Tag Archives: social enterprise

How Public Sector Procurement Can Have Social Value

With public sector organisations becoming increasingly aware that their procurement decisions have an impact on local communities, some are rethinking how they award contracts.

By Jacob_09/ Shutterstock

Both private and public sector entities are becoming more interested in how their organisations impact society. Whether it’s in contributing to the community or managing the impact on the environment, organisations recognise they can change their local communities through who they pick to deliver goods or services.

Traditionally, it had been assumed that choosing a supplier that added social value may mean compromising for a sub-standard quality product or service, but views are slowly starting to change.

“They recognise the benefits of working with social enterprises, but are ruled by the need to mitigate risk and deliver efficient and economic services,” says Beth Pilgrim, co-founder of Supply Change.

“Often companies will just go to suppliers they know. What we are trying to explain to the public sector is that adding social value into your supply chain doesn’t have to be difficult or require extra work.”

Ms Pilgrim established Supply Change in 2018 with colleagues Aoise Keogan-Nooshabadi and Verena Wimmer after the trio conducted a series of research studies on the public sector procurement process. They found that while public sector bodies were keen to award contracts to social enterprises, they struggled to do so.

“One of the key themes that came out of our research was that social enterprises struggle to navigate public sector procurement processes,” Ms Pilgrim says. “The existing portals are not really tailored towards them, so they don’t get good visibility.”

In 2013, the UK government’s Social Value Act came into force, obligating public sector bodies to look at the social and environmental benefits of awarding a contract to a supplier, as well as the economic ones.

Heralded as a game-changer by the then-government, the Act has nudged public bodies to look more closely at the attributes of companies bidding to win work.

Despite this, some experts say that the legislation doesn’t go far enough, with a company’s social and environmental points score only accounting for a very small percentage of the overall total, and the outcome weighted towards other factors such as quality and cost.

“A number of leading authorities have recognised this and increased the social value element of their contracts,” says Ed Cross, executive director at procurement advisory group Odesma.

Mr Cross says that upping consideration of social value attributes could be good news for smaller businesses competing for contracts, but adds that the public sector still has some way to go.

“There seems to be a lack of trust in smaller enterprises, particularly social enterprises, from the public sector,” he explains.

“Part of this is down to the false assumption that social enterprises working with volunteers or part-time employees aren’t as reliable as larger organisations with full-time, paid employees.”

Mr Cross’s sentiments are shared by many, who feel that smaller enterprises can often face a real battle just to get an initial foot in the door.

“One of the biggest challenges smaller businesses face when it comes to gaining access to contracts that offer social benefits is the tick-box process of tenders for contracts, as well as how public sector guidelines are inflexible,” says Craig Knowles, marketing manager at procurement software group Market Dojo.

“The tick-box approach often means small businesses that might not fit specific criteria are left at the door before they’ve even been given the chance to prove themselves.

“There needs to be a change in attitude on taking “risks” on small business as many, often wrongly, believe they don’t have resources to work through big tenders when in reality this couldn’t be further from the truth.”

Despite widespread concerns that social enterprises and small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) are still missing out on contacts from the public sector, there is evidence of innovation.

Supply Change’s Ms Pilgrim says initiatives at some local authorities show how awarding contracts to smaller, local businesses can be transformative for the local community. She cites Preston in Lancashire as an example.

In 2013, the council brought in external consultants to evaluate whether it would be possible to redirect some of its annual contract-award budget to local businesses which had clear social impact objectives. Since doing so it has stimulated the local economy, putting money into local firms and increasing employment.

“We have seen how that can be a real success story,” says Ms Pilgrim. “Preston has a strategy of spending money within their local economy to build up SMEs, social enterprises and the voluntary sector as much as possible. It has resulted in a turnaround in the local economy.”

Similar projects are now underway across the UK, with Manchester City Council and Birmingham City Council among the larger authorities to consider how they can alter their approaches.

For SMEs and social enterprises looking to get a piece of the action, Malcolm Harrison, group chief executive of the Chartered Institute of Procurement & Supply, says small firms should play to their strengths.

“SMEs and social enterprises need to work hard to showcase the flexibility, innovation and financial rigour they can provide,” he says.

“To help SMEs, government should do more. Simpler language, less jargon and the chance for an open dialogue all help SMEs to compete with large companies. SMEs can themselves take charge and become more visible to potential contractors, and websites such as Contracts Finder and Compete For can be a great way of finding opportunities.”

