Tag Archives: supply chain risk

Automation: Who Says You Can’t Manage What You Can’t See?

If your business is engaged in international commerce, you’re probably struggling to toe the line with supplier risk management. Automation, alerts, and third-party data are your best defense.

Managing supply chain risk is no walk in the park. Exogenous events like the recent terrorist attacks in Barcelona have drawn attention to the EU’s rules to combat terrorism financing through stricter anti-money laundering (AML) regulations. These rules impact many companies that are increasingly added to the law’s scope: possibly yours.

Meanwhile, modern slavery violations can surprise even the most astute contract or supply chain managers who may have unknowingly relied on invalid or falsified information. In the U.K., The Modern Slavery Act 2015 includes a Transparency in Supply Chains clause, which requires companies operating in the U.K. to address modern slavery in their supply chains. If you’re at a big company, you’re probably on the hook to comply.

Once you add in the more common types of risk, such as the financial or credit health of your suppliers, changing markets, and natural disasters, the sense of how challenging it is to manage them all—in the age of digital disruption with fast-paced change and volatility—can quickly become overwhelming.

Fortunately, there is technology and automation to help you maintain control, gain visibility into your supply chain, and mitigate much of these risks. The right technology can help you proactively steer your organization clear of minefields that can damage everything from reputation to sales. And it’s only getting better.

 Start with real-time monitoring and alerts

The first step is to identify the most likely disruptions to the supply chain, like a natural disaster or a work stoppage at a supplier’s supplier. One way to deal with this type of risk is with real-time monitoring. Real-time monitoring of your suppliers means that you can receive an alert whenever there is a potential for disruption. Such alerts can help you find an alternative source of supply, maintain production, and avoid missed deliveries or even a plant shutdown.

Real-time alerts should be an extension of an overall solution consisting of a platform and business network. This is the ideal foundation to set up, monitor, and manage a portfolio of suppliers to ensure that all essential documentation about labor practices, certifications, certificates of insurance, and so on, is in place before you start doing business.

Integrate third-party data sources

Documentation and data about your suppliers can come from many sources, not just what you gather during an onboarding, contracting, or surveying exercise. There are plenty of third-party sources that have standalone solutions and open APIs or integrations into supplier management platforms that let you address various dimensions of supplier risk and to set up corresponding alerts.

If your company is engaged in trade and has a 10,000-euro or more money transfer in any way, it will need to comply with the EU 4th AML Directive. In addition to digitally onboarding your supplier base, you may want to automate KYC / KYB (know-your-customer, /-business), AML (anti-money-laundering), and EDD (enhanced due diligence) requirements. These steps will help you comply with the directive

One provider that is using cutting edge technology like distributed ledgers is Austria-based Kompany. Their counterparty verification data allows users to streamline the supplier verification process at the point of onboarding (and continually) with up-to-the-minute alerts on any material changes to supplier vitals. Their information comes directly from the commercial registers. Kompany even includes PEP (politically exposed person) screening and sanction lists.

Who says you can’t manage what you can’t see?

Other popular sources of company and industry data include Moody’s (credit ratings), EcoVadis (sustainability scorecards and ratings), riskmethods (transparency into risk exposures in 1-n tier supply chains), and Made in a Free World (visibility into modern slavery), to name a few. These data sources can help you continuously monitor for risks and evaluate your risk portfolio during the sourcing process.

Through technology and regulatory technology systems like those described above, you can design an automated, customized, and intelligent risk management strategy. In turn, this can boost trust between you and your suppliers and you can plan more confidently in an environment full of uncertainty.

Desperation: Somali Piracy Back On The Rise

After a relative hiatus over the past five years, international supply chains are once again threatened by a resurgence of piracy off the coast of Somalia.

At the height of the Somali pirate crisis in 2011, 151 vessels were attacked in one of the world’s busiest shipping routes. Thousands of hostages were taken and billions of dollars were lost in ransom, damage and delayed shipments.

An unprecedented international response saw the dispatch of over two dozen vessels from the EU, the U.S., China, Russia, India and Japan, which succeeded in reducing the number of attacks down to only 17 in 2015, mainly involving smaller fishing vessels.

However, last month, dozens of armed men in two small skiffs captured the Aris 13, an oil tanker flying the flag of Comoros, and escorted it to be ransomed in the semi-autonomous northern Somalian region of Puntland. The vessel was attempting to pass through the Socotra Gap, a route between Ethiopia and the Yemeni island of Socotra, when it was boarded by pirates. The route is often used by vessels as a shortcut to save time and money, but has been identified as a high-risk area by anti-piracy groups. According to reports, the Aris 13 was “low, slow and too close to the coast”, making it an easy target for armed attackers.

The Aris 13 was the first large commercial vessel to be captured since 2012, when the Greek-owned MV Smyrni, carrying 26 crew and 135,000 tones of crude oil, was held in a pirate anchorage for 10 months before being released for an undisclosed ransom.

Speaking at a news conference in late April, U.S. Defence Secretary Jim Mattis told reporters there have been “five or six” piracy incidents in the region in the past two months. An anonymous defence official told The Washington Post  that the increase in pirate activity could be linked to complacency among shipping companies, who may have relaxed their security procedures (such as carrying anti-boarding devices and armed contractors) in recent years.

What drives people to risk piracy?

