Tag Archives: procurement technology

How can Procurement Work Smarter, Not Harder?

Time never seems to be on our side. It’s time for procurement spend its time more wisely, and work smarter, by leveraging new technology.

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Procurement, finance and operations have forever been working on ways to integrate simply and effectively. While it is reasonably simple to coordinate small teams in one office, hospitality is one industry faced with the tough task of managing spend and suppliers across multiple locations, multiple businesses within a business and a seasonal spend pattern.

Traditionally, these three departments have been engaged in a never ending paper chase between numerous locations and head office. Not to mention the arduous task of managing budgets across a multitude of locations, geographies and currencies. Until now, managing this extensive workload has meant the headcount in the back office goes through the roof and the time staff should be spent in front of the guest/client, is instead spent on pushing paper and placing orders.

Breaking with Tradition

So how do you fix this expensive problem, and work smarter?

Breaking decades’ old business patterns and cleverly using technology to simplify buyer – supplier interactions and location management. However, Z Hotels have cut administrative tasks by up to 90 per cent through simplifying and digitising many of their previously time devouring tasks.

Frontline hotel staff would spend up to five hours a week on purely administrative duties like placing orders, chasing paper invoices and pushing items through the approval process back to head office. Meanwhile, head office staff lacked the transparency and real time control on departmental spend and relied solely on location staff to be their eyes and ears.

Since bringing in a new, cloud-based procurement platform, they have cut admin duties for location staff time down by 90 per cent.

Bev King, CEO at Z Hotels, commented on the benefits of the new solution. “Customer service is at the forefront of everything we do, InstaSupply gives us the opportunity to have a much more automated solution that allows our staff to have time to focus on the service to the customers rather than try to fill the administrative gaps. The process has become very easy to use. We’re on the right track,” King said.

Supported Growth Ambitions

The platform now pulls together all orders, delivery reconciliation, stock, invoice processing, location management and budget tracking as well as a host of other functions still being refined within the portal. All this with full integration with the business’ accounting software.

When Z Hotels first brought in InstaSupply, at the end of 2014, they had big ambitions to grow. A year later, they have just opened their 10th site and are on course for another five by the end of this year.

Under the traditional model, a flurry of staff would have been brought in to handle the additional workload that growing nearly 300 per cent would have created. In fact, the head office team that deals with finance and procurement has stayed the same as it was in the beginning.

It is this ease of use that makes it a great solution for Z’s predominantly Millennial operational staff. Implementing a fully responsive, one click, cloud solution is in tune with the emergence of a dominant Millennial workforce who will no longer just get by with archaic systems and countless spreadsheets.

With a wealth of new technology available to procurement and finance teams, isn’t it time for your organisation to look at ways you could work smarter?

Watch a video on this case below:

Instasupply employs advanced cloud technology and a user-friendly web application to give users control of their time and their spend. Find out more about Instasupply’s purchase-to-pay ordering system, and supplier invoice management and consolidation functionality, at their website.

For Spend Management Success, Don’t Say the P Words!

Thinking differently about procurement starts with talking differently. If growth companies want to succeed then they need to change their vocabulary, starting by introducing the term ‘Spend Management’.

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Read Tyler’s thoughts on when to buy your first ERP system here.

When should a growing company start building its procurement infrastructure? When you reach about 100 employees, or when you buy your first ERP system, whichever comes first. Not many companies have the foresight to do this. The common wisdom is that you bring in procurement at about 700-900 people. That’s too late.

In my experience one thing that keeps companies from starting as early as they should are the “P” words: Procurement; Purchasing; Process; Policy. Not only do these words define the function too narrowly, they’ve also become synonyms for bureaucracy and red tape.

People at small, entrepreneurial companies recoil when they hear these words. We need to rethink how procurement is positioned so companies can embrace it early on, and in a positive spirit, well before chaos ensues. That starts with changing the way we talk about it.

Call it Spend Management

Don’t get me wrong. I’m in procurement and I love the field. But this vocabulary is not just off putting, it’s inadequate for what the profession does today. The classical understanding of procurement is contract negotiations – leveraging a company’s size and buying power to get discounts and save money.

That’s not a bad thing to be known for, but it’s understandable why somebody with that classical understanding working at company of a couple hundred people would say, “We don’t need procurement yet.” They can’t yet buy on a massive scale, and at that stage revenue is far more important than savings.