One of the biggest challenges smaller businesses face is the tick-box process of tenders for contracts, as well as how public sector guidelines are inflexible.

This article, edited by Peter Archer, was taken from the Raconteur Future of Procurement report, as featured in The Times. 

Blockchain: Procurement’s Secret Weapon

Procurement will be the single largest instrument in the world to change the world…

“Frankly procurement is at the same level, in my eyes, as auditing, accountancy and that level of excitement. There’s more excitement in the hashtag #Birdsarentreal – because people believe in that more and with more emotion than this.”

Olinga Taeed became the world’s first Professor in Blockchain and Social Enterprise at Birmingham City University in 2018. His research explores how blockchain can be used for social good, focussing on studies into methods to alleviate problems and provide significant intervention into society.

And when it comes to procurement and the future of the profession, he doesn’t mince his words.

“No one grows up saying mummy I’d like to be a CPO,” he explains. “And that’s because we value non-financial value. We grow up wanting to do things that have value in society – things to do with life and sentiment, we want to change the world.”

The Power of Procurement

“Doctors save one life at a time. In procurement, we can save or kill thousands by one decision”

When you say I will knock 3 per cent off my supply chain budget, somewhere in that chain some people will enter into slavery conditions

We now know that 32 people commit suicide manufacturing iPhones in China every year.

800 people might die in a fire making clothes for a retailer.

“In procurement we have the power of life and death and that is a major responsibility.”

Changing the world

Blockchain could enable procurement to change the world by bringing our values back into the workplace.

“In institutional life we often succeed in stripping out any kind of intangible value. But this attitude doesn’t occur in real life, only within institutions.”

In our own lives we use our personal values to procure things “I’d like to have products that are aligned to my values, I’ll use this coffee shop not that one, I’ll eat this ice cream but not one from that place, price is this important to me but slavery is this important. We talk about our feelings”

Blockchain will allow procurement professionals to use our values as a mechanism for procurement, just as we all do in our own lives.

Blockchain can put into a ledger an entire supply chain, which means at the point of sale, just as you would see calories on a food product, you can decide whether to buy it or not to buy it based on the values of the supplier. You are given all of the information and can make a choice based on that.

Olinga explains that AI will help procurement in a similar way “these are my values go and find me products that are aligned to my values – don’t pick companies or suppliers where I know environmentally they aren’t good.”

Organisations used to readily give discounts to NRA (National Rifle Association) members but all of that changed because our values changed, companies stepped back and procurement changed. Using blockchain, procurement professionals can procure against a set of corporate values – “it’s for me to buy products from suppliers that are aligned to those values.”

Olinga Taeed speaking at Big Ideas Zurich

“My honest belief is that procurement will be the single largest instrument in the world to change the world – children will say they want to be a procurement officer because they will want to change the values of the world – what we buy, what we eat, what we sell, the values by which we transact. Blockchain and AI will change our processes dramatically.”

Olinga Taeed speaking at Big Ideas Zurich

Procure with Purpose

Procurious have partnered with SAP Ariba to create a global online group – Procure with Purpose.

Through Procure with Purpose, we’re shining a light on the biggest issues – from Modern Slavery; to Minority Owned Business; and from Social Enterprises; to Environmental Sustainability.

Click here to enroll and gain access to  all future Procure with Purpose events including exclusive content, online events and regular webinars.  

Exploding The 4 Social Enterprise Myths

Social enterprises require a LOT of extra procurement work and handholding. So it’s totally fine to avoid them…right?

We love busting the most common myths in procurement.

And there’s no myth more satisfying to bust than one that can benefit everyone.

There’s a lot of misinformation going around about the pros and cons of social enterprises. So we decided to find out the actual facts from an expert.

We spoke to Mark Daniels, Head of Market & Sector Development -Social Traders and asked him to clarify a few of the most common misconceptions about social enterprises.

What is a social enterprise?

Social enterprises (SEs) are businesses that trade to intentionally tackle social problems, improve communities, provide people access to employment and training, or help the environment.

Using the power of the marketplace to solve the most pressing societal problems, SEs are commercially viable businesses existing to benefit the public and the community, rather than shareholders and owners.