Whilst the international naval response to the piracy crisis has been effective, the situation is expected to continue until the root cause is tackled – the lack of authority of Somalia’s central government. The country has been labelled a “failed state” since a bloody clan-based civil started in 1991. Other factors that drive piracy include:

  • Widespread drought and famine
  • Local anger over illegal foreign vessels fishing in Somali waters
  • Extreme unemployment with no factories or industry
  • Very low earning for fishermen (approximately US$5 a day)
  • The lure of high potential earnings from piracy and ransom money
  • Cash from piracy providing the first boom in living memory in coastal towns.

Reports are also emerging of piracy on the rise on the other side of Africa, along Nigeria’s coastline. Pirates have taken to kidnapping crew members for ransom along the major oil shipping route. Previously, hijackers would siphon off oil from commercial vessels, but now that oil prices have fallen, abductions have proven more lucrative.

In other news this week:

Uber to unveil flying taxi service by 2020

  • Uber has announced “Elevate”, a flying taxi service featuring electric vehicles capable of a vertical take-off and landing.
  • Users will be able to book a ride with their mobile phone app, with Uber’s marketing team already spreading the message of “push a button, get a flight”.
  • The biggest selling point of the urban air network is that it would be able to avoid congested streets in busy cities. The service is expected to launch first in Dubai and Dallas.

Read more at Smartcompany.com.au

 ISO 20400 launched to support sustainable procurement

  • The world’s first international standard for sustainable procurement was launched last week. ISO 20400 was created with the input of experts and industry bodies from over 40 countries and is expected to increase supply chain transparency globally.
  • The Standard is applicable to any organisation, public or private, irrespective of size and location.
  • Read more about the background to ISO 20400 in Procurious’ interview with committee member Jean-Louis Haie.

Access ISO 20400 here.

How To Play The Hand You’re Dealt In The Age Of Uncertainty

Poker: It’s a game filled with excitement and risk. But just how far does it correlate with the uncertainty of our everyday lives?

Last month, Procurious attended eWorld Procurement and Supply where we were  lucky enough to experience a thought provoking talk from Caspar Berry on risk-taking and decision-making in the age of uncertainty.

Whatever our political leanings, we can all agree that unpredictable occurrences are happening everywhere in today’s world.  2016 saw Brexit and the election of president Trump; two events many  had thought impossible. There’s the refugee crisis in the Middle East, the continued prevalence of ISIS and upcoming elections in France and Germany; the results of which could determine the future of the EU.

Caspar Berry, professional poker player and poker advisor on Casino Royale, knows exactly what it means to take risks and admits that it can be dangerous, scary or disruptive. But, we need  risk, whether it’s in our personal or professional lives.

Have you ever considered what it is that makes sport so compelling? We’re gripped by the uncertainty. We have no idea what’s going to happen or who’s going to score and that adds a level of excitement and interest. But of course in professional sport, as is the case with poker, we’re not the ones who have to take the leap. We can leave all of that reckless risk-taking to the professionals… or can we?

Everyday Risk

Caspar pointed out that the average person would love to believe their everyday life has a level of  risk-free stability and  consistency. Whilst we might marvel at the bravery of prevalent risk takers in the casino or on the sports pitch, we’d much prefer to avoid a life of uncertainty.

In actual fact, there a number of parallels to  draw between poker and real life. The future is far more uncertain than we would choose to acknowledge.

In poker, the cards are randomly shuffled making it utterly impossible to predict what’s coming.  Our everyday lives are much the same. We can’t be sure when something will change the course of the future, whether it be a large scale political event, an encounter with a new person or a medical diagnosis.

The Butterfly Affect

The phenomenon whereby a minute localised change in a complex system can have large effects elsewhere. Originating from the notion in chaos theory that a butterfly fluttering in Rio de Janeiro could change the weather in Chicago.

Every single moment of every single day people are doing things somewhere in the world which could change your life.  If any one of your ancestors hadn’t been around, you wouldn’t be either.  If one tiny interaction hadn’t happened hundreds of years ago, history  might look very different indeed. These examples are just two of the billions of butterflies that are interacting with each-other; impacting events across the globe.

When so much is out of our control, it’s natural that we would try to limit uncertainty. We set laws and implement criminal justice systems so we have a vague knowledge of how people are going to behave. We buy branded clothing and eat in chain restaurants because it’s reassuring to know exactly what we’re going to get for our money. We’ll happily pay a premium for these things because it lowers the associated risks.

When we come across people or institutions that seem to know what’s going on, whether it’s a religious group, a futurist or a bank, we want to believe them. And so we do.

Philip Tetlock and The Good Judgment Project

Philip Tetlock, Canadian-American political science writer, began an extensive 20-year study in 1984 on future judgements.

He questioned 284 world experts on their future predictions and requested that each prediction be awarded a likelihood of occurrence. The study is widely considered one of the most robust in the history of social sciences with approximately 2800 answers obtained. And what did those answers show?

As Caspar put it, you  would have gotten the exact same results by asking an eight-year-old to randomly throw darts at predictions. In fact, the strongest correlation in the survey results was between successful predictions and the confidence of the person predicting, but a negative correlation!

Why  were the least confident participants correct? As Caspar explained, these are the people who are both humble and intelligent enough to embrace the concept of uncertainty.

