Tag Archives: recruitment advice

Executive Recruiter: 4 Must-Have Attributes For Aspiring CPOs

Procurious caught up with Naseem Malik, Managing Partner at the Chicago-based supply management executive search firm MRA Global Sourcing, to find out what attributes recruiters are looking for in the next generation of top CPOs.

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Naseem Malik has gone from sourcing goods to sourcing talent. After gaining 15 years’ experience as a procurement practitioner, Naseem turned his full attention to something he enjoys most – leveraging his network, connecting the dots and finding the best talent in the profession. Naseem is also a member of the ISM2017 Conference Leadership Committee, and has some excellent tips for getting the most out of ISM’s biggest event of the year. But first, Procurious asked Naseem for his views on what makes a candidate ideal for a CPO-level role.

Naseem, as a specialist in supply management executive search, what are the top attributes you look for in aspiring CPOs?

Based on the trends we’re seeing and what our clients have typically asked for, there are four stand-out attributes that we look for in a CPO-level candidate.

First, and foremost, they need to have a broad perspective. Companies are asking specifically for candidates from different industries to their own, as this brings about fresh, disruptive and innovate thinking.

Secondly, the candidate should be someone who can earn themselves a seat at the table with the CFO and CEO. They can do this by talking confidently about what they can bring to the business in terms of supply and market intelligence, data analytics, and leverage their own broad perspective. They should focus on the things that matter most to the C-Level – risk, compliance, and technological trends.

Operational know-how is also important, particularly change-management skills. Does the candidate have the emotional intelligence (EQ) to truly collaborate? Are they able to engage, influence, persuade and lead people in a global environment, including those that don’t report to them?

I’d like to add a fourth attribute here that ties the other three together, and that’s humility. Yes, you need to be able to talk confidently about your accomplishments, but this has to be balanced with humility and an awareness of your place in the corporate pecking-order. Humility will lead to credibility, which will pay off down the road.

 You mentioned that you got into executive search because of your love of networking. Can you share any tips for effective networking?

Everyone now needs to have a social presence, and continually build upon that presence online. However, without some sort of face-to-face follow-up, your online connections can be specious. To truly leverage the power of your online network, you need to meet people face-to-face at conferences, make phone calls and gather referrals. Face-to-face networking will help you grow you online network, and vice-versa.

Another piece of advice is to embrace the concept of “pay it forward”. Always see if there’s something you can do to help people in your network – for example, see if there’s someone who you can connect them with to help solve a challenge they may be facing. Again, it will pay off in the long-term.

What are you most excited about seeing at ISM2017?

Besides attending Procurious’ “Network Your Way To The Top” session, you mean?

As a member of the Conference Leadership Committee, I’m really excited about ISM2017 because every year we’re seeing the conference gaining incrementally in attraction. There are more people attending than ever, and I don’t think that’s only due to the prospect of meeting Mickey Mouse at Disney World – it’s about the quality of the speakers, the excellent content and the companies attending (Apple, Google, Salesforce and others). The keynotes, including David Cameron and Colin Powell, are also fantastic. Personally, I’ve been involved in helping ISM find good speakers, great topics and promoting the event.

What are your top 3 tips for getting the most out of a procurement conference?

Network – take every opportunity you can to build your network at the event. After the event, follow up with all the people you’ve met, and also be sure to connect with the speakers or presenters you were most impressed by. Consider writing a blog article to share your thoughts and to keep the momentum going.

Have a plan before you go to the conference. There are a lot of learning tracks, lots of great presentations, but there’s only a finite number of sessions you can attend. It pays to have an attack plan before you go. You can target a specific learning track, or mix and match.

ISM’s Learning Tracks are designed to help guide delegates through the maze of options available. As a committee member, I have joint responsibility for the “Outside” track. Outside sessions are all about learning new and effective ways of improving your skills and establishing your relevance, including career-building, building your professional presence, honing your networking skills and building high-value relationships.

There’s still time to register for ISM2017, taking place in Orlando, Florida from May 21-24.

Planning to attend ISM2017? Don’t miss out on Procurious Founder and CEO Tania Seary’s top tips on how to Network Your Way To The Top on Tuesday May 23rd, 3.45pm.

