Tag Archives: supply chain management

Could Brexit Cloud have a Silver Lining?

The Brexit result upset the apple cart. It also left many people searching for a silver lining to the clouds on the horizon.

silver lining

This article was written by Daniel Ball, Director, Wax Digital.

Marmite – you either love it or hate it as they say. Well, Tesco for one was probably agreeing with the second of those sentiments recently when its rocky relationship with the brand’s owner Unilever hit the press.

As you’ll remember the food giants’ spat was triggered when Unilever stated it would need to raise its UK prices. This was in order to offset the impact of the pound’s post-Brexit weakness against the Euro in its supply chain.

Tesco retorted by removing Unilever products from its shelves. A bold move considering the food manufacturer owns many leading consumer brands.

Weakening Sterling

To recap, in mid-October the pound fell to a value below €1.10 for the first time since March 2010. The pound had generally been on the slide ever since the UK’s EU referendum back in June. It was also performing weakly against other major currencies including the US dollar and those in most emerging markets.

In many ways this is bad news for UK consumer and business to business purchasing. Both as individuals and organisations we’re pretty heavily reliant on global supply chains, meaning that it will cost domestically-based organisations heavily.

UK manufacturers sourcing parts and materials from overseas to make products locally, will pay more due to poor exchange rates.

Equally retailers and wholesalers buying end products from other countries will pay more to put them on their shelves or fill their warehouses. These cost increases will inevitably be passed on to UK business customers and consumers alike.

Returning to Domestic Focus?

However the situation may not be all bad and there could be a silver lining in this post-Brexit cloud. One potential positive outcome from this situation could be some British supply chains choosing to return to a more domestic focus.

Weighing up the options in a less than favourable global financial position, it may make sense for some UK businesses to explore the cost benefits of buying locally. This will help to remove exchange rate risk, even if local supply is not the cheapest price book option.

After years of decline, UK manufacturing may actually receive a boost and resurgence of ‘Buy British’ standards of the past. However this will be fuelled by necessity, rather than a Brexit campaign.

Admittedly it’s an ambitious scenario. Imagine the impact of Tesco commissioning UK food producers to come up with viable, locally made alternatives to replace Unilever’s full range. Especially considering its brands comprise around half of the worldwide grocery market share.

Secondly, consider how a weak pound may also drive overseas buyers to look to British suppliers for pound-based pricing. This will allow them to realise the benefit when the Sterling costs are converted back into their own stronger currencies. UK suppliers could see new market openings and opportunities to trade overseas that once didn’t exist.

British supply may suddenly become in vogue.

Silver Lining in Currency Battles

For procurement teams choosing to buy domestically, a move such as this will mean significant focus on supplier sourcing and close inspection of supplier relationships. Necessary checks and due diligence would have to be built in, in order to ensure any changes in supply didn’t leave the business at risk.

Equally procurement professionals working supply side in the UK should seek to advise the business on how to make the most of new opportunities and negotiate effectively in supply relationships.

Brexit is rather like Marmite in that it divided the nation. But while there are fears about the UK’s future after Brexit, recent currencies-related battles have highlighted a potential silver lining.

Now could actually be the time where we see both onshore and offshore buyers eyeing up UK supply options over going overseas or opting for their foreign domestic choices.

Procurement would need to ensure necessary checks, due diligence and information management in new sourcing activities. There would be a need to ensure swift and effective onboarding. New contracts and relationships would have to carefully managed to minimise ongoing trading risk with new partners.

But if procurement can pull this off, who’s to say this cloud couldn’t have a silver lining?

3 Ways the IoT Can Benefit the Supply Chain

We’ve heard about the IoT disrupting our personal and home lives. But where will these technologies really stand up in the supply chain?

iot in supply chain

We’ve come to know the Internet of Things as a technological phenomenon that is revolutionising many ways of life. The idea is that devices and computer systems can communicate and work with each other, and make things easier. And we’re starting to see applications in all manner of places.

The IoT is making exercising more intuitive, making homes more secure, and making offices and hospitals more efficient. But these benefits are only scratching the surface. There are also many IoT benefits that are less visible to the general public. One that is becoming fairly interesting is the effect on business supply chains.

This may not be the sexiest application of the IoT, but it’s one with significant potential to change the nature of big retail companies and even lower costs for consumers. Here’s how it’s happening.

IoT In Production Plants

IoT sensors are allowing manufacturers to collect key data from various physical spaces within production plants and manufacturing facilities.

Sensors can be used to monitor machine temperatures and send automatic alerts to problems by way of changing lighting. They are also able to monitor the use of safety equipment (and the condition of that equipment) automatically.

Additionally, factory conditions such as temperature and humidity can be tracked and controlled. Individual pieces of inventory can be tagged the moment they’re created, so as to be kept track of in the future. Other functions more typical of ordinary office environments can also come into play, like security and communication measures.

It’s easy to see how basic IoT sensors can help to automate some of the trickier aspects of production that kick off the supply chain process.

IoT On The Road

Perhaps the most fascinating impact of the IoT on supply chains is occurring on the road, in shipping vehicles. Tracking sensors on individual pieces and crates of inventory help companies to “watch” those materials until they arrive at retail locations or other points of sale.

