Tag Archives: procurement savings

The Loss Leading Approach to Savings

Challenging, controversial and, for small organisations, potentially crippling, but for many, Loss Leading remains a popular strategy. Is there a sustainable way procurement can use this strategy to deliver real savings?

Photo by Artem Beliaikin from Pexels

Loss Leading is the practice of selling products at, or just below, cost price, with the aim of bringing consumers into a store and then selling add-on items to the original product, or encourage impulse purchases. And when the average consumer spends $5,400 per year on impulse purchases, you can understand the attractiveness of this.

If you have been shopping for groceries, a new mobile phone, electronics or even a new car, the chances are fairly high that you have encountered a Loss Leader pricing strategy. So common are these deals across a whole range of goods and services that it’s probable you have encountered this strategy without even realising it.

It’s the notion that this strategy is somehow underhand that, in spite of its popularity, has led to controversy. It’s even been banned in half of US states and some European countries. Why? Because there is a widely held belief that the practice doesn’t promote competition and may harm consumers in the long-term. 

Reduced Competition?

The fact that the strategy has been banned in half of US states suggests that the practice has more negative connotations than positive. In most cases, the belief is that Loss Leading actually reduces market competition to the detriment of the consumer. 

Large organisations, the likes of Amazon, Walmart and Apple for example, have broad product ranges and the ability to withstand losses from these products by having a greater profit margin on others. Smaller organisations don’t have this luxury and either choose not to stock a product or sell it for more, reducing consumer choice.

It’s not all positive for organisations either. Savvy consumers may only look for the introductory offer or the products at the loss leading price, and not buy add-ons. This is termed as ‘cherry picking’ and may cause financial issues for even large organisations in the long-term. There may also be a knock-on effect in the supply chain as manufacturers may be required, or feel the need, to keep prices low so that loss leading strategies can continue.

There are positives for organisations and consumers though. Organisations may use it as a strategy to increase sales or engage consumers on a new product, with consumers benefiting from better deals and lower prices. 

Could we then be looking at a situation where unsustainable loss leading is the issue, where the strategy is actively used to reduce competition or drive other organisations out of business? And how does all of this relate to procurement?

Sustainable Loss Leading

For procurement, introductory pricing and negotiated discounts are commonplace. Across all industries and sectors, suppliers will try to get a foot in the door with an organisation, offering lower prices, demonstrations and even free samples. While regulations and transparency should stop this having a direct correlation to contracts awarded, there is benefit that procurement can derive from this.

Where suppliers can accommodate lower prices, a loss leading strategy on price plays right into procurement’s hands. As the profession looks to drive down costs in both direct and indirect sourcing, procurement strategies are looking for greater innovation and strategic buying initiatives to achieve this, without just chipping away at profit margins.

The Power of GPOs

Let’s say, hypothetically, that procurement professionals are looking at loss leading strategies without knowing that this is what they are. A good procurement strategy would focus on ensuring that no matter how low the price is, it is sustainable for the market and the supplier. After all, it’s no use driving prices down and putting your supplier out of business. 

What if there was a solution in the market that would enable sustainable loss leading prices over the longer term, which procurement could take advantage of? The good news is that there is in the form of Group Purchasing Organisations (GPOs). Linking up with a GPO doesn’t diminish procurement’s role, rather it enhances it. Supplier consolidation activities can be aided and it’s not a ‘race to the bottom’ in pricing, meaning that required quality levels will be maintained.

GPOs will assist in gaining the best prices possible through sourcing at bulk rates, without the individual organisations having to increase their purchasing volumes. The GPO can then guarantee that these prices stay low, at the ‘loss leader’ level for the life of the contract, through the use of pre-negotiated contracts and the fact that, due to the volume, even the smallest organisation is treated as a key customer for the supply base.

Turning the Negative Positive 

As you can see, when done sensitively and sustainably, a loss leading strategy for savings can actually be a positive for procurement. Not only that, but by taking the route of the GPO, the strategy is open for the first time to smaller organisations, without the potentially fatal risks attached to it. As procurement strategies go, it’s a strong one, allowing for wider input and not undermining strategic supplier relationships. 

