Tag Archives: riskmethods

Supply Chain SOS: How Proactive Risk Management Can Put Out Fires

Spend all your time at work fighting fires? Proactive risk management can help douse the flames and get you ahead of the game.

Photo by Kristopher Allison on Unsplash

For as long as procurement has been a profession, risk management has largely been seen as a data collection exercise, undertaken at alarmingly infrequent intervals. Often, it was nothing more than a checked box to indicate assumed compliance, with no deeper insight or follow-up.

But as the reach of procurement extends beyond savings, compliance and performance. The profession touches almost every facet of a company, and mitigating risk is increasingly being seen as the fourth pillar of the profession. To be truly successful, risk management requires robust insight into all links of a supply chain – a task that has often been insurmountable.

How can you properly manage your company’s risk as supply chains go global? And who should be responsible for ensuring you’re ahead of issues before they arise?

Procurement teams have the potential to drive big changes on a global scale. If you’re not successfully navigating your risks then you’ll struggle to join the ranks of the world leaders.

Proactive vs Reactive

Whether caused by bankruptcy, politics or even severe weather events, risks to your supply chain come in all shapes and sizes, so it’s not completely unreasonable to be overwhelmed. Preparing for every single eventuality is a daunting task that seems to stop procurement professionals in their tracks.

As such, many people start on the back foot, considering the risks only when their bottom line has already been affected. However, if you understand your risk profile – the types of threats that will have the biggest impact on your business, whether they’re physical, logistical or reputational – then you’ll be able to develop proactive risk mitigation plans that can keep your business flowing seamlessly through strikes, shut downs and storms.

Successful risk management in action

At riskmethods, we combine advanced AI technology with human support to offer comprehensive risk management solutions for our customers. We train our AI using over 5 million articles relevant to their unique risk profiles, to allow us to give our clients the visibility into what the current and future risks are for their business and offer insight into the underlying threats in their supply chain – so they can take action before it hits.

For example, when Hurricane Harvey hit Texas in 2017, it made landfall three times in six days, causing $125 billion in damages and sending a third of Houston underwater. As the storm began making news, we were able to use our technology to create storm projections for our customers that narrowed down the affected location as the storm approached. This alerted them to the risk of damage or delays, and allowed them to contact any suppliers or manufacturers within the impact zone before the storm arrived.

As a result, they were able to take action to create proactive mediation plans for their impacted suppliers with outstanding orders before the storm even hit the ground, successfully navigating potential shutdowns that could have impacted their supply chain for weeks to come.

In an elite enterprise, this active monitoring of new and emerging threats means that while it may not be financially possible for all enterprises to have crisis management teams on hand, ready to pounce at the first hint of trouble, they will have contingency plans in place. This increases your ability to react faster and could potentially give you the leg up on your competition.

Where is risk management going in the future?

The next procurement transformation is taking the profession from a singular discipline to a cross-organisational centre for increased collaboration and supplier transparency.

Risk management is set to go hand-in-hand with this transformation to alleviate the risks within an enterprise, bringing another tool to the table for CPOs to leverage and creating a competitive differentiation for enterprises. While this direction may seem like common sense going forward, the reality is that it’s only in recent years that its importance has really been acknowledged.

Those who continue to think of risk as someone else’s problem will soon find themselves falling behind.

riskmethods was one of the sponsors for the Big Ideas Summit Chicago 2019, with Bradley Paster delivering an ace keynote too. Don’t worry if you missed out, you can still sign up to access all the great content. Register now by clicking here.

4 Ways Procurement Could Better Manage Risk

Procurement pros need to get better at managing risk. Because supply chain disruption can come from any angle, whether it’s caused by a supplier site failure, environmental or geopolitical factors, or even adverse weather… 

If it’s not already, risk management should be a top priority for businesses. The consequences from not actively identifying, managing and mitigating supply chain risk can significantly impact an organisation’s profitability, not to mention brand reputation and potentially, its sheer existence.

riskmethods set out to determine the current “state of risk management and mitigation” in today’s global business ecosystem by surveying more than 250 senior procurement executives from across the globe. The study unveiled important findings around how prepared procurement leaders are to tackle rapidly evolving business environments brought on by new, more complex threats, and the current methodologies employed to manage risk in the supply chain. Here are four areas the survey explored, which indicate where procurement teams are failing in terms of risk management.

