Tag Archives: procurement webinar

Three Reasons I’m Excited About Blockchain

Blockchain – is it the answer to procurement and supply chain’s prayers?  Or is it over hyped, another ‘technological innovation’ that promises much and delivers little?

blockchain
Photo by Mert Guller on Unsplash

I must admit I was leaning towards the pessimistic camp – when were those great use cases really going to happen?  I signed up for the Procurious webinar to find out more about how this new technology is impacting supply chains – and what I learned was very exciting:

Blockchain Lets You Focus on What Is Important

One of the pieces of work we all wish would disappear from the day job is the time-consuming process of supplier onboarding. 

Webinar guest IBM Sterling’s Shari Diaz told us about a blockchain-enabled onboarding process that would “give the procurement professional all that time back”. 

Describing immutable records that the supplier would update themselves and third-party validation of accreditation, Shari encouraged us to think of a world where master data management had transferred from the buyer to the supplier.

Imagine what you could do if you didn’t have to worry about more mundane tasks within your role and could instead give more focus and energy to strategic projects!

A New Way of Measuring Value

One way that Professor Olinga Ta’eed is taking forward the development of a blockchain is through the not for profit Transnational Transaction Procurement Foundation.  Since its launch earlier in 2019 the TPP foundation has grown to over 165,000 members, impressive numbers! 

Olinga set out the goals of the TPP as being practical – to “fathom out” use cases like how we can capture and report things like intangible assets using blockchain to give a broader picture of an organisation’s true value.  

Olinga thinks this new reporting will be liberating for procurement professionals allowing a more strategic focus to the role. 

How much more value could we demonstrate if we could capture and record it?

A Re-Alignment of Values for the 21st Century

Both webinar guests thought that the greatest potential for blockchain will be the ability to articulate the alignment of values.  As we move into a world where values are becoming more important, blockchain is going to provide the traceability and trackability that consumers demand. 

As Shari observed “there’s a huge trend for supply chain to be able to demonstrate their values and consumers are starting to speak with their dollar”.

Shari also stressed that blockchain can enable our eco systems to work together.  “Enterprises [typically] depend on partners for 65 per cent of the value they deliver to their customers.  The more collaborative and connected we are – the more efficient and effective we’re going to be”.

So, blockchain technology is ready to give us time back, new ways of measuring value and for our values to be realigned. 

Our webinar guests have given procurement and supply cause to remain optimistic and in fact licence to dare to dream big.

I’ll leave the last words to Professor Ta’eed,

“Blockchain will light up the path for procurement to align with mankind – making procurement and supply chain the single greatest instrument to change the world”.

A recording of the Procurious-IBM Webinar – Blockchain Supply Chain’s 21st Century Truthsayer – with panel members Shari Diaz, IBM Sterling, Professor Olinga Ta’eed and host Tania Seary, Procurious is available here

Blockchain: Supply Chain’s 21st Century Truthsayer

No-one can predict the future. But we could all use a truthsayer to help us protect ourselves in the here and now…

Photo by Mitya Ivanov on Unsplash

In most supply chains, communication is point-to-point and one direction. There is no single, shared record of events across multiple parties. This is no longer an efficient or effective way to do business and most organisations know this.

And where there is no single point of truth or shared records, trust in supply chains and from consumers can be eroded. What procurement and supply chains need is a solution that can deliver data, but also be unimpeachable.

But how to solve this issue and penetrate the dense forest of new ideas and myriad technologies all offering to be some form of truthsayer?

A Truthsayer in our Midst?

New technology is, however, transforming that linear disconnected approach, and providing momentum to the movement for mature supply chains to operate in a “network of networks”.

By placing a supply chain on the blockchain, it makes the process more traceable, transparent and fully digital. With blockchain, organisations can shine a light on the provenance of their goods, but also earn the trust of consumers by proving the safety and traceability of the goods. And in a fast-paced environment, those organisations who don’t engage with blockchain face the reality of being left behind.

From farm to plate, the food supply chain can now be tracked in an open, transparent, fully traceable and entirely digital way. But what has started out in the food supply chain has all the applicability we need to cover all supply chains. Everywhere.

How then do we get involved? And how also do we sell this concept to a probably sceptical organisation (and budget holder…)?

Join our Webinar

Help is at hand in the form of Procurious and IBM’s latest webinar, ‘Blockchain – Supply Chain’s 21st Century Truthsayer’.

