Tag Archives: SAP Ariba

Humanity, Environment, Ethics – For A Responsible Supply Chain

Tackling modern slavery might seem like an insurmountable problem for you to tackle alone, but even a reduction of one is huge. 

January: Human Trafficking Awareness Day

April: World Earth Day

In between these two months at the very beginning of the year, and surrounded with newly renewed resolutions, many of us go about our day to day lives.

Negative media and events increase. Technology brings these stories to us, and we “click” on them, but nothing changes.

Years ago it was easy to hide child labor and human bondage. No one paid attention to deep sea fishing trawlers or dingy factory floors in remote parts of the works. But now, this is front page news.

One thing is clear – the number of those in bondage have grown. How could that be? If there is now more exposure, more news, more awareness – how can the number of people enslaved be increasing?

The numbers are staring at us in the face. The International Labor Organisation recently shared that there are more than 45 million enslaved today.

This number grows yearly. Every corporate procurement individual must take responsibility for going beyond audit compliance to drive continuous improvement in our supply chains and eliminate modern slavery. We must go beyond one-off state level (California Transparency Act) and country level (UK Modern Slavery) initiatives to pave the way for a binding international consensus that covers global supply chains and cooperation between countries to accelerate action.

What can supply chain professionals do?

Turn to technology. Technology can help mine, collate, compile and quickly pin point areas of actions

  1. Breakthrough innovations in production and processing including IoT can generate signals that provide advanced warning helping to limit forced labor
  2. Mobile phones can be used to track labor rights violations and working conditions
  3. Blockchain is being used to track labor contracts
  4. Trusted distributed ledgers are also used for tracking at source ‘ethical’ practices
  5. AI/ML can scour through vast volumes of data to generate high intensity negative signal, sifting through noise to help corporate buyers focus on supplier co-development efforts
  6. Procurement networks can help provide visibility to ethical sources of supply, highlighting those companies that do good and establishing solid, long-term relationships for a responsible supply chain

I recently outlined the specific actions procurement can take to generate the much needed momentum to bring forced labor incidences down to zero.

But if you and I, the corporate and personal buyers, do not act on all this information – yet another decade will pass. The numbers of those enslaved might double or triple. Is this the world we want to leave behind?

Tackling modern slavery might seem like an insurmountable problem for you to tackle alone, but even a reduction of one is huge.  Little drops of water make a mighty ocean…

Are you ready to act?

As an individual?

For your team?!

Because as US Navy Admiral, William H. McRaven said in his motivational speech “If you wanna change the world, start off by making your bed”.

This article was written by Padmini Ranganathan, Global Vice President – SAP Ariba.


Procure with Purpose – Join the movement

Procurious have partnered with SAP Ariba to create a global online group – Procure with Purpose.

Through Procure with Purpose, we’re shining a light on the biggest issues – from Modern Slavery; to Minority Owned Business; and from Social Enterprises; to Environmental Sustainability.

Yesterday’s webinar on modern slavery,  Procurement Unchained, will soon be made available on-demand via the Procure with Purpose group on Procurious. Click here to enroll and gain access to this and all subsequent Procure with Purpose events. 

Could The 21st Century Wilberforce Please Stand Up?

The world is in dire need of a 21st century William Wilberforce to realign the corporate moral compass on this increasingly pressing issue of modern-day slavery

In the early 1800s, the politician and social reformer William Wilberforce famously spearheaded the movement to abolish slavery. His campaign was long and hard-fought, beginning in 1787 with the Committee for the Abolition of the Slave Trade and culminating in 1833 when the House of Commons passed the Slavery Abolition Act.

Wilberforce, by this stage, was in poor health and died just three days after seeing his life’s work pay off. But he had achieved what he set out to – slavery was effectively wiped out across most of the British Empire.

Modern Slavery Today

There are more than 30 million forced labourers around the world today.

Now, nearly 200 years later, I can imagine Wilberforce turning in his grave at the prevalence of modern slavery in today’s supply chains and the thought of all he worked for being undone.