How to manage risk and face uncertainty head on

In our organisations we know, for the most part, that taking risks won’t result in someone getting hurt. But it could mean something going very wrong for the business. So, how do you know when its worth taking a risk and how can we become more confident to do so?

  1. Be competent at assessing risk

We’ll never be able to predict exactly what’s coming our way. But  we can get better at deciding when to take a chance. In business, evaluate what the chance of success is, what’s the return on a gamble. If you’re faced with a 25 per cent chance of success and an amazing ROI, it’s worth taking that risk. Sometimes it will pay off.

2. Immunise yourself to loss

When it comes to risk-taking you will fail and you will lose out, perhaps more often that not. Caspar cited Abraham Lincoln as an icon who endured multiple short term failures, moments of rejection and losses. But he went on to great success.  We can all do better at immunising ourselves to loss,  let downs and failure.

3. Embrace risk taking

Casper asserted that if someone is cocky at poker, they’re possibly a bit insane. It takes a level of caution and the acceptance that there is always risk involved. But risky people have something to teach us, we can learn from them and embrace the uncertainty ahead.

Resistance Is Futile, Disruption Is Coming!

Massive changes are coming to procurement pros, whether they like it or not! Is it high time we started embracing, instead of resisting, them?

Mark Stevenson is one man who understands the key trends heading our way. An expert on global trends and innovation, he will be setting the scene with our opening keynote at the Big Ideas Summit 2017 in London.  We caught up with Mark ahead of the event to get to know him a little better!

Tell us a bit about yourself?

I’m an entrepreneur, an author, an occasional comedy writer, a musician, and, as some people like to define me, a futurologist, but I’m not at all keen on that particular term.

What don’t you like about the term Futurologist?

I think it’s a fairly dodgy profession overall if I’m honest. There are no qualifications required and it’s often associated with prediction and, of course, you can’t really predict the future, you can only make it. Also people who identify themselves as future-experts are as apt to be shaped by the culture in which they are embedded or dogged by their own prejudices and wish-lists as the rest of us, and tend to predict accordingly. For instance many futurologists are overly tech focused. My work is more about the questions the future asks us about the interplay of technology, economics, society and politics. My job is to help people and organisations to ask the right questions about the future and then convince them to answer those questions in a way that makes the world more sustainable, humane, compassionate and just.

 What are the key challenges procurement and supply chains face in the next decade?

Supply chain issues are hugely important at the moment and supply chain professionals are having a lot of questions asked of them.

The first challenge to overcome is achieving greater supply chain transparency. Plenty of procurement professionals, particularly in larger organisations, have no clue where they are actually buying from. When the Rana Plaza building in Bangladesh collapsed in 2013 killing over 1,000 factory workers, many high-street brands were called out and, it materialised, ignorant of their involvement. Tragedies like this have forced high street companies to better audit their supply chains but there’s still a long way to go.

Secondly, organisations need to make their supply chains more sustainable by adopting science-based targets – addressing agricultural sustainability and reducing carbon emissions to give a couple of examples.

You’ve often advocated science-based targets in the past. Could you explain the concept in more detail? How could procurement apply these targets?

Science-based targets are a really simple idea and a very good way to think about sustainability. When it comes to dealing with environmental sustainability companies tend to say ‘this is what we can do, this is what we’re aiming for’ but, in reality, it doesn’t mean a whole lot when a multinational organisation vows to reduce its carbon emissions by 10% by the year 2034! That’s a recipe for planetary disaster.

Instead, organisations must figure out what they have to do based on scientific facts. The Science Based Targets campaign (a partnership between

Carbon Disclosuse Project, UN Global Compact, World Resources Institute and WWF) helps companies determine how much they must cut emissions to prevent the worst impacts of climate change. Coca- Cola, Walmart and HP signed up to this and if they can do it, anyone can.

And, by saving the world you’re also saving your business. Companies who take this stuff seriously will out-perform because they’ll become more efficient and they’ll attract the most forward-thinking, young talent who want to work for companies of which they are unashamed.

In your experience, how open are organisations to new technology trends?

Not very! Organisations tend to be comfortable operating as they always have done.

Upton Sinclair put it well: ‘It is difficult to get a man to understand something when his salary depends on his not understanding it.’ Take Blockchain, it could take away the untrustworthy parts of banking: bankers, who will naturally resist this particular technology!

Another example is driverless tech- it doesn’t take an expert to predict that the 3.5 million US truck drivers would be wary of such an advancement – and rightly so. So we have to find a transition plan for them – which culture resists. But it’s a business responsibility to prepare for the changes and approaching transitions, you have a duty of care to your employees and not being future-literate is a dereliction of that duty. Remember, Blockbuster, the DVD rental company went bust the same week that Netflix released House of Cards.

If you had one key message for our delegates at Big Ideas, what would it be?

Wherever you work and wherever you end up in the next 15-20 years, remember that it’s going to be a very turbulent time. Massive disruption lies ahead and the bad news is that our current institutions and businesses are unfit for purpose. Ask yourself: what’s my best effort for myself, my family and for society (and remember they’re all related). If you don’t, you can prepare to be very irrelevant and very unhappy!

Join the conversation and register as a digital delegate for Big Ideas 2017

Supply Chain Risk Management: Not a Procurement Priority

This article was first published on My Purchasing Center.