However, there are also IoT measures being put in place to keep fleet vehicles operating safely and on schedule.

By outfitting fleet vehicles with high-end GPS and WiFi, companies can provide managers with real-time sharing of vehicle diagnostics and more important data. These devices can keep track of vehicle performance, driver activity, and routing information, effectively automating the management and scheduling process that was once a headache for everyone involved.

Vehicles can be repaired precisely when needed, and be directed on the most efficient routes. Plus drivers can be kept on reasonable schedules, and held accountable for their own tendencies on the road.

IoT In Stores

Finally, once the product has been shipped to retail locations, there are also IoT-related technologies in place to monitor that selection for the sake of restocking inventory when necessary.

The IoT has the potential to drastically alter numerous aspects of the retail experience. However, when it comes to the supply chain, “smart shelves” are making the biggest difference.

These are shelves that can recognise when inventory is getting low and send automatic alerts to store managers, or even directly to production facilities, communicating orders and keeping the store in supply.

That about covers an overview of how the IoT is changing the supply chain in retail businesses. On the business end of things there’s no telling how much these changes can cut costs and improve the speed and accuracy of production.

And for consumers, those same benefits should ultimately translate to fair prices and consistently stocked store shelves. All in all, it could be one of the more impactful mainstream IoT developments.

Blaine Kelton is a programmer and freelance writer currently living in Beverly Hills. From technological advancements to new albums by favourite artists, he’s eager to just write and get his work out there.

Scan, Print, Wear – Does The Future of Fashion Lie in 3D?

3D Printing is disrupting yet another industry – fashion. But this time, the big companies are ahead of the game.

3d printing fashion industry

From parts for fighter jets, to prosthetic arms and legs, and concept cars, 3D Printing is being used to manufacture a huge variety of items. And with its use on the rise, it’s putting pressure on organisations to reassess their manufacturing and supply chains.

The latest industry to come into the sights of the 3D Printing revolution is one that might surprise you – fashion. It’s not strictly a new phenomenon (it’s been over a year since these items first appeared), but it’s worth noting for a couple of important reasons.

Firstly, unlike in other industries, the well-known clothing manufacturers are at the forefront of the efforts. Secondly, the consideration of what this might mean for the fashion industry in terms of manufacturing and intellectual property.

Introducing Liquid Factory

Last week, Reebok announced the introduction of ‘Liquid Factory‘, a brand new manufacturing process using the concept of 3D drawing. Using a liquid created especially for them, Reebok can literally draw a shoe, without the need to use a mould at any point.

Not only does this drastically reduce the speed of manufacture, but it also allows Reebok to innovate more freely in the design of their footwear. According to Bill McInnes, Head of Future at Reebok, it’s the first jump forward in footwear manufacturing in over 30 years.

“One of the most exciting things about Liquid Factory is the speed. We can create and customise the design of shoes in real time, because we’re not using moulds – we’re simply programming a machine,” said McInnis. “Liquid Factory is not just a new way of making things, it’s a new speed of making things.”

Innovation doesn’t come cheap, for the consumer at least. A pair of the new ‘Liquid Speed’ trainers will set you back $189.50, though McInnes points out they more advanced than other trainers.

Setting the Fashion Trends

Reebok aren’t alone in using new methods to creating footwear.

Adidas rewarded its sponsored athletes who won medals at Rio 2016 with a new 3D printed running shoe. Under Armour created a new trainer with a 3D printed sole, and sold out the entire line (at $300 a pair) after Michael Phelps wore them at the Olympics Opening Ceremony.

Under Armour have stated that the 3D printing process allows them to create a highly customised shoe based on individuals’ vital statistics. And printing, rather than moulding, allows for “mass customisation” without huge increases in price.

And it’s not just trainers that are going through the 3D printer. Bikinis, dresses, and even the costumes for HBO’s latest masterpiece, Westworld, have been 3D printed. 3D printing is also being used to manufacture so-called “smart fabrics“, essentially wearable technology in clothing.

IP, Counterfeits & Consumers

However, while 3D printing holds many positives for the fashion industry, there are concerns too. Consumers are unlikely to see changes to their shopping habits in the very near future. But it’s how shopping will evolve that plays a major role in the fashion industry’s evolution.

Consumers may in the future be able to pay to download files of clothes to print themselves at home. 3D body scans could make tailored clothing much cheaper and more accessible.

But the over-riding concern for designers and retailers is what would happen to the IP. And how could they cope with the likely influx of counterfeit goods. The industry already deals with countless fakes, but access to CAD files and cheaper 3D printers could see the issue increase exponentially.

Fortunately, the fashion industry has time on its side in this respect. Affordable 3D printers capable of this are still very rare. And if organisations choose to invest time and resources into protecting their IP now, it could save them considerable trouble in the future.

Will 3D Printing change the way we buy clothes? Could it also see an end to sweatshop labour in fast fashion? Share your views below.

While we’ve been searching for a cheap 3D printer, we’ve also been on the look-out for the top headlines this week.

