Tag Archives: procurement talent

Big Ideas Summit 2016: Big Idea #2 – Procurement Owns Talent

Mark Roberts, Global Procurement Capabilities Director at AB InBev, believes that procurement should be the gateway for new talent coming into the organisation.

At the Big Ideas Summit 2016, we challenged our thought leaders to share their Big Ideas for the future of procurement.

From ideas that have the potential to change the very nature of the procurement profession, to ones that got the assembled minds thinking about the profession’s impact outside of the organisation, the response we received was amazing.

Mark Roberts, Global Procurement Capabilities Director at AB InBev, says that procurement institutions and bodies need to do more to tell people what procurement is about, and organisations need to now be bold in order to attract the best and the brightest of new talent.

Catch up with all the thought leadership and ours delegates’ Big Ideas from the 2016 Summit at the Procurious Learning Hub.

If you want to find out more about Big Ideas 2016, and what we have planned for 2017, you can visit our dedicated website!

If you like this (and you haven’t done so already) join Procurious for free today, and connect with over 15,000 like-minded procurement professionals from across the world.

What Does Procurement Agility Mean in 2016?

Discussing the term ‘Procurement Agility’, and the ways in which procurement organisations can become more agile in their activities.

Procurement Agility

In various reports and papers published over the last few years the phrase “procurement must be agile”, appears on a constant basis. Indeed, there is even a regular publication called ‘The Agility Agenda’. It’s an excellent read and well worth subscribing to.

This article will try and give some practical takeaways for procurement professionals to consider when applying in their own environments.

When considering procurement agility, we need to consider internal and external environments for the two main themes that are emerging in 2016.

Procurement Talent

With the release of the recent Deloitte CPO Survey, attention has once again fallen on talent, and the acquisition, developing and retaining of it. According to the report over 60 per cent of CPOs feel that their teams do not have the skills needed to perform their roles. What is also interesting in noting that the report suggests that these CPOS are not looking to change their teams, but to develop them.

The report states that training budgets have largely stagnated, if not fallen. So how can CPOs develop their teams without a large training budget.

The answer could be an agile programme that blends the theories and methods of procurement with an increase in workplace based development. These programmes, sometimes called Active Learning Programmes, are a mix of short classroom based sessions, which are then immediately applied back in the workplace. When those skills have been applied, it’s time to move to the next set of skills.

These activities are supplemented with desktop video learning. Again, the importance is on the quick application back in the workplace. The idea here is to utilise more of the 70-20-10 learning methodology. Writers such as Tough (1979) and Kajewski and Masden (2012) have argued that the majority of adult learning (about 70 per cent) takes place outside institutional frameworks, while 20 per cent is supported by those who are not professional helpers, such as supervisors, colleagues, parents and friends. Professional helpers, such as teachers, trainers and counsellors, account for only 10 per cent.

For example:

  • 70 per cent – informal, on the job, experience based, stretch projects and practice
  • 20 per cent – coaching, mentoring, developing through others
  • 10 per cent – formal learning interventions and structured courses.

The application of this theory into development platforms has gained momentum in recent years, and this has impacted how people put together formal programmes. For example, according to Kajewski and Masden (2012), an Australian firm has 70 per cent of learning as experience on the job to integrate, practice and master new skills, knowledge or changes in behaviour.

20 per cent of learning is from exposure to others, such as learning through the observation of others (mentors, coaches), and reflection on the impact of this behaviour on one’s own practice. Just 10 per cent of learning is from formal programs designed for the acquisition of knowledge or skills through carefully programmed instruction.

Alternatively, an Australian public sector programme has been set out in a more simplistic way, in that 70 per cent of learning is experiential, 20 per cent of learning is relationship based and 10 per cent of learning is formal.

What is clear is that despite the differences in application the methodology allows multiple ways for practitioners to develop their skills as opposed to formal training alone.

Responsiveness

One of the constant gripes about procurement is the time it takes to “get things done”. Procurement therefore needs to be agile in responding to its stakeholders, both internally and externally.

The fundamentals of Just In Time suggest a review of the non-value and value-adding activities as a means of eliminating waste. If we apply this to our process and procedures, we may find that the need to ask the same question multiple times adds to the turnaround time in procurement, and frustrates suppliers.

Many procurement organisations decide, for a number of reasons, that they need to deal with a set of suppliers who have already passed the hurdle required to supply to an organisation. This could be supply chain transparency, insurance requirements, past history. The ‘barriers’ are yours to set.

Pre-qualification allows these questions to be answered once, and also will allow procurement to have pass/fail rates for areas such as supply chain transparency and accreditation. Ultimately this will also help to develop better relationships with those critical suppliers, to reduce lead times, allow for innovation, and allow procurement to focus on other value adding activities.