Procurement teams struggle with supply chain risk management. They are aware of  the consequences of not managing it, but often they don’t have the resources to focus on it as much as they’d like. Even when they do, managing supplier risk poses a challenge: Most often the best metric of procurement performance at risk is when nothing happens.

A new report, Is Your Luck Running Out? Managing Supply Risk in Uncertain Times, by A.T. Kearney and Rapid Ratings International, describes the current state of procurement involvement in supply chain risk management activities, potential risks that could affect the supply chain, and ways procurement can begin to better manage risk.

Report co-authors Carrie Ericson, Vice President at A.T. Kearney Procurement and Analytic Solutions, and Rose Kelly-Falls, Senior Vice President at Rapid Ratings, did a presentation on the study for procurement and supply managers at ISM2016 held recently in Indianapolis.

Describing the report in an interview with My Purchasing Center, Ericson says she and Kelly-Falls started with the hypothesis that there’s risk along the supply chain that procurement teams simply aren’t managing. “They’re taking a kick-the-can approach,” she says. Asked if managing supply chain risk is procurement’s responsibility, Ericson responded:

“Procurement plays a big role in terms of vetting and onboarding suppliers before they even enter the supply chain,” she says. “Then, typically it’s procurement’s responsibility to put in supplier performance management programs to monitor and track behavior of suppliers throughout the course of the relationship or contract.”

The Is Your Luck Running Out? Managing Risk in Uncertain Times report, referring to the A.T. Kearney Assessment of Excellence in Procurement, states that companies are not effectively managing supply risk and that their risk management approaches are ad hoc at best. What’s more, just 40% of companies report having key performance indicators (KPI) or metrics for supply continuity and supply chain risk mitigation.

Most cite lack of bandwidth and budget as the biggest roadblocks.

Overlooking risk management—or, rather, getting by with that “kick-the-can” approach—leaves procurement teams especially vulnerable in today’s tenuous geopolitical and economic environment, according to the report.

The report also cites A.T. Kearney’s Global Business Policy Council (GBPC)  study, Divergence, Disruption, and Innovation: Global Trends 2015–2025, which analyzes trends shaping the world today and in the decade ahead. It identifies macro trends that play a role in the current and future operating environment for businesses and global supply chains. Among the trends procurement teams are advised to watch are: geopolitical realignment, continued global violent extremism and accelerating global climate change.

Understanding these trends and how they could affect the supply chain is the first step in anticipating and planning for the future,” reads Is Your Luck Running Out? Managing Risk in Uncertain Times.

Supplier Risk: A Closer Look 

The report also demonstrates how procurement teams can use the Rapid Ratings proprietary FHR® (Financial Health Rating) to analyze the health of public and private companies globally, with comparison across industries and regions. 

According to Kelly-Falls at Rapid Ratings, this is the first time such a study shows how combining macro trends analysis with a micro bottom-up company and industry analysis provides procurement teams with relevant industry insights to make informed risk management decisions.

Is Your Luck Running Out? Managing Risk in Uncertain Times shows the financial health of U.S. public firms peaked three years after the beginning of the global financial crisis in 2008, with an average FHR of 61.0 in 2011. Since then, they have declined to an average of 59.2 in 2015, a drop of 3%.

The peak for non-U.S. public firms (61.9), on the other hand, came in 2008 as the global financial crisis was beginning, while the low point was 58.4 in 2009 and again in 2015, a decrease of 5.7%.

While a two- or three-point change might not seem like much, it represents a very significant change based on the algorithm used to determine FHRs, the report states.

Over the same period, the financial health of non-U.S. private firms peaked in 2010 at 63.6 and deteriorated by 6.8% through 2015. U.S. private firms exhibited a decidedly different pattern of behavior. Their rating peaked in 2014 after achieving a 9.6% improvement from 2008 to 2014 and demonstrates a resilience quite unlike the other three groups. U.S. private firms declined slightly in 2015 to 64.2 but still led the others by a wide margin, indicating U.S. private firms have had an edge in terms of minimizing sourcing risk since 2012.

The report also drills down into the health of individual supply markets (by industry). For example, it shows that deteriorating financial health is evident in non U.S. firms in the aerospace and defense industry and in U.S. firms in the chemicals and computer technologies and services industries.

What is Procurement to Do?

A.T. Kearney finds that 90% of procurement teams expect they will have more responsibility for managing risk in the next two years—and they see a growing need to implement a risk management strategy within the next three years. As a result, they are starting to invest in risk management practices that link procurement, category and supplier management strategies.

Is Your Luck Running Out? Managing Risk in Uncertain Times looks at research on developing supply risk management strategies at the category or supplier level and risk and supply base segmentation.

The report finds there are multiple points in the sourcing life cycle where procurement can use risk mitigation strategies—especially in the early phases. This is when supply or category managers conduct the most comprehensive analysis, evaluating alternative suppliers and supply scenarios.

“At no other time does a procurement team spend so many resources on developing suppliers than when it selects, negotiates with and screens potential new partners,” Ericson tells My Purchasing Center.

After that, the report states that procurement’s most important tool for identifying and mitigating ongoing risk is access to robust, relevant and current data.

Kelly-Falls adds that, “procurement teams should not be shy about starting to engage suppliers they’ve been doing business with for years in risk management. It’s going to have to happen. It’s inevitable procurement will need a monitoring system for the supplier. Maybe not every supplier, but we can’t let incumbents know they’re okay.”