  1. Preventing disruption

All senior procurement professionals identify ‘avoiding significant disruption to the supply chain’ as a top priority, but when survey respondents were asked whether their organisation had a significant disruption in the past 12 months, more than 47 per cent indicated that they had experienced between one and five.

Additionally, a surprisingly high 13 percent indicated that they had 20 or more significant disruptions in the past year. Arguably the most alarming statistic – 12 per cent of respondents did not even know whether there were any serious disruptions to their supply chain during this time.

This is a testament to the 12 per cent’s minimal visibility into their operations. According to this data, nearly all organisations faced a disruption in the past year, speaking to the prevalence and nature of supply chain threats at they continue to increase. 

  1. Improve ability to uncover risks

The current landscape has made it critical for procurement professionals to have real-time, thorough views into potential risk and their impacts to make well-informed purchasing decisions. Many organisations have implemented some form of tracking mechanism for risks, but how often the data is updated is another issue.

When we asked respondents about the frequency in which data is refreshed, less than one third of respondents answered continuously. This is an alarming percentage.

Risk monitoring in today’s digital business environment needs to be a 24/7/365 task. Organisations that aren’t receiving continuous updates are falling behind and can’t possibly be making the best decisions for their business.

The underlying cause of this lack of complete information is usually associated with traditionally highly manual processes. Not only is the manual approach an extremely tedious and time-consuming task, it also takes away resources from other critical objectives. Most importantly, it severely limits big-picture insights and increases the chances of a serious supply chain disruption. When survey respondents were asked what level of automation their organisation employed to refresh critical information, less than one per cent of respondents indicated that it is completely automated.

An additional 39 per cent indicated that they were in the low to moderate rage of automation, relying heavily on manual tools such as Excel in conjunction with some outside sources. A full quarter of respondents indicated that they have no automation capabilities at all and are completely reliant upon manual search.

  1. Supplier risk impact assessments are key

Understanding a supplier’s potential impact on the business is key for procurement teams when it comes making purchasing decisions. For example, if a major supplier gets hit by a severe weather event which causes a delay in shipping, that could cause a ripple effect that halts production and eventually leads to a loss in revenue.

When survey participants were asked if their organisation had a mechanism in place for measuring the impact a supplier has on the business, almost half said that their organisation had no structured assessment of supplier criticality or impact.

Having no such assessment means organisations are at times putting their fate in the control of someone’s best guess. Organisations must have clear visibility into their supply chain, including which suppliers have the greatest potential impact, so they can refocus resources on reducing risk and preparing for a crisis.

  1. Organisations must be better equipped to mitigate emerging threats

While being able to identify potential risk is a crucial procurement workflow, having the ability to act on that information and mitigate evolving threats is equally, if not more, important.

Only slightly more than 20 per cent of study respondents indicated they have plans in place. An additional 27 per cent indicated that no such plans exist and 53 per cent indicated that there were only partial plans in place. These numbers demonstrate how difficult it is to evolve into a mature organisation when it comes to prioritising risk because businesses lack the necessary level of stakeholder collaboration.

Supply chains will never be free of risks, but an organisation’s ability to prepare for, identify and mitigate emerging threats will set them apart from the competition. Procurement teams can’t possibly make well-informed business decisions without a risk management strategy in place. As the number of risks continues to increase in this environment, the need for accurate, actionable insights will only become more critical.

When it comes to risk management, companies need to consistently be moving forward as the current threats will only continue to evolve.

Download the report: Procuring Risk: The State of Risk Management and Mitigation in Today’s Global Supply Chain to read riskmethods’ full findings.