Sign up now to join our panel of experts at 14:30pm (BST) on Tuesday the 15th of October:

  • Tania Seary, Founder, Procurious
  • Shari Diaz, Innovation Strategy and Operations Program Director, IBM Watson Supply Chain
  • Professor Olinga Ta’eed, Director of the Centre for Citizenship, Enterprise and Governance

In the webinar, you’ll hear from a panel of experts on a range of topics including:

  • The importance understanding products’ provenance in your supply chain;
  • The link between successful blockchain adoption and rising consumer confidence;
  • Success stories from across the globe in blockchain implementation; and
  • How to start the conversation in your organisation to get the ball rolling.

FAQs

Is the Blockchain webinar available to anyone?

Absolutely! Anyone & everyone can register for the webinar and it won’t cost you a penny to do so. Simply sign up here.

How do I listen to the Critical Factors webinar?

Simply sign up here and you’ll be able to listen to the on-demand. 

Help – I can’t make it to the live-stream of the webinar!

No problem! If you can’t make the live-stream you can catch up whenever it suits you. We’ll be making it available on Procurious soon after the event (and will be sure to send you a link) so you can listen at your leisure!

Can I ask the speakers a question during the Blockchain: Supply Chain’s 21st Century Truthsayer webinar?

If you’d like to ask one of our speakers a question please submit it via the Discussion Board on Procurious and we’ll do our very best to ensure it gets answered for you.

Don’t Miss Out!

This webinar promises to provide a fascinating insight for all procurement professionals into the wealth of possibilities that Blockchain has to offer procurement.

Make sure you don’t miss out by signing up today!

Blockchain – A New Flavour of Traceability

Why did the chicken cross the road? More importantly, was there traceability of its journey and how many miles did it cover? Maybe blockchain can help us answer this age-old question…

Courtesy of Portlandia

Do you find yourself thinking more and more about the journey your food has taken to get to your plate? It’s not just because you’re a supply chain professional. It’s because, as a community, we are increasingly interested in the origin and safety of the food we consume.

Farm to Plate – Tracked and Traced

Consumers have an increasing interest in and focus on sustainability, food miles and the concept of ‘farm to plate’. The pressure is on the supply chain to maintain quality while providing both transparency and a fully auditable trail.

Production lines can be stopped and deadlines missed. But if fresh produce doesn’t get to where it needs to be on time, there isn’t any end product.

Delayed, incomplete, incorrect or damaged shipments create a monumental volume of administration. Productivity tanks, costs mount and trust erodes as the parties enter into a “we said, they said” situation, with each party trying to avoid being the ones to blame. This has led to a situation that as the food supply chain has grown, the level of trust has diminished.

However, one of the hottest new technologies, blockchain, has proved to be an invaluable tool in helping provide transparency and maintain trust.

Network of Networks

In most supply chains, communication is point-to-point and one direction. There is no single, shared record of events across multiple parties. Damages or changes – malicious or accidental – may surface in the moment, or potentially only when they are raised by consumers.

According to research published by Gartner in 2017, there is a movement for mature supply chains to operate in a “network of networks”. The network of networks acts as a self-fulfilling prophecy, as mature supply chains in these networks achieve higher levels of maturity, including improving ecosystem visibility.

By placing a supply chain on the blockchain, it makes the process more traceable, transparent and fully digital. Each node on the blockchain could represent an entity that has handled the food on the way to the store, making it much easier and faster to identify the source of food safety issues with much greater precision.

The attributes of blockchain technology are ideally suited to networks of partners, big and small. By providing a shared, single version of the truth through a shared, digital ledger, blockchain increases trust and creates efficiencies by eliminating the “we said, they said” problem and creating a shared understanding of all possible disruptions that could impact OTIF delivery.

With blockchain, transaction records are immutable, or tamperproof, and agreed upon by all parties. Immutability creates an audit trail. Privacy is maintained by setting the appropriate levels of data visibility for different parties. And business rules are shared and enforced by the system through smart contracts.

Trust and Traceability

A prime example of the effectiveness of blockchain in the food supply chain is Walmart. The retail giant has been working with IBM on a food safety solution, using IBM’s ‘Food Trust‘ solution, which was specifically designed for this purpose.

Before working with IBM to move some of its food supply chain to blockchain, it typically took Walmart approximately 7 days to trace the source of food. With the blockchain, it’s been reduced to 2.2 seconds. This time may be the difference between a consumer eating unsafe food and it never reaching the shelves in the first place.

IBM has also played a major role in the development of blockchain tracking for another retailer, Carrefour. The organisation uses blockchain ledger technology to track produce including meat, milk and fruit from source to shelf. The technology has enabled tracking on the consumer side too, with shoppers able to scan QR codes on products, allowing them to read product information on provenance and process.

Carrefour has credited the technology with increasing consumer trust in the brand, resulting in an increase in sales. It’s an example that many other retailers may look to follow soon.

