Tag Archives: procurement strategy

Big Ideas Summit 2016: Big Idea #14 – Procurement Must Evolve

Procurement must evolve if it’s going to survive. It needs to leave its comfort zone and showcase real value for the organisation.

At the Big Ideas Summit 2016, we challenged our thought leaders to share their Big Ideas for the future of procurement.

From ideas that have the potential to change the very nature of the procurement profession, to ones that got the assembled minds thinking about the profession’s impact outside of the organisation, the response we received was amazing.

Evolve to Survive

Dapo Ajayi, CPO at AstraZeneca, believes that procurement as a profession must evolve in order to remain relevant.

Dapo argues that procurement needs to stop being process-based, and leaders must develop new skills in order to deal with ambiguity, and enable evolution into a profession that can work with the business to enable value.

Catch up with all the delegates’ Big Ideas from the 2016 Summit at the Procurious Learning Hub.

Want to find out more about Big Ideas 2016? And maybe what we have planned for 2017? You can visit our dedicated website!

If you like this (and you haven’t done so already) join Procurious for free today. Get connected with over 17,000 like-minded procurement professionals from across the world.

10 Ideas to Encourage Suppliers to Go the Extra Mile

Are your suppliers willing to go the extra mile for you? What can you offer them to drive the extra effort?

Extra Mile

Buyers rely on suppliers to perform numerous requests from the very beginning of their relationship.

From the first RFx, to the laundry list of requests on tight timelines, suppliers play an integral role in the sourcing process. And having them wanting to help can make a huge difference.

What can supplier enablement do to encourage suppliers to meet their deadlines, and even go the extra mile beyond the bare minimum?

Here are ten potential ‘carrots’ to offer suppliers: 

1) Invite to Assist with eProcurement Pilots

Suppliers welcome getting as much exposure as possible. Particularly if they are a new supplier, or you’re rolling out a new eProcurement system.

You can let suppliers know that if they can meet or even exceed your requirements that you’ll highlight them during testing and User Acceptance Testing (UAT). You can include them in your test scripts, and call them out during demos, amongst other things.

2) Feature on eProcurement System’s Home Page

Some modern eProcurement systems give admins the ability to display whatever you’d like on the homepage using business enabled CMS blocks.

Offering this prime real estate to highlight suppliers who have excelled (e.g. provided an awesome catalogue or offered heavy discounts) would be a huge inspiration for a supplier.

3) Float Sales Items to Top of Search Results

Modern eProcurement systems allow admins to affect search results giving specific items more weight or even float to the top of search results.

Similar to how suppliers promote sales items on their B2C sites, you can offer suppliers to boost items they agree to put on sale for at least a period of time.

4) Invite Onsite for ‘Meet and Greet’

Most suppliers will welcome the opportunity to come in and informally meet with their end customers. Maybe even allow them to setup their trade show booth or a table in the office lobby.

I’ve seen some buyers even create some co-branded marketing material, including booth signs or posters, stating that the supplier’s products were available on the eProcurement platform.

5) Visit Them Onsite

When suppliers have to come in to meet with you in your office, it’s typically a nerve-racking experience for them. They’re probably all dressed up and a little nervous as they enter your, likely relatively lavish, corporate office building.

But offering to come to their office for an informal tour/meet-n-greet would likely be an enjoyable honour for them. 

6) Promote in an Email Blast

How every supplier wishes they had the ability, and their buyer’s blessing, to send even one email to all your employees.

Offer them the chance to promote their offerings in a company-wide email blast and every supplier will jump at the opportunity. 

7) Display an Ad on your Intranet

It’s in a buyer’s best interest to entice more employees to use their eProcurement system to make purchases. The buyer’s intranet is probably a popular place where employees go daily.

You can display an ad on your intranet to let employees know they can procure that supplier’s category via the eProcurement system. For example, “The New iPhone 7 – Now on eBuy!”

8) Offer a Testimonial

Suppliers are very proud of their relationship with their customers. They’re especially proud of being selected to tightly integrate with a customer’s internal eProcurement system after all the effort both have put in. 