According to the International Labour Organisation, there are more than 30 million forced labourers around the, with recent high-profile cases uncovered in almost every industry – from indentured servitude in commercial fishing near New Zealand to child labourers in the cocoa and coffee industries in Latin America and Africa.

Closely analysing suppliers and, perhaps even more importantly – where businesses tend to source their components or raw materials, can reveal alarming and eye-opening results.

A construction company, for example, might discover it is using iron from China, where the industry is poorly regulated and there is a high probability of forced labour.

A search for women’s shirts in Malaysia could reveal cotton sourced from Mali, another potentially problematic region in terms of labour practices.

As with so many areas of modern life, it feels like we’re forgetting the lessons we should have learned from history – to the point that we’re in dire need of a 21st century Wilberforce to realign the corporate moral compass on this increasingly pressing issue.

Procurement pros should take center stage on tackling modern slavery

Procurement has a crucial role to play in the fight against modern slavery. These issues allow procurement to move away from the “back office” and take centre stage.

Previously mundane tasks such as supplier screening actually turn out to be critical in helping a company stamp out the scourge of poor labour practices, indentured workforce and poor working conditions, whether in Bangladesh or the UK – where recently arrived immigrants are working for less than a minimum wage.

More than a third of UK businesses are still failing to combat modern slavery, according to the latest CIPS survey.

The EU recorded the largest increase in slavery of any region worldwide (according to research by British analytics firm Verisk Maplecroft) with 20 of its 28 states reporting higher levels of slavery than they did in 2016.

There is clearly still more work to be done.

Who should step forward and become the new William Wilberforce?

Another Parliamentarian?

A leader with deep religious beliefs?

NGOs?

Pressure groups who can organise boycotts?

Brand attacks might ignite fleeting moments of righteous social media outrage, but society needs to dig a lot deeper to effect lasting change. You can boycott your local shop but that won’t impact a large buyer of steel or soybeans.

You have to persuade companies that it’s not just the right thing to do but that it’s also better business.

My view is the CPOs of the largest companies are best placed to start solving this problem. Collectively, the Global 2000 spend $12 trillion on goods and services annually so by tying their purchases to purposes, these companies can ensure they provide fair labour practices across their supply chain.

Now is the time for a coalition of well-intentioned and influential businesses to come together and become a modern-day Wilberforce that can stamp slavery out for good.

SAP Ariba’s James Marland will be speaking at Big Ideas Summit on 26th April 2018. To find out more information and register to attend in person or as a digital delegate visit our dedicated site. 

How Your Network Can Turbocharge Procurement

Networks have the power to transform procurement teams and turbocharge the businesses they link together. So how do you get the best value from your network?

Since you’re here reading Procurious, I can already tell you appreciate the value of networks.

And you’ve probably realised that the wider your network of professional connections, the greater its value to you.

This network effect, where the benefit of a product or service increases as more people use it, has fuelled the growth of leading Internet companies for decades.

In procurement as elsewhere, networks enable participants to reach across the world, think big, and magnify their impact.

Meanwhile, as networks embrace cloud-based technologies, they allow buyers and suppliers to think even bigger — and to make an exponentially greater impact on the buyers, sellers, and ultimately customers who rely on them.

As innovations like artificial intelligence, machine learning, the Internet of Things, and blockchain reshape entire industries; networks are becoming not only faster but actually smarter at drawing meaningful insights from sprawling troves of seemingly unrelated data.

Envisioning the world as it could be…

In the process, these advances are helping procurement professionals to envision the world not just as it is, but as it could be — including their own role in it. When cloud-based applications take on many of the function’s day-to-day tactical activities, they free up procurement professionals to focus on strategic priorities such as strengthening supply chain resilience, safeguarding the brand from third-party risk, and cultivating new sources of innovation.

As a result of this digital transformation, procurement is evolving from its traditional role of generating cost-savings to fostering collaboration and, ultimately, driving much of the strategic value that fuels growth.