What people outside the profession don’t realise is the extent to which the function has been growing in responsibility and strategic importance over the past few decades. However, we still haven’t communicated clearly about the nature of the role, its importance and how it fits in the organisation.

Procurement should really be joined at the hip with finance, but ask five different finance professionals what encompasses procurement, and you’ll get five different answers. If our closest ally in the organisation doesn’t fully understand the role, we clearly need to do a better job communicating what it is we do.

Procurement today should ideally encompass five or six functions: strategic sourcing, contract negotiation and management, workflows for buying, supplier information management, and the handoff to accounts payable and the ERP system. Continuing to call all of that procurement really doesn’t do it justice. Spend Management is a much better term. 

Think More Broadly

It’s not the sexiest term, but it does imply a broader function that’s squarely aligned with finance. Even employees at a small company will recognise the need to manage spending. Maybe if it’s presented that way, we can start sooner, and with greater focus and intention.

A small company may not be ready to negotiate big contracts, but they do need to buy things and pay bills, so they set up an AP department and processes for paying people. Whether they realise it or not, they’re already laying down the foundation for their Spend Management infrastructure.

At about 100 people, someone needs to start planning how that’s going to scale and start laying the groundwork. If you walk in at 100 people and start using the ‘p’ words, it would actually create a barrier to starting. But if you wait much longer than that, the first job is to jump in and stop a fast moving train.  When that’s a company’s first introduction to procurement, it only serves to reinforce any negative impressions they may already have.

Don’t Wait to Build

Once those impressions get culturally ingrained, it’s an uphill battle to change that perception. Yet that’s what happens all the time. The vocabulary and, by extension, the whole profession has become synonymous with bureaucracy, and no small company wants anything to do with bureaucracy.

This is holding companies back from proactively building out spend management as part of an efficient, effective corporate finance infrastructure. You’re going to build infrastructure around marketing, sales and delivering your product or service.

There’s a one hundred percent chance you’ll also need to build infrastructure to support spending money as the company as it grows. Yet most companies wait until things are really broken and people are complaining, and then the whole thing is really painful. If you start early you have a chance to set up a system that works smoothly from the get go.

Be the Change

Change has to start with those of us in the profession. We can talk more broadly about what we do. We can talk about ‘buying guidelines’ instead of ‘purchasing policies’ and ‘simple steps to getting what you need to do your job’ instead of talking about the ‘procurement process.’ Neutralising these defensive barriers helps people realise, “Oh, okay, these are ways that I can get what I need to do my job in an easier way.”

Small companies may not be ready for concepts like category management and contract negotiations, but they need help buying things, designing workflows and finding automated tools. They may be able to do some simple sourcing for volume discounts, and there are usually all sorts of unmet needs. It’s at that point you need to bring someone in to address them with an eye to the bigger picture of building a scalable spend management program that’s integrated into the corporate finance system.

There are lots of ways to approach it, and lots of conversations we could be having, if we don’t let the ‘P’ words get in the way.

Coupa are one of the sponsors of the Big Ideas Summit, to be held in London on April 21st. If you’re interested in finding out more, visit www.bigideassummit.com, join our Procurious group, and Tweet your thoughts and Big Ideas to us using #BigIdeas2016.

Don’t miss out on this truly excellent event and the chance to participate in discussions that will shape the future of the procurement profession. Get Involved, register today.

Are Procurement Professionals Stuck in the Stone Age?

Ed Cross, co-founder at Odesma, and Anya McKenna (of Market Dojo) ponder the neanderthalic and stone age ways of B2B software…

The peculiar thing about business technology is that generally it is not very easy to use. I might exclude here email, but the rest of it seems to need a training course and some sort of super user, or a training provider (or even worse a consulting firm) to come and show you how or work it for you. Whereas the most used technology that we interact with outside of work generally does not require any support.

The irony here is that business technology came first, and the use of technology first appeared in the office, long before we all had tech at home or on our person. Yet, it remains unintuitive, expensive, and, as a result, does not get utilised fully or at all by a lot of people at work.

Compare this to B2C technology, how hard is it to work? ebay for instance. Or Facebook. Or even Candy Crush. The simple answer is they are intuitive, straightforward and certainly do not need any training or consulting support to get the benefit of them. In fact even Generation X (us older types) can work them on any number of portable or fixed lumps of technology. And a lot of them are free to the user.

Where Did it all Go Wrong?