When a buyer gives a supplier a testimonial that they can use to grow their business. It’s often a very welcome shot in the arm for the supplier’s marketing efforts.

9) Blessing for a White Paper

A step up from a testimonial would be a buyer’s blessing to allow the supplier to create a white paper on how they’ve helped you.

For example, getting the supplier to tell the story of how they exceeded requirements for the buyers on a new project. 

10) Issue a Press Release

While I’ve never heard of it being done, there is one absolute ultimate carrot (apart from a multi-million dollar contract) which would ensure the extra mile from the supplier.

This would be to give the supplier their blessing to issue a press release to let the world know about the partnership. Ideally the release could also include a quote from the buyer.

Admittedly, this would only make sense if it was a very strategic and unique arrangement, and that a press release would make BOTH companies look good.

Some of these may be out of the question for your organisation. But hopefully they’ll at least give you a sense of what’s often valuable to suppliers, and some ideas on how you can help them to help you.

What are some other examples of ways you’ve been able to encourage suppliers to go the extra mile?

Big Ideas Summit 2016: Big Idea #12 – Millennial Talent Response

The Millennial generation has greater expectations in relation to job roles. Only by changing the way they engage Millennials can organisations meet these expectations.

At the Big Ideas Summit 2016, we challenged our thought leaders to share their Big Ideas for the future of procurement.

From ideas that have the potential to change the very nature of the procurement profession, to ones that got the assembled minds thinking about the profession’s impact outside of the organisation, the response we received was amazing.

Meeting Millennial Expectations

Nic Walden, Director – Procurement P2P Advisor at The Hackett Group, talks about the greater expectations that Millennials have for job roles.

These include expectations from on working on CSR projects, and building sustainable relationships, to the technology that they will be working with.

Nic argues that procurement needs to change the way it engages with the Millennial generation in the workplace to meet these expectations.

Catch up with all the delegates’ Big Ideas from the 2016 Summit at the Procurious Learning Hub.

Want to find out more about Big Ideas 2016? And maybe what we have planned for 2017? You can visit our dedicated website!

If you like this (and you haven’t done so already) join Procurious for free today. Get connected with over 16,000 like-minded procurement professionals from across the world.

Would You Couchsurf to Make Business Travel Savings?

Splitting travel savings with employees may be the best way to encourage travellers to treat every dollar of company money as their own.

Couchsurfing - Travel Savings

A New-York based consultant, Geoff, has to visit a client in Seattle. He logs onto his organisation’s travel management system to book his flight and hotels.

The app recommends a flight that’s within budget and suits his timeframe. However, Geoff ignores this, scrolls through a list of other options, and selects a flight leaving later for a cheaper price.

Similarly, he chooses not to go with the 4-star hotel recommended by the system. He instead chooses a slightly cheaper hotel that’s still convenient to his destination.

Upon arrival in Seattle, Geoff walks past the cab rank to the bus stop. He’s thinking about where he can get a cheap but healthy meal to avoid ordering room service.

As he makes each travel-related purchase, he’s scanning receipts into his travel app, which subtracts the costs from his total travel budget.

Geoff is behaving like he’s spending his own money rather than his organisation’s travel budget. Why? Because in essence, it is his own money. His company has an arrangement in place where employees are allocated 50 per cent of the savings if they come in under their allocated travel budget.

It’s entirely automated. At the end of his trip, the travel management system takes the difference between the budget and Geoff’s actual costs, splits the savings, and adds half to Geoff’s next pay check.

Sharing travel savings encourages a cost-conscious culture

Why aren’t more organisations sharing travel savings? Possibly, it’s due to a myopic attitude where travel managers are reluctant to part with any savings whatsoever, preferring to allocate every dollar straight back to the bottom line.

However, there’s a much bigger prize at stake. Building a cost-conscious culture and creating that critical mind-shift where employees start treating company money as their own.

