect CV

If you are not really sure what type information to add to your CV or how to organise it, do not worry! Neuvoo have prepared a list of recommendations just for you:

  • Country Format

Check if the country where you want to apply for a job offer has a specific format before designing your CV, as this may vary.

  • Specificity 

Try to be as specific and to the point as possible in the information you add to your CV.

  • Personal Information

Add your personal information: full name, age, career and courses, address and contact information. Furthermore, along with your phone number, include an email address and, when possible, add the user name of your social networks.

Nowadays, many companies consider the content and the use you make out of them very important. Try to keep all that information in a visible place, it may be at the top of the page or, if you want to explore a design variation, you could add a left-hand column with all this information.

  • Skills Summary

Summarise the skills and abilities you have. It is essential for a business to know which are your strengths. They will take you into consideration if you have what it takes to perform well in your job.

  • Work Experience

Add previous work experience, in chronological order. Be specific in the tasks you performed. Include the name of the company you worked for and the period of time you were there.

  • Additional Information

Do not forget to mention the courses you took, additional studies and, if you master one or several languages, include them as well!

Vanessa Fardi is the Leader of US, Central America, and Latin America Team for Canadian startup neuvoo. Neuvoo is a job search engine that indexes jobs available online in one unique platform, without any charge for the source of the job. It was created in 2011 and is currently available in more than 60 countries.