Tag Archives: storytelling

7 Steps To Telling A Story

If you want anyone to take action from the information you’re looking to share or the change you’re trying to create, a story has to be an essential part of your communications armoury.
We live in an of Netflix, LinkedIn and Instagram.  A big impact of us spending time on these platforms is that our brains are being rewired for stories – we spend time consuming story, after story, after story.
Not only that, we’re able to be highly selective about the stories we consume.There are companies now that actually study what makes stories, and particular advertising stories, ”unskippable”, what makes them compelling. Because, as viewers of stories, we’ve become the connoisseurs.
But when it comes to telling compelling stories for ourselves, many people struggle, despite the fact that the ability to tell a story is becoming an ever more critical skill in our professional lives.
We live in an of Netflix, LinkedIn and Instagram.  A big impact of us spending time on these platforms is that our brains are being rewired for stories – we spend time consuming story, after story, after story.
Not only that, we’re able to be highly selective about the stories we consume.
There are companies now that actually study what makes stories, and particular advertising stories, ”unskippable”, what makes them compelling.
Because, as viewers of stories, we’ve become the connoisseurs.
But when it comes to telling compelling stories for ourselves, many people struggle, despite the fact that the ability to tell a story is becoming an ever more critical skill in our professional lives.

The importance of storytelling

Every single day, more information is created than existed from the dawn of time up until 2013. We’ve got hoards of information being streamed at us, which ironically doesn’t really work because we are not logical, linear people at our hearts.
Julie Masters, CEO – Influence Nation  believes humans are wired for stories because they are how we connect and how we engage. “They are the only way you build empathy and a connection with someone else – I tell you my story you tell me yours.
“If you want anyone to take action from the information that you’re looking to share or the change you’re trying to create then a story has to be an essential part of your communications armoury.”
On Day Four of the Bravo podcast series, Julie shares her top tips for becoming a master story teller.

1. Make it compelling

If you want some guidance on how to tell a great story, Julie advises that you start watching Netflix with an eye for storytelling. Consider how do they do it , what happens in the first 20 seconds of a compelling story. “It is a formula, so if you’re curious, watch more television!  Ask yourself, what is the last story that caught your attention and what is the last story that lost your attention?”

2. Make a clear structure

Julie believes that we put far too much kudos on how we tell or present a story and not nearly enough focus on how we structure that message in the first place. The most groundbreaking pieces of information will fall flat if they aren’t structured in a way that’s going to compel attention.

3. Be relatable

Julie advises that you organise your story into a few main points. “Are you using useful ideas and useful examples to illustrate those points – examples that [your listeners] can relate to.”

4. Have a clear beginning and a clear ending

“This one flies under the radar all too often” Julie explains . “It’s important to consider what you want us to do with your story as a result of your story. Is there something you want us to do differently, or believe differently?” Having a compelling opening is also important to draw in your audience. Julie suggests opening with question, which will “guide you into an interesting space and usually gets attention fast.”

5. Take it slow

“One of the key things we do when we’re nervous is speed up. So slow down, take a breath and remember to pause.” Julie advises that it is especially important to pause following an important point. “Our brains take a while to catch up with where you’re at and if you just keep on talking we’ll miss the fact that you believe this part was important.”

6. Monitor your movement

“Don’t be afraid to be still” Julie asserts. ‘If you’re constantly moving around  it’s like listening to the sound of a washing machine – you tune out.  Similarly, if you’re still and rigid we’ll tune out. Use your body for impact, move at certain points if you’re illustrating a point and then stand still and grounded for another point.”

7. Vary your Voice

It’s important to avoid speaking in monotone and varying your tone, pitch, volume and speed. “Up the energy of your voice and then bring it back down again. Use all the tools you have to get and maintain our attention.”

In Bravo, our five-part podcast series celebrating women in procurement, five inspiring and courageous women share their stories and the secrets to their success. Sign up to now (it’s free!)

The 3 Rules Of Epic Storytelling

The key to creating real engagement – the type of engagement that actually leads to action – is deceptively simple. Learn how to become an EPIC storyteller with these tips from Influence Nation CEO Julie Masters.

 We are, by our very nature, storytelling creatures. It’s how we’ve been connecting since the Stone Age when we sat around campfires sharing our stories as a way of showing vulnerability and intimacy – and we’re hardwired for it.

According to Forbes, storytelling ‘the new strategic imperative of business’. Think about what happens in your mind when someone starts talking about statistics. Now compare that to what happens when they start telling you a story. Immediately you make yourself the lead character – how would I feel if that were me? How would I have responded? And there you have an emotional connection.

