Tag Archives: sustainable procurement

Save The Planet With Garbage-Powered Trucks And Edible Water Bottles

Earth Day is about more than switching off the overhead lights – it’s about making purchasing decisions that will minimise our impact on the environment. From eerily-silent zero-emission trucks to seaweed-membrane edible water bottles, these are just some of the products that should be on the radar of every innovation scout.  

Modernise your fleet with hydrogen-fuelled, electric or biomethane trucks

Although the petroleum industry is grudgingly beginning to recognise that an increasing number of car drivers will hang up the fuel bowser (gas pump) for the last time within the next decade, there’s still a sticking-point when it comes to heavy vehicles.

“Sure, you can move a car with an electric battery, but an 18-wheeler truck is always going to need diesel.”

Wrong. Alternatives are already available for zero or low-emission trucks that match, or even beat, the performance of a diesel-fuelled truck.

Toyota’s hydrogen fuel-celled semitrailers

The Ports of Los Angles and Long Beach took delivery of a zero-emission, 670 horsepower 18-wheeler earlier this month. The hydrogen-fuelled truck is completely silent and emits only water from its tailpipe.

The twin ports are a major source of pollution in the region, due in part to an estimated 19,000 cargo containers moving through daily, carrying $450 billion worth of goods annually. If the test is successful, thousands of conventional trucks could potentially be replaced by hydrogen-fuelled trucks.

Toyota is yet to announce a price for the truck but have predicted it will be competitive with new, diesel-powered trucks when it hits the market. Mileage looks good, with a range of 200 miles on one 20-minute charge. The fuel-cell stacks can be fed water, natural gas or a variety of waste products, with one Toyota spokesperson telling the press that abundant hydrogen can be reclaimed from landfill waste.

Tesla’s all-electric semi-trailer

Mystery surrounds Tesla’s much-anticipated electric semi-trailer, with most reports centred around a tweet from Elon Musk announcing that the truck will be unveiled in September 2017, and that it is “seriously next-level”.

Musk has also confirmed that the semi-trailer will be followed by a ute (pick-up truck) within 18-24 months, and has suggested that Tesla should also enter the bus and heavy-duty truck markets.

The company has yet to share details about how large the battery itself would be or how the truck would overcome range limitations, but commentators from Morgan Stanley have predicted that the truck would be “relatively short-range” (200-300 miles), and use Tesla’s charging stations to quickly swap the batteries for charged ones (a 5-minute process) and get the vehicles back on the road.

Waitrose’s rotten food-powered trucks

Waitrose has partnered with bio-fuel company CNG Fuels to place an order for 10 flatbed trucks that will be powered entirely by rotten food, sourced from unsold food at supermarkets across the UK.

This investment ticks two boxes for Waitrose’s sustainability targets – lowering carbon dioxide emissions, while addressing food waste. Globally, an estimated one-third of all food, or 1.3 billion metric tons of produce – goes to waste every year. The new biomethane trucks have an average range of nearly 500 miles, with the biofuel to cost 40% less than diesel fuel. The biomethane emits 70% less carbon dioxide than diesel.

The next challenge? Lifting a commercial airliner off the ground with rotting vegetables. It may seem unthinkable today, but so was the technology that’s now enabling zero-emission semi-trailers.

Procuring for an event? Try edible water bottles

With an estimated 100 million plastic water bottles being trashed globally every single day, there will soon be more plastic than fish in the ocean. That’s why it’s vital that a solution is found to stem the (literal) tide of plastic.

A start-up called Skipping Rocks Lab has created a product that won’t completely replace plastic bottles, but could potentially make a big dent in their consumption.

“Ooho!” edible water spheres are created by dipping frozen balls of liquid into an algae mixture (seaweed), forming a watertight membrane around the water, which then melts inside. To consume the liquid you simply bite into the membrane (apparently tasteless) and sip it out, or just eat the entire ball.

The spheres generate 5x less carbon dioxide and require 9x less energy to make than a conventional PET (plastic) water bottle. But here’s the catch – they’re perishable. The product has been compared to fruit, with a shelf-life of just a few days. Try keeping one of these in your pantry for a week and you’ll find that it has dissolved into a puddle. However, Ooho would be perfect for events where bottles are bought in bulk and distributed to enormous groups of people, only to be trashed in huge numbers during or immediately after the event – think music festivals, marathons and conferences.

