Tag Archives: purpose-led procurement

Golfing for a Spectrum of Opportunity

We’re seeing people on the spectrum unleash their intellect, experience and creativity across the company and around the world.

By bbernard/ Shutterstock

Recently I was invited to participate in a golf tournament. Golf is more than a game to me: it’s social; it’s outdoors; and it’s competitive. I’m always up for some good competition! Unfortunately, I just don’t get out there as much as I’d like, but in this situation, it’s not just about competing in a beautiful setting with friends and colleagues.

This tournament has a purpose that is meaningful, powerful and valuable: Els for Autism Golf Challenge. Not only do I get to play golf and feel good about supporting a great cause, but this helps people, communities and businesses. It’s a trifecta!

In the software industry, the network effect occurs when new participants join a digital platform, and the entire collective reaps the benefits — the more inclusive the network, the richer the experience and the greater the value. The same can be said for inclusivity in the workplace. Both serve as opportunity multipliers enhancing the experience and value for all.

I aspire to create a corporate culture that is welcoming to and respectful of all. For me, this aspiration is modeled through SAP’s Autism at Work program, one of our many great diversity and inclusion programs at SAP.

We’re seeing people on the spectrum unleash their intellect, experience and creativity across the company and around the world. People with autism are realising more than gainful employment; they’re forging professional careers. Here’s an amazing feature highlighting the program:

Of course, in the procurement business, where matching supply with demand is our specialty, we know a mismatch when we see one. There is upwards of eighty-five per cent unemployment rates for adults on the spectrum — people with skills and ambitions and dreams — which indicates that our colleagues, customers and communities are missing out on a huge untapped pool of talent. It’s also an opportunity denied to people with a tremendous amount to offer.

When I think about these people with skills, ambitions and dreams, I think of Dennis, a quality assurance specialist at SAP Ariba. Dennis has muscular dystrophy and struggled to fit in. He always assumed it was because of his wheelchair.

A diagnosis of autism after college gave him better insight into why making friends was so challenging, but it didn’t change the fact he couldn’t land a job. Lucky for us, Dennis found his way to SAP through the Autism at Work program. He has said, “I’m sad to have lost the ability to walk, but I’m an optimist and don’t let it get me down. Now, I live life without thinking too much about my physical disabilities… Autism is neither a disability or an ability. It just makes a person like me different.”

Now that is the caliber of colleague that I want on my team — someone who spends more time thinking about what he can do than what he cannot. Not to mention that as a quality assurance specialist, Dennis is an expert at catching issues way before customers experience them!

Dennis, in foreground, with colleagues

At SAP, we hire people like Dennis because we’re better for it. We develop the best products because we hire the best people. It’s as simple as that.

Though I am looking forward to a great day of golf, it’s really not about the game. It’s about providing opportunities and presenting the realm of possibility. American writer and lecturer Dale Carnegie once said, “We all have possibilities we don’t know about. We can do things we don’t even dream we can do.” Dennis is doing his thing, and I’m doing mine. We can all do something. The Els for Autism Foundation is a valuable resource to educate ourselves on autism, to donate and to volunteer. Each of us can play a role in helping our communities and companies be better. The possibilities are simply waiting to be seized.

Procure with Purpose

Procurious have partnered with SAP Ariba to create a global online group – Procure with Purpose.

Through Procure with Purpose, we’re shining a light on the biggest issues – from Modern Slavery; to Minority Owned Business; and from Social Enterprises; to Environmental Sustainability.

Click here to enroll and gain access to  all future Procure with Purpose events including exclusive content, online events and regular webinars.  

Procurement’s Missing Puzzle Piece

How can the missing puzzle piece make it easier for procurement teams to operate sustainably, improve supply chain transparency and eliminate corruption?

As procurement professionals we’re always talking about how leveraging innovative technology can add value to our organisations.

But less frequently addressed is how technology can make it easier for procurement teams to operate sustainably, improve supply chain transparency and eliminate corruption. 