Shared travel savings might also fix the multi-billion dollar “open booking” problem. In the US, for example, 50 per cent of hotel bookings and 24 per cent of airline bookings occur outside corporate travel programs. This presents a significant compliance challenge and visibility problem.

Creating a policy wherein shared savings can only be claimed when bookings are made through the approved system would provide a major incentive for employees to comply.

Where can employees save on travel costs?

Here are a few ideas for frugal travel across transport, meals and accommodation:

Flights

Even if your organisation allows you to fly business class, do you really need to? What about flying at a different time of day to get a cheaper fare? A common reason employees go outside approved travel management systems is a belief they can find a better deal themselves.

The TripScanner start-up (acquired last year by Coupa) provides a clever way around this issue. Employees can book travel options via any website they like, so long as they sync their purchases with TripScanner. The software then automatically checks each booking against the company’s travel policy.

Ground transport

Can you take the train or a bus rather than a taxi? How about Uber? There’s always going to be a trade-off between the convenience of being taken directly to your destination and having to walk from the bus stop. However, with the prospect of an extra $25 in your pocket, employees might just choose the bus.

Meals

Consider grabbing a cheap meal rather than paying inflated prices for room service. Keep in mind that “cheap” doesn’t necessarily have to mean “unhealthy”. Eating well and affordably takes planning, as room service is most often ordered when busy travellers run out of time.

Accommodation

This is where your company’s travel policy need to be absolutely clear, because accommodation (and to a lesser extent, transport) involves a safety factor.

Having an approved list of hotels will stop truly frugal employees from trying to save drastically by booking hotels in undesirable parts of town. Or even (in extreme cases) going for an unconventional option such as Couchsurfing.

Setting it up

There are some things to bear in mind when setting up a system such as this.

  • Better planning: Saving money when travelling takes planning, because needlessly expensive flights, taxis and meals are usually chosen due to tight schedules.
  • Get the budget right: Travel managers need to do their research to get the travel budget right for their organisation, as setting it too high will mean losing money unnecessarily. Fortunately, there’s software available to help with this task. A sophisticated travel management system will allocate a unique budget to each trip, rather than a blanket dollar figure for all travel.
  • Make sure your travel policy suits your risk appetite: Travel policies can vary wildly, from tightly-controlled lists of accommodation options, to a free system where employees can do as they like. Again, encouraging frugality may cause some employees to select unsafe options, which is why couchsurfing or ridesharing may need to be excluded from the system.
  • Frugal travelling isn’t for everyone: For some, saving money when travelling might not be a priority. Having a comfortable flight or good night’s sleep in a nice hotel might be much more important than winning back a few hundred dollars extra per month, and that’s fine. Again, it’s important to set the budget as accurately as possible, and be clear in your travel policy about what happens if employees go over budget.

Does your company share travel savings? What are your tips for beating the travel budget?

The Benefits Procurement Can Realise from RPA Adoption

Understanding the benefits of Robotic Process Automation (RPA) can help sell adoption to the rest of the business.

RPA Procurement Automation

In our first instalment, we described the fundamentals of robotic process automation (RPA), how it is typically used, and some pricing trends.

Here, we discuss some of the benefits of RPA, as well as what to think about as your organisation considers adoption.

The RPA Value Proposition

Purchase-to-pay organisations that are implementing RPA expect benefits in higher productivity and lower operating costs (Fig. 2).

RPA
Fig. 2 – Benefits Expected By Purchase-to-Pay Organisations with RPA

These improvements are realised in a number of ways, including:

1. Ability to bypass the IT department

Because RPA does not require IT development resources, and calls for a very limited technical infrastructure, businesses are able to undertake these projects by themselves.

However, a big lesson learned from early pilots is that IT needs to be involved in some capacity early in the project, even though this may bring in extra bureaucracy and potentially slow down progress.

Getting IT to sign off on performance demands, system availability, security infrastructure, etc., will pay dividends later when RPA is in production.