What does it mean to a business — to all its trading partners and other stakeholders — when, for the first time, cognitive insights allow it to get ahead of problems before they occur?

The implications extend well beyond operational risk. Consider the reputational risk associated with forced labour upstream in one’s supply chain. A network instills confidence across the value chain when it offers visibility not only into inventories, cycle time, and turnover ratios but also into the criteria that gauge whether a trading partner’s brand values align with one’s own.

Does a supplier have, for example, the governance structures in place necessary to root out forced labour, human trafficking, and inhumane working conditions? Customers and investors alike demand transparency into all these factors, and networks provide a comprehensive, real-time glimpse to simplify compliance. The result is peace of mind when advances in machine learning provide buyers and suppliers with options instead of data so that they can create ethical, sustainable supply chains, all while extending their competitive advantage.

At its best, technology enhances our business relationships, our personal ones, and the quality of all our lives. Yet, as anyone who’s ever experienced a hard-drive crash can attest, technology can sometimes serve at cross-purposes to this goal.

The same holds true for the software industry. The world’s most powerful networks can evaluate immense amounts of information, but unless they’re designed with the customer in mind they may as well possess the processing power of an abacus.

Procurement professionals have every right to expect that the network they rely on be intuitive, reliable, and — above all — consistent in delivering on their promises.

Does yours?

Demand it!

SAP Ariba’s James Marland, Vice President, will be speaking at Big Ideas Summit in London later this month. To find out more information and register to attend in person or as a digital delegate visit our dedicated site. 

This article was originally published on LinkedIn. 

Exploding The 4 Social Enterprise Myths

Social enterprises require a LOT of extra procurement work and handholding. So it’s totally fine to avoid them…right?

We love busting the most common myths in procurement.

And there’s no myth more satisfying to bust than one that can benefit everyone.

There’s a lot of misinformation going around about the pros and cons of social enterprises. So we decided to find out the actual facts from an expert.

We spoke to Mark Daniels, Head of Market & Sector Development -Social Traders and asked him to clarify a few of the most common misconceptions about social enterprises.

What is a social enterprise?

Social enterprises (SEs) are businesses that trade to intentionally tackle social problems, improve communities, provide people access to employment and training, or help the environment.

Using the power of the marketplace to solve the most pressing societal problems, SEs are commercially viable businesses existing to benefit the public and the community, rather than shareholders and owners.

Social Traders, Australia’s leading SE development organisation, define a SE by the following three factors:

  1. They are driven by a public or community cause, be it social, environmental, cultural or economic
  2. They derive most of their income from trade, not donations or grants
  3. They use the majority (at least 50 per cent) of their profits to work towards their social mission

We asked Mark Daniels, Head of Market & Sector Development at Social Traders, to bust some of the most common myths associated with SEs.

Myth 1: SEs are less capable

The idea that SEs are limited in terms of capability are generally not founded, explains Mark.

“But many are limited in terms of scale. There are very few SEs that can be a major tier 1 supplier, which is mostly what procurement teams are looking for.”

Procurement teams, instead, “have to become more creative and look to tiers 2 and 3 to buy from or work with organisations like ours to work out new and different ways to buy from them.”

Another option is to encourage tier one suppliers to buy from tier 2 SEs.

Myth 2: SEs are a risky business

“To date, we haven’t seen any examples where SE have failed during contracts,” asserts Mark.

“Delivery is comparable to private sector suppliers.”

Myth 3: SEs are expensive

“Just like any other supplier; some [SEs] can be expensive, or the same, or cheaper.”

“We run a SE audit of any new buyer members. Coca Cola Amatil, for example, was spending over one million dollars on SEs and didn’t even know it!”

“There are 20,000 SEs turning over 3 per cent of the Australian economy. They’re already winning work without preferential treatment!”

“In some cases corporates do assist SEs with capacity building. This might involve paying more now but they know that in three to four years they’ll achieve scale and prices will drop.”

Myth 4: SEs require a lot of handholding

A lot of the time, SEs won’t require any more support than their private counterparts. “Coca Cola discovered that they had four or five SEs that didn’t require any hand-holding – they simply won the tender processes.”

