Tag Archives: supply chain

How To Turn Your Procurement Team Into A Cracking Intelligence-Gathering Organisation

According to Justin Crump, CEO, Sibylline, procurement professionals would be foolish to underestimate the value in becoming more active intelligence-gatherers.

Justin Crump spoke at the Procurious CPO Forum in London, Big Ideas In Action, sponsored by Basware

In his book, Corporate Security Intelligence and Strategic Decision Making,  Justin Crump, CEO Sibylline, addresses the current void of awareness about and study of the corporate security intelligence environment. “The increasing size, scale and sophistication of corporate activities  on the world stage – coupled with increasing legislative attention is driving an increasing focus on the [topic of corporate security], and the traditional gap between “business” (which makes money) and security ( a corporate cost center) is markedly narrowing.

Procurement’s value to an organisation has long been due to it’s position at the interface between the supply-chain and the business itself.  Its external reach offers a unique insight into market trends across the globe.

But is your team sufficiently engaged with the external world to spot these trends and push them  back out to your organisation to ensure that you, the CPO, get a seat at the table.

Justin outlines Sibylline’s five tips to bear in mind for anyone seeking to build out their internal process:

Corporate Intelligence is both an art and a science, and is often misunderstood. It is, perhaps sadly, not the province of dashing secret agents and beautiful women in fast cars; rather it is a process that involves everyone in the organisation, refining the myriad data in the world around us into some sort of meaning. Put simply, intelligence is the process which delivers timely, accurate and relevant insight to decision makers, allowing them to value risk and weigh opportunity effectively for their organisation.

The state of the world at present makes the need for an effective security intelligence process in businesses more important than ever. Drivers include:

  • Legislation – duty of care, safe workplaces, negligence
  • Threat environment – scale and tempo
  • Complexity of supply chains – “just in time”, dependencies
  • Information availability – expanding, data overload
  • Global marketplace – challenges and opportunities

Research has shown that truly resilient organisations not only survive but thrive in this environment. Taking an intelligence-led approach allows for effective and efficient risk management and demonstrates clear value add. After all, if you’re not intelligence-led, then what are you being led by…?

1: Perfect is the Enemy of Good

Intelligence is an imperfect process – inherently, returns are a the function of time and resources. While we equate security forecasting to weather forecasting, the weather does not deceive or lie to you – humans do, whether accidentally or deliberately ! In this uncertain world, everything represents a “best effort” – and you more or less get out what you put in.

 2: Understand what you Care About

Understanding what you care about is at the heart of an effective intelligence function. Faced with a mountain of information, it is answering the “so what” question that matters the most – and clear requirements are the fuel for this. Thorough understanding of the organisation, including its people, its business processes, its strategy and its areas of key exposure, is a key facet of making this all work.

3: Make the Most of People, Processes and Technology

Overcoming the constraints of limited time, imperfect information and strained resources relies on a combination of well-trained people, slick processes and appropriate technology. This helps to generate the best possible results in the time and resources available. All too often companies address only one of this triad, meaning that results are imbalanced and opportunities to provide effective insight are missed.

4: Make an Impact

The best analysis, from the most perfect process, is no good at all if people are not listening. One way to ensure this is to speak to their needs; but sometimes even this is not enough. Presentation is therefore important; what suits your consumer? How much detail do they need, or can they absorb? How much information is too much, or not enough? These are the questions that the practitioner must answer in order to ensure that they make a meaningful impact.

5: Manage Intelligence as a Project

Introducing an intelligence function need not be complex, but needs to be managed as a project and with rigour. As the function begins to build a head of steam, it will start to generate more client interest and greater demands will be made, requiring a steadily evolving approach in order to satisfy expectations. It is therefore best run as a project, within a coherent framework that allows it to grow in a controlled fashion.

We at Sibylline earnestly believe that the best decisions are taken on the basis of intelligence, and an intelligence-led process helps make organisations resilient – allowing them to cope with the challenges of the modern global marketplace. This is a minor investment that returns a great deal, often requiring little more than enforcing things that are already happening within a more effective and disciplined system.

The process of examining yourself and examining the world, within a cohesive framework, gives a stable way to reference what is changing in your environment and therefore highlights both risks and opportunities. Procurement functions in particular are well placed to understand the world and the organisation, and so have a vital part to play in making sense of it all – however crazy the world threatens to get, and well know that there are opportunities amidst the doom, gloom and fake news!

This Little Procurement Pro Went To Market…

How do you know when you should  go to market? ThomasNet discuss strategies for three common sourcing scenarios. 

Strategic sourcing is all about generating a return on investment for every sourcing initiative. However, different sourcing scenarios require different levels of investment – in terms of time, effort and resources. Therefore, it’s important to approach each situation differently as well in order to produce the best results.

Here are three common sourcing scenarios, along with proven advice you can use to ensure an optimal return.

Scenario 1: Reducing Costs With A Strategic Partner

Your current supplier is deeply involved in the design, engineering, and process improvement of your product. You rely on them for the success of your day-to-day operations, and they have invested heavily in technology to ensure the success of your product. However, you are exploring ways to reduce costs.