Social Traders, Australia’s leading SE development organisation, define a SE by the following three factors:

  1. They are driven by a public or community cause, be it social, environmental, cultural or economic
  2. They derive most of their income from trade, not donations or grants
  3. They use the majority (at least 50 per cent) of their profits to work towards their social mission

We asked Mark Daniels, Head of Market & Sector Development at Social Traders, to bust some of the most common myths associated with SEs.

Myth 1: SEs are less capable

The idea that SEs are limited in terms of capability are generally not founded, explains Mark.

“But many are limited in terms of scale. There are very few SEs that can be a major tier 1 supplier, which is mostly what procurement teams are looking for.”

Procurement teams, instead, “have to become more creative and look to tiers 2 and 3 to buy from or work with organisations like ours to work out new and different ways to buy from them.”

Another option is to encourage tier one suppliers to buy from tier 2 SEs.

Myth 2: SEs are a risky business

“To date, we haven’t seen any examples where SE have failed during contracts,” asserts Mark.

“Delivery is comparable to private sector suppliers.”

Myth 3: SEs are expensive

“Just like any other supplier; some [SEs] can be expensive, or the same, or cheaper.”

“We run a SE audit of any new buyer members. Coca Cola Amatil, for example, was spending over one million dollars on SEs and didn’t even know it!”

“There are 20,000 SEs turning over 3 per cent of the Australian economy. They’re already winning work without preferential treatment!”

“In some cases corporates do assist SEs with capacity building. This might involve paying more now but they know that in three to four years they’ll achieve scale and prices will drop.”

Myth 4: SEs require a lot of handholding

A lot of the time, SEs won’t require any more support than their private counterparts. “Coca Cola discovered that they had four or five SEs that didn’t require any hand-holding – they simply won the tender processes.”

On some occasions, however, “procurement may realise that these suppliers need help.”

“Social Traders has shifted to invest heavily in capability building for SEs. Some SEs need help to transition from a $1m to a $5m business. That’s the sort of assistance we’re giving – strategic support, accessing capital and so forth.”

“We’re also seeing things like 90-day payment terms being an issue.” Which is something procurement teams can work to change.

“The industry is starting to change the way they do payment terms – Broadspectrum, for example, has moved to 14 day payment terms for SEs and indigenous businesses.

“Suddenly more suppliers can work with Broadspectrum.”

Social enterprise policy

As we explored in last week’s blog , countries around the world are taking different approaches to improving their supplier diversity.

Buying from SEs is a great way to start.

In Australia, the opportunity around SEs came off the back of indigenous procurement proactive policies, which set targets and created social procurement systems in government to enable targets to be met.

“Level Crossing Removal Authority requires that 3 per cent of the supply chain must be indigenous-owned or SE businesses, or SE.

This has been quite powerful in changing behaviour in the infrastructure industry. We will see hopefully something to the tune of $300 million spent with SE or indigenous businesses.”

“France, Germany, Austria have requirement that around 6 per cent of your workforce and supply chain have to be people with disabilities. If that isn’t the case you have to pay a higher tax rate.”

“That tax was used to create more SEs to help people with disability. It’s an impressive policy.”

About Social Traders 

Social Traders is an Australian organisation that works to put social enterprise into business and government supply chains. They do this in order to create employment for the most disadvantaged by increasing the trading activity of social enterprises and to create new value streams for buyers.

It emerged over time was that there was a new marketplace starting to establish, which was corporate and government buyers interested in delivering social value through their procurement processes.

Social traders enable more organisations to buy from SEs, certifying them to give buyers the assurance that they aren’t being deceived. Because, as soon as social enterprise becomes a competitive advantage in a tender process, people will claim they are when they’re not

The impact of Social Traders work is impressive. In 2017 they enabled approximately $20 million in deals, which translated roughly to 300 jobs for disadvantaged people.

Their target in 2021 is $105 million in deals, creating 1500 jobs.

“We can see a market where hundreds of millions will be going to SEs every year.”

This can start to make a real dent in the unemployment of disadvantaged people.  Social procurement is a real lever for addressing social inequality.

Procure with Purpose – Join the movement

Procurious have partnered with SAP Ariba to create a global online group – Procure with Purpose.

Through Procure with Purpose, we’re shining a light on the biggest issues – from Modern Slavery; to Minority Owned Business; and from Social Enterprises; to Environmental Sustainability.