So what’s gone wrong? For this, we’ll let Ed share an anecdote from 1999. While working for PwC, I presented to a local CIPS event in Staffordshire on e-commerce. This topic was perceived as very much the new kid on the block, and a whole host of new tech start ups were receiving incredible valuations.

At this session I laid out the view of the future described by the firm, ignorant to the nay sayers. In fact there were quite a few in the audience, most notably those with a few more years under their belts than me. One or two challenged my hypothesis on the topic.

I later left PwC to set up a Private Equity backed branch of a US e-Sourcing firm Sharemax.  A year or two later the dot.com bubble had burst and I was back in Consultancy, and the nay sayers were proven right.

So, what was, or still is, the problem? From an historic perspective the leading market insight companies and so forth, focused heavily on functionality, as did many buyers of solutions. And ignored the user experience, the maturity or demographic of the population expected to use the technology.

Many people in senior or middle management positions did not grow up with computing technology, and when making selection decisions, focused on elements outside of ease of use, and considered technology against an historic understanding – one where tech is always hard to use.

They therefore condoned supplier behaviour where training and consulting support were deemed acceptable costs of enablement. And this thinking has not much changed, given the demographics of leadership.

Of course, the existing providers have not been driven to step up, because the customer has not demanded it of them. Whilst in the B2C arena the demographic is younger. The expectation is of instant gratification, solutions that are compelling, easy to use and free or very low cost. With Generation Y coming through in business we expect the current issues are about to change.

So why have B2B software providers not followed the B2C route, and provided better, more compelling solutions to pull procurement out of the stone age? You’ll have to wait for the next part of our series to find out.

Market Dojo and Odesma have partnered to combine their intuitive eSourcing software and expertise in offering business advisory services to offer clients a winning procurement solution.

Leading with Value – The Uber-ization of Procurement

Disruption in industries, heading towards major disruption in procurement too. Gabe Perez talks about the uber-ization of procurement.

We’re off to a flying start after lunch here at the Big Ideas Summit 2016. Sometimes a graveyard slot at conferences, Gabe Perez, Vice President, Strategy & Market Development at Coupa Software, got the audience energised discussing the disruption heading our way in procurement.

Gabe challenged our audience to start with the outcome, changing the way we traditionally look at going to the market as procurement professionals. The Uber-ization of procurement starts here, with a focus on value, rather than features.

Just What us ‘Uber-ization’?

Put simply, ‘Uber-ization’ is about being able to access value in real-time. In our personal lives, everything we need, we can get in real time – products within the hour from Amazon, cars from Uber, even setting up a site to sell our product on Etsy.

According to Gabe, you don’t have to do the same legacy tasks now in order to sell things. From selling or buying products, to driving a car for Uber, you just need to have a pulse! There is a new type of workforce, making money in ways that have never been imagined before.

In the real world, there’s little enablement. It’s totally the opposite in the business world, where we’re really just at the beginning in terms of this real-time penetration.

Issues in Procurement Technology

The biggest issue in procurement technology is that it is was originally developed and evaluated in a legacy way. That means is was evaluated on the features and functions, built for the organisational ‘power users’ years ago, and not with the best practice and innovation that is available in today’s economy in mind.

Gabe told the delegates that an RFP isn’t the best way to start. A better approach might be an RFV – a Request for Value. Procurement needs to start with the value proposition, and then work backwards, starting with who the best partner to achieve this outcome will be.

The issue for organisations is they are trying to do the same things over and over, not making any changes, and not making any difference. Features and functions shouldn’t be the focus, but the tools that allow procurement to get to value.

Organisations need to frame evaluations of procurement technology on the value delivered based on the business outcomes your organisation is looking to achieve.

Power of Networks

Gabe went on to talk about business networks, and involving more suppliers. The more companies, or “suppliers” procurement are connecting with, the more opportunities they have to leverage knowledge and expertise for innovation.

A lot of this innovation is coming from the suppliers in the ‘tail’, ones who are traditionally consolidated or ignored.

These smaller organisations don’t always have the opportunity to work with larger companies, thanks to traditional processes, protocols and business portals. All of this adds up to a higher business cost for small companies, making doing this work unprofitable.

There are so many processes and boxes to tick in most companies processes and evaluation, that small companies are out of the work at the beginning either because they did not get an opportunity, or did not see the value because of the cost of doing business.