On some occasions, however, “procurement may realise that these suppliers need help.”

“Social Traders has shifted to invest heavily in capability building for SEs. Some SEs need help to transition from a $1m to a $5m business. That’s the sort of assistance we’re giving – strategic support, accessing capital and so forth.”

“We’re also seeing things like 90-day payment terms being an issue.” Which is something procurement teams can work to change.

“The industry is starting to change the way they do payment terms – Broadspectrum, for example, has moved to 14 day payment terms for SEs and indigenous businesses.

“Suddenly more suppliers can work with Broadspectrum.”

Social enterprise policy

As we explored in last week’s blog , countries around the world are taking different approaches to improving their supplier diversity.

Buying from SEs is a great way to start.

In Australia, the opportunity around SEs came off the back of indigenous procurement proactive policies, which set targets and created social procurement systems in government to enable targets to be met.

“Level Crossing Removal Authority requires that 3 per cent of the supply chain must be indigenous-owned or SE businesses, or SE.

This has been quite powerful in changing behaviour in the infrastructure industry. We will see hopefully something to the tune of $300 million spent with SE or indigenous businesses.”

“France, Germany, Austria have requirement that around 6 per cent of your workforce and supply chain have to be people with disabilities. If that isn’t the case you have to pay a higher tax rate.”

“That tax was used to create more SEs to help people with disability. It’s an impressive policy.”

About Social Traders 

Social Traders is an Australian organisation that works to put social enterprise into business and government supply chains. They do this in order to create employment for the most disadvantaged by increasing the trading activity of social enterprises and to create new value streams for buyers.

It emerged over time was that there was a new marketplace starting to establish, which was corporate and government buyers interested in delivering social value through their procurement processes.

Social traders enable more organisations to buy from SEs, certifying them to give buyers the assurance that they aren’t being deceived. Because, as soon as social enterprise becomes a competitive advantage in a tender process, people will claim they are when they’re not

The impact of Social Traders work is impressive. In 2017 they enabled approximately $20 million in deals, which translated roughly to 300 jobs for disadvantaged people.

Their target in 2021 is $105 million in deals, creating 1500 jobs.

“We can see a market where hundreds of millions will be going to SEs every year.”

This can start to make a real dent in the unemployment of disadvantaged people.  Social procurement is a real lever for addressing social inequality.

Procure with Purpose – Join the movement

Procurious have partnered with SAP Ariba to create a global online group – Procure with Purpose.

Through Procure with Purpose, we’re shining a light on the biggest issues – from Modern Slavery; to Minority Owned Business; and from Social Enterprises; to Environmental Sustainability.

Enrol here to join the Procure with Purpose group and gain instant access to our exclusive online events.

6 Reasons It Pays To Care In Procurement

“Do good, feel good” or “Do good, and save lots of money”? Whichever  you find the more enticing, we can certainly conclude that it pays to care in procurement!

Roger Clark ARPS/Shutterstock.com

Pat McCarthy, SVP and GM, SAP Ariba North America, is one of the driving forces behind SAP Ariba’s Business with Purpose initiative. Over time, he’s noticed how business attitudes have shifted as corporations become more socially aware. “For companies in the past it was pretty simple, the charter was pretty simple – increase profits for their shareholders or their owners. But today we find that many companies are taking on a higher mission to make the world a better place to live and work and to run their businesses with a higher purpose.

Of course, you don’t need Pat to tell you that sourcing from minority owned businesses, eradicating slave labour or watching your carbon foot print is a good thing. No one would try to contest that. But aside from the “do good, feel good” ideology, is Business with Purpose actually good for your business, or is it going to cause your procurement team a whole lot more – in money and stress!?

“We know that purpose driven companies out perform the market by almost 5 per cent” says Pat. “In other words they can do good and do well. Procurement has a unique opportunity to lead the way.”

And so it would seem that there’s a strong business case far beyond the moral imperative to embrace a higher cause in your procurement team.