When your incumbent supplier already acts as a strategic partner, the potential return on investment from pursuing alternate suppliers is significantly reduced. In fact, pursuing alternative suppliers can actually yield greater risk than reward. That’s because the supplier has provided you with capital investments that they have engineered and maintained, and the transition costs are likely to exceed the cost savings opportunities available with an alternate vendor. In addition, your current supplier has a comprehensive understanding of your product design, so they are less threatened by outside competitors who are likely working with imperfect information, and therefore less likely to reduce their pricing.

The Strategy

Rather than pursue alternative suppliers, you should engage the incumbent supplier in direct negotiations. Leverage the value your business brings to their operations; be upfront with your desire improve pricing; and be transparent about your procurement goals. Should negotiations prove unsuccessful, that may be a flag that your supplier is too complacent in the relationship, and alternate options can be explored at that time.

Scenario 2: The Unsolicited Proposal

Before reviewing a purchasing category, you reach out to suppliers within that category to notify them about your initiative. One supplier responds with an unsolicited proposal that reduces costs or otherwise increases value.

As a Supply Chain Project Analyst at Source One, this is a situation I encounter often. After a supplier realizes that their spend is being reviewed or a sourcing initiative is being considered, they attempt to get ahead of the process by offering up a proposal. The proposal typically includes a cost reduction in exchange for a longer contract or additional business.

The Strategy

The supplier is aware that their costs are not market competitive and are adjusting accordingly. However, while it may be tempting to award your existing supplier and reap the savings, it’s better to conduct a full sourcing initiative through an RFP, eAuction, or even an RFQ. At worst, you will have alternative bids to use as leverage with your incumbent supplier. At best, you can save a substantial amount of money. In fact, in my experience, the savings you can realize from alternate suppliers is often greater than the cost reduction proposed by the incumbent.

Scenario 3: Tactical Versus Centralised

Your business has been purchasing tactically in a particular category. The overall market basket is high mix, low volume, with very few recurring purchases to leverage for specialized pricing.

This is a common occurrence in indirect categories such as industrial supplies, industrial hardware, safety supplies, and office supplies. Employee preferences and unique company needs can influence purchasing, and standardization of products is nearly nonexistent.

The Strategy

 In this scenario, the continuation of tactical purchasing may seem like the most appealing option, as prompting a centralized supplier to bid on such an immense market basket would likely result in poor pricing and participation. However, it’s almost always prudent to conduct an RFP. Invite suppliers that can cover all required geographies and product categories. Focus on leveraging the overall value of the market basket to establish discount structures, rather than having suppliers exhaust resources pricing out an extensive product list.

To gauge the potential savings available, examine a random sampling of products and ask suppliers to apply the proposed discounts to those items to compare to your baseline price. If you do eventually move to a centralized account, lean on the supplier to drive product standardization and compliance. This will give you the opportunity to further refine pricing and terms down the line.

Other Strategies


Granted, not all sourcing events will fall into one of these three scenarios. However, there are some principles that can be applied universally:

  • Closely monitor the relationships with current suppliers
  • Don’t be afraid to shake up the status quo if a competitive event can yield cost savings or product improvements
  • Maintain clear and consistent communication between procurement and other departments
  • Above all, remember that the strategic sourcing process does not begin with the identification of an initiative, it thrives on the constant analysis of the current state of purchasing

Jennifer Engel is a Supply Chain Project Analyst at Source One Management Services, responsible for executing strategic sourcing and process improvement initiatives for Fortune 1000 clients.

This article was orginally published on the ThomasNet blog. 

Order Up! 5 Supply Management Capabilities You Can’t Leave Off The Menu

When it comes to supply management, are you managing your customer orders effectively? Dave Food discusses Order Management and five more capabilities you just can’t go without.

Last week, Dave Food talked us through five of the key supply chain capabilities that everyone needs. This week, he’s come up with five more!

From order management to shop floor execution and supply chain visibility, these are the things procurement and supply chain professionals should be on top of.

1. Order Management (OM)

Knowledge and skill necessary to manage the receipt and scheduling of customer orders. An integrated OM system may encompass these modules:

1) Product information (descriptions, attributes, locations, quantities)

2) Inventory available to promise (ATP) and sourcing

3) Vendors, purchasing, and receiving

4) Marketing (catalogues, promotions, pricing)

5) Customers and prospects

6) Order entry and customer service (including returns and refunds)

7) Financial processing (credit cards, billing, payment on account)

8) Order processing (selection, printing, picking, packing, shipping)

2. Shop Floor Execution

This is the area in a manufacturing facility where assembly or production is carried out, either by an automated system or by workers or a combination of both. The shop floor capability may include equipment, inventory and storage areas. You can create customer orders and shop orders for each product manually or import shop orders from an ERP system. When this shop order authorisation is created or received, it contains a specified quantity of the product to be built on the Shop Floor.

Once you define your production work floor processes and rules, the platform to optimise operations can be implemented. Real-time status updates can be provided to your organisation and your customers as they need them. A SF provides an on-demand view of bill of materials, routing details, work instructions, material availability, part and product images and programs, to develop optimal SF processes. These should match your business needs, increase view production work orders at any stage of manufacturing, and rework instructions are sent directly to the factory floor to coordinate processes efficiently and improve customer service.