Who knows, you might even earn your organisation a slice of that impulse spend. Now that would be a good outcome, wouldn’t it?

Want to know how to gain the benefits of sustainable loss leading without any of the negatives? Then contact UNA today and join their growing network.   

What Literature and Film Teaches us about Savings

The theme of money is a very common one in the world of books and film. So what can our favourite fictional characters teach us about increasing our savings?

From Pixabay on Pexels

It’s not too much of a stretch to suggest that procurement can learn a lot about saving from literary and film characters. Money is a common central theme in so many novels and movies and so it shouldn’t come as a surprise that there is a multitude of good and bad examples of how organisations can manage their money. 

One of the many options available to organisations is to look for external assistance in the form of procurement consulting. To tie in with the idea of drawing inspiration from a network of sources, one particular strategy would be to use a Group Purchasing Organisation (GPO). A GPO draws uses the collective purchasing power of its members to achieve greater discounts and lower prices from suppliers. 

The benefits don’t stop there. A GPO can apply various procurement strategies and actually increase organisational savings year-on-year. It’s about selecting the right strategy or strategies. And this is where our movie and book characters come in.

Strategic Buying and Mr. Micawber

Wilkins Micawber is a primary character in the Charles Dickens novel, David Copperfield. The character has begat the ‘Micawber Principle’, which simply and eloquently states that if annual expenditure exceeds annual income, then the result is ‘misery’. Though he seems to be better at offering this advice than taking it himself, this shows a good example of strategic buying.

In spite of some criticism faced, GPOs don’t encourage greater spending or higher volume of purchasing – this is a myth! They do, however, utilise the greater buying power of the collective over the individual to provide lower prices for members. And then, in addition, keep these prices lower in the long-term by leveraging higher volumes and pre-negotiated contracts. 

Definitely no misery here if the strategic buying is carried out effectively, as this will result in continued savings for the organisation.

Monty Brewster and Centralised Procurement 

If you haven’t seen the 1985 comedy classic, ‘Brewster’s Millions’, then finish reading this first and then go and find it on whichever TV/film/streaming service you use! In the book and film, the titular Brewster must spend $30 million in 30 days in order to inherit $300 million. And there are a couple of catches: 

  1. if he fails to spend the full amount he is left with nothing; and 
  2. he cannot tell anyone the reason for his spending spree.

Let’s set aside for a moment that this is every procurement professional’s nightmare end user – off doing their own thing without communicating anything. 

One of Brewster’s main issues in spending the money is his well-meaning friend, Spike. While Brewster is off throwing money away, Spike is making shrewd investments and actually earning more. It’s the very definition of decentralised procurement.

A GPO helps to build centralised procurement in the organisation and in its network of members. Communication is key and demand management strategies are developed by procurement in conjunction with end users, reducing excess usage. This is all supported by GPOs providing metrics and benchmarks from the network for all members to use. 

This again helps keeps the price down in the longer term and reduces the likelihood of an end user going on a Brewster-style spending spree!

Procurement Software and Nick Leeson

They say the best stories start with the kernel of truth. Well this one is based on a true story which helps to highlight the benefits of procurement software in both traceability and compliance. Ewan MacGregor plays real-life ‘Rogue Trader’, Nick Leeson, whose attempts to save and recoup money caused one of the biggest scandals in banking history.

Without trivialising the situation, or making light of what was a very damaging time for a large number of people, the film and real-life story highlight why organisations, and procurement within them, need high quality procurement software to track and manage spend. The concept of ‘you can’t save what you can’t see’, as well as ensuring that spend is compliant rather than non-contract or maverick, links heavily to the savings agenda.

Companies like Sourcing Insights provide world-class software and analytics which enable procurement to track and visualise data in real-time and see where future issues may lie. You may not have a Rogue Trader in your midst, but with the application of the right software you’ll have greater control on your spend which will help to deliver savings year after year. 

Managing your Money

There’s an idea in procurement that to get the best from spending, professionals need to spend the money like it’s their own. But how about you engage some procurement consulting and get them to manage your money like it was their own?

Whether you are a Micawber or a Brewster, you can access the best knowledge and software, knowing that your money is safe in their hands. After all, it would be nice to be able to point to this success the next time your CFO asks “show me the money”!