2. Shorter, less expensive development cycle time

The typical timeline to develop and deploy RPA is six to eight weeks, dramatically less than traditional, IT-led application integration projects. The latter’s cost to design, program, test and maintain system interfaces is significant. In some instances, it can exceed the cost of the software itself.

The ability to link systems through the user interface layer in a non-invasive way, without these costs, is core to RPA’s value proposition.

3. Labour Cost Savings

RPA vendors claim to deliver as much as 60-80 per cent in savings. Feedback from participants in interviews conducted by The Hackett Group indicated that returns are much more modest, but still significant at 20-30 per cent.

4. Increased Auditability and Consistency with Fewer Errors

Routine tasks executed by humans are prone to errors and inconsistent application of rules. Robots apply the same set of rules consistently and operate without errors.

Furthermore, all tasks executed by robots are recorded, and these execution logs are auditable.

5. Improved Scalability

Human capacity is difficult to scale in situations where demand fluctuates, leading to inefficiencies such as backlogs or overcapacity.

In contrast, robots operate at whatever speed is demanded by the work volume. Multiple robots can be deployed when demand exceeds the capacity of a single one.

However, an RPA must still work within the performance limitations of the software with which it is designed to interact.

Looking Ahead

We predict that RPA may have an impact on the number of people needed to perform mundane, repetitive tasks. Ultimately, this is a good thing, because many of these resources can be reassigned to more rewarding activities and job satisfaction will increase.

Fortunately, this shift in the profile of source-to-pay talent is consistent with the direction that procurement has been heading in for some time, moving away from transactional work, to more of a trusted advisor and partner to the business.

This will require complex problem-solving abilities, interpersonal skills, emotional intelligence and intellectual curiosity. There will also be a strong need for people who understand how to orchestrate a combination of automation solutions to obtain the best results.

Patrick Connaughton is the Senior Research Director, Procurement Executive Advisory Programme at the Hackett Group. He has published groundbreaking research in areas like spend analysis, contract life cycle management, supplier risk assessments and services procurement. You can contact him via email or on Procurious.

You can also learn more about Hackett’s Procurement Executive Advisory Program here.

The Truth? Businesses Still Struggle with Indirect Procurement

The procurement industry is evolving at a rapid rate. But it still has broad issues with indirect procurement and how to determine value for money.

Indirect Procurement

No matter where you are in the world, indirect spend is a notoriously difficult area for CPOs to control. Because of this, it presents huge potential for savings for companies.

Direct Procurement refers to the act of acquiring raw materials and goods for production. Indirect Procurement is the act of purchasing services or supplies required to keep the day-to-day business ticking over.

However, there’s a consistent message out there that procurement, and indirect procurement in particular, is under-appreciated by the broader organisation.

Establish Internal Targets

Celia Jordaan is the founder of Australia’s Ichiban Commercial Solutions, which helps businesses with tendering, risk management and procurement solutions.

Over two decades, Jordaan has worked in a number of different countries, locations and cultures. She has experience across procurement, supply chain, contract management, law and risk.

The procurement function often influences the company budget, but doesn’t always entirely control it, she says. The difficulty with indirect procurement or procurement for internal use, is that it’s difficult to determine value for money.

“Indirect procurement is generally seen as soft services that aren’t adding direct value to the cost of production or core business. However, it’s a service that’s vital in order to be able to effectively make the business run,” Jordaan explained.

The downfall in many cases is a clear budget. Professionals need to establish their own internal targets around value created, and qualify what they do and the value they create.

“There’s no real crystal clear way to measure the cost avoidance elements of indirect procurement. It presents a lot of complexities.

Procurement professionals need to sell their own value, and put their own processes in place that helps them demonstrate the value they can create for an organisation, Jordaan says.

Procurement Outsourcing?

David Rae, editor of Procurement Leaders, wrote in ‘Procurement Outsourcing – Managing Indirect Spend’, that change will come when CPOs get involved and influence buying behaviour across the entire organisations, and in every category.

They must also apply the same rigour to the indirect categories as they do to direct materials, he wrote.