Failing Networks

Business networks have historically failed in the supply chain, as they have been designed by the software vendor, with the vendor’s priorities and strategies in mind. They are not designed to be open networks, and because of this, they don’t drive value on both sides of the equation.

The other problem is that they only cover a fraction of the total number of suppliers worldwide. There are close to 200 million suppliers in the world. Traditional procurement methods and business networks only enable access to approximately 1 to 2 million, which is a dismal result.

An open network turns this on its head completely. What suppliers need is the simplest way to connect with buyers, other suppliers and collaborate with them. This is the key to unlocking innovation and value creation in the supply chain.

In a perfect world, there would be no user interface at all, but we need to open up the networks before we can get to that stage. And then we will have found the path to the Uber-ization of procurement.

Why Predictive Analytics is Changing Procurement’s Future

The opportunity for predictive analytics and Big Data in procurement goes well beyond spend.

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Hackett’s 2016 Procurement Key Issues Study shows that increasing agility is a critical development area for organisations. It also shows that predictive analytics and forecasting tools are identified as having the greatest transformational impact on procurement in the future.

A confluence of high volatility, technology-led innovation, and hyper-competitive market conditions, has accelerated the rate of change in business to unprecedented levels. Agility is the key to success in this environment. In a procurement context this has four attributes:

  • Proactive Decision Making: Leveraging information and predictive analytics to improve the quality and timeliness of decision-making.
  • Value Chain: Industry leadership in digitising their value chain, including supply and demand chains, as well as internal operations.
  • Planning: Customer-centric planning processes and day-to-day business decisions.
  • Operational responsiveness: Permitting swift response to changes in the supply chain, customer preferences, the competitive landscape, and business strategy.

Overcoming Obstacles

However, accessing this data, information and market intelligence is a significant obstacle that must be overcome.

Becoming information-driven should be a primary focus area for procurement. The function must develop the tools and skills that will allow staff to apply market data and intelligence to decisions on spending and sourcing strategies. Creating deep, consultative working relationships with business leaders, demands that procurement bring this valuable expertise to the table.

This level of insight requires high-quality, real-time market intelligence. However, over half of the Key Issues Study respondents lack a formal market intelligence program or are in the very earliest stages of adoption. At the same time, establishing data governance and building a continuous improvement culture for data management and quality, are also tactics increasingly adopted by organisations.

Access to market intelligence, and ensuring that sourcing and supplier relationship management teams are using high-quality category and supplier intelligence, are prerequisites for agility.

Transformative Impact of Predictive Analytics

As procurement’s role matures from transactional facilitator to trusted business advisor, proficiency with the next generation of analytics – a.k.a. “big data” – will be a key enabler. Big data has been a game changer when it comes to customer analytics, offering an unprecedented ability to quickly model massive volumes of structured and unstructured data from multiple sources.

Good examples from the digital world include Google’s insight into customer behaviours and preferences, and Amazon’s ability to anticipate orders and ensure on hand stock to meet demand.

Source: The Hackett Group Key Issues Study 2016
Source: The Hackett Group Key Issues Study 2016

Predictive analytics refers to the use of statistical and mathematical techniques to predict the probability of future events occurring.

The predictive analytics and forecasting use case for procurement can be an increased focus on business outcomes, through greatly enhanced forward looking decision support capability; and automated and real-time information and analysis availability. Both of these are underpinned by greatly improved data quality.

Combining predictive analytics with cognitive tools will allow, for example, upgraded end-user buying experiences and automated sourcing actions to anticipate supplier and market events. It will also allow for forecasting of and acting to mitigate the impact of supply chain disruptions, and reduction of the severity of supplier risk events.

How do we respond?

As procurement leaders this situation poses challenging questions:

  1. What are the business outcomes and specific use cases for predictive analytics?
  2. How can we accelerate the organisation towards a single view of data and segmentation?
  3. Do we need to access new sources of meta and domain data?
  4. What is the value from faster, more frequent and higher quality information and insight?

Taking advantage of advanced analytical tools and methods requires appropriate staff with the skills to use them, as well as new technology roles, aligning business agendas, and elevating the overall level of technology knowledge. Future talent management plans should reflect the importance of training and hiring staff to handle the sophisticated analytical tools and methods, to deliver the full potential of Big Data.

Analytical projects are not without challenges. Procurement leaders who have not already started down this path should use the high-stakes competitive environment of 2016 as a burning platform.