3. Supply Chain Continuity Planning

This is the process that seeks to optimise Supply Chain strategy, processes, human resources, technology and knowledge. Supply Chain Continuity Planning controls, monitors and evaluates Supply Chain risk, which serves to safeguard against new uncertainties that may emerge affecting profitability. The continuity of the company is vital for the long-term success of the business, in today’s world; all aspects of the functioning of an organisation are vulnerable to disruptions and risks. Supply Chain Continuity Planning controls, monitors and evaluates Supply Chain risk.

4. Supply Chain Visibility

Supply chain visibility (SCV) is defined as the ability of parts, components, or products in transit to be tracked from the manufacturer to their final destination. SCV enables you to perform “what-if” scenarios. Visualising these different scenarios can help you predict issues and problems that may arise, and then plan for them and their solutions.

Visibility allows people in the supply chain to see problems before they occur and take necessary steps to avoid the expense in real time. Visibility also provides insight to make more intelligent decisions early in the order cycle (just in time inventory) and perform more intelligent audits in the distribution centres on inbound shipments. Finally, visibility can also be a major driver increasing throughput in the existing distribution network and thus delaying the need for costly new DCs

5. Supply Chain Network

The collection of physical locations, transportation vehicles and supporting systems through which the products and services firm markets are managed and ultimately delivered; it can be manufacturing plants, storage warehouses, carrier, docks, major distribution centres, ports, intermodal terminals whether owned by a company, suppliers, a transport carrier, a third-party logistics provider, a retail store or an end customer.

Emerging technologies and standards such as the RFID and the GS1 are now making it possible to automate these SCNw in a real time manner making them more efficient. A SCN can be strategically designed in such a way as to reduce the cost of the supply chain. Designing a SCN involves creating a network that incorporates all the facilities, means of production, products, and transportation assets owned by the organisation or those not owned by the organisation but which immediately support the supply chain operations and product flow.

There is no definitive way to design a SCN as the network footprint, the capability and capacity, and product flow—all intertwine and are interdependent. Following on from this, there is also no single optimal SCNw design, in designing the network there is an apparent trade-off between responsiveness, risk tolerance and efficiency.

Dave Food is a supply chain innovator, a passionate educator, a futurist, a trend-watcher, an insightful consultant and a marketing strategist. This article was originally published on LinkedIn.

Gender Diversity: Would You Leave $12 Trillion On The Table?

Anne Tesch is one of those professionals who has facts and figures at her fingertips to back up every point she makes. As she tells Procurious, it’s vital that supply managers have the facts in their possession when pursuing a goal as important as increasing gender diversity.

Why should gender diversity be high on every company’s agenda?  

Where should I start? There’s a vast amount of global research and evidence on the importance of women’s economic empowerment and the benefits of hiring women-owned businesses. To list a few key studies:

  • McKinsey’s Global Institute report found that $12 trillion could be added to the Global GDP by 2025 by advancing women’s equality. Economies most impacted (with GDP gains) would be India (16%), Latin America (14%), China (12%), and Sub-Saharan African (12%);
  • Another McKinsey survey found that 34% of companies said working with women-owned suppliers had increased their profits;
  • Women perform 66% of the world’s work, produce 50% of the food, but earn only 10% of the income, and own very little of the world’s private property;
  • There are approximately 187 million women entrepreneurs worldwide who own between 32% and 39% of all businesses in the formal economy;
  • Women dominate the global marketplace by controlling more than $20 trillion in consumer spending that will rise to $30 trillion in the next decade; and
  • According to research conducted by WEConnect International, women-owned businesses globally earn less than 1% of the money spent on products and services by large corporations and governments.

What are your recommendations for supply managers looking to increase their engagement with women-owned businesses?

1. Know your numbers

Firstly, it’s important to know the percentage of women-owned businesses in your supply arrangements.  Why not do some research and ask suppliers if they are “women-owned” which, by definition, means that they are at least 51% owned, managed and controlled by one or more women. Furthermore, why not consider tracking tier 2 spend, as smart companies will often increase spend with women-owned businesses to win large contracts.

 2. Spread the word

Convince others in your team that working with women-owned suppliers is good for business. A recent McKinsey survey indicated that working with women-owned suppliers increases profits, while the Hackett Group’s research last September shows 99% of diverse suppliers meet buyers’ expectations, with nearly 25% exceeding expectations.

Though improvement to the bottom line is always important, incorporating women-owned businesses in your supply chain also provides an opportunity to grow your customer base, attract and retain talent, and enhance your branding – all while increasing profits and reducing costs.

 3. Network, network, network

Accessing networks of women-owned businesses, even just to participate in RFPs, is a critical success factor but one of the more difficult parts of starting and managing a supplier diversity program.  Engaging with third parties that specialise in connecting buyers with diverse suppliers, such as WEConnect International, can assist this process. Our organisation certifies women-owned businesses through a rigorous, globally accepted process, and provides access to these organisations through our eNetwork.

What are the proven benefits of having more women in your supply chain?