Best of The Blog- Should You Ever Rehire An Ex-Employee?

When you rehire an ex-employee, especially one that was a star, it looks like you are getting a great deal. What you see is what you get. They understand your business and its own unique culture, are immediately productive and bring industry knowledge and new ideas.

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Everyone loves a good throwback article, which is why we’re hopping in our time machine to bring you back some of the biggest and best Procurious blogs. If you missed any of the golden oldies, look no further!

This week, we’re revisiting an article by Elaine Porteous who explains why organisations must be very cautious when considering whether to rehire employees. 

The best-case scenario is when an employee wants to return because he has had time to learn new skills and has gained in-depth work experience somewhere else that he can share with you.

The good news about rehiring top performers

Rehiring former employees often costs much less than hiring from scratch, especially since you can cut out the extremely costly recruiting and interview process. When budgets are tight, you can explore this avenue using social media, alumni groups and word-of-mouth to find out who is actively looking.

The potential rehires, also known as boomerangs, are easier to assimilate into the organization and you will save you orientation time. The thinking is that since they know exactly what they’ll be signing up for, they will be likely to stay longer the second time and therefore be less risky, more productive and better for your retention statistics.

There’s also some thought that a rehired person can provide you with a fresh perspective, innovative ideas and some industry intelligence.

So what can go wrong? Quite a lot

Not all former employees are worthy of rehiring. Let’s hope they left for the right reasons and of their own accord. Obviously, you will exclude anyone who was fired, incompetent or unproductive or suddenly has accumulated a criminal record.

Here are a few of the main disadvantages of rehiring former employees:

  •  Current managers and co-workers may feel threatened if the employee returns with a new set of skills, and especially irritated if they come back onboard with a higher remuneration package, which is quite likely. They may feel an employee already had their chance.
  •  The reason that they left in the first place may still be a problem: the boss from hell, lack of benefits, poor promotion prospects and/or lack of opportunities to learn.
  •  There may be unintended consequences if the rehire is appointed at a higher level than his previous role. It may trigger other departures if promotional prospects are blocked, i.e. waiting to fill “dead man’s shoes.”
  •  Returning employees may just not fit in. The climate and culture of the company may no longer be the same. In this case, their new presence may be disruptive and cause tension.

Develop a rehiring policy

A definite success factor is having a firm policy that is applied fairly to all potential “Comeback Kids.” Who is eligible to be rehired should be agreed upon internally and be legally defensible.  Two important elements to include are how long after leaving an employee can return, and  what’s a reasonable maximum time to be away.

In some industries, some employers also refuse to rehire an employee who left to go to a competitor. Other organizations may welcome the broader experience and give preference

to ambitious ex-employees who went off to try their hand at consulting or starting their own business.

Booz Allen Hamilton, a leading U.S. consultancy, is such a staunch believer in rehiring that it sponsors a Comeback Kids program, through which it actively reaches out to past employees and those from the military.

A few more things to consider when rehiring

  • Make sure the conditions that caused that person to leave are not still barriers. Exit interviews are notoriously unreliable. so it’s best to work out why the employee really left. If he undervalued the company before, has anything changed?
  • Is this person really the best candidate for the job? It should not be a quick fix — don’t take the lazy recruiter’s solution.
  • Are you overlooking quality internal candidates? Someone else internally might be just as qualified to do the job. Think about the message you’re sending and the possible repercussions of rehiring instead.

Don’t forget to brief the new employee on how things have changed since he left and any new projects that have come up since.  A “welcome back” interview shows that your company is open to hiring the best people, whatever their job history.

Would you rehire a great former employee? Let us know by commenting on the story below.

Want That Job? 7 Pitfalls To Avoid On Your CV

This seasoned recruiter skim-reads CVs for an average of two to three seconds before deciding whether to read them in their entirety. How can you make sure your CV doesn’t end up in the bin? 

Even with the digital revolution changing the world, CVs are still the Number 1 way to showcase your skills and achievements to a new employer or recruiter.