As for tier-two and three suppliers, she says, “We know as we get deeper in the supplier chain, it’s possible to lose touch with some of the smaller suppliers. So, it’s a matter of having good practices and making sure to cascade them to tier-one suppliers then hopefully they will take them and cascade them down to their supply base.”

Management of a Global Supply Chain in Emerging Markets

Managing a global supply chain is complex, and fraught with risk. So what tactics can you use to minimise this risk?

Global Supply Chain

This article was written by Rob Barnes, Founder at PrimeRevenue.

In many ways, sourcing goods and services internationally is easier than ever, with the internet making it possible to research, source and communicate with global suppliers from the comfort of your desk.

But in reality it isn’t always that simple. Setting up and managing an global supply chain is a complex, and often risky, business. Without careful planning, local expertise and meticulous management, there’s a lot that can go wrong.

Not only are you dealing with numerous rules, regulations, taxes and constantly fluctuating currencies – all of which have the potential to significantly impact your bottom line. You also have cultural and language differences to contend with, which, in the world of business, can be daunting and confusing to say the least.

On the other hand, getting it right can give you a huge competitive advantage, with cost savings and higher quality or unusual products just a couple of the potential benefits.

So how can you make sure your global supply chain works effectively, while minimising the risks to your business? Here’s a few pointers:

Strategic Planning  

Planning and management of a global supply chain affects the whole organisation, not just certain departments. That means ownership must come from the top, and involve all areas of the business, from procurement and finance, operations and logistics, to sales and marketing.

Don’t allow teams and decisions to become siloed. Make sure there is transparency across the business. Otherwise you’ll be missing important pieces of the puzzle, and find that your supply chain isn’t delivering the value you need, either for the customer or the bottom line.

Local Expertise

Knowledge of the local market is crucial to ensure you understand what to look for in a supplier and how to handle local business practices, from taxes and duties, to employment law and health and safety regulations.

If you don’t have this local expertise internally, consider hiring somebody who does. Or look to bring on a consultant who can guide you through what, and who, you need to know.

Prioritise Relationships  

The foundation of a successful supply chain is building strong relationships with as many elements of the chain as possible. While the internet can help you at the research stage, it’s crucial to visit suppliers regularly, to make those personal connections, scope out their operations in person, and discuss ways of maximising efficiency and collaboration.

In many countries, personal relationships and networks are even more important than in the UK, so it’s in your interest to prioritise this valuable bonding time.

Sales Forecasting

Forecasting is crucial when sourcing products globally, to avoid ending up with too much or too little inventory to deliver on what you need.

This is partly due to timing – your goods are going to take longer to arrive from far flung locations – but there is also a cost element, with taxes and duties to pay every time you move your goods.

Accurate forecasting means that you’ll be transporting the right quantity to arrive at the right time, to deliver on projected demand. You’ll also avoid wasting money on warehouse space by over-ordering.

Technology

Technology is your friend when managing a global supply chain, helping you to streamline processes and minimise unnecessary administration.

Look for a supply chain management solution that works across the different markets you’re operating in, so you don’t need to work with numerous systems.

You can also streamline your invoicing and payment terms using a supply chain finance platform, avoiding the need to negotiate these on a case by case basis, and improving consistency and transparency across suppliers.

Performance Tracking

Just one disruptive link in the chain can impact your whole operations. Make sure you implement a system to measure the success and efficiency of each supplier regularly – delivery times or product quality for example.

By doing this, you can spot any warning signs early on and be ready to replace an underperforming supplier if necessary.

Have a Plan B

Even with top notch processes, you can never be sure what’s going to happen, so have back-up suppliers ready to go in case of any unexpected disasters. This will keep your supply chain running smoothly and avoid lots of unhappy customers.

Focus on Long-Term Sustainability

To minimise risk in the chain, look for ways that you can support your suppliers both financially and logistically. Make sure your lines of communication are always open, so any potential issues can be aired quickly and easily.

You can also help your partners manage their cash flow through supply chain finance, allowing them to choose to be paid more promptly if and when they need. This is particularly useful for suppliers in emerging markets.

This reduces the need for them to take out expensive bank funding or overdraft extensions, minimising costs and risk in the long-term.

Supply Chain Finance from PrimeRevenue and AIG caters to thousands of mid-market, non-investment grade companies, by providing financing, with the credit risk insured by AIG’s market-leading trade credit insurance. It enables suppliers to take early payment less a small discount, while enabling buyers to standardise and potentially lengthen their payment terms.

5 Key Trends Driving Supplier Management and Due Diligence

Can you afford to take the risk? We assess the key drivers behind increasing supplier management and due diligence activities in supply chains.

Supplier Due Diligence

This article was first published on Greenstone.

First, we would like to take the opportunity to thank the Procurious members who took part in this survey. Your input is very much appreciated.

In the current non-financial reporting landscape there is a heightened focus on understanding your supply chain. As a result, organisations are increasingly evaluating the performance of their suppliers against a wide spectrum of non-financial criteria and monitoring the associated risks.

In order to better understand what is driving this behaviour and how companies are identifying and mitigating supply chain risk, Greenstone conducted the ‘State of Supplier Management 2016 survey.

We asked 1000 senior decision makers from mid-to-large organisations about the perception of supply chain risk and due diligence at their organisation. We also asked about the drivers for collecting supplier information and key factors in shaping their supplier engagement programmes.