When considering the matter of procurement agility, it is imperative to understand the multiple ways we can be agile in meeting the changing needs of our organisations. From building better teams, equipped with the skills and knowledge our organisations require for the future, to ensuring that the suppliers we work with can help meet the objectives of the organisations, procurement agility comes in many shapes and sizes.

Big Ideas in Procurement in Asia-Pacific

With a huge geographical area and diversity of cultures and industries, procurement in Asia-Pacific is both highly complex and fascinating.

Procurement in Asia-Pacific

Ahead of the Big Ideas Summit 2016 on April 21st, we are taking a look at the key issues facing procurement in the coming years. We have asked experts and influencers in our community to share their Big Ideas on the themes we will be discussing on the day.

Here, experts who work in procurement in Asia-Pacific, share their thoughts on the Big Ideas impacting organisations and industries in Procurious’ second largest market.

Gordon Donovan, Procurement & Supply Chain Manager, Metro Trains

Gordon DonovanTalent – With the release of the recent Deloitte CPO survey, attention has once again fallen on talent – acquisition, developing and retaining.

Over 60 per cent of CPOs feel that their teams do not have the skills needed to perform their roles. However training budgets have largely stagnated, if not fallen.

There is a feeling that the traditional methods of training are not delivering the results required, therefore the onus now falls on more applied learning programmes that have a direct correlation to the workplace.

The big idea here is to focus on these types of learning activities which will deliver an immediate ROI as well as taking the theory from the classroom to the application.

Supplier Pre-qualification – Procurement needs to be agile in responding to its stakeholders, both internally and externally. Procurement also needs to “get more done with less”. Therefore, attention is turning to dealing with a set of suppliers who have already passed the hurdles required to supply to an organisation.

The need to ask the same question multiple times adds to the lack of turnaround time in procurement, and frustrates suppliers. Pre-qualification allows these questions to be answered once, and also will allow procurement to have pass fail/rates for areas such as supply chain transparency and accreditation.

Accreditation – Accreditation of your supply chain is becoming the hot topic in procurement. Do you know who you are dealing with and how your suppliers operate? Are we are aware of the ethical and sustainable issues within procurement and within the wider supply chain?

The hot topic now for procurement in Asia-Pacific, and across the globe, is how do we accredit our suppliers/supply chains and how do we ourselves gain accreditation for our policy and process to deliver value to our organisation.

Madeleine Tewes, Project Manager, Australian Maritime Safety Authority

Madeleine TewesInternationalisation – Traditional, family-controlled businesses across Asia are increasingly choosing to internationalise. Some Governments are supportive of this internationalisation. For example, one of the core tenants in China’s 2016 – 2021 Five-Year Plan is internationalisation, with many Chinese companies expected to ‘go global’ in this period.

As part of this process, many businesses are now looking to American, European and Australian consultancies and technology providers to radically overhaul their business functions and processes including procurement.

The overhaul includes tasks like introducing business English into meetings and contracts, expanding supplier bases, implementing technology to automate processes and provide greater spend visibility and even setting up procurement teams where before all that existed was purchasing clerks within a Finance team.

Mark Gibbs, President of SAP Greater China, notes that China is SAP’s second home, and that the trend of internationalisation is continuing to support the “massive cloud computing and e-Commerce expansion” that has been in progress over the past few years.

Innovation driving competitive advantage – Singapore has a focus on pioneering advances in innovation and driving competitive advantage for growth according to Teo Lay Lim, MD, Accenture Singapore and ASEAN.

More broadly in Asia, innovation is increasingly being recognised as the key to sustainable growth by companies around the world and as Capgemini research points out, innovation has evolved from a purely internal capability, to a collaborative process with the external network of supply partners.

Therefore, the ability of procurement to work with suppliers to identify and execute innovation within existing contracts, and to stimulate innovation outside of existing arrangements, is a key part of the procurement value proposition.

Some simple observations from Singapore include having incentive schemes in place relating to innovation in supplier contracts, having innovation as an agenda item on regular meetings with key suppliers as well as internal stakeholders, and having KPI’s in place which reward procurement team members for focusing on innovation, rather than relying purely on traditional savings or throughput metrics.

Corporate Social Responsibility – Research conducted by the Harvard Business School found that organisations who focus on corporate social responsibility (CSR) significantly outperform their competition in terms of stock market and financial performance.

One Singapore-based organisation, Fuji Xerox, describes their view of CSR very clearly, “…forging a link between long-term competitiveness and the sustainable development of society and the company…”. This seems to be a view echoed by a growing number of organisations across Asia.

Each of these organisations will have a different ways of using their procurement team to support their organisation’s focus on CSR. However, an IBM IBV CPO study found that 97 per cent of successful and influential procurement teams are significantly involved in their organisation’s CSR initiatives, compared to 61 per cent of average procurement teams.