Supplier ‘Passports’

IBM very recently announced a new blockchain network, ‘Trust Your Supplier’. The network, not solely limited to the food supply chain, has been designed to improve supplier qualification by creating a form of passport for suppliers. This will help to reduce time and resources for validation, with everything verified by third parties, such as Dun & Bradstreet, to square the circle.

The network, and network of networks, look set to revolutionise how organisations and consumers look at supply chains. The food supply chain is merely the first where the technology is making strides, though the fashion industry has also made moves to implement with significant success.

As consumers buy less fresh produce to reduce food waste, they are willing to spend a bit more to ensure quality. With blockchain, organisations can shine a light on the provenance of their goods, but also earn the trust of consumers by proving the safety and traceability of the goods. And in a fast-paced environment, those organisations who don’t engage with blockchain face the reality of being left behind.

We might never know why the chicken crossed the road. But with blockchain tracking the supply chain, we’ll be able to understand where it came from, how far away and track it’s route all the way to your plate (sorry Colin!).

Blockchain: Supply Chain’s 21st Century Truthsayer

From farm to plate, the food supply chain can now be tracked in an open, transparent, fully traceable and entirely digital way. We may never know the why, but the how and where are within our grasp!

In our latest webinar, Blockchain: Supply Chain’s 21st Century Truthsayer, we’ll be exploring the full applicability of this great technological innovation, understanding how Walmart and Carrefour have turned this to their advantage and revealing why it’s a must have for supply chains of the future! Click here to sign up now.

The Secret of Successful Supplier Selection

Still using cost as a primary criteria for supplier selection? Our latest webinar shares all the secrets you need for success.

Have you been tasked with running a selection process for a new supplier but don’t know where to start?  Perhaps you’ve been using the same routine for years but feel it’s time to freshen it up?  Are the old ways just not delivering the outcomes you need?

In our recent Procurious-Ivalua Webinar, Critical Success Factors for Supplier Selection, our panel of experts revealed the secrets to how they get the outcomes they want from their sourcing processes. 

Here are five great take-aways from that discussion.

Supplier Selection – Get the Balance Right

Our panel reported that many organisations are not yet on a path that leads away a cost-driven focus.  Tech tools that are available to help with future cost modelling mean procurement can go to the market with uncertainty about this type of risk reduced.  When cost risk is managed this leaves the way clear for the road to value. 

A great example quoted in the discussion was a utility contract. The focus was on value rather than cost. It led to costs being reduced and also meant a more sustainable outcome was delivered. This lowered usage and introduced measures to promote sustainability. 

Can you introduce a selection process that balances cost, value and your organisation’s wider sustainability goals to select a supplier who is right for you?

Remember, One Size Doesn’t Fit All

Making sure a supplier is a good cultural fit for the organisation is a key requirement that all our panel members stressed.  Think about the impact of a cultural misalignment on your organisation’s reputation or brand.  

Cultures vary across the world and getting a cultural fit when you’ve got a global supply chain is hard. However, there are many things on which the buyer and supplier can agree. How about meeting with your supplier’s leadership team as part of the sourcing process? This would allow you to assess their management ethos to make sure that the cultural fit is there right from the start?

The unknown unknowns

Managing external factors and risks, particularly those that are not yet known, are something that supplier selection process is often expected to address.  All panel members reported the challenge of grappling with the unknown unknowns in the current period of global upheaval and change. 

The advent of technology-driven real time data is something panel members welcomed to manage supplier and supply chain risk.  It’s also a great way to check and monitor supplier financial health. 

Make use of the new tools that are available to ensure your organisation is prepared and have a backstop position to allow a response when situational or supplier risks change.

Be a customer of choice

When it came to the supplier-buyer relationship our panel had very clear advice.  Whether we’re a supplier or a buyer, we’re all looking of a return on the investment in the relationship we’re about to have.  Focus clearly on the outcomes both sides are trying to achieve. 

Make sure you put yourself in the seat of your supplier’s sales director – how can a contract with your organisation provide a supplier with the opportunity for fair value earnings or a sustainable revenue stream?

Start the conversation

Changing the way your organisation selects suppliers will not happen overnight.  When you’re engaging with stakeholders our panel advises you to talk in their terms not the language of procurement. 

Will the change you’re proposing add value?  Why will it improve customer experience?  Why could it safeguard or improve reputation?

So, go ahead and pick one of the secrets that the webinar panel shared as being critical factors for success and start that conversation with the business today.

A recording of the Procurious-Ivalua Webinar – Critical Success Factors for Selecting Your Suppliers with panel members Gordon Tytler, Rolls Royce, Stephen Carter, Ivalua, Fred Nijffels, Accenture and host Tania Seary, Procurious is available here.