We have identified five key insights into the state of supplier management from this study. These are listed below and expanded on in this report.

  • Supplier due diligence processes are a growing requirement for most businesses.
  • The majority of businesses are collecting non-financial information from their suppliers at some level.
  • Regulation and reputational risk are the strongest drivers for collecting supplier information and help to shape supplier engagement programmes.
  • Procurement teams are much more likely to be responsible for the collection of supplier data than Sustainability teams.
  • There is a growing trend of companies adopting online solutions to gather and analyse supplier management data.
Supplier Due Diligence

As you might expect, given the increasing global focus on supply chains, more than three quarters of respondents see supply chain risk, and the resultant need for supplier management and due diligence processes, as a growing requirement in their business.

Supplier Management Survey - Fig 1

In line with this perception, 72 per cent of responding companies are already trying to address supply chain risk by collecting non-financial information from their suppliers.

Supplier Management Survey - Fig 2

Data Collection

The necessity to collect non-financial information from suppliers appears to have become accepted across multiple sectors. However, the level of detail, method, and frequency of data collection differs greatly.

It was found that 43 per cent of respondents only collect supplier information as part of a tender process, or in the initial stages of supplier contracting. Therefore, these organisations are not conducting ongoing supplier due diligence. They cannot be sure that suppliers remain compliant throughout the period in which they deliver services.

However, a similar number of organisations do keep track of ongoing supplier performance. 17 per cent are sending out questionnaires by email or post, and 22 per cent are using an online supplier management tool.

Where supplier information is being gathered, there are common topic areas of compliance focus. Environment, health and safety and commercial information (e.g. insurance certification etc.) are the top three areas covered in supplier questionnaires.

However, what the study also shows is that a wide range of information is being requested.  As a result, increasingly diverse areas of both the buyer and supplier organisations are required to engage in the process and have access to the data. 

Supplier Management Survey - Fig 3

Drivers for Supplier Engagement

The research demonstrated that non-financial supplier risk and compliance have become key topics for organisations but what is driving this shift in behaviour?

When asked which factors are driving the collection of supplier information, 43 per cent of all respondents point to regulation and legislation being the strongest motivating force, followed closely by reputational concerns (32 per cent).

Supplier Management Survey - Fig 4

When asked what factors were important in shaping the structure and focus of organisations’ supplier engagement programmes, risk reduction, corporate sustainability, reputational risk and regulation were all sighted as significant motivating forces.

Specific legislative and reporting framework drivers mentioned by respondents included: Bribery Act, the UK Modern Slavery Act, UN Global Compact and ILO Core labour Standards as the top four frameworks or guidelines used to inform their supply chain practices and reporting processes.

Responsibility for Supplier Risk and Compliance

While non-financial reporting has long been the responsibility of CSR or sustainability teams, the increasing momentum of supply chain reporting is engaging new areas of organisation.

This is partly due to the outward looking nature of this issue and the need to engage with multiple supplier organisations. It is also due to the breadth of topics covered by the requests for information.

The study shows 83 per cent of respondents stated that procurement is the area that manages the entire process, from contacting suppliers, through to analysis of the data.

This is most likely due to the fact that procurement ‘own’ the relationships with the suppliers, have a clear idea of contract status and the commercial scale of the contracts and can therefore identify which suppliers meet the buyers defined risk and compliance criteria.

The level of resource allocated to supplier programmes varied significantly with 40 per cent saying that managing this process was the part-time responsibility of a full time employee and 38 per cent saying that multiple individuals in the business have full time responsibility.

What this does show is that there are clearly defined responsibilities within organisations for identifying third party risk and dealing with non-compliance.

Moving Beyond Manual Processes

The complexity and scope of collecting, analysing and reporting supplier information often calls for solutions beyond the manual processes and repository functions of lifeless spreadsheets.

For those organisations that have not yet automated the process, 61 per cent say they are considering adopting an online solution to gather and analyse supplier information.

It is evident organisations recognise the need for automation in the process, as it is not feasible to manually evaluate hundreds or thousands of supplier responses, and monitor their ongoing compliance.

In addition, the increasing legislative and reporting requirements place an additional emphasis on transparency and audit capabilities.

For more on the ‘State of Supplier Management 2016‘, visit the Greenstone website.

Greenstone’s SupplierPortal solution enables buyers to effectively manage supplier risk and compliance through a secure and private online platform. Buyers have the flexibility to distribute standard framework questionnaires, as well as proprietary questionnaires, to their suppliers and can then manage and analyse this information through a comprehensive suite of analytical tools.

The Key Role of Procurement in Risk Mitigation

As average spend with suppliers increases, procurement must be more active with the management of risk mitigation in the supply chain.

Risk Mitigation

Increasingly companies have a higher percentage of their cost base with suppliers, frequently as much as 50-70 per cent. Typically half of this is indirect spend on functions such as Marketing and Human Resources.

It is clear that as the cost spend increases with these suppliers, procurement is playing a key role as a broker and helping to drive the revenue line. However, if the majority of cost base is outside of the company’s walls, this presents a major business risk.

This is particularly alarming in industries such as financial services and pharma, where the regulatory and reputational landscape is complex. How can procurement help with risk mitigation, and also help senior executives have greater confidence that their supply chain is in order?