In other news this week:

New study finds that Brexit fears are impacting growth for 80% of UK businesses

  • eProcurement provider Wax Digital has surveyed 200 UK business on the impact of Brexit, finding that 4 out 5 business fear it will hinder their growth. 79% also stated their growth is being hindered by suppliers being unprepared for growth amidst Brexit.
  • 37% said that Brexit will restrict their ability to do business in Europe and 35% said that it will make EU business more costly and complex. 26% expect to reduce their business operations on the continent and 24% will look at alternative international opportunities. Interestingly, 65% of surveyed UK business leaders voted “remain” and would still do so today.
  • The survey also explored perceptions of the Trump Presidency, with 82% saying that a ‘business mogul’ type figure in the White House is positive, and 40% expecting Trump to improve UK to US business opportunities.

20400 Reasons The World Needs An International Standard For Sustainable Procurement

ISO20400, otherwise known as the International Standard for Sustainable Procurement, is due to be published this month. Procurious recently interviewed Jean-Louis Haie, sustainable procurement expert, head of the Australian delegation for ISO20400, and guest speaker at the upcoming Women in Procurement 2017 conference in Melbourne.

“We are at a tipping point in terms of the sustainable procurement journey across the globe”, says Jean-Louis Haie. “Organisations spend between 40 per cent and 80 per cent of their revenue on the supply chain, but increasingly recognise that they can’t achieve their sustainability objectives without getting their suppliers to actively contribute.”

“CPOs who are serious about sustainability goals know that around half of those objectives can only be delivered by their suppliers. There’s no such thing as an effective sustainability program without a supply chain component.”

By nature, supply chains are international, which is why having an international standard is vital. “When you’re asking a supplier based in China to align with your business’ or your country’s standards, they simply don’t have the same standards and don’t speak the same language around sustainability. ISO20400 seeks to create a standard that will enable every organisation in the world, regardless of size, industry and location, to have a flexible guidance framework on sustainable procurement.”

Learning from France’s sustainable procurement bible

Jean-Louis says that it depends on the industry and the area of sustainability under discussion, but in general, governments around the world can learn from his home country (France) when it comes to implementing sustainable procurement. Three key milestones took place – in 2006, 2010 and 2012 – that illustrate France’s journey towards a national sustainable procurement standard.

“The first thing I would mention is that France has a National Procurement Code – a “bible” for procurement professionals that’s applied to all public procurement tasks. In 2006 they changed the Code to include some clear objectives and principles around sustainable procurement. This caused a lot of change, as governments, councils, public hospitals, water corporations etc were encouraged to look at environmental and social specifications when making purchasing decisions. The private sector followed to a certain extent. The point is that it’s a national Code, and highly centralised. I now live in Australia, and we don’t really have that here – the federal government, state governments and local councils are all pretty autonomous.”

In 2010, the ObsAR, a National Association for Sustainable Procurement was created in France in reaction to a crying need to share knowledge and experience around this important topic. “It’s a platform for public and private organisations to share lessons learned around sustainable procurement, through working groups, an annual conference, and ongoing discussions.

At the same time, the government started to get involved in making sure the big buying organisations (including private companies) manage their supply relationships with SMEs fairly. It created a Charter for Responsible Supplier Relationships, which described 10 commitments to be respected by signatory organisations. This initiative was a success and thousands of organisations follow its principles now. 2 years later, the Government transformed this Charter into a certification scheme, which was tested on a selection of 30 organisations, including some SMEs, multinational companies and government agencies.”

“The certification program includes fair payment terms, fair contractual clauses, checks on abuse of power, inclusion of social and environmental requirements, and more.”

While France’s sustainability journey is encouraging, Jean-Louis notes that supply chains are international. “These are international companies dealing with an international supply chain in a global economy”, he says. “No matter how rigorous the standards are in one country, the system can’t work unless there’s a similar standard in the country you’re sourcing from – hence the need for an international standard.”

What does ISO20400 include?

The Standard includes seven core subjects, such as the environment, fair operating practices, labour issues and human rights, with a range of subtopics under those, such as discrimination and gender inequality. “It provides the reader with a thorough description of all the potential sustainability issues and risks they may face when they want to put in place a contract and buy something. Then it’s the responsibility of the procurement professional to decide what the hot spots (risks) are for their particular procurement activity, using ISO20400 as a framework. The Standard provides a methodology to set priorities. What it doesn’t do is put more weight on any one subject over another – we’re not telling people that human rights are more important than the environment, for example.”