Uber Drivers in Landmark Case Win

  • Uber drivers in the UK have won an employment tribunal case, which ruled they were workers, rather than self-employed.
  • The decision means that drivers will be entitled to holiday pay, rest breaks and the national minimum wage.
  • Uber, who argued that its drivers were self-employed contractors, has already said it will appeal.
  • Should the verdict stand, it could impact tens of thousands of workers in a similar situation.

Read more on The BBC

Tesla Posts First Profit in Three Years

  • Electric car maker Tesla has posted a surprise profit this quarter after selling more vehicles than expected.
  • The company’s revenue rose 145 per cent to $2.3 billion in the quarter, while vehicle sales doubled to 24,821.
  • Tesla’s stock rose 5 per cent in response to the news.
  • The news may mean Tesla is able to meet its bold target of selling between 80,000 and 90,000 electric vehicles this year.

Read more at The Wall Street Journal

Currency Related Price Increases Continue

  • Microsoft has become the latest company to increase its prices as it adjusted its charges to account for currency fluctuations.
  • The rise comes less than two weeks after Unilever’s public spat with Tesco over requested price increases.
  • Microsoft stated that the increases were as a result of assessing their product prices, and creating alignment across the European region.
  • Apple have also announced price rises on their hardware in the UK, some by more than £500.

Read more at Supply Management

Modern Slavery Allegations in Fashion Supply Chains

  • A BBC investigation has revealed modern slavery and child labour in the supply chains of major global companies.
  • The supply chains of Marks & Spencer and ASOS were found to have poor working conditions in Turkish factories.
  • War of Want also alleged similar findings in the supply chain of Japanese retailer, Uniqlo.
  • The company’s Chinese suppliers have been found to enforce excessive overtime, and dangerous conditions, on their workers.

Read more on Supply Chain Dive

Samsung Eats Horsemeat on the Titanic with Captain Kirk

Highlighting potential procurement lessons from the latest supply chain crisis for Samsung – the Galaxy Note 7.

samsung galaxy

This article was written by Daniel Ball, Director at Wax Digital.

The Samsung Galaxy Note 7 spent just two and a half months on the market before it was recalled amidst a crisis badly affecting its share price, not to mention its brand image.

The device was quickly taken off the market after some models of the phone exploded and went on fire. It was found that overheating lithium ion batteries were to blame.

Some analysts have been quick to consider how a respectable brand like Samsung, which surely has a sound manufacturing process and supply chain, has come to retailing a product that turns out to be dangerous.

Many have put the blip down to Samsung’s competition with rival Apple. The battery of the Galaxy Note 7 is bigger and has a higher energy density than Apple’s iPhone 7 Plus. This suggests that Samsung has tightly crammed in more components.

Has Samsung’s desire to trump Apple seen it rush a product to the market without properly addressing the true capability of its battery technology?

It’s also been argued that the mobile sector’s demands are pushing battery technology to and in some cases beyond, its limits. It’s not the first time this technology has literally flared up (remember the hoverboards last Christmas?).

Race to Beat the Competition

The situation raises a key question that applies to any competitive marketplace.

At what point does the race to release new products and beat the competition, or simply deliver a competitively priced product to tight margins, become more important than ensuring your supply chain is not taking risks? Where is the line drawn in adding components into the product that could ultimately harm the very people you are trying to win over (your customers)?

It’s what I call ‘the Titanic effect’. In a bid to make the infamous boat lighter and faster in the race to cross the Atlantic, all sorts of risks were taken. And it was the customer who paid the ultimate price.

While not all risks involved are supply chain related you have to ask the question “what was procurement’s role in all of this?”

Are customer and business demands properly mapped onto supply chain capabilities? Are supplier checks rigorous enough to ensure they can do the job we need them to do safely and securely?

Or is procurement like poor Mr Scott in Star Trek, constantly at the mercy of his boss, Captain Kirk, wanting him to flog the warp engines again even though he keeps telling him “they cannae take much more”. 

At the bottom line, visibility of who is in your supply chain and how they are operating has reared its head once again. It raises the point that procurement needs to play an increased role in the decisions of the business to ensure the rules of demand and supply are effectively balanced.

How Big Data Insights are Revolutionising Global Procurement Strategy

More companies than ever are using Big Data insights to drive their decision making. But what key benefits are they realising by doing so?

big-data-insights

This article was originally published on My Purchasing Center.

Advances in technology are making it possible to generate more data than ever before. We can quantify, measure and track every interaction, transaction and engagement in excruciating detail.

And when we collect these “big data,” we can gain tremendous insights into business processes, including global procurement strategy.

Because global procurement is focused entirely around obtaining greater efficiencies and streamlining purchasing operations, global procurement is primed to be revolutionised by the insights that stem from big data.

Businesses that collect big data insights are finding that they can refine global procurement strategies and processes with greater precision than ever before. They also can intervene more effectively to resolve problems and challenges, and they can use concrete data instead of intuition and instinct to accomplish this work.

One study by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Sloan School of Management, finds that among companies in the top third within their industry, the use of data-driven decision-making made a company 5 per cent more productive and 6 per cent more profitable than a company that didn’t use data-driven decision-making.

Let’s explore the specific ways that big data insights are revolutionising the global procurement industry:

Shorten order-to-delivery times

Traditionally, the procurement timeline has been based largely on individuals using their best judgment and insider knowledge to get the right products and resources to the right place at the right time.