From savings and pre-negotiated agreements, to spend analytics and collective buying power, GPOs provide a wealth of benefits to procurement organisations. Find out more by visiting UNA.com now.

Navigating the Choppy Waters of the Future – An Expert’s View

Photo by Garrett Sears on Unsplash

The US escalating a trade war with China by imposing additional tariffs on Chinese goods. The ongoing debacle of European trade policies over Brexit. The perennial Middle East crisis over oil. 2019 has not been easy for global businesses and their procurement professionals.

But given that it is only one-quarter of the exhaustion, could we benefit from an expert’s insights and frame strategies such that procurement can navigate successfully through the rest of the waters?

Sure! Zycus got in touch with the CEO & President of SIG, Dawn Tiura soliciting her point-of-view on how procurement professionals can navigate through the uncertain times ahead. Dawn, a former partner in a CPA firm, focused on early-stage Silicon Valley enterprises and high wealth individuals, kindly agreed to explain her actionable list of do’s and don’ts that every Procurement leader can benefit from.

Zycus: What elements should be central to our conversation on procurement in the coming year?

Dawn: One of the important conversations that procurement teams all over the world should reflect on at the moment is their understanding that every dollar-saved might not directly translate into company’s eventual revenue objective but they do improve the bottom line when the focus is consistent. We have the unique ability to impact not only bottom-line savings but also top-line growth. We have insight into all lines of business as they are making decisions, not in the rearview mirror. And, we have relationships with suppliers who are incented to bring innovation to us. If that is not enough, why not use equivalent revenue? That will get the attention of the CFO, CEO, and Board.

Zycus: Most organizations majorly use hard dollar savings as the primary parameter to measure procurement and sourcing performance. Would it be safe to say it is a dated method of measuring current performance?

Dawn: Absolutely. We have to stop using savings as our sole barometer for measurement. Let’s look at an example:

The spend of an organization is $500 million; the cost avoidance from sourcing efforts at 12% comes to $60 million. Net profit margin is 7.5%. The equivalent revenue to generate the same value from sourcing efforts is $800 million (or $60 million divided by 7.5%)

The amount of energy required by the company to generate $800 million in revenue is massive and clearly understood by all members of the C-suite. Therefore, reporting results in terms of “equivalent revenue” instead of “savings” positions the sourcing organization in a more impactful and compelling way.

While you would assume that others will make this calculation and realize this is the case, they don’t, or can’t make the analogy to give us the credit we deserve. We must step up and change the dialogue to get the respect we have earned. 

(Read Dawn’s complete blog that talks about this issue and a lot of others here)

Zycus: So the first focus of a procurement and sourcing professional is getting the C-Suite to shift focus from savings to equivalent revenue, what would you say would feature next in their “things to keep in mind” list?

Dawn: Third party risks. Procurement and Sourcing professionals should be particularly mindful about these threats and therefore should have a foresight aided by technology that would mitigate the potential of loss. A take charge approach towards risks is what the current environment demands. Procurement and sourcing teams all over are responsible for managing goals and key relationships for the organization. It becomes vital for them to work on these objectives while taking into consideration the various risks they might be exposed to. Strategical planning and readiness will help not only tackle these risks better but also ensure the routine operations and performance doesn’t get disrupted.

Zycus: From what we’ve seen, these discussions seem much underrated, what can organizations do to ingrain this line of thought across the team?

Dawn: You make a valid point. However, that is changing. Organizations are becoming more mindful that this change in mindset is long due, and they need to adapt. This is why we’re seeing more and more people investing in education and certifications, so they have the necessary skillset to tackle these changes better.

Zycus: Artificial Intelligence has created a lot of buzz. How do you think that is changing procurement today.

Dawn: There is a breakthrough using Artificial Intelligence to manage risks in tail spend. A lot of companies are still new to the idea of AI, but the use of AI will be a game-changer.

Zycus: Gartner’ predicts, “By 2022, 75% of all B2B tail spend goods will be purchased in an online marketplace.” Do you agree with this?

Dawn: Indeed. As legacy systems continue to phase out, it is only AI that can redeem procurement an improved balance sheet.