Looking at the explosion of social media and reality TV, not only are we storytelling creatures, we’re suckers for real stories – full of ups, downs and lessons learned. In the business world, regardless of whether you’re putting together a pitch presentation, vying for venture capital funding or presenting to the Board – your primary objective should be to get people emotionally connected enough to your message to take action. To help you get started as an epic storyteller – here are my three top rules:

MAKE IT REAL

Stories are so much more impactful when they are real – especially if they happened to you. A speaker I work with once said, “You don’t tell and retell a great story, you live and re-live it”. It’s hard to live and re-live a story that isn’t yours, however, we don’t always have the opportunity to take inspiration from our own lives. I recently coached a CEO who had to present at an industry convention, she needed to share how the digital revolution had fundamentally changed their consumer. Instead of jumping into some hard-core statistics, we took a different approach. She said “I want to introduce you to Emma…”

Emma wakes to the sound of her iPhone alarm. She quickly checks the weather forecast and emails before getting out of bed. She reads the news on her iPad, drops the kids at school while listening to a favourite podcast, orders the weeks groceries online… and on the story went. Every single statistic was covered by Emma’s journey and at the end the question was posed: “Who here has a day that resembles that?” Everyone put up their hand. In under 3 minutes, she had the room convinced that digital devices have completely reinvented our lives. Compare that to 10 minutes spent going through statistics and figures – which is the most compelling?

MAKE IT COMPELLING

Some of us are born with the ability to tell a really great story, but it usually requires three pints and a shot of tequila. For the rest of us (and where alcohol isn’t an option), the answer is to sharpen your skills. The key to a compelling story is energy. If you’re speaking in front of people, start by using your whole body. Remember the ‘live and re-live’ rule – how would you tell this story if you were literally re-living it? How would you use your hands? How would you move your body? How would your voice change? In the most recent studies, body language accounts for a huge 55 per cent of how a message is received, so harness its power and start literally taking up more space.

If your story is going to be consumed on a digital device rather than in person – look at using video as a storytelling tool. With video content predicted to account for 80 per cent of internet traffic by 2019, customers are sending a clear message. Don’t tell me, show me. And if you want me to amplify your story by sharing it – tell me on a platform where I’m already actively sharing content. It might be Snapchat, it might be Instagram stories – look to where your target market is already hanging out and start a conversation.

(If you want to learn more about powerful ways to use your body – Harvard Professor Amy Cuddy delivered an incredible TED Talk on the topic of ‘power posing’).

MAKE IT ACTIONABLE

This is one of the biggest mistakes I see from great storytellers. The story ends – there’s an eager and engaged audience – ready to take action – and then – nothing. The most effective stories are the ones that finish with a simple request.

I recently watched a documentary about the alarming decrease in the whale population. It lasted an hour and, by the end, I was willing to do anything in my power to help. The credits rolled and that was it – no way for me to turn my new-found passion into action. Compare that with the Dolphin Safe label campaign. In this case the action was simple – only buy cans of tuna containing this label. A simple request that has permanently changed my buying behaviour.

I interviewed Daniel Flynn the Founder of social enterprise Thankyou a months ago on my podcast. He was telling me about the beginnings of Thankyou – when he knew the core to it’s success would be to get products stocked by a major retailer. He set up a meeting with 7/11 and – in the two weeks before the meeting – ran a social media campaign asking consumers to do one simple thing. To let 7/11 know that if they stocked Thankyou products – they would buy them. Within one day, 7/11’s social channels were flooded with support and within a few weeks – their products were stocked in 7/11s around the country.

The key to creating real engagement – the type of engagement that actually leads to action – is deceptively simple. Tell compelling stories – on the right platforms – and make simple requests. In a world where we’re overloaded with information. Epic storytelling will continue to be the only key to cutting through the noise.


#BigIdeas2018 speaker Julie Masters is a globally recognised expert in influence, authority and thought leadership. She is the CEO and Founder of Influence Nation and Founder of ODE Management – responsible for launching and managing the careers of some of the worlds most respected thought leaders. Julie is also the host of the weekly podcast Inside Influence.  http://juliemasters.com

Are you in Australia? There’s still time to reserve your seat at the Sydney Big Ideas Summit on Tuesday 30th October. Book now: http://www.bigideassummit.com/big-ideas-sydney

Can’t make it to Sydney? Become a digital delegate and catch all of the action LIVE right here on Procurious. Digital delegates can download a free copy of Julie Master’s ebook: The Influencer Code. https://www.procurious.com/big-ideas-summit-sydney