Bringing procurement and sustainability expertise together

“In my experience, procurement professionals struggle to work with sustainability experts. They should be best friends”, say Jean-Louis. “The trouble is that there’s no framework to enable these two groups of experts to speak the same language and work more effectively together. ISO20400 will provide a framework – or a bridge – to channel the discussion in plain English so they can understand each other.”

“For example, most companies have some sort of sustainable procurement code in place, which puts pressure on suppliers to comply. But they forget that a good many of these sustainability impacts are created by bad procurement practices. Look at the fashion industry, for example – impossible deadlines put pressure on suppliers, which causes them to abandon key guidelines such as working safely and not using child labour”.

Jean-Louis Haie is the founder of Planet Procurement and a guest speaker at Quest’s upcoming Women in Procurement 2017 conference in Melbourne, Australia.

Resistance Is Futile, Disruption Is Coming!

Massive changes are coming to procurement pros, whether they like it or not! Is it high time we started embracing, instead of resisting, them?

Mark Stevenson is one man who understands the key trends heading our way. An expert on global trends and innovation, he will be setting the scene with our opening keynote at the Big Ideas Summit 2017 in London.  We caught up with Mark ahead of the event to get to know him a little better!

Tell us a bit about yourself?

I’m an entrepreneur, an author, an occasional comedy writer, a musician, and, as some people like to define me, a futurologist, but I’m not at all keen on that particular term.

What don’t you like about the term Futurologist?

I think it’s a fairly dodgy profession overall if I’m honest. There are no qualifications required and it’s often associated with prediction and, of course, you can’t really predict the future, you can only make it. Also people who identify themselves as future-experts are as apt to be shaped by the culture in which they are embedded or dogged by their own prejudices and wish-lists as the rest of us, and tend to predict accordingly. For instance many futurologists are overly tech focused. My work is more about the questions the future asks us about the interplay of technology, economics, society and politics. My job is to help people and organisations to ask the right questions about the future and then convince them to answer those questions in a way that makes the world more sustainable, humane, compassionate and just.

 What are the key challenges procurement and supply chains face in the next decade?

Supply chain issues are hugely important at the moment and supply chain professionals are having a lot of questions asked of them.

The first challenge to overcome is achieving greater supply chain transparency. Plenty of procurement professionals, particularly in larger organisations, have no clue where they are actually buying from. When the Rana Plaza building in Bangladesh collapsed in 2013 killing over 1,000 factory workers, many high-street brands were called out and, it materialised, ignorant of their involvement. Tragedies like this have forced high street companies to better audit their supply chains but there’s still a long way to go.

Secondly, organisations need to make their supply chains more sustainable by adopting science-based targets – addressing agricultural sustainability and reducing carbon emissions to give a couple of examples.

You’ve often advocated science-based targets in the past. Could you explain the concept in more detail? How could procurement apply these targets?

Science-based targets are a really simple idea and a very good way to think about sustainability. When it comes to dealing with environmental sustainability companies tend to say ‘this is what we can do, this is what we’re aiming for’ but, in reality, it doesn’t mean a whole lot when a multinational organisation vows to reduce its carbon emissions by 10% by the year 2034! That’s a recipe for planetary disaster.

Instead, organisations must figure out what they have to do based on scientific facts. The Science Based Targets campaign (a partnership between

Carbon Disclosuse Project, UN Global Compact, World Resources Institute and WWF) helps companies determine how much they must cut emissions to prevent the worst impacts of climate change. Coca- Cola, Walmart and HP signed up to this and if they can do it, anyone can.

And, by saving the world you’re also saving your business. Companies who take this stuff seriously will out-perform because they’ll become more efficient and they’ll attract the most forward-thinking, young talent who want to work for companies of which they are unashamed.

In your experience, how open are organisations to new technology trends?

Not very! Organisations tend to be comfortable operating as they always have done.

Upton Sinclair put it well: ‘It is difficult to get a man to understand something when his salary depends on his not understanding it.’ Take Blockchain, it could take away the untrustworthy parts of banking: bankers, who will naturally resist this particular technology!

Another example is driverless tech- it doesn’t take an expert to predict that the 3.5 million US truck drivers would be wary of such an advancement – and rightly so. So we have to find a transition plan for them – which culture resists. But it’s a business responsibility to prepare for the changes and approaching transitions, you have a duty of care to your employees and not being future-literate is a dereliction of that duty. Remember, Blockbuster, the DVD rental company went bust the same week that Netflix released House of Cards.

If you had one key message for our delegates at Big Ideas, what would it be?