No matter how talented people are, however, they’re often no match for a computer algorithm that is specifically designed to optimise timelines and manage all aspects of the ordering and delivery process.

Computer-based analytics also can adapt to changing conditions in real time, ensuring that no matter what happens, nothing will slip through the cracks, and order-to-delivery times will continue to be optimised.

Increase supply chain efficiency

As with managing a procurement timeline, individual people can only manage a supply chain as efficiently as the human brain will allow.

Analytics software goes past the limitations of the human brain, processing and interpreting more data points about a supply chain than anyone’s brain could possibly synthesise.

In the end, these big-data insights yield more precise predictions about how to optimise the supply chain – and better predictions yield better decisions.

Lower costs

The goal of global procurement is to achieve cost savings, so it makes perfect sense to use big data insights to optimise all opportunities to lower costs.

Analytics software can instantaneously and accurately compute more possible combinations of events and items and scenarios than any human brain could, and computers can also thus make the “sweet spot” recommendation that appropriately balances all of these competing factors.

Improve supplier-client relationships

Both the supplier and the procurement client benefit from big-data insights. The supplier gets access to invaluable information that helps the supplier more effectively allocate its resources, as well as make plans to deliver on time and on budget.

The client benefits by no longer being forced to actively manage every aspect of the procurement process. Rather, a computer-based management approach frees the client to focus on building and enhancing relationships with suppliers, and on developing creative, out-of-the-box solutions that further enhance procurement processes.

Eliminate arbitrary decision-making

As much as businesses like to think their managers are making sound decisions, some will inevitably make decisions based on emotion, gut instinct, and self-interest.

Big data insights dramatically reduce the chances of this by forcing managers to not only use data-driven analytics to make decisions, but also to be prepared to defend those decisions.

As more businesses turn to big data insights to drive global procurement strategy, it’s important to provide adequate resources to support this transition and to provide adequate time for this transition.

When big data insights are integrated effectively into procurement processes, businesses can count on shorter order-to-delivery times, increased supply chain efficiencies, lowered costs, improved supplier-client relationships, and less arbitrary decision-making.

With more than 30 years of experience working with and providing excellent customer service to companies of all sizes, Rick Bender now is the Sales Director at CenterPoint Group.

CenterPoint is a management consulting firm that specialises in reducing purchasing expenses of businesses in areas such as office supplies, janitorial supplies, and industrial supplies.  

The Evolution of Procurement Culture

Procurement often struggles with the perception of its value. But could the issue be traced back to the culture expected by its stakeholders?

evolution of culture

What is Procurement’s business value? Is it doing a great job and does the business agree? If the perception of procurement is less than we desire, it is possible to change it?

These are the tough questions we explore within this article. Warning…this article may offend some people! Yet, if we are to make progress, it’s time to be honest.

Procurement’s Perceived Value 

If you ask a procurement person if they are doing a great job, most will agree. They might say they are working to tight deadlines, complying to complex processes with limited resources and information, they do the best they can. Generally, it’s a fair assessment.

However if we ask the business the same question the response can be brutal, “No, they are not.”

The feeling is that procurement is driven by price, that they are reactive, and that procurement never brings new ideas into the business. Frequently procurement are used out of necessity, but their involvement is not desired.

This revelation can be upsetting to many within Procurement, especially when their is a clear desire to be considered as a trusted advisor, pro-active and a business capability that adds value.

If a negative perception of procurement is something you face within your organisation then we have some good news! It isn’t your fault, and it is possible to change it. 

Stakeholders & Customers

“Why is there such a disconnect?”

To help us identify what might be going wrong with the perception of procurement, we need to identify the main business areas involved.

There are four main groups that are important customers and/or stakeholders to procurement:

1. Head of the Business/CEO/CFO

This individual is responsible for budget approval, business strategy and might even decide if there is a procurement department. Their ability to decide Procurement’s future makes them a critical stakeholder for the function.

2. Business leaders/Budget Holders

This group are responsible for bringing requirements to procurement, and procurement needs their business. Losing the support of the business leaders could see a drive to outsource/automate the procurement department.

3. Supply Chain

The suppliers provide the solutions to the business leaders requirements. No suppliers means no business solutions.

4. Head of Procurement/CPO

This individual is responsible for employment, pay rises and promotions within the procurement team. As this person holds the career of the Procurement Practitioner in their hands, they are a key stakeholder. 

Procurement’s Culture Today

If we accept procurement’s culture largely remains focused on price, then we need to know why. Even will all the evolution in procurement, it’s clear that this is still prevalent. Here’s why:

  • The number 1 driver for the current procurement culture is the CEO (or CFO or equivalent)

Traditionally, to this individual procurement is principally a ‘cost centre’. The greatest value procurement offers them is keeping their costs to a minimum.

  • The next driver for procurement is the CPO

The CPO wants to ensure they meet the needs of the CEO/CFO. This is critical in ensuring they retain the support from the senior stakeholders.

Therefore maximising cost reductions are critical, realised through contract savings. This culture is amplified further by attaching procurement salary bonuses for achieving contract savings.