Another aspect of change that people might miss out on is accounting regulations changing concerning leases and procurement people need to be aware of the changes and impact on their companies.  While the implementation of the new lease accounting guidance will fall within the accounting department, procurement needs to be a part of this review to provide its perspective on any proposed changes to agreements and to do the cost/benefit analysis.

Zycus: Moving forward, one thing that has always been a concern is how procurement can have a facelift from being a more tactical function to a strategic one. So what steps would you recommend teams take for this significant makeover?

Dawn: A strategic mindset is crucial to this rebranding of procurement. This transition is what will make other functions value procurement’s take on importing sourcing decisions. For this procurement, professionals need to be all eyes on various risks and opportunities. Professionals must be mindful of changing technologies. They need to prepare for it with certification in third party risk management and sourcing professional’s coursework.

Procurement and sourcing teams should consistently measure their contribution to the enterprise. An excellent way to measure one’s impact on to company’s strategic objectives would be to create a chart that cascades from the top management down to the business units, and how at each phase, the person has contributed to every success. On this note report from the Hackett Group also states, “This is a unique time for procurement organizations. Never before have companies been able to derive more competitive advantage from superior procurement capability. The function’s role is shifting from a sourcing gatekeeper to a provider of insight and decision support, made possible by improved access to digital technologies, data, and advanced analytics. World-class procurement organizations consistently get better results with 29% fewer (but higher-paid) FTEs per billion dollars of spend.”

Zycus: One parameter to measure overall procurement impact would be to track contribution in top-level business objectives, what do you think could be other benchmarks procurement teams could use to measure performance holistically?

Dawn:We need to, as proactive procurement practitioners, change how savings from procurement is measured. “Equivalent revenue,” the term will not only consist of hard dollar savings but elements like savings through cost avoidance. Anything that impacts the bottom line and contributes to growth counts!  

Another common and useful benchmark used to measure performance is FTEs. The number of full-time equivalent employees (FTEs) needed to perform a process, or a group of processes is one way to gauge process efficiency. The fewer FTEs required to process purchases, the higher the efficiency and the lower the overall cost of the procurement cycle. However, consider only those who formally report into the procurement organization.

FTEs are employees who devote all or part of their jobs to sourcing activities, and they should factor into the measurement. Meaning, if a non-procurement employee spends a portion of his time to procurement or sourcing activities, he or she is a partial FTE. Their effort will also eventually add up to that of full-time employees.

Zycus: My last question to you is, what are three things procurement should start/stop doing this year?

Dawn: The first thing that Procurement professionals must stop is being transactional and writing checks. The second to stop would be to keep talking about savings over everything else, while the last one would be to learn to communicate in the language of the CFO.

Our Conclusion from the interview

A seemingly strong inference that can be drawn from this interaction is Procurement’s transition from a transactional to a strategic function. This shift in approach has been a necessity for some time now; statements from subject matter experts and veterans advising Procurement professionals advising alignment of goals and their measurement, to learn the language of a CFO instead of focusing on operational goals, go to show how vital that shift is now.

Read our latest eBook “Procurement Experts Outlook 2019” to gain more insights into what eight other experts predict for the procurement future.

References:

–         https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/may-i-vent-lets-change-how-we-talk-procurement-dawn-tiura/

Out Of Savings Ideas? Here’s How To Unlock A New Level Of Buying Power

If you feel like you’ve exhausted every avenue for finding cost savings, a Group Purchasing Organization could be the answer to your challenge.

By Andrew Paul Deer /Shutterstock

There’s a gripping scene in the last chapters of Jules Verne’s Around the World in Eighty Days where the ever-dapper hero, Phileas Fogg, finds himself on a steamboat from New York to Ireland. Going full steam against hurricane winds, the vessel runs out of coal after a few days but Fogg, desperate to get to London in time to win a wager, buys the steamer from the captain and launches a desperate plan.

He instructs the crew to feed the furnace with all the wooden parts of the ship – the cabins, bunks, masts, rafts, spars were all burned, followed by the decking itself in a “perfect rage for demolition”. By the time they reach Queenstown the steamship has been reduced to an iron hull and an engine.