Critical Factors for Selecting your Suppliers

What critical factors do you look for in your suppliers? What does an organisation have to offer to get their foot in your door?

When you think of procurement, and get beyond the savings agenda, then the first thing that comes to mind is managing suppliers. While employees may be the life-blood of an organisation, suppliers are definitely the nourishment and support that keep organisations alive.

Without suppliers and their extended supply chains, organisations wouldn’t have any raw materials to make into products, any products to sell, or anyone to deliver much-needed services. That’s why a good supplier relationship (or relationships) can be critical to your daily operations.

However, one bad apple, one flawed contractors could not only stop the seamless functioning of your supply chain. It could also harm those two vital elements for all businesses – trust and reputation.

Your Critical Factors

If supplier relationships are key, then surely procurement should be taking its time selecting the right ones. And given the importance of this, procurement also needs to be applying the right ‘critical factors’ when selecting their suppliers.

As has been discussed in the past on Procurious, there are a number of factors that must be considered when selecting suppliers. The only issue is that these don’t appear to have changed very much over the years, begging the question – is procurement doing everything it can to adapt these criteria in line with the external environment?

Sure, it’s high time that procurement was looking past the traditional criteria of cost and quality when making their assessments. But the truth is, there’s no getting away from them.

However, this isn’t necessarily a bad thing if they aren’t the only factors in the equation. As procurement professionals, you are probably only too aware of the myriad of other factors that you need to be accounting for, from cultural fit and financial stability, all the way through to ethics and sustainability.

So which are the critical factors that procurement should be using? Is there a list that we should all be looking at?

Join our Webinar

Help is at hand in the form of Procurious and Ivalua’s latest webinar, ‘Critical Factors for Selecting your Suppliers’.

Sign up now to join our panel of experts at 11am (BST) on Tuesday the 3rd of September:

  • Tania Seary, Founder, Procurious
  • Stephen Carter, Senior Marketing Manager, Ivalua
  • Fred Nijffels, Accenture Operations ANZ – Procurement & Supply Chain
  • Gordon Tytler, Director of Procurement, Rolls Royce

In the webinar, you’ll hear from a panel of experts on a range of topics including:

  • The importance of cultural fit in your supplier relationships;
  • If sustainability, social value and fair working practices are becoming more prominent for procurement;
  • What your suppliers are looking for in your organisation; and
  • How to start the conversation in your organisation to move away from just cost and quality criteria.

FAQs

Is the Critical Factors webinar available to anyone?

Absolutely! Anyone & everyone can register for the webinar and it won’t cost you a penny to do so. Simply sign up here.

How do I listen to the Critical Factors webinar?

Simply sign up here and you’ll be able to listen to the on-demand. 

Help – I can’t make it to the live-stream of the webinar!

No problem! If you can’t make the live-stream you can catch up whenever it suits you. We’ll be making it available on Procurious soon after the event (and will be sure to send you a link) so you can listen at your leisure!

Can I ask the speakers a question during the Critical Factors For Selecting Your Suppliers webinar?

If you’d like to ask one of our speakers a question please submit it via the Discussion Board on Procurious and we’ll do our very best to ensure it gets answered for you.

Don’t Miss Out!

This webinar promises to provide a fascinating insight for all procurement professionals into the Critical Factors you should be considering in supplier selection.

Make sure you don’t miss out by signing up today!

Is AI The New Electricity?

For supply chain professionals, the drive to use AI is there. But how do organisations get to the point when AI-enabled supply chain management is the norm?

By kung_tom/ Shutterstock


“Electricity changed how the world operated. It upended transportation, manufacturing, agriculture, health care. AI is poised to have a similar impact. Artificial Intelligence already powers many of our interactions today. When you ask Siri for directions, peruse Netflix’s recommendations, or get a fraud alert from your bank, these interactions are led by computer systems using large amounts of data to predict your needs.”

Andrew Ng – Stanford University – March 2018

According to the results of our latest survey, Procurement 2030, supply chain pros are well aware of how impactful AI could be for their profession. Indeed, 92 per cent of professionals believe the profession will transform by 2030 as a direct result of new technological innovations. And 51 per cent predict that, with the help of AI, supply chain professionals will become an agile group of strategic advisors.

The intention to utilise technology is there. But how do organisations get to the point when AI-enabled supply chain management is the norm?

Getting started, and knowing where to start, is tough going – as with anything new and unknown. We know that many supply chain pros are concerned that implementing AI into their supply chains is a complex step. In fact, our survey takers ranked it as the technology they feared most difficult to adopt. But are their fears unfounded?