  • The third driver for procurement culture is business leaders

The culture is already firmly established on reducing costs/price to achieve a procurement agenda. The business leaders can struggle to identify any real business value in procurement engagements, resulting in a strained relationship.

  • The final group driving procurement culture is the Supply Chain

The culture of the engagement is based on a drive to reduce supplier margins. With no real focus on collaboration, promoting success, or becoming a customer of choice, it is a one way relationship focused on procurement success. This results in an engagement with little or no trust.

To recap, because the culture is coming down from the CEO/CFO it creates a culture focused on savings, which continues to flow down into the business and the supply chain and can result in the business leaders and the supply chain trying to by-pass procurement.

Culture From the Top

But all is not lost. In the second part of this article, we’ll propose an alternative cultural model that will drive benefit for all four stakeholder groups, plus procurement.

This will also help optimise procurement practitioners’ individual value, an aspect critical for attracting the best talent and talent retention.

“Perceived value can be in response to how you engage, which is a result of your culture, and is influenced by your drivers.”

POD Procurement is a consultancy and advisory for Procurement Transformation. For more information, and to read more about the POD Model, visit our website.

Not Worth The Money – Will Entrepreneurs Avoid Business in Britain?

The Great British Pound is in trouble again this week and it’s making budding entrepreneurs think twice about their business plans.

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Talk of a Hard-Brexit Sparks Global Concern

The pound plummeted to a 31-year low last week sparking global concern. The crash followed Prime Minister Theresa May’s announcement on Sunday 2nd October, which revealed a firm timeline for triggering Article 50 and the beginning of Brexit. Extra fuel was added to the, already well-stoked, fire when the media reported that she would opt for a complete break from Europe- a “hard brexit”. Reports  already suggest that a “hard brexit” could result in a loss of 70,000 jobs and cost £10bn in tax receipts.

With the pound sitting at $1.27 against the US dollar, chancellor Philip Hammond scuttled to New York with the hope of reassuring America’s biggest banks about the consequences of Brexit. He will try to convince the Wall Street powerbrokers that London will maintain its position as the world’s leading financial centre once the break from the EU is complete.

The pound is also falling against the euro this week, hitting a five-year low and continuing to escalate concerns.

Weak Pound Triggers Rise in UK Services Sector Prices

The dropping value of the pound is already affecting the UK services sector as input prices rose to a three and a half year high in September 2016.

David Noble, group CEO, CIPS, said: “Firms raised their prices in response, to counteract increased costs for fuel, food and elevated wage bills and as the weaker pound had an effect.”

Companies demonstrated their concerns at the ongoing uncertainty over Brexit implications through their reluctance to forge ahead with confidence.

“It’s clear that the pace of expansion has cooled since the first half of the year, reflecting widespread concern about the potential future impact of Brexit”, David commented.

Is Brexit Scaring Off Entrepreneurs?

The aftermath of Britain’s Brexit referendum back in June 2016 saw a strong display of optimism from many entrepreneurs. Indeed, a survey conducted by the Financial Times confirmed that the majority of founders and investors had confidence in London retaining its status as Europe’s biggest center for start-ups. But, is there a change in the wind?

Diana Paredes, CEO & Co-founder at Suade Labs and passionate entrepreneur spoke with Business Insider last week about the effects Brexit will have on entrepreneurship.

She questions why anyone would opt to start a business in the UK given the current economic climate. Operating in London adds a premium in terms of housing and talent and people often see the many business opportunities on offer as a justifiable compromise for quality of life. However, with the future so uncertain, is it worth the risk and sacrifice?

Existing organisations might also be keen to relocate their bases to elsewhere in Europe where it is cheaper to operate, less isolated and they can continue to be regarded as a European company and not simply a British one. 

If you’re an entrepreneur, what are your thoughts? Is the dropping value of the pound enough to make you run a mile from UK business? Let us know in the comments below.

Find out what else has been happening in the world of procurement and supply this week…

Samsung in Trouble Again

  • It’s been a month since Samsung recalled its new flagship phone, the Galaxy Note 7, following several cases of it exploding and injuring customers.
  • The company have been issuing replacement devices to customers who bought Galaxy Note 7 phones.
  • However, a Samsung recently started smoking uncontrollably on a flight before takeoff, forcing the cabin crew to evacuate the plane. This could lead to a second recall and a disastrous outcome for Samsung.
  • Google announced its Pixel smartphone this week and could be well placed to steal a whole host of disappointed Samsung’s customers.

Read More at Business Insider

Uber’s Self-Driving Cars

  • Uber’s self-driving car pilot program may want to fasten its seat belts after the bumpy beginning it has reportedly gotten off to.
  • The cars have reportedly gotten into accidents and ignored traffic signs during testing in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
  • Whilst it is still very early days for self-driving cars, it’s believed that they are, ultimately, inevitable given the overall, enticing end-game which should see the cars combatting road deaths.

Read more at Tech Radar

Supply Chain Leaders Pressured to Embrace Climate Change

  • Business for Social Responsibility (BSR) meets next month in New York with the current cri de Coeur being “bold climate action”.
  • Analysts have observed that multinationals must raise their ambitions by investing in climate finance, transition to renewable energy, and find more innovative was of ensuring resilient supply chains.
  • As well as encouraging change in organisational culture to embrace clean energy and other climate solutions, BSR insist that supply chain managers join Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) managers in becoming .intrapreneurs.
  • Supply chain managers can – and must – play a major leadership role in addressing the alarming consequences of aberrant global weather conditions.