In our latest Procure with Purpose webinar we’ll be exploring how the latest and greatest in technology innovations can not only help procurement pros deliver business value but also drive and enable purpose-led practice.

Join us on October 10th when we’ll discuss the tech that’s helping procurement  teams to collaborate with their suppliers and  improve transparency; how to communicate the importance of using tech to improve purpose-led procurement and why businesses must integrate tech-led purpose-driven practice into all of their decision making.

How do I register for the webinar?

Registering for The Missing Puzzle Piece: How Technology Can Empower You To Procure With Purpose couldn’t be easier (and, of course, it’s FREE!)

Click here to enter your details and confirm your attendance. We’ll send you a email with a link to the webinar platform in the run up to the event.

I’m already a member of Procurious, do I still need to register?

Yes! If you are already a member of Procurious you must still enroll to access the webinar. We’ll send you a email with a link to the webinar platform in the run up to the event.

When is it taking place?

The webinar takes place on 10th October at 10am EDT/ 3pm BST. Sign up or log in via the form above and we’ll be in touch ahead of the event to provide details on how to join the webinar live.

Help! I can’t make it to the live-stream

No problem! If you can’t make the live-stream you can catch up whenever it suits you. We’ll be making it available on Procurious soon after the event (and will be sure to send you a link) so you can listen at your leisure!

Can I ask a question?

If you’d like to ask one of our speakers a question please submit it via the Discussion Board on Procurious and we’ll do our very best to ensure it gets answered for you.

What is the Procure with Purpose community?

Procure with Purpose is a community for procurement pros who want to deliver value beyond cost savings and efficiencies – shining a light on the biggest issues from Modern Slavery to Environmental Sustainability – and on you, our members, who are already driving exponential change.

Webinar Speakers

Oliver Campbell, Director Procurement & Packaging Engineering

Oliver is a Director of Procurement & Packaging Engineering at Dell Technologies.  He has become one of the most influential thought leaders in the packaging industry by combining innovation and supply chain best practices.  Under his leadership, Dell introduced industry changing materials such as bamboo, mushroom, and molded paper pulp for more environmentally healthier packaging.

Most recently, Dell launched Ocean Plastic packaging with the aim of creating an industry response to tackle the task of the ocean plastic crisis.  Through founding NextWave, a cross-industry consortium of like-minded companies, Dell is creating a commercially viable, and scalable, supply chain that is focused on keeping plastics out of the ocean and in the circular economy.

Oliver’s accomplishments have been highlighted for their business and social influence by Fortune in their 2017 Change the World Companies, and by LinkedIn in their 2017 Top Companies to Work For.  Additionally, the 2018 Consumer Electronics Show recognized his pioneering work in Ocean Plastic with a Best of Innovation Award.  Mr. Campbell holds Bachelor and Master Engineering degrees from Cornell University and an MBA from The University of Texas.  In his free time, you can find him training for his next triathlon.

Justin Sadler Smith, Head of United Kingdom & Ireland, Ariba Cloud Procurement at SAP Ariba

Justin Sadler-Smith is head of SAP Ariba UK and Ireland, procurement and supply chain thought leader, and cognitive procurement ambassador. He is one of a growing number of procurement leaders around the world who helps procurement and supply-chain teams ensure that fair labor practices are in play across their global supply chains by harnessing innovative technology and increasing competitive advantage

Padmini Ranganathan, Global Vice President – SAP Ariba

Padmini Ranganathan is Vice President, Products and Innovation for Supplier Risk, Compliance and Sustainability solutions for SAP Ariba.  In this role, she is responsible for product strategy and engineering and leads a team of experts focused on delivering solutions that enable risk-aware, sustainable and ethical supply chains.

Prior to SAP Ariba, Padmini led the Analytics for Industries solutions marketing team at SAP which brought to market the first analytical applications and content for “art of the possible”  industry and line of business application scenarios. Before joining SAP, Padmini worked at Oracle, where she was part of the procurement product management team that delivered the first web-based, self-service applications for procurement and a technical consultant in the areas of order management, inventory & distribution, procurement and manufacturing.