We want procurement pros to be pushing the limits on Industry 4.0, and the first to adopt new technologies.

And so, in our latest webinar – How AI Saved My Day Job: Confessions from a Supply Chain Pro we’ll be demonstrating that AI is the real deal by giving you the insider information, the low-down, on what it is delivering right now for supply chain teams.

Webinar speakers

We’ll be speaking with supply chain professionals who are already implementing AI in their organisations and have discovered that AI does provide a demonstrable bottom-line impact across all supply chains structures. Speakers include:

  • Rob Allan – Program Director, Supply Chain Insights Offering Management – IBM
  • Tania Seary Founder – Procurious
  • Connie Rekau – EDI Manager – The Master Lock Company
  • Nickolas Bonivento – EDI Manager – Anheuser-Busch InBev

When is the How AI Saved My Day Job webinar?

The webinar takes place on 15th May 10am ET / 3pm BST. Sign up or log in via the form above and we’ll be in touch ahead of the event to provide details on how to join the webinar live.

How do I listen to the How AI Saved My Day Job webinar?

Simply sign up here and you’ll be re-directed to the Supply Chain Pros group where you can access heaps of related content. You will also join the webinar mailing list, so we can provide you with details on how to access the webinar before it goes live.

Help! I can’t make it to the live-stream of the How AI Saved My Day Job webinar?

No problem! If you can’t make the live-stream you can catch up whenever it suits you. We’ll be making it available on Procurious soon after the event (and will be sure to send you a link) so you can listen at your leisure!

Do I have to be a member of Procurious to access the How AI Saved My Day Job webinar?

Yes. To access the webinar you’ll need to sign up to Procurious. You’ll be joining a community of 30,000 like-minded procurement and supply chain peers and gain access to all Procurious’ free resources. You’ll be joining a community of 30,000 like-minded procurement and supply chain peers and gain access to all Procurious’ free resources.

Could AI revolutionise your supply chain and save your day job – allowing you to make better decisions, more efficiently and in a more repeatable way over time? Let’s find out!

5 Reasons Your Organisation’s Travel Spend is Out Of Control

Procurement travel managers have a whole host of issues they need to take into account – from cost, efficiency and payment processing to data security, service reliability and employee safety.

By sergeevana/ Shutterstock

Today, corporate ground travel, both locally and globally, is remarkably complex with worsening traffic and congestion charges adding to the challenge of running a low cost, efficient operation. Meanwhile, employees, who are accustomed to the ease and efficiency of the technology they use outside of work, expect a better travel experience than ever before.

Procurement travel managers have a whole host of issues they need to take into account – from cost, efficiency and payment processing to data security, service reliability and employee safety. However, according to UK Taxi Expenses Review 2017 55 per cent of companies don’t even have a defined travel policy.

24 per cent of financial decision makers rank travel as one of the most difficult operating expenses to control. Here are five factors  that are contributing to the problem…  

1. Wasted time

Think about how many people are involved in each travel expense that an employee submits. Firstly they need to fill out the expense form, which 60 per cent of employees fill out during working hours, spending up to an hour per month on bureaucracy. In 90 per cent of cases, the claim requires approval from a senior employee before it is finally sent to another party to be processed.

2. Cost inefficiencies

That’s only half of it though. Over 50 per cent of employees round their claim up by an average of 25 per cent while a third admit to forgetting the fare before they have made a note of the charge. The subsequent expense claim discrepancies can lead to significant losses.

A number of other factors can also lead to financial losses that are hard to track, such as lack of employee punctuality that causes the overall fare to spike or unreliable travel service providers, which leads to lost business opportunities.

3. Lack of data

Only 31 per cent of companies feel that they have control over their data. This means that the vast majority believe their businesses are in the dark about their travel expenses. This can have a critical impact on productivity, costs and data security.

According to JP Morgan, for 39 per cent of travel managers travel data is necessary to enable successful negotiation with vendors. There are multiple reasons why travel information is vital, but if you don’t have an advanced mechanism that lets you know who is travelling, when and where then it is virtually impossible to manage your travel expenses. In a modern, dynamic business real time data is required to know all of this information and more, including which projects or time periods are travel intensive so you can adjust your travel policy accordingly.

4. Hidden costs

To further complicate matters hidden costs are abound, which complicates a company’s abilities to calculate expenses. This is most evident when employees are abroad. In an unfamiliar environment, employees are far more likely to hail a ride at a taxi rank, which is on average 40 per cent more expensive than doing so on the street or by calling a local service. Equally, ground travel costs are frequently folded into per diem payments so there is no clear data on travel expenses. On a local level, tips can vary widely and impact the bottom line. For example, in London, employees tip an average of 19 per cent and elsewhere, approximately 13 per cent.