Before a prospective employer reads a CV they may well have supporting information in the form of a referral,  LinkedIn profile or a cover letter. But however good any supporting information might be, the CV is still the deciding factor when it comes to getting you a face-to-face meeting.

Recruiters have to place even more credibility on the CV than line managers. I have read over 250,000 CVs in my recruitment career and can skim read a CV in two to three seconds to decide if I want to read it in its entirety. If you are reading 100-400 CVs a day, can you really spare the time to read a cover letter as well? The CV is still king!

My goal whenever I am coaching CV writing is:

To make it as easy as possible for the reader to find the information they are looking for.

Worst case scenario: you have two to three seconds to get someone’s attention, so you need to give them the information they need as easily and accessibly as possible. When you think about your CV from this perspective you will need to make sure you identify your audience correctly to ensure it’s hitting their criteria.

Make sure you don’t fall into these traps:

1. Not Making The Most Of Your Success

Most people avoid talking about success like the plague. But if you’re writing a list of your responsibilities, the very least you need to demonstrate is that you have completed those tasks. Ask yourself:

  • Is it obvious I am successful?
  • Did I deliver this bullet point/responsibility?
  • Could a cynic read this and interpret it as failure?

You spent a whole lot of effort and time doing these things. At least take credit for what you delivered.

2. Inducing Claustrophobia

The majority of CVs look cluttered. Not “easy for the reader to find the information they are looking for”. Make it an appealing document to look at:

  • Decrease your margin widths (1” – 1.5” margins are fine)
  • Use white space

-90% of bullet points should be two lines maximum. If most of your bullet points are longer than that, look at splitting them into two points.

-Don’t have massive blocks of bullet points together. Four to five bullet points is enough. If you have any more than that, split them into sensible headings (Responsibilities and Achievements; Categories and Savings; Projects and Delivery etc).

-Have a small space between roles.

  • Font

-Make it an easy-to-read font (Times New Roman, Arial, Calibri, Garamond)

-Don’t worry about size too much. People read CV’s on a screen so can zoom in if they need to. (10 – 12 pt is fine)

3. Contact Details Taking Up Your Prime Real Estate

Geoff Molloy BSc (Hons)

132 Partridge Way, Bishops Stortford, Essex, CM23 3XY

Tel 01279 333 444

Mob 07788 111 222

E-mail [email protected]

Most people have their contact details at the top of their CV. You have two seconds to get their attention and you want them to read your phone number? It doesn’t make sense when you think about it unless you think your phone number, address or e-mail address is the single factor that will get them to give you a call!

Move them down to the footer and reduce your address down to town and postcode.

4. Information Above Your Career History/Experience

The problem with adding information above your career history is that it’s hard to make it contextual. Context is the only difference in impact between meeting an

IT Director

or

IT Director for Google

The difference between these two people would probably be significant and, but for a tiny change, you wouldn’t know it.

Try and keep the information above your career history to a minimum. It’s useful to be able to summarise your skills/experience/achievements etc but be aware that it loses impact if it’s not contextualised by the role you were in when you delivered it.

5. Proof-Read, Spell Check

Make sure it’s perfect. Spelling, grammar or punctuation are all indications to the employer. Some people get really irritated by mistakes so make sure you don’t put them off immediately!

  • Your/you’re
  • Were/we’re/where
  • Its/it’s

Get a friend/colleague/pedant to read your CV after you have checked it, and checked it, and checked it.

6. Squeezing Your CV Onto 2 Pages

If your CV is well written, relevant, articulate, demonstrates success and is easy to get the information the reader is looking for, it doesn’t matter how long it is (within reason). “Two pages” is a myth. But, if you’re going over the page make sure you use the next page fully.

If you’re not convinced, look at it the other way. If it’s awful they won’t get to the end of the first page! Make sure your CV is giving them the information they want in an accessible way. They will read it if you are relevant.

7. References

“References available on request” or “Reference Details”. Once you have risen above “School Leaver”, everyone assumes you have references so it adds no value and takes up space. In fact, it probably impacts negatively as it raises some doubt in the reader’s mind. If they want references they will ask you.