Women influence the vast majority of purchasing decisions globally, but they are significantly underrepresented in global value chains. Even though more than one third of private businesses are owned and controlled by women, on average, women earn only 1 percent of large corporate and government spend globally. Benefits of having more women in your supply chain include:

  • Mirroring your diverse customer and employee base – it’s important to reflect the communities around the globe where you operate, not only with staffing, but also with your supplier base;
  • Supporting your corporate clients – more corporates are growing their tier 2 inclusive sourcing programs and requesting reporting from their prime suppliers;
  • Supporting business growth in new markets;
  • Accessing innovation and securing competitive advantage from new SMEs offering more creative options;
  • Reducing costs through competitive bidding;
  • Accessing local networks and knowledge; and
  • Enhancing the company brand and community engagement by promoting success stories about working with women-owned businesses.

Anne Tesch and other leaders in the profession will be speaking at Quest’s Women in Procurement 2017 event in Melbourne on 26-27 April. Visit Quest Events to download a brochure and find out more.

WEConnect International is a global network that connects women-owned businesses to qualified buyers around the world.

5 Core Supply Chain Capabilities Everyone Needs

What are the supply chain capabilities that everyone needs? Dave Food gets to the core of the issue…

What are some of the key capabilities for supply chain professionals?  When it comes to acing decision-making, cost effectiveness, forecasting, and productivity you can’t go wrong if you’ve nailed these five things.

1. Capacity Planning

CP is essential to determine the optimum utilisation of resources, and plays an important role in the decision-making process. It is a technique used to identify and measure the overall capacity of production. CP is utilised for capital intensive resource like plant, machinery and labour. Capacity planning also helps meet the future requirements of the organisation; it ensures that operating costs are maintained at the minimum-possible level without affecting the quality, and ensures the organisation remains competitive and can achieve its long-term growth plan.

2. Inventory Management & Optimisation

IMO is a top investment priority for manufacturers. It is driven by a set of values which are typically service level and inventory investment. IO is widely known as a way to free-up working capital or cost-effectively increase service levels. IO can:

  • identify all the stages of inventory
  • point out exactly which stock is excess inventory and where it is stored in the supply chain
  • understand which warehouse space can be freed up (and which shouldn’t be)
  • create a series of “what-if” scenarios based on the organisation’s improvement ideas and alternative configurations.

An IO solution should offer opportunities for supply chain professionals to understand the causes of inventory, accept or reject recommendations, and build trust in fact-based decision-making.

3. Demand Management

Demand Management is a planning methodology used to forecast, plan for and manage the demand for products and services. DM has a defined set of processes, capabilities and recommended behaviours for companies that produce all manner of goods and services. DM outcomes are a reflection of policies and programs to influence demand as well as competition and options available to users and consumers.

4. Master Production Scheduling

Scheduling is the process of arranging, controlling and optimising work and workloads in a production process or manufacturing process. Scheduling is used to allocate plant and machinery resources, plan human resources, plan production processes and purchase materials. It is an important tool for manufacturing and engineering, where it can have a major impact on the productivity of a process. In manufacturing, the purpose of scheduling is to minimise the production time and costs by telling a production facility when to make, with which staff, and on which equipment. Production scheduling aims to maximise the efficiency of the operation and reduce costs.

5. Materials Replenishment Planning

Most MRP systems are software-based, but it is possible to conduct MRP by hand as well. In almost all supply chains, materials need to be stored or buffered. This competency involves different steps, considering aspects of the planning environment/conditions about the product and the supplier. The importance of the companies’ goals/motives for materials supply must also be assessed.

MRP uses global demand plans to create a pull-driven replenishment process; this prevents ordering from the supplier when there is excess stock elsewhere in the supply chain.

Dave Food is a supply chain innovator, a passionate educator, a futurist, a trend-watcher, an insightful consultant and a marketing strategist. This article was originally published on LinkedIn.

Standard, Express, or Flying? Why supply managers need to be ready for delivery drones

Flying delivery drones will soon take over the last mile of your supply chain. Have you started planning ahead for a drone-filled future? 

“Alexa, re-order Doritos from Prime Air.”

Blink, and you’d miss it. Amazon purchased 10 seconds of the year’s most expensive advertising space last week to introduce the U.S. Super Bowl audience to two of its latest tech products: Amazon Echo and Amazon Prime.

Disgusted by her partner’s finger-licking, a tech-savvy woman directs her request for a second bag of Doritos to the IoT-enabled smart speaker in front of her television. The speaker (“Alexa”) in turn places an order with Amazon Prime, resulting in a delivery drone making a graceful touchdown in the yard outside.

Meanwhile in the U.K., a Youtube clip featuring former Top Gear presenter Jeremy Clarkson explains the ordering and drone delivery process in much greater detail:

Drone delivery services are swiftly approaching the commercial market, with Amazon taking a clear lead in the development race. In December, Amazon made its first successful go-round in a rural corner of England, where it has been beta-testing. While there’s still a significant weight restriction, the benefits of drone delivery are clear:

  • The 30-minute delivery time is an enormous improvement from the standard 24-48 hour wait customers currently experience when ordering online.
  • Drones can reach a height of 400 feet and fly for 24 kilometres at a stretch. They  avoid traffic and potential obstacles using laser, sonar and other technology.
  • Environmentally, battery-operated drone delivery ticks a lot of boxes as they’ll eventually replace many fuel-burning delivery vehicles currently on the road.
  • Finally, the full autonomy of drone delivery will mean there’ll be very little need for human interference, leading to enormous efficiency gains for delivery companies.