Mitigation & Segmentation

According to Jon Kirby and Paul Birch, from Business Process Transformation consultancy Genpact, organisations must institute better and more sophisticated risk segmentation, dividing the procurement supplier base into distinct risk tiers.

This does not necessarily mean that the largest suppliers in terms of spend will pose the largest risk. Companies should also be continually re-assessing supplier risk and asking questions, such as:

  • Are any of your suppliers at risk of bankruptcy?
  • Are there any global or geopolitical issues in your supply chain that could disrupt it?
  • Do you have systems and processes in place to regularly evaluate and monitor your most important suppliers?
  • Have you embedded risk evaluation into the on-boarding of new suppliers?

Creating stronger links between the lines of business and the procurement function can also ensure that the risk profile is in line with business priorities.

Procurement’s Role

There are a number of factors procurement professionals can keep an eye on when tasked with supplier risk mitigation. Sandeep Singh, Vice President – Procurement and Supply Chain Services at Genpact, shares his experience across these factors.

  • What are the signs that procurement needs to watch out for when assessing suppliers’ bankruptcy risk?

Assessing the financial health of a supplier should be a critical part of selection, as well as the ongoing relationship management process. Financial failures in today’s economy are not uncommon and can cause disruption to companies business.

Procurement professionals should pay close attention to the following aspects of business when assessing a supplier’s financial condition or bankruptcy risk:

  • Financial information – including profitability or margins; revenue growth; liquidity; negative cash flow.
  • Law suits such as where supplier is being sued for collection matters.
  • Managerial and employee related events such as resignation of key members of management, or abnormal turnover of employees.
  • Poor quality of product or services, or long term order delinquencies.
  • Inability to produce timely and accurate financial information.
  • Delay and penalties due to outstanding tax and statutory issues.
  • Request for special payment arrangements, such as changing terms of shipment to Cash on Delivery, or request for advance payment
  • Declining relationship with their bank or frequent change in their banks.

However, applying various signs and parameters to assess a suppliers financial condition can be a huge challenge for procurement, for the following reasons:

  • Financial assessment needs to be a continuous process, and doing it only during selection process may not be sufficient.
  • How priorities are given (i.e. which supplier to cover and which supplier to exclude).
  • Large supplier base can run into the thousands.
  • Multiple early warning signs and financial parameters.

To overcome the above challenges, leading global companies are leveraging Lean Digital solutions, which combine digital technologies with design thinking. This results in procurement being able to segment their supplier base with minimal effort, and being able to prioritise multiple early warning signs and financial parameters.

The adoption of the Lean Digital approach also provides companies with the ability to conduct ongoing financial risk assessments on their suppliers as opposed to doing it only during the selection process.

So what else can procurement do to assist with risk mitigation in the supply chain? For this you’ll need to come back for the second article in this series.

Genpact offers a number of procurement services that can be tailored to specific client needs, including end-to-end Source to Pay (S2P) services for both direct and indirect materials. Find out more by visiting their website.

Don’t Risk It – Why Your Organisation Needs Supplier Pre-Qualification

Workplace accidents have other costs apart from the tragic loss of human life. They can damage your brand, cost your company millions and, if you’ve failed to mitigate a known risk, could put you behind bars.

Pre-qualification Risk
Cell tower climbing – One of the world’s deadliest jobs

It’s difficult to write about the business consequences of a workplace fatality. It can be hard to see beyond the immediate human tragedy – from shattered families to a saddening waste of life when someone is killed on the job.

But the business consequences do need to be talked about, not only due to the financial impacts, but also because it’s up to big businesses to drive the safety improvements that could one day make workplace fatalities a thing of the past.

Risk Management Expertise

Insurance companies understand this, as do the risk management experts who take a holistic view of the impacts of accidents and fatalities. Angelique Navarro, of supply chain risk management firm Avetta, gives the example of a major telecommunications organisation that suffered eleven fatalities amongst its cell tower climber contractors before it acted to pre-qualify suppliers.

“The human cost was horrific, but the business costs were high as well. There is always significant public anger when preventable deaths occur, and people generally vent their frustration at the provider at the top of the chain – even though the safety lapse may have occurred two or three tiers down the supply chain.

“Cell tower climbers potentially have the deadliest job in the United States, so it’s a prime example of an area where you need to be 100 per cent confident that your suppliers, and their suppliers, are doing the right thing. Since the telecommunications organisation has partnered with us to bring in rigorous pre-qualification, there have been zero fatalities to date.”

Highly Visible Organisations

Navarro’s point about the most visible corporation taking the blame for its suppliers’ errors is borne out by the example of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Public anger – from placard-waving protesters to President Obama himself – was directed almost entirely at the highly-visible oil giant, BP.

We didn’t hear anywhere near as much about the operators actually responsible for the spill, namely oil-field service company Halliburton and offshore drilling contractor Transocean. Almost seven years on, BP is still suffering from the enormous brand damage that this environmental disaster incurred.

“Consumers lose trust and confidence in what your organisation can do for them”, says Navarro. “But brand and reputation damage aren’t the only negative effects. There are huge insurance payouts involved, and of course lost production time and revenue. Knowing that you work with suppliers who are completely qualified mitigates that risk.”

Avetta’s 300+ major clients, such as Coca-Cola, Shell, Verizon and John Deere, tend to come from some of the riskiest industries – oil and gas, chemicals, construction, utilities and energy, telecommunications, transport and manufacturing. This core group of more than 300 clients has approximately 50,000 suppliers over 100 countries – every one of which carriers a degree of risk.