Enrol here to join the Procure with Purpose group and gain instant access to our exclusive online events.

Big Ideas Summit 2016: Big Idea #30 – Buy Social Challenge

Supply chains need to be transparent, and also more socially and environmentally sustainable. That’s why we’re challenging professionals to ‘Buy Social’.

At the Big Ideas Summit 2016, we challenged our thought leaders to share their Big Ideas for the future of procurement.

From ideas that have the potential to change the very nature of the procurement profession, to ones that got the assembled minds thinking about the profession’s impact outside of the organisation, the response we received was amazing.

Buy Better, Buy Social

Peter Holbrook, CEO of Social Enterprise UK, introduced the assembled professionals to the ‘Buy Social Challenge’. The aim of the Challenge is to grow £1 billion of spend in the UK with social enterprises.

Peter argues that procurement needs to make supply chains much more transparent, as well as more socially and environmentally sustainable. By working with social enterprises, they can both do well, and do good, at the same time.

Catch up with all the delegates’ Big Ideas from the 2016 Summit at the Procurious Learning Hub.

Want to find out more about Big Ideas 2016? And maybe what we have planned for 2017? You can visit our dedicated website!

If you like this (and you haven’t done so already) join Procurious for free today. Get connected with over 18,500 like-minded procurement professionals from across the world.

Big Ideas Summit 2016: Big Idea #13 – Maximise Social Impact

Procurement is no longer just about cost. Professionals should be looking put their organisation’s social impact at the heart of purchasing decisions.

At the Big Ideas Summit 2016, we challenged our thought leaders to share their Big Ideas for the future of procurement.

From ideas that have the potential to change the very nature of the procurement profession, to ones that got the assembled minds thinking about the profession’s impact outside of the organisation, the response we received was amazing.

Increase Social Impact

Hugh Chamberlain, Commercial Procurement Lead at Johnson & Johnson, challenged procurement professionals to buy from social enterprises in his Big Idea.

Buying from social enterprises allows procurement to add value to society, as well as meet CSR requirements. Hugh argued that buying social can also give buyers immense personal satisfaction, and a feeling they are making a real difference.

Catch up with all the delegates’ Big Ideas from the 2016 Summit at the Procurious Learning Hub.

Want to find out more about Big Ideas 2016? And maybe what we have planned for 2017? You can visit our dedicated website!

If you like this (and you haven’t done so already) join Procurious for free today. Get connected with over 16,000 like-minded procurement professionals from across the world.

Why Procurement Should Invest In Social Enterprise?

Have you ever bought the Big Issue? Watched Jamie Oliver’s Fifteen? Shopped at a Co-op?

These are social enterprises which are in our communities, on our high streets; and range from coffee shops and cinemas, pubs and leisure centres, to banks and bus companies.

What is a social enterprise? The simple answer is an organisation that seeks to be financially successful while creating social and/or environmental impact. Social enterprises can be structured as a for-profit or non-profit, and may take the form of a co-operative, mutual organisation, a social business, or a charity organisation.

As the diagram below indicates, what differentiates social enterprises from other businesses is that their social mission is at the core of their offering, with profits reinvested in the company or local communities.

Social Enterprises
Social Enterprise Structure

 

The unique structure of social enterprises means that a financial goal may not exist to benefit investors, but rather local communities and social activities.

Social Enterprises in Action

Social enterprises are an integral part of the United Kingdom. The Key Fund is the biggest UK regionally-based social investor, operating across Northern England. The Key Fund focuses on supporting disadvantaged communities, offering to invest in community projects which aim to have an impact on the local community and the environment.

Other examples of social enterprises in the UK include:

  • Higher Rhythm Ltd – a not-for-profit company established in 2001 to offer high quality musical, media and creative services, and  opportunities to local communities.
  • The Create Foundation – a debt information provider aimed at helping people get themselves out of debt and living a normal life, free from financial problems. Their social goal is to provide education on finance and making informed decisions with money.
  • Refurnish – a company which aims to reduce landfill waste by providing both new and pre-owned furniture and electrical goods to the community.

Social Enterprises UK is the national trade body for social enterprises. Members comprise of social enterprises, private businesses, charities and public sector organisations, who all support the vision of a world where social enterprise involvement in business is common practice.