After the successful beta-tests in England, drone confidence is rising in the US, although the Federal Aviation Authority (FAA) has been slow to react. A report from December 2016 claimed the FAA has yet to begin drafting rules around flying drones over populated areas.

Testing, however, is taking place, with examples including UPS making a medical supply drop to an island off the coast of Massachusetts, while Alphabet’s drone delivery initiative (Project Wing) sent a hot dinner to students at Virginia Tech. Both the U.S. Postal Service and Britain’s Royal Mail have expressed keen interest in drone delivery as the cost of traditional delivery methods continue to rise. In Europe, DHL similarly completed a round of drone testing last year.

The process of delivery drones

Using a GPS system, delivery drones can quickly generate the most efficient route and even communicate with each other. Users can use communicate with delivery drones via smart phones, selecting delivery options such as: “Bring it to Me,” “Home,” “Work,” and “My Boat.” Additionally, if the customer relocates, the drones can redirect mid-route.

While apartment buildings are still too complicated for drone routes, doorstep delivery throughout rural and suburban neighbourhoods has been mastered.

Allison Crady, Marketing Specialist at CDF Distributors, has followed the rise of drone deliveries closely. She comments that drone delivery will only be applicable to a limited number of products at first: “Giant screen TVs will still require a typical truck delivery, but drone warehouses are currently ideal for light-weight purchases such as tech gadgets or snacks. As drone weight options increase through future development, their useful applications will extend far beyond simple convenience deliveries.”

What can supply managers do to prepare? 

Regulatory bodies such as the FAA move slowly to make drone deliveries a reality.  Supply managers can take advantage of this delay by planning ahead for a drone-based future. This means reviewing your current delivery arrangements (in-house or outsourced) and measuring:

  • the number of light-weight products currently delivered by truck that could be carried by drone
  • current delivery timeframes versus potential drone delivery speed
  • traditional price structures and operating costs against drone delivery
  • the human workforce required to run a delivery fleet versus autonomous drones
  • your current ability to deliver to difficult/remote locations
  • environmental benefits of taking fuel-burning cars off the road in favour of delivery drones.

In other  procurement news this week…

Huawei announces IoT Partnership with Deutsche Post DHL 

  • Huawei and Deutsche Post DHL Group will collaborate on innovation projects to develop a range of supply chain solutions for customers using industrial-grade Internet of Things hardware and infrastructure.
  • The group  is expected to make its IoT devices and network infrastructure accessible to DHL to assist in incorporating greater sensing and automation capabilities into warehousing, freight, and last-mile delivery services.
  • A  spokesperson from Huawei, Yan Lida, commented, “This partnership opens up an opportunity to improve the efficiency, safety and customer service offered by global supply chains in previously impossible ways, and defines how the Internet of Things will shape the fortunes of the logistics industry in the next few critical years of innovation.”

Read more at Logistics Magazine. 

Remote Australian supply chains cut by flooding

  • Floods in Western Australia closed major road transport routes for three days last week. Meanwhile, rail movement into Perth was delayed for five days.
  • The Newmont Mine in the Tanami desert has been closed for over a month due to the flooding. Delivery company Toll has been issued permits to use the flood-damaged roads to deliver fuel, food and emergency supplies to the community at the mine.
  • Parts of the Stuart Highway and Carpentaria Highway have also been closed. This is  impacting on the movement of heavy trucks in the region.

Read more at Fully Loaded. 

Should Procurement Pros Be Concerned About Global Trade?

Renowned economist and Big Ideas Speaker Dr Linda Yueh explains why CPOs needn’t panic about the President Trump administration but there are causes of concern. 

Register as an online delegate for the London Big Ideas Summit 2017 here.

Donald Trump made good on a campaign promise on the first day of his presidency by signing an executive order indicating the United States won’t ratify the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) trade deal.

Though expected, the move caused a media storm and a flurry of responses from politicians and businesses all around the globe. But what does this mean for supply managers?

Many CPOs are understandably nervous about the Trump administration’s policies with regards to global trade. The resurgence of protectionism in the U.S., coupled with the continuing fallout and trade effects of Brexit, has left many procurement professionals wondering which region of the world they should plan to source from in the future.

The TPP was a massive free-trade agreement advocated by the Obama administration, aimed at deepening economic ties between the U.S. and 11 other Pacific Rim nations, cutting taxes, and fostering trade to boost economic growth in the process. Trump argued on the campaign trail that the agreement would be harmful to the U.S. manufacturing sector. As he signed the withdrawal order, he called it “a great thing for the American worker”.

Economist, broadcaster, author and Big Ideas Summit guest speaker Dr. Linda Yueh’s message to CPOs is one of caution but it’s not time to panic.

Don’t panic

According to Linda, there are three reasons not to panic about what Trump’s protectionist tendencies will mean for procurement, trade, and global supply chains.