5. Inadequate Security

While cost efficiency is an essential aspect of any company’s travel policy, employee safety is also a vital concern. It’s important to provide the highest standards of care to ensure the welfare of your employees. Can you guarantee they are having a consistent and comfortable travel experience? If they are abroad, can you still ensure their security and that they experience the same standards of driver safety, reliability and professionalism.

Clearly, travel can entail an array of unforeseen risks and costs and a lot of companies don’t have a tight enough grasp of what is happening in the business.

What can you do about it?

You need to identify the where and how of your company travel and to achieve this you must think about your current travel needs. The following questions are a great way to get the ball rolling.

  1. Have your needs evolved over time and are you keeping up?
  2. Do you have a defined, company-wide travel policy?
  3. How many of your employees travel and for what purpose?
  4. Do your employees just travel with the city, between cities or also globally?
  5. How are you ensuring the safety of your employees when they travel?
  6. How closely can you track your travel activities and expenditure?
  7. What reporting mechanisms do you have?
  8. Which specific projects, business units or individuals are responsible for peak spend?
  9. How many different service providers are you using and how reliable are they?
  10. How much of your expenditure is accounted for with your current reporting system?  

New Webinar: Rush Hour: High Risk, Hidden Costs and Unexpected Travel Spend

To start getting your corporate travel under control, register (it’s free) for a new procurement webinar,  which covers every aspect of how to manage the the total cost of ownership: Rush Hour: High Risk, Hidden Costs and Unexpected Travel Spend

The webinar will take place at 11am BST on 16th AprilSimply sign up via this form. You will then be added to the webinar mailing list, with details on how to access the webinar before it goes live.

If you can’t catch the live stream, you can sign up at any time and catch the recorded version later via the Procurious site.

3 Steps To Kickstarting Your Marketplace Strategy

Our latest webinar, Going to Market(place): The Future of Procurement sponsored by Amazon Business is now available on Procurious. Sign up now to listen!

William Potter/ Shutterstock

Everyone’s talking about the benefits of procurement marketplaces, particularly when it comes to managing tail spend – but actually adopting one as part of a procurement strategy is another matter entirely. If it’s something your team is talking about, but not yet investing in, how do you get started? And if you’ve already taken the leap, how can you ensure you’re making the most of it?

In a recent webinar Going To market(place): The Future of Procurement we defined marketplaces, in short, as places where people gather (in person or digitally) to buy and sell goods and services. For B2B purchasing, marketplaces are gaining steam, with recent announcements indicating that millions of businesses globally use Amazon Business.

What’s driving this trend?

The global business environment is challenging organisations of all sizes to be increasingly agile and remain competitive with slim margins. Procurement teams have an opportunity to contribute to business performance through digital innovation, new technologies, and other strategic projects. However, they need the bandwidth to do so and that’s often a key challenge.

According to the 2018 Deloitte CPO Survey, 51 per cent of procurement leaders shared that they did not believe their teams had sufficient capabilities to deliver on their procurement strategy. And recent Procurement Leaders research found that administrative and non-strategic work can take up to a third of a category manager’s time.

A B2B marketplace offers the opportunity to offload a significant amount of time spent on administrative work through a solution that offers you choice, competitive offers, and transparent pricing – with tools that help you to maintain procurement control and visibility. Perhaps most importantly, this opens up your resource to focus on more value-adding strategic activities.

How do you get started?

We think about getting started as a three step process.

  1. Build your business case and understand the potential savings

We believe in working backwards from the customer. First, determine who your customer is – whether that’s your buyers, your procurement team, or your company more broadly. Then identify what your customer actually needs and the problem you’re trying to solve. From there, work backwards to ensure your strategy delivers on that customer need.

For example, if you’re looking to empower your end users by increasing stakeholder satisfaction and collaboration, and offload administrative burden so that you can focus your procurement team on strategic initiatives, build your business case there.

When you estimate your potential savings, consider both hard savings, including product costs and shipping fees, as well as soft savings: the cost of managing suppliers – with Hackett Group reporting the average cost between $700-$1400; the cost of search time in finding the items that are needed; and the cost of PO processing time. Make sure to consider both hard and soft savings when looking at your total potential value saved.