About Hackett’s Procurement Key Issues Study

The results of this annual study are gathered from executives from over 180 large and global companies operating in the US, Europe and rest of the world, with annual revenue of $1 billion or greater. Find out more at the Hackett Group website.

Chris Sawchuk will discuss why procurement needs to be more agile during his keynote address at the Big Ideas Summit on April 21st.

If you’re interested in finding out more, visit www.bigideassummit.com, join our Procurious group, and Tweet your thoughts and Big Ideas to us using #BigIdeas2016.

Don’t miss out on this truly excellent event and the chance to participate in discussions that will shape the future of the procurement profession. Get Involved, register today.

Showcasing Your Big Ideas – Procurement-as-a-Service

Ahead of the Big Ideas Summit 2016 on April 21st, we’re on the hunt for your Big Ideas. Philip Ideson discusses his Big Idea of procurement-as-a-service models.

At the Big Ideas Summit 2016, which takes place on 21st April,  we will be asking our speakers and attendees to record their ‘Big Ideas’ live on camera for the whole of our Procurious community to see.

But we also believe that every single procurement and supply chain professional has a unique vantage point in the industries, communities and businesses they work in. You have been submitting your Big Ideas to us, and so far, we think they have been great!

Philip Ideson, Host, The Art of Procurement

Philip believes that procurement-as-a-service delivery models will transform the procurement value proposition. Companies will be able to access procurement talent and technology “on-demand”. This means the cost of accessing procurement expertise becomes a variable cost rather than a fixed cost.  

The result? Organisations of all sizes can now access specialist domain expertise which allows us to pull value levers that over and above cost savings that elevate our role and transform our value proposition. 

Philip elaborates on this big idea further here. You can connect with Philip on the Art of Procurement website, or on Twitter at @aopshow or @pideson.

How to Submit Your Big Idea

We don’t mind if you film your submission on your phone, tablet, laptop or PC. However, to help you out we’ve compiled a list of some of our recommended methods for reaching out.

Once you’ve completed your film, you can reach us by email ([email protected]); on Twitter (@procurious_) or via Google Drive or Dropbox (using [email protected]).

You can find all the information you need on recording and submitting your Big Idea here.

Want to know more about Big Ideas 2016? Then visit www.bigideassummit.com, join our Procurious group, and Tweet your thoughts and Big Ideas to us using #BigIdeas2016.

Don’t miss out on this truly excellent event and the chance to participate in discussions that will shape the future of the procurement profession. Get Involved, register today.

Procurement Software – Weighed Down by Unnecessary Ice?

Is the procurement software created to make jobs and lives easier actually doing the opposite? Is it all weighed down with a glut of unnecessary features?

Paul Blake leads the technology product marketing team at GEP, a leading global provider of procurement technology solutions.

Have you ever wondered how many power stations are needed to make all the ice that no one uses? Or how about this: what does the internet weigh?

These are the sort of questions that I have found coming to mind on long journeys. I know, it’s sad, isn’t it?

Another one was, what is the quickest way to transfer a really huge amount of data from one place to another?

Answering the Abstract

You’d be forgiven if such questions fall into the category of “things I never think about,” but increasingly the answers to seemingly abstract questions might indicate the kind of thinking we’ll have to do to solve more complex problems that really matter.

The journey that brought our opening question to mind was one homeward bound after a procurement conference, one where I had engaged in a fascinating conversation with some specialists in procuring energy. We all know that one firm’s indirect can be another’s direct category, and energy is a perfect example.

The power appetite of some businesses is simply staggering and the strategising and planning effort that go into managing what, for us, is such a trivial everyday concern is equally impressive.  More on energy in a moment but…

How DO you transfer a vast amount of data in the quickest way possible? The answer may surprise you. FedEx. (Other global courier firms are available.)

100 terabytes of data is a large, but not unimaginable, amount. Given that you can buy a card today for your camera that can store 960GB, then you’re pushing a terabyte (more or less) into something the size of a thumbnail. Stick a hundred of those in a padded envelope and you can have it anywhere within a 25 mile radius within the hour or anywhere on the planet within 24.

A 500-megabit broadband connection would take you the best part of three weeks to send that much data to your neighbour, let alone to your colleagues 7 time zones away.

As the complexity of business information increases and subsequent data volumes explode will we begin to see a hybrid solution to data transfer? SneakerNet 2.0?