Read more at Supply Chain 24/7

Drones Tested for Emergency Cell Service

  • Verizon Communications is testing the deployment of large-scale drones to provide mobile connectivity in emergency situations when the land-based cellular network has been damaged.
  • The drone which is being flown by American Aerospace Technologies, is nothing like the small, quad copter devices flown by amateurs at home. With a 17-foot wingspan, Verizon’s drone more resembles the types of unmanned aircraft used in the military.
  • Data gathered in Thursday’s trial will be shared with the FAA in order to help craft future rules regarding drones, Verizon said.

Read more at Fortune

Time to Panic? Climate Change Driving Coffee and Chocolate ‘Extinction’

Like to start your day with a latte? Make the most of it while it lasts, as climate change threatens extinction of the coffee bean.

coffee climate change

No, it’s not scare-mongering. And yes, there are more important things in the world than a daily espresso. However, the possible extinction of the coffee bean could have a wider-ranging, and more devastating, impact than you think.

And that’s not all. Climate change is also threatening a number of other popular foods and drinks, including chocolate, wine and beer.

Climate Change Destroying Farmland

A new report by the Climate Institute has shed light on a number of worrying facts. They argue that, should global warming continue at the same rate, wild coffee could be “extinct” by 2080.

In addition, rising global temperatures, and increasing pests and funghi could halve the available farmland suitable for growing coffee by 2050.

And it’s not just gourmet beans, and your local Starbucks’ supply of arabica beans that are set to be impacted. With a global temperature increase of 3 degrees as a result of climate change, even instant coffee is going to suffer.

Climate change is also causing the spread of pests and funghi to coffee growing areas not previously affected.  Coffee Leaf Rust, a fungus, and the coffee berry borer, a pest, have destroyed crops in South America, and have started to appear at higher altitudes, impacting a greater number of crops.

Coffee – Supply Chains and Livelihoods

Around the world, people drink more than 2.25 billion cups of coffee each and every day. In the UK alone, 70 million cups of coffee are consumed each year. And by 2020, it’s predicted that there will be 21,000 coffee shops around the country.

Coffee is a major export for a number of developing countries. An estimated 120 million people would be impacted by the total extinction of coffee crops. In countries like Burundi, coffee makes up 59 per cent of its exports, while it accounts for 33 per cent of Ethiopia’s.

However, climate change is already taking its toll in a number of other coffee producing countries. In Tanzania, where 2.4 million people work in the coffee supply chain, output has dropped by 50 per cent since the 1960s.

In 2012-13, the spread of coffee leaf rust in South America destroyed 85 per cent of Guatemala’s coffee crop, caused damage worth $500 million across the region, and cost 350,000 people their jobs.

And while some growers can move crops to higher altitudes to mitigate this risk, it’s not an option for small farmers who make up 80-90 per cent of total coffee growers.

Making a Difference

However, there is still time to make a difference and help sustain the livelihoods of the millions of people who rely on coffee for an income.

Helping to reduce emissions is a good place to start. Limiting temperature rises to 1.5 degrees could make a major difference to coffee producers. On your daily coffee run, use a reusable cup – one paper cup has the equivalent carbon footprint to 811 passenger vehicles.

Consumers can also buy brands that give a good deal to small farmers. These funds can then be used to help the farmers adapt their practices and mitigate future risks.

Not Just Coffee…

Sadly for all the foodies out there, coffee isn’t the only crop that is under threat from climate change. Avocados, chick peas, honey, and bananas are all on the food equivalent of the ‘endangered’ list if current trends continue.

And what’s more, chocolate, wine and beer may also be at risk. Chocolate is suffering from over-demand (70,000 more tonnes were consumed than produced last year), and cocoa supplies could be exhausted in the next 16 years.

As for wine, with current temperature rises, an estimated 73 per cent of land in Australia, and all of the Bordeaux region, will be unsuitable for grape crops by 2050.

As consumers it’s time to change our habits, or face running out of some of our staples and luxuries. It’s high time we all make some changes.

Away from a world without coffee, chocolate and wine, we’ve been collecting the big stories in procurement and supply chain this week…

Hanjin Bankruptcy Continues to Disrupt Supply Chains

  • The fallout from the bankruptcy of South Korean shipping company, Hanjin, has continued throughout the week.
  • Despite a US Court granting Hanjin ships access to ports, there are still concerns that delays will create significant bottlenecks for retailers.
  • Companies including Samsung, Hugo Boss, and Nike have all reported having to source alternative logistics options due to shipping delays.
  • Hanjin Group has made an offer of 100 billion won ($92 billion) to help contain supply chain disruptions.

Read more at The Globe and Mail

Australia Asks Chinese Shipping Company to Pay Clean-Up Costs

  • The Australian government has asked Shenzhen Energy Transport to pay $120 million towards the clean-up of a 100-acre area of the Great Barrier Reef.
  • One of the company’s ships ran aground on the southern edge of the reef in 2010 after going off-course.
  • According to the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, the ship caused severe physical damage and considerable contamination by toxic chemicals, including the now-banned anti-fouling agent tributyltin.
  • Shenzhen is fighting the bill, arguing the costs are unrealistic, and that the Great Barrier Reef is “self healing”.