“The research shows that, while there is still much work to be done, CPOs are tackling this area. One way of doing so is to engage an outsourcing partner, who can often bring category expertise, greater buying power and improved compliance to an organisation’s indirect spend categories.

“And, while it continues to struggle to match the likes of HR and finance in terms of uptake, there are signs that procurement outsourcing is really taking off,” he wrote in the report.

Under-Investment in Indirect Procurement

Meanwhile, a research report by Proxima explores what procurement can do to redefine how it’s perceived by the broader organisation.

The report says that a vast majority of C-suite executives feel that indirect procurement is under-invested across the UK, Europe, US and further afield.

This prompted Proxima, in conjunction with NelsonHall, to run a research study to uncover perceptions, attitudes and desired outcomes of indirect procurement. It was hoped this would catalyse the common sense that procurement could and should play a greater role in most businesses.

Responses indicated that indirect procurement in some organisations is perceived to have a role that is tactical and administrative. Some respondents advised that it can create process blocks, and can, on occasion, even be antagonistic to specialist suppliers of the business.

Five Key Challenges

The research found five key challenges for the procurement function, impacting on CPOs’ ability to effectively manage indirect expenditure.

These include, as outlined here in the report:

1. Lack of capacity

The indirect procurement team has to focus on sourcing commonly purchased and high volume goods and services, as well as transaction processing.

2. Lack of political clout

CPOs involved in the research study tended to be quite self-critical. This was particularly prevalent in areas such as their ability to introduce process improvement, and to increase the level of spend under contract.

3. Lack of mandate

The primary responsibility for most indirect procurement categories often lies within the business units. For some categories, such as travel, it may not even be clear as to who actually owns the policy.

4. Lack of awareness and low visibility of indirect procurement

Indirect procurement is often seen as less important than direct procurement in the eyes of senior executives. It is seemingly even less important at the business unit level. Many stakeholders view an indirect procurement professional’s role as the ‘rubber stamper’ at the end of the process.

5. Organisations lack the skills required for effective stakeholder management

A common perception held by CPOs and CFOs is that the indirect procurement function has to find ways of working more effectively alongside the various business units and stakeholders within each business unit.

Big Ideas Summit 2016: Big Idea #11 – Making Agility Core

Chris Sawchuk states that procurement needs to make agility core to all of its activities in order to survive.

At the Big Ideas Summit 2016, we challenged our thought leaders to share their Big Ideas for the future of procurement.

From ideas that have the potential to change the very nature of the procurement profession, to ones that got the assembled minds thinking about the profession’s impact outside of the organisation, the response we received was amazing.

Agility Core to Success

Chris Sawchuk, Principal and Global Procurement Advisory Practice Leader at The Hackett Group, says that procurement needs to make agility core in all of its activities.

With new events, such as disruptive innovation, happening all the time, and new organisations being created, existing organisations need to be more agile in order to cope with these challenges.

Catch up with all the delegates’ Big Ideas from the 2016 Summit at the Procurious Learning Hub.

Want to find out more about Big Ideas 2016? And maybe what we have planned for 2017? You can visit our dedicated website!

If you like this (and you haven’t done so already) join Procurious for free today. Get connected with over 16,000 like-minded procurement professionals from across the world.

Indirect & Direct Procurement: Right Tool for the Right Job!

Too often organisations use the same tools for direct procurement as they do for indirect. It’s time to start using the right tool for the right job.

Direct Procurement

This post was first published on POOL4TOOL.

Let me start by saying what this post is not about.

It is not about Direct vs. Indirect. It is also not about what is more critical and strategic between Direct and Indirect.

Things are more complex than a Manichean division of Procurement into two categories. If category management was just about that split, we would know it. Wouldn’t we?

This post is simply about common sense!

Serving Different Markets

All the above does not conflict with saying that there are specificities to both components of the Purchase spend. Especially when looking at industrial companies.

One area of differentiation between Direct and Indirect Procurement is related to the market they serve.