  • We need to keep in mind that trade takes place under WTO rules. China is the U.S.’s biggest trading partner, despite no free trade agreement being in place. Of course, if Trump were to pull out of the WTO, then that would be a game changer. But, globalisation, especially e-commerce and the Internet linking markets and people, will mean that trade is likely to continue across borders as it’s hard to see a significant roll-back Costs of trade, of course, are another issue to be focused on.
  • Luckily, the Trump administration hasn’t honed in on e-commerce, which is good news for procurement and supply chains. Currently, one in ten transactions are already undertaken via e-commerce, and this figure will continue to grow.
  • Trump may have moved quickly to sign the TPP withdrawal order on his first day in office, but that wasn’t a formal agreement. Extricating the United States from NAFTA for instance will require renegotiation time and then a period of notice before that free trade agreement would end. Even then, most trade agreements include implementation periods, so a “cliff edge” is unlikely which gives businesses time to plan. Therefore, there’s no need to panic or overhaul your supply chain immediately. But, of course, forward planning and following economic policies would be wise. Also, take Brexit as an example – if Britain succeeds in triggering Article 50 in March 2017, then the UK is scheduled to leave the EU by the end of March 2019 – almost three full years after the people’s vote. And even there, the Prime Minister has indicated that there may be an implementation period to allow more time for businesses to adjust to leaving the Single Market.

Things to watch

So, Linda warns that supply managers should keep an eye on certain factors as global trade adjusts to these seismic political shifts.

1) U.S. border taxes – recently, Trump threatened BMW with a 35 per cent border tax on foreign-built cars imported to the U.S. market. This isn’t an isolated incident and American companies are under even more pressure to produce in the U.S.. Congress is also considering a similar tax, so that is worth bearing in mind as that would have the force of legislation.

2) U.K. Tariffs – one of the consequences of a “hard” Brexit where the UK leaves the EU without any preferential trade deal, which would include no agreement on the Single Market, Customs Union, is the re-emergence of customs for EU trade. Right now, significant customs procedures only apply to non-EU shipments. But, with around half of UK exports going to the EU, taking leave of Britain’s membership in the EU with no deal would means the end of free movement of goods. More customs declarations and duties would raise costs, slow down supply chains and certainly add time at border checks. A potential ‘hard border’ would be a particular issue for Ireland.

3) Resourcing Brexit – the UK Government also needs to think about the resourcing challenges involved in ramping up staff as well as IT systems to cope with the doubling of customs checks on the UK border.

4) NAFTA – As mentioned earlier, Trump has also flagged that the North American Free Trade Agreement (between Canada, Mexico and the U.S.) is up for renegotiation. If you’re a U.S. company, you need to start making plans now about how these changes will affect you. The same applies to any other of America’s free trade deals with 20 countries that Trump would have the authority to re-examine.

What about China?

Globalisation has helped China become a manufacturing powerhouse, but with numerous closed markets.

However, there are very good reasons to continue to do business with China. Wages may be rising but that helps businesses to think about China as a market as well as one production locale in a supply chain. Plus, with growing protectionism in America, China’s President has signalled that China may take more of a lead in globalisation. There’s a lot to watch for.

In short, Linda’s advice to CPOs around the world is keep calm, but keep an eye on the details as the globalisation landscape is shifting significantly. Global trade won’t end tomorrow but it will likely look rather different in the coming years.

Join the conversation and register as a digital delegate for Big Ideas 2017 in London.

Resistance Is Futile, Disruption Is Coming!

Massive changes are coming to procurement pros, whether they like it or not! Is it high time we started embracing, instead of resisting, them?

Mark Stevenson is one man who understands the key trends heading our way. An expert on global trends and innovation, he will be setting the scene with our opening keynote at the Big Ideas Summit 2017 in London.  We caught up with Mark ahead of the event to get to know him a little better!

Tell us a bit about yourself?

I’m an entrepreneur, an author, an occasional comedy writer, a musician, and, as some people like to define me, a futurologist, but I’m not at all keen on that particular term.

What don’t you like about the term Futurologist?

I think it’s a fairly dodgy profession overall if I’m honest. There are no qualifications required and it’s often associated with prediction and, of course, you can’t really predict the future, you can only make it. Also people who identify themselves as future-experts are as apt to be shaped by the culture in which they are embedded or dogged by their own prejudices and wish-lists as the rest of us, and tend to predict accordingly. For instance many futurologists are overly tech focused. My work is more about the questions the future asks us about the interplay of technology, economics, society and politics. My job is to help people and organisations to ask the right questions about the future and then convince them to answer those questions in a way that makes the world more sustainable, humane, compassionate and just.

 What are the key challenges procurement and supply chains face in the next decade?

Supply chain issues are hugely important at the moment and supply chain professionals are having a lot of questions asked of them.

The first challenge to overcome is achieving greater supply chain transparency. Plenty of procurement professionals, particularly in larger organisations, have no clue where they are actually buying from. When the Rana Plaza building in Bangladesh collapsed in 2013 killing over 1,000 factory workers, many high-street brands were called out and, it materialised, ignorant of their involvement. Tragedies like this have forced high street companies to better audit their supply chains but there’s still a long way to go.

Secondly, organisations need to make their supply chains more sustainable by adopting science-based targets – addressing agricultural sustainability and reducing carbon emissions to give a couple of examples.

You’ve often advocated science-based targets in the past. Could you explain the concept in more detail? How could procurement apply these targets?