About the Author

I set up The Chameleon Career Consultancy to coach CV Writing, Interview Technique and Linkedin Profile writing building on over a decade of corporate recruitment specialising in Procurement and Supply Chain Professionals. During that 11 year period I read in the region of 250,000 CVs (100 a day for 11 years as a conservative estimate!). I made the decision to take a sideways step out of recruitment to help the candidates get the roles they really deserve.

If you would like any advice on any of these areas or more help on your CV feel free to get in touch at [email protected] or www.thechameleon.org or our Linkedin page.

Recruitment Insider: Demand For Temporary Workers Fast Outstripping Supply

Demand for workers is accelerating so fast that it’s outstripping supply. How can organisations find the employees they need without racking up a whole load of extra cost?  Jon Milton explains  the elephant in the recruitment room.

A cursory look at REC jobs market figures show that turnover in the recruitment industry for 2014/2015 was £31.5bn, the highest since records began in 2001/2002.

Permanent recruitment revenues have increased by 58.4 per cent from the recessionary lows of 2010/2011. Temporary or contract revenues are up by 60.1 per cent over the same period. Unemployment is exceptionally low.

What this means is;

  • Demand for workers is accelerating
  • Organisations are turning to recruitment agencies to help them meet it
  • The pool from which to draw workers from is receding

Any situation where demand outstrips supply should result in higher costs. These costs may be reflected in margin, pay rate, expenses or even resource commitment as your organisation searches to find the right worker fit. We have, however, gotten used to paying workers at a certain level and it’s possible to secure low margins from agencies.

How do you deal with this challenge without racking up a whole load of extra cost? Not as you perhaps think – and it’s probably worth addressing that particular elephant in the room first.

The Urban Myth: Exchanging volume with a single agency supplier will solve all my problems.

There are c24000 recruitment agencies operating in the UK, employing about 102,000 recruitment consultants. It’s a massively fragmented supply market that has never responded well when customers with diverse needs have attempted to exchange volume with a single supplier.

In the managed service world, some providers have responded to the challenge of keeping margins low with brute force, transferring workers supplied by incumbent agencies to their own books at implementation, and attempting to fill every requirement that comes along. In the long term this approach inevitably drives off contract buying and significantly reduces quality. This will obviously impact organisational output and competitiveness.

Keeping rates sustainable – making it worthwhile for the agency

The rate paid to an agency is sustainable if it covers their cost of sale and generates a reasonable profit. Cost of sale is important here; agencies typically pay their temporary workers at the end of the previous week worked and get paid by the customer in arrears. As such, prompt and efficient payment is crucial; agencies only get paid once they have filled a role successfully. Providing a decent level of opportunity on a level playing field is extremely important; and they are a vital component in delivering the temporary workforce so it is important to allow them to be heard (and not just through email) and responded to.

In terms of return, it’s important to pitch rates at the right level. Instinctively you may distrust agencies if you have stung by high spot fees in the past, but there are boundaries beyond which margins simply don’t work and render the fee payable non-profitable. Clearly it’s important to push these boundaries where the market dictates, but you will need to develop a strong understanding of the market to do so.

In our own managed service model suppler relationship management is a key component of our service and one that has helped us to address these issues. If you’re considering the managed service route, do talk to your agencies and ask them to give their views on different managed service providers – it will be an interesting conversation and one that should form part of your market approach.

Keeping rates sustainable – making it worthwhile for the worker

Whilst demand for skilled workers is currently outstripping supply it’s easy to think that the amount that you pay for those workers will have to go up, but this is not necessarily the case. Whilst pay rate is of course important, a workers decision on where to work is also led by a number of other factors. The includes the work itself, length of assignment, departmental profile and culture, amenities and work-life balance.

Keeping rates sustainable – managing expectations

Over the last 24 months we have been regularly canvassing the views of our agency suppliers to understand market dynamics, and one consistent theme has been of expectations. In an uncertain economic market where there is an abundant supply of skilled workers, the chances of recruiting someone who meets all your criteria are relatively high, so conversely with the market going full circle, expecting the same now can lead to disappointment.

The best way to address this is to allow agencies to manage the expectations of your line managers for you. This will help your managers to focus on their required outcomes rather than their perception of what they need. It will enable them to benefit from the recruiters’ knowledge of the market and what skills are available.