  • Indirect serves mostly internal needs, a.k.a. the employee
  • Direct serves external needs, a.k.a. the customer or the consumer. Though, of course, the difference between B2B and B2C is becoming increasingly blurred.

Both markets have their own challenges.

In indirect, the diversity of internal customers is quite important (travel is an example) and that makes stakeholder management quite difficult.

In Direct, stakeholders are more easily identifiable as they revolve around the product (this would typically be R&D and manufacturing). But consumers are more diverse and volatile, which requires special attention as, in the words of Peter Drucker, “the purpose of business is to create and keep a customer”.

Product Lifecycle

Another difference is the  relationship to the product lifecycle.

R&D and New Product Development (NPD) are intrinsic to Direct Procurement. This is a bit less of a reality in Indirect, even if some indirect parts of the spend are related to complex projects very similar to NPD, for example, real estate and facility management.

Some companies like Apple have very complex projects to manage in that area, for example their new headquarters or their retail spaces. As retail spaces contribute to the overall customer experience, is that Direct Procurement or Indirect Procurement?

Supply chain management and execution is also an area of differentiation, as direct supply chains tend to be more global and complex.

Right Tool for the Right Job

This post is about using the right tool for the right job!

Each area has specificities, so you have to use specific tools and processes for the job. In terms of Direct Materials Procurement, some of the specificities translate into specific capabilities that modern platforms should have, as Michael Lamoureux from Sourcing Innovation explained in a recent post.

The thing is that none of the Indirect tools have all these capabilities. And neither they should, as most of them are irrelevant for a great part of indirect spend. As Lamoureux puts it in the conclusion of his white paper available for download here.

“The fact of the matter is that you wouldn’t use a Chihuahua to herd sheep, so why are you trying to use a mouse to herd cats (which is mission improbable anyway)?”

Big Ideas Summit 2016: Big Idea #10 – Procurement as a Change Catalyst

Dirk Van De Putte argues that procurement should embrace its role as a change catalyst in organisations, helping to break down organisational silos.

At the Big Ideas Summit 2016, we challenged our thought leaders to share their Big Ideas for the future of procurement.

From ideas that have the potential to change the very nature of the procurement profession, to ones that got the assembled minds thinking about the profession’s impact outside of the organisation, the response we received was amazing.

Procurement – A Change Catalyst

Global CPO, Dirk Van De Putte’s Big Idea discussed how procurement could act as a catalyst for change in organisations, due to its unique position at the crossroads of internal and external stakeholders.

Dirk gave his thoughts on how to successfully achieve this, with procurement breaking down organisational silos, as well as building a diverse function.

Catch up with all the delegates’ Big Ideas from the 2016 Summit at the Procurious Learning Hub.

Want to find out more about Big Ideas 2016? And maybe what we have planned for 2017? You can visit our dedicated website!

If you like this (and you haven’t done so already) join Procurious for free today. Get connected with over 16,000 like-minded procurement professionals from across the world.

Big Ideas Summit 2016: Big Idea #7 – Disrupting Linear Thinking

Alex Kleiner says that procurement organisations need to throw off their linear thinking to increase flexibility and collaboration.

At the Big Ideas Summit 2016, we challenged our thought leaders to share their Big Ideas for the future of procurement.

From ideas that have the potential to change the very nature of the procurement profession, to ones that got the assembled minds thinking about the profession’s impact outside of the organisation, the response we received was amazing.

Alex Kleiner, General Manager, EMEA at Coupa Software, says that organisations as a whole need to throw off their linear thinking and increase flexibility and fluidity.

This transition will allow organisations to eliminate barriers to collaboration, but also enable procurement to focus more on alternatives to savings, such as usability, people, or even lives saved!

Catch up with all the thought leadership and ours delegates’ Big Ideas from the 2016 Summit at the Procurious Learning Hub.

If you want to find out more about Big Ideas 2016, and what we have planned for 2017, you can visit our dedicated website!

If you like this (and you haven’t done so already) join Procurious for free today, and connect with over 15,500 like-minded procurement professionals from across the world.