Science-based targets are a really simple idea and a very good way to think about sustainability. When it comes to dealing with environmental sustainability companies tend to say ‘this is what we can do, this is what we’re aiming for’ but, in reality, it doesn’t mean a whole lot when a multinational organisation vows to reduce its carbon emissions by 10% by the year 2034! That’s a recipe for planetary disaster.

Instead, organisations must figure out what they have to do based on scientific facts. The Science Based Targets campaign (a partnership between

Carbon Disclosuse Project, UN Global Compact, World Resources Institute and WWF) helps companies determine how much they must cut emissions to prevent the worst impacts of climate change. Coca- Cola, Walmart and HP signed up to this and if they can do it, anyone can.

And, by saving the world you’re also saving your business. Companies who take this stuff seriously will out-perform because they’ll become more efficient and they’ll attract the most forward-thinking, young talent who want to work for companies of which they are unashamed.

In your experience, how open are organisations to new technology trends?

Not very! Organisations tend to be comfortable operating as they always have done.

Upton Sinclair put it well: ‘It is difficult to get a man to understand something when his salary depends on his not understanding it.’ Take Blockchain, it could take away the untrustworthy parts of banking: bankers, who will naturally resist this particular technology!

Another example is driverless tech- it doesn’t take an expert to predict that the 3.5 million US truck drivers would be wary of such an advancement – and rightly so. So we have to find a transition plan for them – which culture resists. But it’s a business responsibility to prepare for the changes and approaching transitions, you have a duty of care to your employees and not being future-literate is a dereliction of that duty. Remember, Blockbuster, the DVD rental company went bust the same week that Netflix released House of Cards.

If you had one key message for our delegates at Big Ideas, what would it be?

Wherever you work and wherever you end up in the next 15-20 years, remember that it’s going to be a very turbulent time. Massive disruption lies ahead and the bad news is that our current institutions and businesses are unfit for purpose. Ask yourself: what’s my best effort for myself, my family and for society (and remember they’re all related). If you don’t, you can prepare to be very irrelevant and very unhappy!

Join the conversation and register as a digital delegate for Big Ideas 2017

Why “Free Help” With Buying Decisions Costs More

As consumers, we’re wary of so-called “free” products and services as there’s always a hidden cost. Why, then, are procurement teams willing to accept free help with supplier selection?

Businesses often seek help with their buying decisions, especially in complicated categories such as telco or energy. Preparing an RFP requires a willingness to trudge through data swamps, while analysing supplier responses requires more than a strong coffee to do properly.

When a third-party broker says that they’ll help – for free – the temptation is to say yes, if only to avoid data swamps and caffeine addiction. However, you need to keep in mind that the people who help “for free” are still going to get paid, just not directly by you. They’ll collect their pay from your suppliers who are willing to pay a commission to get the opportunity to service your organisation. In turn, those suppliers recover commissions from their customers (you), either as a line item on the bill or through higher prices. In the end, you’re still paying for the service, just not up-front.

For large businesses with lots of cost centres, this can be a good way to share the cost of getting help. Branch stores pay their bills and, without realising it, pay for the help you received through higher prices. Procurement managers who use this approach can look like heroes because they claim savings and a successful outcome without having to win broad company endorsement for using expensive 3rd-party assistance.

Selecting suppliers for the wrong reasons

The danger of commission payments is that different suppliers pay different amounts. Some commissions contain a ratchet mechanism with longer contract terms, while higher contract values generate higher commissions.

Unfortunately, brokers who offer their services for free are incentivised to select the suppliers who pay them the most, rather than those who deliver the greatest value to the customer. The usual outcome is long-dated contracts with a single source supplier. At least the billing is easy, but your business will end up paying more in the long-term due to lack of value.

Up-front payments

Paying brokers up-front changes their incentives. Instead of focusing on supplier commissions, they now focus on demonstrating their value to you in a bid to win further business from your organisation. “Brokers” go upmarket and call themselves “consultants”, working harder to realise the greatest-possible savings and service levels. Customer and consultant incentives align.

The positive consequences of fee-for-service payments are shorter contract terms and more suppliers. Shorter contracts reflect a balance between testing market prices with the logistics of changing suppliers. Having more suppliers means you are able to split your requirements across the lowest priced suppliers to get the best possible price for your portfolio of demand, rather than being herded toward a single-source supplier.

“Free” services in IT

For software companies, “free” represents a gateway product, or a way of demonstrating the value of a software product to the customer. It means the software provider doesn’t have to employ a slick-suited sales person and can scale the work of their t-shirt clad developers. Salesforce, one of the leading dealers of enterprise SaaS, costs their customers on average $45,000 per annum. The entry level CRM package is $5 per user but customers quickly pay more to satisfy their needs, getting more value from the base CRM product as they buy additional features and capability.

Our approach at Kansoly is the same. We’re a cloud-based telco procurement platform for businesses running RFPs and reverse auctions. Our base product is free, where we offer to run a telco RFP for you for nothing. What’s in it for us? We gain customer insights and supplier engagement, both vital for making our product better and delivering more value to our larger, fee-paying customers. Our free customers get competition for their services and cost analysis that they would otherwise have to invest in.

Brokers and consultants have always been part of the procurement landscape, but their incentives are defined by the way they’re paid. However, the development of Saas procurement platforms increasingly means that free offers aren’t always related to low-value outcomes.