Read more at Mashable

UK Local Government “Off Message” on Cloud

  • A new report from Eduserv suggests that UK local council procurement teams are “off message” on the Government’s G-Cloud software.
  • Only one in three councils say they have both a cloud IT strategy and a procurement policy which allows them to use G-Cloud.
  • Over 27 per cent claim they have an in-house procurement policy that doesn’t let them use G-Cloud at all.
  • The report has suggested that councils need to bridge the gap between IT and procurement to drive G-Cloud usage.

Read more at UK Authority

Coupa Moves to Register for Public Offering

  • Cloud-based spend management platform Coupa Software has publicly filed a registration statement with the U.S. SEC for an initial public offering.
  • The number of shares to be offered and the price range for the offering have not yet been determined.
  • The company has announced plans to raise $75 million in IPO.
  • Coupa intends to list its common stock on the NASDAQ Global Market under the ticker symbol “COUP.”

Read more at VentureBeat

10 Ideas to Encourage Suppliers to Go the Extra Mile

Are your suppliers willing to go the extra mile for you? What can you offer them to drive the extra effort?

Extra Mile

Buyers rely on suppliers to perform numerous requests from the very beginning of their relationship.

From the first RFx, to the laundry list of requests on tight timelines, suppliers play an integral role in the sourcing process. And having them wanting to help can make a huge difference.

What can supplier enablement do to encourage suppliers to meet their deadlines, and even go the extra mile beyond the bare minimum?

Here are ten potential ‘carrots’ to offer suppliers: 

1) Invite to Assist with eProcurement Pilots

Suppliers welcome getting as much exposure as possible. Particularly if they are a new supplier, or you’re rolling out a new eProcurement system.

You can let suppliers know that if they can meet or even exceed your requirements that you’ll highlight them during testing and User Acceptance Testing (UAT). You can include them in your test scripts, and call them out during demos, amongst other things.

2) Feature on eProcurement System’s Home Page

Some modern eProcurement systems give admins the ability to display whatever you’d like on the homepage using business enabled CMS blocks.

Offering this prime real estate to highlight suppliers who have excelled (e.g. provided an awesome catalogue or offered heavy discounts) would be a huge inspiration for a supplier.

3) Float Sales Items to Top of Search Results

Modern eProcurement systems allow admins to affect search results giving specific items more weight or even float to the top of search results.

Similar to how suppliers promote sales items on their B2C sites, you can offer suppliers to boost items they agree to put on sale for at least a period of time.

4) Invite Onsite for ‘Meet and Greet’

Most suppliers will welcome the opportunity to come in and informally meet with their end customers. Maybe even allow them to setup their trade show booth or a table in the office lobby.

I’ve seen some buyers even create some co-branded marketing material, including booth signs or posters, stating that the supplier’s products were available on the eProcurement platform.

5) Visit Them Onsite

When suppliers have to come in to meet with you in your office, it’s typically a nerve-racking experience for them. They’re probably all dressed up and a little nervous as they enter your, likely relatively lavish, corporate office building.

But offering to come to their office for an informal tour/meet-n-greet would likely be an enjoyable honour for them. 

6) Promote in an Email Blast

How every supplier wishes they had the ability, and their buyer’s blessing, to send even one email to all your employees.

Offer them the chance to promote their offerings in a company-wide email blast and every supplier will jump at the opportunity. 

7) Display an Ad on your Intranet

It’s in a buyer’s best interest to entice more employees to use their eProcurement system to make purchases. The buyer’s intranet is probably a popular place where employees go daily.

You can display an ad on your intranet to let employees know they can procure that supplier’s category via the eProcurement system. For example, “The New iPhone 7 – Now on eBuy!”

8) Offer a Testimonial

Suppliers are very proud of their relationship with their customers. They’re especially proud of being selected to tightly integrate with a customer’s internal eProcurement system after all the effort both have put in. 

When a buyer gives a supplier a testimonial that they can use to grow their business. It’s often a very welcome shot in the arm for the supplier’s marketing efforts.

9) Blessing for a White Paper

A step up from a testimonial would be a buyer’s blessing to allow the supplier to create a white paper on how they’ve helped you.

For example, getting the supplier to tell the story of how they exceeded requirements for the buyers on a new project. 

10) Issue a Press Release

While I’ve never heard of it being done, there is one absolute ultimate carrot (apart from a multi-million dollar contract) which would ensure the extra mile from the supplier.

This would be to give the supplier their blessing to issue a press release to let the world know about the partnership. Ideally the release could also include a quote from the buyer.

Admittedly, this would only make sense if it was a very strategic and unique arrangement, and that a press release would make BOTH companies look good.

Some of these may be out of the question for your organisation. But hopefully they’ll at least give you a sense of what’s often valuable to suppliers, and some ideas on how you can help them to help you.

What are some other examples of ways you’ve been able to encourage suppliers to go the extra mile?