Wherever you work and wherever you end up in the next 15-20 years, remember that it’s going to be a very turbulent time. Massive disruption lies ahead and the bad news is that our current institutions and businesses are unfit for purpose. Ask yourself: what’s my best effort for myself, my family and for society (and remember they’re all related). If you don’t, you can prepare to be very irrelevant and very unhappy!

Join the conversation and register as a digital delegate for Big Ideas 2017

Fasten Your Seatbelts: You’re Going Global!

The Big Ideas Summit, powered by Procurious, is embarking on a world tour. And you’re all invited! 

Register as an online delegate for The Big Ideas Summit in London here.

Fasten your seatbelt, fold away your tray table and return your seat to the upright position – we’re taking you and your procurement career on an epic journey!

Funding might be tight and you can’t even remember the last time you had a spare second to give to your career development but, in 2017, everything changes!

Procurious will be bringing you the best in procurement thinking from our events around the world. And the best news? You’ll be able to access all of the content for free and at your leisure; whether it’s from your desk, on the go or in the comfort of your own home.

19,000 Procurious Members On Tour

For the past two years, Procurious has hosted The Big Ideas Summit, the world’s first digitally-led procurement event, in London.

The event has earned a global reputation as the most innovative leadership event for the procurement profession and 2017 promises to be just as exciting and thought provoking as we officially go global!

This year, we’ll be taking you around the globe with events taking place in London, Singapore, Sydney, Chicago and Dubai.

Wherever you are in the world you can fully participate for free by registering for each individual event as a digital delegate. You’ll be joining a community of 19,000+ procurement professionals, from 140+ countries, on Procurious to connect, learn, discuss and innovate together.

What is the Big Ideas Summit?

The Big Ideas Summit is an interactive, online event where up to 50 senior executives, industry thought-leaders and CPOs come together to connect with digital delegates from across the globe via our social media platform to discuss and test strategies and solutions for real world change.

2017 looks set to be a huge year for procurement thanks to rapid technology developments including advancements in cognitive tech and Industry 4.0. Surely there’s no better time to expand The Big Ideas Summit by sourcing ideas from top thought leaders not just in London, but around the world.

The procurement function must adapt and evolve to accommodate these technology changes and be ready to embrace what we’re calling Procurement 4.0. The question is: Are We There Yet?

The Flights Are Booked! Where Are We Going?

The Big Ideas Summit, London – 23rd February 2017 

Procurement 4.0: Are We There Yet?

We’ve got a jam packed agenda lined up for the primary event of the year. Our speakers will include:

  • John Macfarlane: Chairman, Barclay’s PLC
  • Linda Yueh: Fellow in economics, Oxford University,  Adjunct Professor of Economics at London Business School
  • James Bannerman: Creative Change Agent, Author of Genius
  • Mark Stevenson: Futurist, Author of An Optimist’s Tour of the Future

Nexus, Singapore – 30th March 2017

Navigating Procurement’s interface between cost and risk. Singapore’s NEXUS event will focus on managing the critical interface between growth and cost.

Pivot, Sydney – 17- 18th May 2017

Asia-Pacific CPO forum. Disrupting a decade of Big Ideas in Procurement.

Scrum, Chicago – 28th September 2017

A Procurement & Supply Chain Technology Sprint. Chicago’s SCRUM TM event will focus on the way technology is disrupting the workforce and reimagining how procurement value is delivered.

Reboot, Dubai – 23rd November 2017

Designing the Procurement 4.0 Workforce. Dubai’s REBOOT will focus on the talent and people implications of disruption created by Industry 4.0.

Buckle Up, We’re Ready For Take Off! 

The Big Ideas Global Event Series 2017 promises to light up social media, sparking vigorous discussions and crowd-sourcing ideas for the future of the profession but we can’t do it without you! We need your intput your questions and, of course, your big ideas for procurement.

By Registering As A Digital Delegates You Can…

  • Gain access to insightful discussions via our Big Ideas Summit 2017 groups
  • Connect with our influencers and ask questions live on the day of the events
  • Share big ideas for procurement with the Procurious community
  • Follow the day’s events live via our social media channels
  • Access video content from our speakers and attendees on the day and post-event

Who needs a workplace mentor when you can take your pick from the most exciting procurement influencers that the world has to offer?

You can now register free of charge as a digital delegate for our London event! What are you waiting for? Grab your passport and let’s go!

Meet The New General Secretary of Globalisation

Chinese President Xi Jinping claims world leadership for globalisation while the U.S. moves towards protectionism.