  1. Register for your account

With Amazon Business, registering for an account is free and takes minutes to complete. When you have registered your account, take some time to configure your account according to your needs. This could mean thinking through what categories you want to allow and those you want to restrict, including curating what’s available for buyers to purchase. For example, if you have an existing contract for IT hardware, you may want to restrict purchasing of those items, but leave office supplies, janitorial, and other categories open for miscellaneous purchases. Amazon Business also allows you to curate purchasing to only those items that offer a VAT invoice

You may also want to consider how to streamline payments on the marketplace. Do you have a p-card or corporate card programme, or do you wish to pay on terms? Do you need to set up shared payment between groups? Establishing these points up front will make purchasing easier for your buyers.

And depending on your set-up and internal initiatives, you may want to integrate a marketplace as a punchout catalogue in your eProcurement system rather than purchasing directly on the marketplace.

  1. Roll out

Rolling out a marketplace, like any other implementation, will require some change management with your stakeholders. However, the idea of using a B2C marketplace that is familiar and easy to use for B2B purchases requires little to no training. And it’s easy to convince your team of the benefits!

Keep in mind that it always takes more than one email to get your audience’s attention, and you should plan for a regular cadence of messages to reinforce the new process. In addition, we recommend that you plan milestone evaluations with stakeholders to reinforce adoption and review key metrics.

Finally, don’t forget to communicate often with your marketplace account manager to keep up to date on new releases. B2B marketplaces are quickly growing and developing, with new functionality frequently coming to market. If you want a feature that’s not available today, odds are that it’s around the corner.

Using a B2B marketplace for tail spend can save your team a great deal of time and money, and it doesn’t have to be complicated. And if you need help, you can always reach out to your Amazon Business account representative.

To learn more about Amazon Business and register for a free account, visit amazon.co.uk/business.

Our latest webinar, Going to Market(place): The Future of Procurement sponsored by Amazon Business is now available on Procurious. Sign up to listen.  

Is It Time For Procurement Pros To Go To Market?

Going to Market (Place) : The Future of Procurement goes live on 13th November. Sign up now.  

Could a  B2B e-marketplace transform the lives of your procurement team? What are the key benefits of using a marketplace and why are some procurement leaders reluctant to take the leap?

We hear from Molly Dobson, Head of Enterprise Customer Success – Amazon Business and Mary Hetherington, Director of UK Group Procurement – AXA to get the low down on the future of marketplaces, how they can benefit procurement professionals and what reservations are still held by the profession.

Whist digital marketplaces have evolved over time, and come and gone with varying success, the core functionality remains in that they are a central place where people gather to buy and sell goods and services.

“The digital marketplace isn’t a revolutionary concept.” explains Molly. “But it definitely has been more prevalent in our personal lives than our professional lives – e.g. Uber, Airbnb and Amazon.”

Having said that, “early innovators really did introduce a concept in procurement that still underpins the business marketplaces of today. These are capabilities like electronic procurement, reverse auctions and buyer discovery.”

Molly outlines the three core components of any procurement marketplace:

  1. Breadth of choice

The  first core characteristic of a marketplace is having that “wide range of choice within a single interface, which is why we all like to use marketplaces within our personal lives. Within a marketplace like Amazon Business you can access 250 million products from toilet paper to precision test and measurement instruments, to professional medical supplies.”

2. Competition 

“Users of a marketplace get access to multiple sellers for the same offer. Each of these sellers is competing against one another to get your business and with this competition you can have reduced commitments to some of those long, inflexible contracts. We like to talk about a marketplace being dynamic in that sense.”

3. Transparency 

“In a marketplace you can have transparency of product and seller reviews and pricing and delivery options. You really get the capability to compare all of your options and make informed buying decisions.”

“In the procurement space, in particular, you have additional requirements with things like the ability to integrate with other procurement applications.”

Marketplaces and maverick spend

Mary recently began piloting a marketplace at AXA.

“In the short space of time that we’ve been [trialling a marketplace] it has really surprised me the depth of information that we can attain about who’s buying what, the types of goods and services we’re buying,  at a very low level which hasn’t always been that transparent in the past.

“This is really useful for a large organisation like mine where we’re supporting several different business units with very diverse sets of requirements and lots and lots of small purchases. It gives us the opportunity to consolidate information and identify rogue spend very quickly.”

Measuring marketplace success

AXA has been measuring the success of its marketplace with three metrics; customer satisfaction, billing and fulfilment and  management of information.

  1. Customer satisfaction

Customer satisfaction on the solutions and the process around Amazon Marketplace is one metric AXA have been using to measure success.

“We all know that Amazon is the go to place for purchases. We use it in our private lives and people like that experience so we want to try and give our business customers some of that experience and flexibility when dealing with business purchases.”

2. Billing and fulfilment

Making sure that billing and fulfilment of the goods is effective, [that it] interfaces neatly with our purchase to pay solutions  [and] that we get the granularity we want on our invoicing.”