Procurement and supply management professionals on the never-ending hunt for cost savings can face a similar situation. Through the identification of efficiencies, negotiations with suppliers and more drastic cost-cutting initiatives, the wooden decking of the steamship (your organization) can be rapidly stripped away until suddenly you’re left with nothing but the hull.

In an immature procurement function, it’s very easy for procurement professionals to look good by posting impressive savings figures month after month. But as your function matures and savings opportunities become harder to find, your track record suddenly doesn’t look so hot.

Where to from here? Well, that’s where innovative thinking comes in. Finding further savings after all of the obvious avenues have been exhausted takes creativity and out-of-the-box solutions. If you do plan on going back to your supplier base to negotiate lower prices, you’ll need to offer them something in return for a better deal.

Volume, volume, volume

If you’re in a situation where you need further costs savings, but your suppliers genuinely cannot budge on price, there’s one sure-fire lever to reach for – volume.

Most businesses end up paying more than they need to because they only spend a modest amount in a particular category and will never unlock the power of bulk discounts. But not every organization has the resources – or warehouse space – to ramp up their purchase volume on their own. But what if there was a way to get the discounts of “bulk” without having to buy more?

Joining a Group Purchasing Organization (GPO) gives members access to savings you would never be able to negotiate on your own. Your organization joins a group of others buying the same thing, meaning you can leverage your collective purchase and buy in bulk as a group to create buying power.

GPOs help businesses of all sizes save on indirect and direct spend. The savings are found not just through bulk discounts, but through efficiencies (such as cutting down on search time and issuing RFPs) and administrative cost savings.

Collective buying decreases suppliers’ overheads, which drives further savings for the purchasing organization. Imagine, for example, a cashier who takes five minutes to process an order. 1000 single-item orders would require 5000 minutes of labor, whereas a single order of 1000 items requires five minutes of labor.

Looking for some facts and figures?

We get it – you’re a procurement pro, and procurement pros want to see hard numbers rather than fluffy promises of savings. We can’t speak for every GPO out there, but we can prove the value of GPO membership with our own figures.

UNA is a GPO with a combined $100 billion in buying power. We help procurement professionals:

  • Boost their bottom line with deep discounts we negotiate to save an average of 22% on direct and indirect spend.
  • Gain access to steeply discounted agreements (better contracts) that would typically be out of reach.
  • Unlock exclusive savings on products and services including 80% off office supplies, 26% off hotels, 20% off parcel shipping, and more.
  • Save time through pre-negotiated contracts to get started with new suppliers in 30 days or less.
  • Keep prices stable with agreements to ensure rates don’t increase.
  • We provide a free cost analysis across your highest categories of spend and offer procurement tips and support.

OK, but how much does GPO membership cost?

Every GPO is structured differently. Some GPOs charge members a fee for their services, while other GPOs, like UNA, are paid by the suppliers themselves. We, in turn, use that fee to fund our program, so that it’s always free for our members.

Membership with a GPO creates an advantage for the member that they couldn’t get on their own. If you’re running out of cost savings ideas and want to unlock the buying power driven by bulk pricing, a GPO could be the solution needed to keep your steamship sailing along.

Interested in learning more? Contact UNA to discuss the benefits of Group Purchasing.  

5 Ways to Avoid Spreading Fake News in Procurement

Have you ever been guilty of presenting fake news or “alternative facts” to your CFO? Integrity is a cornerstone of the procurement profession, but benefits realisation is one area where supply managers sometimes play fast and loose with the facts.  

 

It seems everyone is talking about fake news at the moment. The term came to the fore after the U.S. election, when Hilary Clinton called out fake news as a contributing factor to the Democrats’ defeat. Since then, President Trump’s team have wholeheartedly embraced the term, regularly branding unfavourable reports as “fake news” and even describing selected media outlets (such as CNN and Buzzfeed) “fake news organisations”.

 

After Trump’s press secretary Sean Spicer’s first press conference contained provable falsehoods about the size of the inauguration crowd, campaign manager Kellyanne Conway came to his defence by saying that Spicer was simply presenting “alternative facts”, much to the delight of Twitter users who immediately converted the term into a hashtag.