Peter Holbrook, CEO Social Enterprise UK, gives six reasons why this is the case.

1. It’s cost effective

“We’ve undertaken research with PwC to look at what social value means for people within procurement departments” begins Peter. “We see that in the majority of cases when you take a social value or an environmental lens to procurement your new suppliers coming in to support your business are in most cases creating value add but are actually cheaper. [You will find] suppliers are much more cost efficient as a result of being more socially and environmentally imaginative.”

2. It brings in top talent

Attitudes of the millennial workforce is a significant factor for organisations to consider in today’s world if they want to recruit and retain the best talent. Employees, for the most part, want to feel as though they are working for companies who care for more than simply profit, who are making the right decisions for the world around them as well as the right decisions for the business.  As Peter explains “the good work your business does can give you the cutting edge or differentiation to bring in the very best talent.  When [organisations] take these approaches and staff believe they are authentic they are more likely to stay in the business in the long term.”

3. It makes suppliers more responsive

The research Social Enterprise UK carried out with PwC revealed that in two thirds of cases  suppliers were more responsive in purpose led companies. This, Peter explains, is due to the relationships created that meant suppliers “were more responsive in terms of responding to the changing needs of companies buying from them.”

4. It makes your organisation more innovative

Purpose driven companies, according to Social Enterprise UK’s research carried out with PwC,  “brought on new products and services to market, which is the traditional way we assess innovation.”

5. It keeps you ahead of the game

“We all recognise that businesses have to change and adapt to help meet the challenges that we all face. Using supply chains as a way to do this is a way of really being cutting edge, staying ahead of the pack and building brand differentiation that all companies increasingly need to be able to define themselves.”

6. It gets your customers on board

“We have researched customer loyalty” says Peter, “And whether it’s members of the public or in B2B relationships – [people] are more likely to remain with companies that are also creating a social benefit.

Peter has some reassuring advice for anyone feeling overwhelmed by the challenge of becoming a purpose-led procurement team. “The risk is that we overcomplicate it. There’s something to be said for proportionality. Start small and start easy- culturally within a company you’ll get much greater buy in if it feels as if its accessible and something that can be achieved relatively simply rather than an additional burden you’re putting on everybody.

“It’s about starting a journey and taking small steps to evolve your methodology and your approach and being fairly honest about where you are succeeding and where some of the challenges exist. No one is assuming and no one should assume that when a company starts embarking on this route that they will come to the ultimate solution within weeks months or even a couple of years!”

Sign up for #FeeltheLove, the first Procurious and SAP Ariba Procure with Purpose webinar, which takes place later today  at 10am EST/ 3PM GMT.

Procurement with Purpose: Beyond the Bottom Line

How can you embrace the notion of procurement with purpose authentically and in ways that are consistent with your core beliefs and ideals?

Sustainability improves the bottom line, and companies can do good while doing well.

In fact, research shows that purpose-driven companies with strong performance in environmental, social, and governance outperform the market by 4.8 per cent. But this is not “new” news.

So what is different now that makes purpose more vitally important? It comes down to transparency and trust.

In many segments of life, trust is at an all-time low. The swarm of misinformation, slanted stories and editorials, and paid reviews have continued to foster these low levels of trust. This presents a unique challenge to companies.

How do companies and we as leaders embrace the notion of purpose authentically?

How do we do so in ways that are consistent with our core beliefs and ideals?

How do we “walk the walk” and not just talk the talk?

In the past, business leaders might have defined their goals as “increasing profits for shareholders and owners.” Now leading companies are beginning to recognise that this is only part of the equation. They see the bigger picture and are taking on a higher mission to make the world a better place to live and work. They are finding new ways to solve the world’s most pressing challenges. Gaining (or regaining) trust will happen through transparent action that demonstrates a commitment to creating a more purpose driven business environment.