3.  Great management of information

It’s important to ensure procurement leaders can make well informed decisions about their future spend and future requirements.

“It can take some work to get [a marketplace] off the ground, [fitting into] your strategy [to a point where  multifunctional leaders can buy into it.”

Marketplace adoption

So what’s holding procurement teams back when it comes to adopting marketplaces. Mary Hetherington, Director of UK Group Procurement – AXA believes part of the challenge is procurement’s need to achieve a healthy balance between enabling the business and applying controls.

“We need to show flexibility but also proportionality when we’re looking at different sizes of purchasing,” she argues.

“The challenge with a marketplace is ensuring we determine the appropriate level of control that gives that flexibility to the business but doesn’t compromise any of our existing  preferred supplier  arrangement or bypass certain checkpoints of governance as a finical services organisation that we need to carry out.

“The key here is pitching it at the right level to ensure both the procurement team and the business get the solution they want.”

Are marketplaces the future of procurement? What are the pros and cons? We discuss in new Procurious webinar. which goes live on 13th November.  Sign up now (it’s free!)

Going To Market(place): The Future of Procurement

Are marketplaces the future of procurement? What are the pros and cons? We discuss in new Procurious webinar. 

In the late 1990s and early 2000s, B2B e-marketplaces were hyped up as the next big thing. For a while it seemed these were going to transform the lives of supply chain and procurement professionals forever. But they never quite took off perhaps because they were too far ahead of the technology and change-management requirements of the time. Indeed, most of the public and consortia marketplaces failed and of the 1,300 that were launched, fewer than 50 exist today.

Fast forward 20 years and, as consumers, we’re all enjoying, and heavily relying upon, the benefits of consumer companies with marketplace models such as Uber, Airbnb and Amazon.com. And whilst the B2B marketplace model might not be expanding with such speed, it is being applied to more diverse industries and with more success than previous models.

If you’re struggling to get a hold on your organisation’s maverick spending, concerned about disruption and risk mitigation within your supply chain or in serious need of a larger supplier pool, a marketplace might just be the answer to your prayers!

In our latest webinar, sponsored by Amazon Business, we explore the evolution of procurement marketplaces and their prevelance in organisations today, the pros and cons of using a marketplace and what the future holds for procurement if this trend continues.

Who is speaking on the webinar?

Molly Dobson, Head of Amazon Business Accounts – Amazon Business 

Molly Dobson is the Head of Enterprise Customer Success for Amazon Business UK. Prior to her role with Amazon Business, she was Head of Buying for European Business, Industrial, and Scientific Supplies and Category Leader for Amazon’s Luggage and Travel business. Molly has her MBA from London Business School and has also worked for Marks & Spencer, Coca-Cola, and Gap Inc.

Mary Hetherington, Director of UK Group Procurement – AXA

Mary Hetherington is the Group Procurement Director for AXA UK.  Mary has worked in the Insurance Industry for over 30 years managing a combination of Finance and Procurement functions. She has led several large multi-company third party programmes focusing on outsourcing, divestment and acquisition activity and GDPR. As part of a broader initiative to bring more agility to Procurement processes, Mary is currently focused on the Implementation of Coupa and an effective purchase to pay strategy.

What will be discussed in the webinar?

  • How can marketplaces help CPOs and their teams control maverick spend?
  • Are B2B marketplaces the future of procurement?
  • How can procurement teams incorporate marketplaces into their business strategy?
  • Why are some procurement professionals reluctant to adopt marketplaces?
  • The evolution of marketplaces and their prevalence in society today

How do I register for the webinar?

Registering for Going to Market (place): The Future of Procurement couldn’t be easier (and, of course, it’s FREE!)

Click here to enter your details and confirm your attendance. We’ll send you a email with a link to the webinar platform in the run up to the event.

I’m already a member of Procurious, do I still need to register?

Yes! If you are already a member of Procurious you must still enroll to access the webinar. We’ll send you a email with a link to the webinar platform in the run up to the event.

When is it taking place?

The webinar takes place on 13th November at 11am GMT. Sign up or log in here and we’ll be in touch ahead of the event to provide details on how to join the webinar live.

Help! I can’t make it to the live-stream

No problem! If you can’t make the live-stream you can catch up whenever it suits you. We’ll be making it available on Procurious soon after the event (and will be sure to send you a link) so you can listen at your leisure!

Can I ask a question during the webinar?

If you’d like to ask one of our speakers a question please submit it via the Discussion Board on Procurious and we’ll do our very best to ensure it gets answered for you.

Going to Market (Place) : The Future of Procurement goes live on 13th November. Sign up now.