AFP PHOTO / POOL / Billy H.C. KWOK

Chinese President Xi Jinping used his address at the World Economic Forum in Switzerland last week to defend globalisation and criticise the rise of protectionism in Western economies.

The speech is the latest in a series of appearances on the world stage where Xi has sought to support the existing economic order that has fuelled decades of unprecedented growth in China. Similar appearances include Xi’s address to the United Nations in 2015, hosting the G20 Summit in 2016 and his speech at the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Summit in Peru in November last year.

De facto Chinese leadership?

With the Trans-Pacific Partnership scheduled for the chopping block when President Obama steps down, Xi now has the opportunity to shape global economic systems to China’s benefit and step into an apparent vacuum for worldwide economic leadership, particularly where free trade and globalisation are concerned. In many ways, the world is now witnessing the situation Obama sought to avoid with his “Pivot to Asia”, designed to maintain American influence in the East.

In a commentary following Xi’s speech, the China Daily referred to the country as now being “the one major power with a global outlook”. “Ready or not, China has become the de facto world leader seeking to maintain an open global economy and battle climate change. In effect, President Xi has become the general secretary of globalisation.”

Xi’s Defence of Globalisation

“There is no point in blaming economic globalisation for the world’s problems because that is simply not the case,” Xi said. “And that will not help to solve the problems.” The problems Xi is referring to are those often referenced by Western populists across the U.S. and Europe, including growing wealth gaps and domestic unemployment related to offshoring. Xi’s speech touched on some of the deeper causes of sluggish world growth, looking to reinforce confidence in global development.

“Protectionism is like locking yourself in a dark room, which would seem to escape wind and rain, but also block out the sunshine,” Xi told the Forum. “No one is a winner in a trade war.” Xi announced that China has no intention to devalue its currency to boost competitiveness, despite ongoing criticism on this point from the new U.S. President.

Can globalisation function without the U.S.?

Despite the nation’s ongoing economic slowdown, the World Economic Forum estimates that China accounted for almost 39% of global growth last year. President Trump’s protectionist tariffs, along with his retreat from trade deals and climate pacts are likely to slow growth further. A similar level of concern is building in India, where the $150 billion outsourcing industry is under threat.

As WorldPost Editor-in-chief Nathan Gardel writes, “The optimal arrangement for making globalisation work is for the U.S. and China to join together as “indispensable partners” based on a convergence of interests to create a world order that works for all. If the world’s two largest economies, though from distinct civilizational spheres, don’t buy in, it won’t work for anyone.”

Read more Huffington Post 

 In other procurement  news…

Britain to purchase 60 trains for HS2

  • Procurement of a fleet of up to 60 High Speed 2 (HS2) trains was officially launched on Friday by Britain’s state secretary for transport.
  • HS2 is a planned high-speed railway in the United Kingdom linking London, Birmingham, the East Midlands, Leeds, Sheffield and Manchester. It would be the second high-speed rail line in Britain, after HS1 which connects London to the Channel Tunnel.
  • The contract has an estimated value of £2.75bn and is due to be awarded by the end of 2019. The overall projected project cost of HS2 is £56bn.

Read more at the Birmingham Mail

GM announces $1 billion investment in U.S. based manufacturing plants

  • GM will invest $1 billion in its existing manufacturing plants, creating or retaining nearly 7,000 domestic jobs.
  • The announcement comes after President Trump criticised GM and other automakers for building vehicles in Mexico and shipping them to the U.S., including a Tweet threatening to tax GM for importing the Chevrolet Cruze.
  • GM’s targeted areas of growth include its subsidiary, GM Financial, and advanced technology divisions.

Read more at Investopedia 

Meals on Robot Wheels

  • Autonomous robot manufacturer Starship Technologies has signed deals with meal delivery companies Postmates and DoorDash to deliver lunches in Washington and San Francisco, beginning in February.
  • The robots are able to autonomously navigate sidewalks and traffic conditions, while customers track their progress via an app as they make the delivery.
  • Each robot weighs approximately 18 kg and can carry three filled shopping bags, while travelling at speeds of 6.5 kilometres per hour.

Read more at CIO 

What Procurement Pros Should Know About UK Energy Market Competition

Buying energy mightn’t always a top priority for procurement pros but there’s certain things you need to know!

The task of buying energy can often be pushed down the list of priorities especially within smaller businesses where time is precious. However, with proposed changes in how energy suppliers can market to businesses in the UK and the information that is available to them about competitors’ customers, could it now be time to start paying more attention to energy procurement?