“We vet suppliers and partner them with clients and industries across the globe”, says Navarro. “And the results speak for themselves. We’ve saved a global leader in oil and gas $6 million in one year by managing its health and safety program.

“We’ve reduced the incident rate at a chemical company by 74 per cent, saved lives at a major telecommunications company, conducted 14,000 performance reviews for a well-known construction company, and Avetta is an integral part of a major airline’s recognition as the safest airline in the world.”

Six Steps to Pre-Qualification

While every industry and business model is different, there are six key steps that can be taken to pre-qualify suppliers and reduce your risk profile. Ensure your suppliers have:

  • risk as a top agenda item for their board or senior team
  • the right employees: conduct background checks, ensure rules and regulations are being followed
  • the correct level of insurance protection with up-to-date insurance certificates
  • safety manuals in-hand and accredited training programs in place
  • prequalification for anyone coming on site
  • a consistent level of auditing multiple levels down the supply chain
  • rigorous tracking and data collection.

Navarro comments that risk-savvy procurement professionals work very closely with their organisation’s environmental health and safety teams, who have been in the risk-management space for a long time and can give some valuable advice. It’s important that we share safety learnings across industries as well. “You need to ensure your organisation is competitive”, she says, “but when it comes to safety we’re seeing major organisations come together to share best practice”.

Personal responsibility

There are executives behind bars for not acting to mitigate risks, with members of the C-level now being held personally responsible for fatalities and other accidents. “There’s little defence if you knew about a risk and didn’t act on it, or if you’ve been warned before yet let it happen again”, says Navarro. “When someone goes to work for a company, they have a reasonable expectation that they will come home safely to their family at the end of the day.”

To learn more about Avetta, visit their website. Avetta Founder John Moreland is President of Operation Underground Railroad, a non-profit organisation dedicated to rescuing children around the world who are victims of sex slavery. Click here to learn more.

Risk Mitigation – Hope Like Hell It Doesn’t Happen to You

Organisations can plan and strategise for risk mitigation in their supply chain, but ultimately a lot of it comes down to luck.

Risk mitigation

In the words of one member of The Faculty’s Melbourne Roundtable, “There’s a lot of risk out there – you can mitigate all you like but in the end, you just hope like hell it doesn’t happen to you.”

Risk-experts Aaron Cleavely-Millwood (Market Development Manager – Regulatory, Market and Operational Risk) and Nathan Lynch (Head Regulatory Analyst) of Thomson Reuters, visited the Melbourne and Perth Roundtables to take members through their organisation’s global research findings on risk and disruption.

While the Thomson Reuters research focused on disruption to financial services, Roundtable CPOs drew some key learnings from shared challenges around governance, risk, compliance and regulatory drivers.

The Faculty ran its own snapshot survey among its Roundtable members, providing some interesting comparisons between Thomson Reuters’ global, cross-industry study and our local, procurement-focused findings.

Supply Chain Risks

Thomson Reuters’ top four disruption risks revolved predominantly around price:

  1. Raw material price fluctuation
  2. Currency fluctuation
  3. Market changes
  4. Energy fuel price volatility

The Faculty’s findings revealed that CPOs have a slightly different set of concerns:

  1. Supplier monopolies
  2. Market changes
  3. Climatic or natural disasters
  4. Emerging technologies

Risks and Impacts

Price risk is an obvious and ever-present danger and a key part of strategic planning. Cleavely-Millwood gave the example of the 2015 drought in Russia, which saw the price of wheat rise by 41 per cent, and create a huge impact throughout Europe. Spikes such as this (and of course the drop in oil price) cannot necessarily be forecast, but it is possible to plan for and hedge against these events.

Interestingly, social activism was placed at the bottom of both lists. This is surprising given some of the recent disruptions driven by environmental activism in the Australian coal and coal seam gas industries.

The Thomson Reuters presentation focused on fraud risk. This has been identified as a high area of concern for Australian organisations despite increasing regulation. CPOs have to be continually aware of the risks around supplier, contractor and employee fraud, and have plans in place to minimise the damage when fraud takes place.

Increased regulation is a double-edged sword. It will effectively lower the chance of fraud risk and other potentially damaging issues, but will mean CPOs need to spend more time and resources ensuring compliance.

Roundtable delegates were taken through various major pieces of regulation including the UK Bribery Act, the Australian Senate Review of Bribery Laws, the Dodd-Frank Act, and the upcoming Unfair Contracts Act.

The key takeaway – communicate regularly with your internal legal counsel to ensure you keep track of regulatory change.

Effective Risk Mitigation

Our snapshot survey asked members to nominate the most effective risk mitigation measures, with the following results (1 being the most effective):

  1. Building strong supplier relationships
  2. Creating a risk-aware culture
  3. Improving market intelligence
  4. Improving IT and data analytics
  5. Increased sharing of information

The Faculty’s advice for managing risk:

Due diligence can take place through three levels of risk assessment:

  • Ensure you thoroughly investigate new vendors.
  • Regularly perform risk assessments of existing vendors to check if anything has changed.
  • Ensure you have visibility of your suppliers’ suppliers, and their suppliers, and so on, until you’re confident that there are no major risks several layers down the supply chain.