Society Profits: Social Enterprise UK 

Peter Holbrook & Social Enterprise UK

Peter Holbrook is Chief Executive of Social Enterprise UK. Social Enterprise UK’s key activities centre on informing and influencing the policy agenda, promoting the benefits of social enterprise, and undertaking research to expand the social enterprise evidence base.

Holbrook says that, through Social Enterprises UK, “we have a unique opportunity to promote an economic model that can change not only the way we do business, but also society at large.”

The Guardian has highlighted Peter Holbrook’s innovative, community-led approach to regeneration, tackling health inequalities, and providing public services in some of the UK’s most deprived regions. This has also lead to a host of admirers, including the former prime minister, Gordon Brown, and current Prime Minister, David Cameron.

Timo Worrall & Social Impact Through Procurement Initiatives

Timo Worrall is responsible for the procurement of Facility Services at Johnson & Johnson. He is a key driver in implementing the ‘Social Impact Through Procurement’ initiative in the UK, and introducing social enterprises into the facilities supply base.

In 2012, the UK passed a law designed to transform the way public bodies buy services. It required all relevant organisations in England and Wales to consider how the services they commission and procure might improve the economic, social and environmental well-being of an area.

One way for companies to meet this legal obligation is by working with social enterprise suppliers. J&J choose to buy from social enterprise suppliers, as it aligns with the company’s initiatives of backing supplier diversity, improves the company’s reputation, and can potentially increase revenue over time.

J&J are leading the way in taking these steps, and ensuring that their procurement activities generate positive social impact. Commercial Procurement Lead at J&J, Hugh Chamberlain, stated that they are taking action and supporting people often termed “furthest from employment”. The ‘Social Impact through Procurement’ initiative aims to create at least 150 jobs for these people by 2020.

“From a procurement perspective it means we can help people to lead happier, healthier lives simply by the way we spend money in our supply chain,” Chamberlain  says. “We can provide a holistic healthcare solution and play our part in things that we wouldn’t normally. It’s a tremendous opportunity and it really resonates with procurement folks.”

J&J’s current social enterprise suppliers include film company Inside Job Productions, and grounds maintenance and facilities services supplier Blue Sky, both of which support ex-offenders. Another is Haven Products, which employs disabled people and provides contract packing, quality inspection, secure storage, printing and mailing.

Why should procurement invest in social enterprise?

An increasing number of organisations are ‘buying social’ and bringing social enterprises into their supply chain.  By procurement investing in buying goods and services from the social enterprise sector it will improve the company’s overall social and environmental footprint.

There are 70,000 social enterprises operating in the UK across almost every industry. They are reinvesting their profits for good, benefitting the people and the planet. When a social enterprise profits, society profits.

Social enterprises, and procurement’s role in supporting them and creating social value, will be a key theme at the Big Ideas Summit 2016.

There’s still time to register for the Summit! Visit www.bigideassummit.com, join our Procurious group, and Tweet your thoughts and Big Ideas to us using #BigIdeas2016.

Don’t miss out on this truly excellent event and the chance to participate in discussions that will shape the future of the procurement profession. Get Involved, register today.

Autism Works for Johnson & Johnson

Big Ideas can help provide greater benefits than cost savings. Timo Worrall tells Procurious how Johnson & Johnson are working with organisations like Autism Works to help a wider community find work.

Timo Worall - Autism Works

For people with autism, finding a job can be a near-impossible task, with recruitment processes stacked against them from the very beginning.

However, Johnson & Johnson, one of the world’s leading consumer healthcare organisations, is supporting organisations like Autism Works, proving that thinking outside of the box to include the people farthest away from employment opportunities is achievable. 

This Big Idea is part of J&J’s ‘Social Impact through Procurement’ initiative, which has committed to spend £15 million with social enterprises, like Autism Works, by 2020.

Timo Worrall, Senior Category Manager (FM EMEA) at J&J, heads up the team responsible for driving this procurement-led initiative through the J&J business in the UK.

At the Big Ideas Summit, Timo will join a high-profile panel to discuss social and sustainable procurement and ethics, their impact on the procurement profession, and what procurement leaders could and should be doing to embed these practices.

Procurious caught up with Timo ahead of the Big Ideas Summit.

I am excited to meet with people who may already be or are open to working with Social Enterprises. I hope by the end of the meeting everyone feels the same.