Bankruptcy Spells Supply Chain Trouble on the High Seas

Global supply chains are sailing into troubled waters again this week following the bankruptcy of a major shipping firm.

Hanjin Shipping Bankruptcy

A storm is brewing on the high seas for global supply chains thanks to the latest issue for the global shipping industry. One of the world’s largest shipping firms has filed for bankruptcy, having lost support from its national banks.

Hanjin Shipping, South Korea’s largest shipping firm cited debts totalling $5.4 billion, following a long period of financial distress. It is the largest container line bankruptcy in history.

The bankruptcy comes at a time of major strife in the global shipping industry. A combination of oversupply of ships, and an undersupply of cargo, has led to a raft of mergers, acquisitions, and cost-cutting exercises.

Seized Ships and Stranded Cargo

Hanjin currently owns and operates nearly 100 cargo vessels, as well as a further 11 ports. The ships move an estimated 25,000 cargo containers across the Pacific every day.

As a result of the bankruptcy, Hanjin has stopped accepting new cargo from customers, while the situation spells trouble for those ships already in transit to and from Asia.

Dozens of ships have been denied entry to ports in North America and Asia, including South Korea’s largest port, Busan. This is due to concerns that the company wouldn’t be able to pay fees for loading and unloading of vessels.

In China, 10 ships operated by Hanjin have been, or are expected to be seized, on behalf of creditors. This is in addition to another vessel seized in Singapore earlier last week.

The South Korean Government has stated that it will start help to prop up the company, a move that will enable it to stop ships and other assets being seized. However, it is unlikely to save the operator, with experts stating that Hanjin will struggle to recover from losing both its business and reputation.

Unhappy Holidays

The company’s bankruptcy has opened the door for other operators to pick up the slack. However, the situation stands to make life more difficult for retailers, with holiday season shipping on the horizon.

Manufacturers are being forced to look for new routes for a number of products, while on some major trans-Pacific routes, shipping costs have jumped by up to 55 per cent. There are further concerns about the potential knock-on effect further down the supply chain.

Rising transportation costs, delays, and a reliance on Hanjin as a freight carrier, could push other trucking and logistics firms out of business too.

Retail Woes Continue

All of this is set to have a major impact on US retailers in the lead up to the traditional holiday season. Retailers are anticipating a two to three-month delay on the arrival of South Korean goods being transported by Hanjin.

Concerns about the impact on the US economy has prompted The National Retail Federation to ask the US Government to intervene.

“Retailers’ main concern is that there [are] millions of dollars’ worth of merchandise that needs to be on store shelves that could be impacted by this,” said Jonathan Gold, the group’s vice president for supply chain and customs policy.

The situation is the latest in a long line of shipping-related trouble for US retailers. In early 2015, a strike by West Coast port workers saw ships similarly stranded, causing months’ worth of delays.

Whether the impact this time around will be as great remains to be seen. Should cargo be released soon, retailers may not suffer as much as expected. However, irrespective of how long the delays are, it’s sure to test the resilience of major global supply chains.

Are you impacted by the Hanjin bankruptcy? Do you have contingencies in place to mitigate the delays? Let us know in the comments below.

Away from the high seas, we’ve been hunting down the top procurement and supply chain headlines this week… 

Fire Closes Gap Distribution Centre

  • Gap Inc.’s main distribution centre in Fishkill, New York State, has been shut down after a massive fire damaged the premises.
  • All employees were safely evacuated, and investigators are working to understand the extent of the damage and cause of the fire.
  • The clothing and accessories retailer has launched contingency plans to move product through its North American network of distribution centres.
  • However, there are concerns that the disruption will create a bottleneck ahead of the upcoming holiday season.

Read more at MarketWatch

DHL Trials Augmented Reality Glasses

  • Logistics giant DHL is to roll out a UK trial of “vision picking”, following a similar trial in the Netherlands.
  • In “vision picking”, warehouse operatives are equipped with advanced smart glasses which visually display where each picked item needs to be placed on the trolley.
  • The company expects that having a hands-free augmented reality display will increase productivity, decrease error rates and improve employee satisfaction.
  • The augmented reality trial is part of DHL’s move towards “Industry 4.0”, which includes testing technologies including robotics and the Internet of Things across the supply chain.

Read more at Logistics Manager

GE Acquires Supply Chain Software Company

  • GE’s Transportation division has announced the purchase of supply chain software company, ShipXpress.
  • GE said the acquisition of the cloud-based software developer would expand its portfolio into the logistics value chain.
  • The company also sees this as a way of increasing its ability to deliver information and transaction services for railway customers around the world.
  • GE Transportation President & CEO Jamie Miller said the acquisition would “deliver the industry’s most advanced, scalable cloud-based solution to accelerate the movement of goods and information”.

Read more at Railway Gazette

SpaceX Explosion Threatens Launch Programme

  • A SpaceX rocket has exploded during a test, destroying the rocket and the satellite it was due to launch.
  • The explosion happened while the rocket was being fuelled, but that the cause of the blast is still unknown.
  • The rocket was due to carry a Facebook satellite into orbit, aimed at providing internet connection to Africa, the Middle East, and Europe.
  • The explosion could delay the launch of its programme to carry American astronauts in the future.

Read more at CNN Money