Fake news can be dangerous – putting aside whether or not it influenced the U.S. election, the phenomenon has inflamed racial tensions, led to at least one shooting (the “Pizzagate” gunman), while more recently the two nuclear powers Israel and Pakistan exchanged tense words over a news report that proved to have no verifiable source.

The good news is that solutions are popping up all over the globe. The BBC is setting up a “fake news” team, Italy plans to establish commissions of experts to rule on the veracity of news, while Germany has threatened to fine social media platforms including Twitter and Facebook for spreading fake stories.

How does fake news apply to procurement? Let’s look at two examples – firstly, the CPO’s role as the organisation’s trusted advisor and arbiter of facts, and secondly, the risk of feeding “fake news” about cost savings upwards to the CFO.

 The trusted advisor in times of crisis

When a disruptive event takes place, procurement needs to be known as the calm centre of the storm. Let’s take Brexit as an example. After the shock result in June last year, a rising sense of panic took hold of markets while business leaders worldwide were rattled. Media organisations began to speculative on the potential fallout of the Brexit vote, leading to the danger of knee-jerk reactions from CEOs and other decision-makers.

It was gratifying to see that one week later, the CEOs of the world’s two biggest professional bodies for procurement and supply management released statements that contained essentially the same message of reassurance. Importantly, both statements emphasised the procurement professional’s role as the suppressor of speculation and the guardian of facts.

ISM’s Tom Derry spoke to Procurious about his organisations’ decision to release a supplementary Report on Business revealing that the impact of Brexit on US CPOs’ buying decisions was negligible. “There has been an enormous amount of speculation about the impact of Brexit, fed by a sense of unease and uncertainty”, said Derry. “ISM was in a position to gather real data and put the information out there so businesses can make informed decisions based on facts, rather than fear, concern or emotion.”

Similarly, the late CIPS CEO David Noble urged procurement and supply professionals to “act as the suppressor of panic, not the creator”. Noble said that how supply managers behave “is fundamental to how the business manages these coming weeks and months. Supply chains can emphasise or exaggerate concern, which can then be magnified all the way down the chain.”

Benefits realisation – procurement’s very own “fake news”

While the Brexit example demonstrates how procurement can either supress or endorse speculation originating in the media, there’s one area where CPOs are guilty of generating fake news themselves – the realisation of negotiated savings and other benefits.

In a report commissioned by members of The Faculty Roundtable entitled Making it Stick, researchers found that 50% of contracted savings are not making their way to the bottom line in leading Australian organisations. Without effective contract management to realise the full value of savings and other benefits, procurement professionals risk damaging the integrity of the function. Eventually, the falsehood will catch up with them when the CFO calls them into their office and demands: “Where’s the money?”

That’s why, to avoid being a purveyor of false data, CPOs must address the fundamental shortfalls that are costing organisations hundreds of millions in unrealised savings.

Five ways to turn “fake news” into real, bankable savings

Procurement teams are adept at finding the money, but it takes a whole organisation to keep the money. Given the uncertain business climate facing organisations internationally, driving savings and other value to the bottom line is an absolute priority facing the C-level today.

  1. Encourage enterprise-wide ownership and alignment with Procurement’s targets (shared targets).
  2. Bust silos through true cross-functional collaboration, particularly between procurement and finance.
  3. Work to eliminate maverick spend and other non-compliance that undermines procurement’s gains and damages supplier relationships.
  4. Establish crystal-clear benefits definitions, measurements and validation processes, agreed upon across the organisation.
  5. Create a cost-conscious culture to enable CPO-level efforts to expand the value that procurement contributes.

In short, as a CPO you’ll need integrity to win the trust and respect of your team, your peers, and your suppliers. Your willingness to accept or even endorse fake news, such as panic-driven speculation or unrealised savings, will very quickly erode this respect and lose the confidence required to run an effective procurement function.

Mastering the True Art of Saving

Why addressing demand management, and bringing down your demand can realise more of a procurement saving than simply cutting costs.

This article was written by Jon Milton, Director at Comensura.