Whether you allow a managed service provider to manage this on your behalf or not, what is of paramount importance is that these relationships are strictly governed.

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What Tinder Can Tell Us About Job Hunting – Part 4: She’s Just Not That Into You

There are more similarities between Tinder and the job hunting process than you might think. Here’s how to deal with rejection from both potential partners and dates.

Read Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3 in this series.

It all started so well. You went into it with high hopes, and it seemed like a match made in heaven. You’d told your friends, you’d even told your mum and of course she’d told her friends. But then…nothing. They never call, they never write. Those potential employers can be every bit as heart-breaking as the “ideal” match that you thought you’d made through Tinder.

Coping with rejection is an inevitable part of the job hunting process and because it can feel both painful and humiliating you need to remember to deal with it properly.

Rejection can happen at any stage of the Tinder or job hunting processes. Although it’s tempting to try to spare your own feelings by quickly saying “plenty more fish in the sea” and moving swiftly on, it’s a much better idea to sneak a peek through your fingers and try to work out what went wrong.

Saying the Right Things

If your Tinder profile is fundamentally pictures of you with your friends, you may think “I look sociable, that’s great” but your prospective dates may be thinking “who am I supposed to be looking at?” Similarly with CVs, a lot of people talk about the projects that they’ve worked on, and what the team did, without saying what they personally achieved. It’s important to stand out so that people can see you. Otherwise you may simply get a Swipe Left – CV in the bin.

If you’re getting a lot of rejections without meeting anyone, go back and see if what you’re saying about yourself is really selling you as well as it could be.

On the other hand it may be that you’ve not quite tried hard enough. Maybe some of your Tinder photos are blurry, or taken from a bad angle, or in harsh lighting. Similarly, your CV may be littered with spelling mistakes, or grammatical errors or written in an ugly font (Times New Roman for CVs? No!). So, do the painful thing and try to find what you’re doing wrong.

One advantage that job-hunters have over Tinder-users is that if they don’t hear back they can always try again. If you’ve applied for a job but not heard back, then why don’t you look again at the job spec, reconfirm that your CV really is a good match and that it’s well-presented, and then ask the potential employer for their comments.

Your CV may have been lost amid a mass of applications, and if you show the initiative and enthusiasm to follow up then you are much more likely to at least get a response.

Be on the Level

Now let’s say your prospective date/employer likes what they see and invites you to chat over a coffee. You’ve told them that you’re a highly-skilled tennis coach/brain surgeon/fighter-pilot but when they meet you they discover that, well, you’re just not.

No-one likes to feel misled and a potential employer is going to be every bit as disappointed as a potential date to find out that you’ve lied to them. The subsequent rejection is your fault, not theirs. In future, you need to focus on being the great person that you are, and not trying to pretend to be someone else.

Let’s assume you’ve got to that meeting and it seems like everything went swimmingly. The body language was there, the personal chemistry was right. It feels like you’re both exactly what the other person was looking for. But then the communication stops – no more friendly messages, no more wooing. It seems that you’ve been dropped like a hot potato.

It could be that the other person hasn’t made up their mind yet, or needs to meet other people first, so if you’ve not heard anything for perhaps a week it is entirely fair for you to make contact. No news is not always bad news. You don’t want to seem like a stalker of course, but you do want to express your interest.

Don’t be Disheartened

And this is a good point to remind you that when you are the one holding the balance of power, as a potential employer or a potential date, the right way to deal with people is to be nice. If you’re going to reject someone, be polite, be clear, and don’t waste their time. Karma will reward you.

Sometimes you’re going to do everything right and it’s still not going to work. Unfortunately that’s just life. You can be the perfect person in every way but it may turn out that your prospective date simply clicks that little bit better with someone else.

It’s the same when you’re job hunting. You may completely fit the bill but if a prospective employer meets someone who brings an additional skill which the employer hadn’t even thought that they needed…well, there’s nothing you can do about that.

Sometimes when they say, “it’s not you, it’s me”, that’s true – you couldn’t have done anything differently. So when that happens, brush yourself down, remind yourself that you’re fabulous, and get back out there.

Good luck!