Combatting Waste

Equally, as energy becomes more of a limiting factor, businesses may look for novel methods to combine traditional and emerging technologies into a solution that works for a new era. Some years ago I was surprised to find, in my local DIY store, a display of low energy compact fluorescent light bulbs on sale for, if I recall correctly 30p (50¢) each.

As I puzzled at how they could be sold so cheaply, a fellow shopper pointed out that they were branded with the logo of a major utility and his comment was, “which is cheaper, give these away at 30p each or build another power station?”

When you do a bit of scratch mathematics on the back of an envelope, and realise how much energy is spent putting ice in places where it doesn’t need to be (a couple of kilos, for example in every hotel room in the place I’ve just stayed as part of their “turn down” service), then you start to think about a whole host of other seemingly trivial things, which add up to huge profligate waste.

Cocktail umbrellas? Sachets of salt and pepper served with in-flight meals that nobody ever opens but which all get discarded? The printing of the words “allergy advice: contains mustard” on jars of mustard (it’s true).

Makes you think doesn’t it?  All that energy adds up to a vast amount of fuel burned for no really compelling reason whatsoever. In solving one small apparent problem (like the inability to get through a night without some ice nearby), we can create another that is much trickier to solve, and they require us to be creative and develop different, perhaps non-obvious solutions.

Perhaps nobody would immediately think of using a traditional parcel service to move data about, or giving away energy saving devices instead of producing more energy.

The Foibles of Features

When it comes to developing procurement software the obvious path is to develop features and functions. Capabilities if you like.  The tools to let you do stuff.  This is natural for developers, it’s what they do.

What they may actually be doing is attempting to solve small problems that aren’t necessarily real in any significant sense (the operational equivalent of running out of ice while you sleep), and at the same time creating a much bigger, more intractable issue.

In trying to deliver every bell and whistle in order to reach feature parity with a competitor, technologists end up building monstrously complex systems that actually hinder the very process they were intended to facilitate.

But perhaps there is a different approach. How about, instead of developing an ever more elaborate set of features in some kind of arms race, we look at developing processes; processes and the means to shape them to suit a business?

What would that mean in real terms? Perhaps the future of business and procurement software is about making connections between people and groups work better, instead of creating more and more levels of complexity in the tools they use.

Shifting Thinking

My contention is that one way to dramatically improve productivity in the modern work place would be to outlaw email. Heretical, perhaps, and probably impossible to implement. But I bet most of you reading this are both shuddering in horror at the thought and, at the same time, recognising the truth of the situation – that email is the static that swamps our day, the noise that is disrupting the signal, so to speak.

Technology has the capability to drive improvements in business but it has also the capability to tie us down in thrall to evermore complex tasks and activities. When looking to what we might develop next, we should not lose sight of the human aspect that is central to what procurement is all about – establishing and managing relationships across an entire supply chain for mutual benefit.

Whilst not proposing a sudden panacea to cure all ills, this approach might start to move us towards better, more natural productivity, and away from being weighed down by increasing complexities.

But that new idea would require a shift in thinking in the customer too. The process of procurement software selection has for too long been dominated by an almost obsessive compulsion to assess suitability by ticking boxes against features and functions, instead of an examination of how a company’s problems might be solved.

Enlightened procurement pros are starting to “get” this idea. They are looking to their own operations to see what the really big problems are, and getting to grips with how to solve them using procurement software as an enabler, rather than as an end in itself.

Time to Lighten the Load

So how much does the internet weigh? Not the server farms or storage devices, or drives or memory chips involved, but the data itself? It might seem like an utterly meaningless question. Surely an acre-sized data centre weighs the same whether it is full, or as empty as the day it came on-line? Well, apparently not. Data requires energy to exist. And every megabyte of data you add to your cloud corpus, adds just a little more energy.

The world’s most famous equation tells us E=mc2. Therefore, every unit of energy you require to store a unit of data, equates to a corresponding unit of mass. A full data centre really does weigh more than an empty one, but of course only by a tiny, tiny amount.

Correspondingly, every email we receive, and every feature we add to our already complex systems, adds just a little bit more mass, literally. We’ll never notice it, of course, but every time we feel weighed down by an information overload, or stymied by ridiculously complex procurement software, at least we can comfort ourselves in the knowledge that we’re not imagining ALL of it. And one day we might work together to lighten the load.

For more high-energy thinking on procurement software, visit the Smart by GEP website.