Most of us know too well the need to tighten the purse strings occasionally in our daily lives. When doing so it’s a natural response to search for cheaper alternatives to the services and products that you’re already buying.

Think about your home energy expenditure for example. Let’s say that you shop around and find a supplier that charges 5 per cent less than you already pay. That’s a good reduction, but it’s a saving within the scale of pricing which, aside from some major shift in energy production trends, is only going to vary to a certain degree. This kind of cost-saving approach will typically only be incremental and rarely save you a dramatic amount.

However, there is an alternative way to save – by managing down your demand. Rather than the pain of switching provider, you could install a smart energy meter and manage down the demand for energy throughout your home, eliminating excessive energy used, and pinpointing when and where you need the heating on. A smarter approach like this could save you much more than 5 per cent.

Smart Saving

It’s for that reason that a cost cutting approach that goes beyond incremental savings should be applied to the corporate world too – especially in complex spend categories such as temporary labour. It’s difficult to know for sure how many workers you need, as it requires you to have an overall view of your organisation’s demand.

And once you establish a number, the sample of workers that are on offer to you vary by qualifications, experience, skills, availability, geography and more – all of which affect how much the candidate costs – making temporary recruitment a complex service category.

Think about how much money organisations could be wasting by hiring the wrong number of temporary workers, the wrong kind, or by not utilising their skills properly. Our evidence as a labour supply management specialist shows that by accurately sourcing the right skills against the organisation’s demand, you can take your cost saving on temporary staff from less than 20 per cent, to over 50 per cent.

Addressing Demand Management

Here are some steps you can take to address temporary labour demand management issues:-

1. Understand your expenditure

Temporary labour is typically ordered directly by line managers as it is under their supervision and control that workers are engaged. There’s usually a business rationale, but is it justifiable?

Additionally, the original rationale for engaging temporary labour will normally be linked to a set time period, such as three months. Any expenditure beyond this initial period should therefore be questioned as to why it is required. 

2. Challenge usage

Once you’ve established an understanding of what’s being spent on temporary labour, ask your managers to justify any anomalies. If they cannot provide sound business rationale, ask them to create an exit plan for the worker and an agreed date. When you review usage the following month, make sure that the worker has been exited.

3. Start planning your workforce

If your use of contingent labour is reactive, ‘fire fighting’ to meet business demand, it is unlikely that you will be in control of your expenditure. Try and review your ordering patterns to identify trends, as this will enable you to plan the workers’ tasks and/or help you to plan your permanent headcount’s activities better.

For example, if historically your usage of contingent workers has a spike in August when staff go on holiday, you may want to review the way that you co-ordinate leave requests, and then plan ahead where cover is required.

4. Properly evaluate needs

Feeling the pressure to hire contingent staff and then recruiting staff that are over qualified (and paid more than the work requires) is one way to rack up an unnecessarily hefty bill. By understanding your requirements fully, you can better establish the experience and type of individual required.

5. Provide a detailed specification

Once you’ve established and understood your requirements, make sure that you, or managers across your organisation communicate these requirements properly. If you want someone with certain skills and experience, be specific about what you need. It sounds simple but it is one of the most common pitfalls that we come across and can cause significant issues.

Often the role is specified (which in an applicant’s mind they could do), but the experience, demonstrable evidence of skills and attributes are not. The more detailed you are, the closer your applicants should be to the requirement. You may get fewer applications, but the quality of hire should be much better.

Saving on Category Procurement

Many organisations are already taking a sound approach to complex category procurement, and with the financial benefits they’ve seen, it’s safe to say that they don’t regret the decision. One of our customers regularly uses temporary staff, and chose us as a single platform to place orders, assign candidates, and manage its temporary staff time sheets.

Having saved £900,000 on temporary staff in 17 months, and delivered a 10 per cent cost saving overall, the customers’ smarter approach to managing temporary staff means that it can invest more funds into vital areas of the organisation.

Just as its name suggests, complex category procurement is a tricky process, particularly when looking for ways to make procurement cost-effective. But provided you look at the wider picture of your organisation, you can restructure processes and gain the benefits.

It starts with making a distinction between your complex and simple procurement, and approaching processes like temporary recruitment in a smarter way that means not just finding cheaper providers.