Regardless of the current maturity of a procurement team though, or if it is the organisation driving these initiatives or procurement lobbying for them, clear KPIs (results driven rather than process orientated ideally) will allow procurement to demonstrate the value it is providing to the organisation.

Do you work in procurement in Asia-Pacific? What’s your Big Idea for the future of the profession? Let us know and we could be discussing them on April 21st.

Want to know more about Big Ideas 2016? Then visit www.bigideassummit.com, join our Procurious group, and Tweet your thoughts and Big Ideas to us using #BigIdeas2016.

Don’t miss out on this truly excellent event and the chance to participate in discussions that will shape the future of the procurement profession. Get Involved, register today.

Planning Procurement’s Response To The Millennial Generation

Understanding how procurement can cope with, and ultimately benefit from, the disruption brought into talent management by the Millennial Generation.

Millennial Generation

Hackett’s 2016 Procurement Key Issues Study shows that talent management remains one of the top 3 of objectives as a critical or major area of focus for virtually all procurement organisations.

Looking deeper, organisations are targeting three specific areas to transform talent: improving leadership skills, honing business acumen, and building specialist procurement skills. The two perennial favourites, category management and strategic sourcing, make up the other top reported objectives.

The research also showed that the Millennial Generation represents one of the greatest potential impacts and challenges to managing talent in the next year or two. Additionally, most procurement organisations (especially those in Europe) continue to experience higher levels of staff churn and difficulty attracting great talent.

What do we mean by Millennials?

When we refer to the Millennial Generation, we are referring to those born in the 80s and now moving into management positions, or early 90s who are leaving graduate school to join the workforce. This workforce demographic is characterised by different attitudes, desires and motivations than earlier generations. Generations X and Y came to be known for their independence, interest in work/life balance, technical proficiency, and measuring success in both financial and social terms.

Millennials, on the other hand, are the first generation of digital natives – i.e. they’ve truly grown up with the internet and social consciousness.  They have high career expectations, desiring both immediate and high impact opportunities, flexibility in terms of schedules, embracing remote working and diversity in assignments (e.g. culture, fun and collaboration).

They plan for rapid advancement as well as frequent job changes. Case in point: 90 per cent of Millennials plan to stay in their job for less than 3 years. They are high touch, and expect frequent feedback. In summary, the millennial generation wants more from work than just a career at a good company.

How can procurement address the critical skills gaps?

Research conducted by the Hackett Group in the past on procurement talent management, has shown clear gaps in the essential business skills required for most procurement jobs. These are: strategic thinking and analysis, group facilitation, and relationship management skills.

When considering specialist skills, enhanced SRM and market intelligence expertise were identified in need of development for most roles, with supply risk, innovation and SCM expertise needed for specialist roles.

How do we respond?

As procurement leaders this situation poses challenging questions:

  1. What procurement value proposition will be the most appealing?
  2. Will higher attrition become the new normal for procurement?
  3. Is now the time to invest in knowledge capture and transfer?
  4. How can we create flexible work schedules and collaborative environments?
  5. Do we need to rethink the importance and type of training we provide?

In all cases, training strategies need to be modernised to reflect this accelerated reality, as well as changing learning styles and preferences. Strategies that get people up to speed faster, use more interactive, workshop and team based formats should be preferred. The 70-20-10 approach to learning is based around the idea that 70 per cent of learning comes through experience, 20 per cent from social learning with colleagues, and just 10 per cent through formal learning involving training or online courses.

This framework will see larger elements of learning being on-the-job, collaborative and workshop based, action orientated to better align to leaders and manager day jobs and current issues, and complemented with self-directed learning elements and social learning (e.g. LinkedIn, Yammer).

Hackett's Framework for Training to Integrate Millennials into the Workforce
Hackett’s Framework for Training to Integrate Millennials into the Workforce

Course materials need to be user friendly, but at the same time to support multi-tasking and access to on-demand, on-line tutorial content. Course design should incorporate the themes seen as important to younger generations – how procurement connects into CSR and sustainability, work/life balance, and career advancement.

The older generations of Baby Boomers and Gen X will need support and even training to adapt to this shift in to mentality and culture.

About Hackett’s Procurement Key Issues Study

The results of this annual study are gathered from executives from over 180 large and global companies operating in the US, Europe and rest of the world, with annual revenue of $1 billion or greater.

Find out more by visiting the Hackett website.

Chris Sawchuk is a keynote speaker at the Big Ideas Summit on April 21st. Chris will be talking about how procurement is applying key agile capabilities in the areas of leadership, talent, service placement and information-driven performance.

If you’re interested in finding out more, visit www.bigideassummit.com, join our Procurious group, and Tweet your thoughts and Big Ideas to us using #BigIdeas2016.

Don’t miss out on this truly excellent event and the chance to participate in discussions that will shape the future of the procurement profession. Get Involved, register today.