Bruce Macfarlane is the founder of Kansoly, a telco procurement platform for business. Kansoly runs RFPs and reverse auctions for data, mobile, or fixed line.

How one tweet from Elon Musk wiped $580 million from Samsung SDI

More than half a billion dollars was wiped from Samsung SDI’s market capitalisation this week in response to a single tweet from Elon Musk about Tesla’s supply chain. 

Musk

Rumours were swirling earlier this week about Tesla’s supply chain for its lithium-ion battery packs. Investors believed that the official supplier, Panasonic, may not be able to produce enough batteries for the much-anticipated Model 3, and that Samsung SDI (Samsung’s battery and display division) would be brought in to meet production targets.

Elon Musk set the record straight on Tuesday with the following tweet, clarifying that the arrangement with Panasonic is exclusive.

Musk

The effect of Musk’s tweet was immense – Samsung SDI’s shares plummeted by US$580 million (or 8%) on Wednesday, while Panasonic added $800 million to its market value on the same day.

Tesla’s Model 3 is slated to be a comparably affordable electric car with a range of at least 215 miles (346 km) per charge. At $35,000, it’s Tesla’s first step away from the luxury space into a price range affordable by mid-level buyers. It’s expected to be an enormous success, leading to significant interest from investors who follow Tesla news very closely indeed. This has led to a situation where a single tweet from Musk can cause huge disruptions in the share market, comparable to the shockwaves caused when Apple makes announcements about its supply chain.

A similar situation occurred in April when shares for Taiwan’s Hota Industrial Manufacturing, Tesla’s sole supplier of gearboxes, plunged rapidly as news broke that Tesla may be looking for a second supply source.

Stock market shocks are compounded by Wall Street firms’ usage of high-frequency trading, where computers use algorithms to comb through the internet to read news items (including tweets), executing thousands or millions of small trades per second based on that information.

Gizmodo’s Matt Novak has observed that if Musk’s Twitter account has so much power, the consequences of a hacking could be disastrous. “We hope he has a strong password and two-factor authentication turned on … If Musk ever got hacked, it could send markets into a minor tailspin.” Novak gave the example of a fake tweet that caused a $130 billion stock market crash in 2013, when hackers used the Associated Press Twitter account to announce that Barack Obama had been injured in an explosion at the White House.

Musk has a longstanding partnership with Panasonic, which invested $30 million in Tesla in 2010. This investment is now estimated to be worth more than $300 million, and Panasonic holds a supply agreement for 1.8 billion cells through to 2017 for Tesla’s luxury Models S and X. Panasonic is also playing a significant role in Tesla’s Gigafactory in Nevada, which will supply 500,000 Tesla cars per year with lithium-ion battery packs by 2020.

Tesla has since tweeted that Samsung may still be involved in making Tesla Energy products, namely its Powerwall and Powerpacks (stationary batteries used in homes). 

We’ve been keeping track of the major stories making the procurement and supply chain news this week…

Amazon’s massive investment in logistics

  • Amazon continues to make aggressive capital investments, with some observers claiming the company is positioning itself to take over the last mile of delivery from UPS, FedEx and the U.S. Postal Service.
  • Recently, Amazon purchased an air cargo network previously owned by DHL, purchased thousands of 53-foot trailers, and is leasing 20 Boeing 767s at a cost of $300,000 per month.
  • The organisation has built over 100 global fulfilment centres between 2009 and 2016, with 125 million square feet of global warehousing. The warehouses themselves contain 30,000 Kiva Robots (acquired by Amazon for $775 million).
  • Amazon’s founder and CEO Jeff Bezos said his company’s goal is to “heavily supplement and support”, rather than take over, peak season fulfilment.

Read more: https://logisticsviewpoints.com/2016/06/06/does-amazon-have-a-first-mover-advantage-in-logistics/

 World Bank to launch modernised procurement framework

  • The World Bank will launch a new procurement policy on July 1, 2016, modernising an outdated framework that has remained unchanged for decades.
  • Moving away from a rules-based procurement system to one that focuses on performance and achieving development goals, the new framework allows for much greater flexibility.
  • Changes in the new framework include a sharper focus on achieving value-for-money, an increased number of procurement methods and approaches, greater streamlining, more attention to contract management, and enhanced support for borrowers in low-capacity environments.

Read more: http://blogs.worldbank.org/governance/imminent-transformation-world-bank-s-procurement-framework

 Johnson & Johnson: Controls need to be in place when buying digital ad placements

  • Johnson & Johnson was recently alerted by shocked customers that one of their baby product ads was played before a video about paedophilia, leading senior digital marketing strategic Louisa Thraves to comment that more responsibility needs to be taken. The issue is caused by automated keyword matching, such as “baby” or “children”, and can be remedied by creating a watch-list of topics to avoid being paired with.
  • Thraves used cold and flu remedy Codrol as an example of a brand that could be damaged by erroneous media placements, which she said could never be associated with alcohol in an advertising environment.
  • Marketing procurement professionals must ensure they know where and when digital ads will be played, and what other content they will be associated with.

Read more: https://mumbrella.com.au/jj-marketer-says-clients-need-take-responsibility-brand-safety-series-shocking-ad-placements-372929