Tell us a bit about Yourself

I am a father of two boys, and live with my family in Woking. We have just started to renovate our 1950’s bungalow, and are presently living on a building site. The kids seem to like it more than my wife and I do, but we are looking forward to the end result!

What are the main challenges that face social enterprises in the UK?

Making the connection to companies who don’t yet know the value of working with Social Enterprises. Once they find these opportunities, how they can meet our sometimes complex requirements, and then grow in a sustainable manner that works for us both.

Can you tell us a bit more about Johnson & Johnson’s work with social enterprises?

We have a program called Social Impact through Procurement. Our goal by 2020 is to spend £15 million with Social Enterprises and create 150 jobs for those people furthest from the jobs market. We are presently working with a wide range of Social Enterprises across many categories.

One of these companies is Autism Works, who we made a video with to show how this particular social enterprise helps those with autism and other autism spectrum conditions.

What should procurement leaders be doing to help drive the social and sustainable procurement agenda?

Firstly understand it and tell your business stakeholders the benefits of doing this. Give your teams a little extra time to look for good social enterprises, and work with them to build sustainable solutions. Then tell the good news stories and build on the success.

Timo Worrall will talk about these topics in more detail during one of our panel discussions at the Big Ideas Summit on April 21st.

If you’re interested in finding out more, visit www.bigideassummit.com, join our Procurious group, and Tweet your thoughts and Big Ideas to us using #BigIdeas2016.

Don’t miss out on this truly excellent event and the chance to participate in discussions that will shape the future of the procurement profession. Get Involved, register today.

Big Ideas 2016 – Meet Our Speakers: Peter Holbrook

The Big Ideas Summit is just a couple of weeks away! We caught up with Peter Holbrook, CEO of Social Enterprise UK, to discuss the rising prominence of the social enterprise agenda.

Peter Holbrook

Peter Holbrook is the Chief Executive of Social Enterprise UK, the UK’s national trade body for social enterprise. The organisation works with its members to raise awareness of social enterprise, generates political engagement for social enterprises, and works with private sector organisations to explore and connect with social enterprises, helping them integrate these businesses into their supply chains.

Peter is passionate about the potential of communities and non-profit organisations to be much more enterprising and involved in business, and is helping to drive the social enterprise agenda across all sectors and industries.

Peter was awarded a CBE in 2015 for his service to social enterprise.

At the Big Ideas Summit, Peter will join a high-profile panel to discuss social and sustainable procurement and ethics, their impact on the procurement profession, and what procurement leaders could and should be doing to embed these practices. Peter says:

Meeting pioneers and enlightened leaders is always a privilege. Procurement has huge impact, potential and possibility – I’m looking forward to meeting kindred spirits, and agreeing further progress.

Tell us a bit about yourself.

I’m a practitioner, networker and advocate for social business – the growth and innovation in this sector is astounding. I’ve been happy to be a part of it for over 20 years.

What are the main challenges that face social enterprises in the UK?

Public awareness of social enterprise still requires a great leap forwards, and many social enterprises still require greater scale.

What’s the biggest success story in the Social Enterprise industry you have come across?

There are plenty of examples but my current favourite is the FairPhone – a crowdfunded social enterprise that has brought to a much needed market the world’s first fair trade smart phone.

Fairphone is the world’s first modular smart phone. It has been designed to be easily repairable by users, to last years longer than other smart phones, and is free from any conflict materials or minerals in its supply chain.

You can find out all you need to know about the Fairphone here.

Many procurement professionals think that buying social or sustainable goods is more expensive – in your experience, is this true?

Our evidence shows that in over 50 per cent of cases social businesses are more competitively priced than their private sector competitors. It’s about creating added value not necessarily added costs.

What should procurement leaders be doing to help drive the social and sustainable procurement agenda?

Become champions for social procurement! Procurement can ensure your brand and company values are reflected within your supply chain. Be bold!

Peter Holbrook talk about these topics in more detail during a panel discussion on turning social enterprises into your ‘ideas suppliers’ at the Big Ideas Summit on April 21st.

If you’re interested in finding out more, visit www.bigideassummit.com, join our Procurious group, and Tweet your thoughts and Big Ideas to us using #BigIdeas2016.

Don’t miss out on this truly excellent event and the chance to participate in discussions that will shape the future of the procurement profession. Get Involved, register today.