Purchasing with Purpose

Those of us in procurement have a unique opportunity to lead the way. With increasing frequency, companies are redefining their supply chains and buying from suppliers who support, for example, people with disabilities or are female led. Companies want to know that no forced labor is being used by their suppliers, and their supplier’s suppliers, and all the way back up the value stream. Procurement is in the unique position to address these issues and have an incredible impact.

Collectively, the Global 2000 spend $12 trillion on goods and services annually. By tying their purchases to purposes, these companies can take a stand and drive ethical behavior across the supply chain. And technology exists to make this possible. The key is to get started. Business networks, for instance, provide transparency and insights into supply chains that enable companies to ensure they are acting in responsible ways.

Take SAP Ariba, the world’s largest business network. Leveraging historical and real-time purchasing data, supplier intelligence, and network insights, along with data and services from third parties like Made in a Free World, procurement can shine a light on materials, regions, and suppliers to ensure they are meeting the organisation’s standards.

Through a link between SAP Ariba Discovery, a global business matching service, and the ConnXus Database, buyers can tap a wider pool of minority, woman, LGBT and veteran-owned businesses and enable global supply chains that are more responsible, sustainable and inclusive. Extending our network even more, we’ve partnered with Nicole Verkindt, founder of OMX, to help our customers analyse the economic impact of their spend in industries such as international defense, aerospace, oil & gas, mining, automotive and construction industries.

But it doesn’t stop there. SAP Ariba is a sponsor of the UN Global Compact’s Decent Work in Global Supply Chain Action Platform. The UN developed the Action Platforms to accelerate the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals. Action Platforms offer a systematic solution to sustainable development challenges through new fostering innovation, developing new financial models, and identifying sustainable solutions across a range of issues. As a Platform Sponsor for the Decent Work and Global Supply Chain Action Platform, SAP Ariba has deepened our commitment to driving purpose across the global supply chain.

Procurement professionals will always be responsible for doing more with less and for delivering value to our organizations. And we can do even more than that.

There’s real power in purpose. It inspires us. It moves us. It enables us to reimagine and to reinvent what is possible and to achieve great things. It is also one of the greatest challenges issued to business leaders today. Join us in taking it up. Together, we can make a difference.

Sign up for #FeeltheLove on 14th February – the first Procurious and SAP Ariba Procure with Purpose webinar .

Can You #FeeltheLove This Valentine’s Day…?

As a procurement professional, cutting costs is the very least you can do! Procure with purpose and start driving change world-wide…

tomertu/Shutterstock.com

Our webinar,  Feel The Love takes place at 3pm GMT /10am EST  on 14th February 2018. Register your attendance for FREE here. 

NEWSFLASH: Being world-class today doesn’t mean being the best in the world. It means helping the world run better.

In 2018, you should be working beyond cost savings and process efficiencies. You should be committed to making a positive impact on the communities in which you operate by eradicating slave labor, creating ethical and sustainable supply chains and levelling the playing field for all.

Thanks to the awesome power of social media and our interconnected world it’s easier than ever before to make that happen. But the challenge procurement pros still face is kick-starting, and measuring the impact of, their purpose-led work.

This Valentine’s Day, SAP Ariba and Procurious present #FeeltheLove – the first Procure with Purpose webinar.

What can I expect from the Feel the Love webinar?

We’ll be discussing…

  • What is Procuring with Purpose?
  • Why should professionals care about purpose-led procurement?
  • What are the small things that you can do immediately to drive big outcomes?
  • How do you measure and report social impact to the CFO?
  • The procurement teams who are already getting it right!
  • How can businesses ensure that economic growth is always accompanied by a respect for human rights?
  • Our vision for using the power of social media to drive purpose-led procurement around the world

Who are the guest speakers?

Tania Seary – Founder, Procurious

A true procurement entrepreneur, Tania is the Founding Chairman of Procurious, The Faculty and The Source. Throughout her career, Tania has been wholly committed to raising the profile of the procurement profession and connecting its leaders.

After finishing her MBA at Pennsylvania State University, Tania became one of Alcoa’s first global commodity managers.