Padmini is a passionate advocate for bringing technology to business users that simplifies and enriches their daily work and decision making. And as the Products & Innovation lead for SAP Ariba’s Procurement with Purpose initiatives, she is dedicated to helping businesses balance their costs with conscience and make an impact on the larger world.

Padmini has a post-graduate diploma in computer science from UC Berkeley, California, and a bachelor’s degree in commerce with a major in Cost & Management Accounting from Bangalore University, India.

Sign up for The Missing Puzzle Piece: How Technology Can Empower You To Procure With Purpose ahead of 10th October. 

Could The 21st Century Wilberforce Please Stand Up?

The world is in dire need of a 21st century William Wilberforce to realign the corporate moral compass on this increasingly pressing issue of modern-day slavery

In the early 1800s, the politician and social reformer William Wilberforce famously spearheaded the movement to abolish slavery. His campaign was long and hard-fought, beginning in 1787 with the Committee for the Abolition of the Slave Trade and culminating in 1833 when the House of Commons passed the Slavery Abolition Act.

Wilberforce, by this stage, was in poor health and died just three days after seeing his life’s work pay off. But he had achieved what he set out to – slavery was effectively wiped out across most of the British Empire.

Modern Slavery Today

There are more than 30 million forced labourers around the world today.

Now, nearly 200 years later, I can imagine Wilberforce turning in his grave at the prevalence of modern slavery in today’s supply chains and the thought of all he worked for being undone.

According to the International Labour Organisation, there are more than 30 million forced labourers around the, with recent high-profile cases uncovered in almost every industry – from indentured servitude in commercial fishing near New Zealand to child labourers in the cocoa and coffee industries in Latin America and Africa.

Closely analysing suppliers and, perhaps even more importantly – where businesses tend to source their components or raw materials, can reveal alarming and eye-opening results.

A construction company, for example, might discover it is using iron from China, where the industry is poorly regulated and there is a high probability of forced labour.

A search for women’s shirts in Malaysia could reveal cotton sourced from Mali, another potentially problematic region in terms of labour practices.

As with so many areas of modern life, it feels like we’re forgetting the lessons we should have learned from history – to the point that we’re in dire need of a 21st century Wilberforce to realign the corporate moral compass on this increasingly pressing issue.

Procurement pros should take center stage on tackling modern slavery

Procurement has a crucial role to play in the fight against modern slavery. These issues allow procurement to move away from the “back office” and take centre stage.

Previously mundane tasks such as supplier screening actually turn out to be critical in helping a company stamp out the scourge of poor labour practices, indentured workforce and poor working conditions, whether in Bangladesh or the UK – where recently arrived immigrants are working for less than a minimum wage.

More than a third of UK businesses are still failing to combat modern slavery, according to the latest CIPS survey.

The EU recorded the largest increase in slavery of any region worldwide (according to research by British analytics firm Verisk Maplecroft) with 20 of its 28 states reporting higher levels of slavery than they did in 2016.

There is clearly still more work to be done.

Who should step forward and become the new William Wilberforce?

Another Parliamentarian?

A leader with deep religious beliefs?

NGOs?

Pressure groups who can organise boycotts?

Brand attacks might ignite fleeting moments of righteous social media outrage, but society needs to dig a lot deeper to effect lasting change. You can boycott your local shop but that won’t impact a large buyer of steel or soybeans.

You have to persuade companies that it’s not just the right thing to do but that it’s also better business.

My view is the CPOs of the largest companies are best placed to start solving this problem. Collectively, the Global 2000 spend $12 trillion on goods and services annually so by tying their purchases to purposes, these companies can ensure they provide fair labour practices across their supply chain.

Now is the time for a coalition of well-intentioned and influential businesses to come together and become a modern-day Wilberforce that can stamp slavery out for good.

SAP Ariba’s James Marland will be speaking at Big Ideas Summit on 26th April 2018. To find out more information and register to attend in person or as a digital delegate visit our dedicated site.