In 2016, Tania was recognised by IBM as a #NewWaytoEngage Futurist and named “Influencer of the Year” by Supply Chain Dive. She hosts regular procurement webinars, and presents at high-profile events around the world.

Pat McCarthy – SVP and GM, SAP Ariba North America

As head of SAP Ariba’s North American business, Pat McCarthy is responsible for driving sales performance, the go-to-market strategy and overall operations of the field organization across the U.S. and Canada.Since joining SAP in 2005, he has held a number of executive roles successfully leading Net New, Mobility, and Database &Technology teams throughout the U.S.

Immediately prior to his current post, Pat served as chief operating officer for the Midwest region of the U.S., overseeing the consistent execution of sales strategies, operations and the region’s go-to-market initiatives.

Pat graduated from Elmhurst College, sits on the board of Chicago Tech Academy, a charter non-profit for Chicago high school students, and supports global charitable endeavours through Kiva.

Nicole Verkindt – Founder and CEO, The OMX

Nicole Verkindt is the Founder & CEO of Canadian technology company, OMX (theomx.com).

She is passionate about the role that data and networks can play in connecting diverse supply chains and analysing and improving the exact impacts from procurements.

The platform is the only one in the world that manages obligations companies have to invest in local businesses. OMX is an online marketplace to help companies diversify their procurement by providing opportunities through the platform that smartly matches to suppliers.

Nicole is a commentator on CBC and columnist for Vanguard magazine focusing on technology and business news and was a “Dragon” on Next Gen Dragon’s Den, which is dedicated to early stage technology businesses. She was named Canada’s national woman entrepreneur of the year in 2017.

Peter Holbrook – CEO, Social Enterprise UK 

Peter Holbrook became CEO of Social Enterprise UK in January 2010.

Social Enterprise UK is the national trade body for social enterprise and represents a wide range of social enterprises, regional and national support networks and other related organisations. SEUK works to promote social enterprise as a model for changing both business and society.

Peter has established, developed and supported hundreds of diverse social enterprises over his career. He has advised government taskforces in the UK and overseas and chaired the Social Enterprise World Forum, the global network of social businesses until 2015.

Peter has previously worked for Oxfam, Greenpeace and various disability charities. He has experience of working in overseas development, community development and public health. Peter started his career with Marks and Spencer PLC and also spent several years with Body Shop International

He was appointed a CBE in 2015.

How do I register for the webinar?

Joining the Procure With Purpose movement and registering for our webinar couldn’t be easier (and, of course, it’s FREE!)

Click here to enter your details and confirm your attendance. We’ll send you a email with a link to the webinar platform in the run up to the event.

I’m already a member of Procurious, do I still need to register?

Yes! If you are already a member of Procurious you must still enroll to access the webinar. We’ll send you a email with a link to the webinar platform in the run up to the event.

When is it taking place?

The webinar will take place at 3pm GMT /10am EST on14th February 2018.

Help! I can’t make it to the live-stream

No problem! If you can’t make the live-stream you can catch up whenever it suits you. We’ll be making it available on Procurious soon after the event (and will be sure to send you a link) so you can listen at your leisure!

Can I ask a question?

If you’d like to ask one of our speakers a question please submit it  via the Discussion Board on Procurious and we’ll do our very best to ensure it gets answered for you.

Commit to Procure with Purpose

Procure with Purpose is a movement. A coalition of committed, energised procurement professionals who want to deliver value beyond cost savings and efficiencies.

Through the Procure with Purpose campaign, we’ll shine a light on the biggest issues –from Modern Slavery; to Minority Owned Business; and from Social Enterprises; to Environmental Sustainability–and on you –our members -who are already driving exponential change.

How do I get involved ?

To stake your place, simply sign up here. It’s FREE to join –you just need to be passionate and ready to lead with purpose! When you sign up for the #FeeltheLove webinar, you’ll be automatically registered for the Procure with Purpose group on Procurious and all of our related, online events.

Our webinar,  Feel The Love takes place at 3pm GMT / 10am EST on 14th February 2018. Register your attendance for FREE here.