Changes in the Energy Market

June 2014 saw the Competition and Market Authority (CMA) open an investigation into the energy market, on the back of a referral from industry watchdog Ofgem. This was triggered by the energy industry receiving increased political and media attention over its perceived competitiveness. The CMA issued its final report in June 2016 and outlined numerous recommendations with over 30 new measures being brought in, a number of which would affect energy procurement among smaller businesses.

Aiming to overhaul the energy market for the benefit of the customer, the report focused on four main areas – increasing customer engagement, creating a framework for effective competition through settlement, industry governance and wholesale market remedies.

Potentially one of the most noteworthy remedies micro businesses should be aware of is a database created and operated by Ofgem made up of ‘disengaged customers’, defined as microbusiness customers who have been on a default contract with the same energy provider for three or more years. Rival suppliers will have access to the information within the secure cloud-based database and have the opportunity to be able to market to potential customers via post. However it’s important to note that during 2017 energy providers will be contacting any affected customers to inform them of the new database, giving them the option to opt out of having their information shared if they wish.

Another measure to be in place by June 2017 is that energy suppliers will be required to provide online quotation tools for relevant micro and small business customers[i] to assist with price transparency and comparisons, helping buyers to get the best possible price based on their business’ postcode and consumption.

There has also been a significant change to arrangements around rollover contracts, as suppliers can no longer automatically rollover an existing customer for another 12 months following the end of their contract without having to allow the customer to exit on 30 days’ notice at any point. The supplier is also not permitted to charge any termination fees to customers that terminate the auto rollover contract during the rollover period.

CMA Report 

Finally, the CMA report states that in 2013 45% of microbusinesses were on default electricity rates, suggesting that customers had been placed on rates without actively negotiating. The CMA hopes to gain more interest and engagement from small businesses into the energy they procure, and with the end of fixed 12 month auto rollover contracts they believe proactive energy buyers will be able to gain better market rates.

Some remedies will come through amending supplier licence conditions, with many coming straight from the CMA via an order.

Energy buying might not be the top procurement priority for some businesses, however the imminent changes may present a timely opportunity to start paying more attention to energy procurement.

Steve Mulinganie is the Regulation & Compliance Manager at Gazprom Energy.

[i] The online quotation tool is only applicable to a subset of micro business customers, defined as customers who:

  • Consume no more than 73,000 kWh of gas
  • Consume no more than 50,000 kWh of electricity and has a meter profile of 1-4.
  • A small business is defined as an independently owned and operated company that has no more than 50 employees.
  • A micro small business is defined as an independently owned and operated company that no more than 10 employees.

2016 Rewind – Best of eLearning – The True Cost of Supply Chains

For our final 2016 rewind, we’re looking at the year’s top eLearning modules. How can sustainability help limit the true cost of supply chains?

Fast fashion is the embodiment of unsustainable supply chains and consumerism. Why then does it still have such a following? And what can we as consumers do to change this.

Well, we could all start by watching ‘The True Cost‘ – a film documentary that highlights the very worst aspects of fast fashion. It’s an eye-opening, and at times harrowing, look at how consumer trends are impacting the lives of workers in developing countries.

Procurious were delighted to be able to host one of the film’s team, Lucy Siegle, to the Big Ideas Summit this year.

True Cost of Supply Chains

When it comes to Fast Fashion, Lucy is one of the UK’s primary experts. At the Big Ideas Summit, she delivered a message to the assembled procurement leaders – you are in a position to change this.

She believes that there needs to be a more holistic view of the supply chain. This can start with procurement, but needs to include consumers too.

Consumers can help develop sustainable clothing and fashion brands by investing in them. Instead of buying attractively cheap clothing, we need to consider the true cost of the garment. Your cheap t-shirt could be driving poor working conditions in another part of the world.

So what’s procurement’s role in this? Well, as the key stakeholder in ensuring supply chain transparency, procurement can ensure suppliers are adhering to proper procedure. The profession also has the chance to change fast fashion trends by supporting truly ethical suppliers. Only then can we break the cycle.

You can read more about Lucy’s work on the Procurious Blog. You can also catch up with all the thought leadership from the Big Ideas Summit 2016 on the eLearning Hub. And there’s a whole lot more there to keep you interested too! Happy viewing!

How Sustainability Can Help Procurement Avoid Black Swans

Swans, procurement and sustainability – what’s the link? It’s all to do with procurement taking account for its impact on the wider world.

The traditional 12 days of Christmas might not start until the 26th of December. But this festive season, we’ll be bringing you the 12 days of procurement Christmas in the run up to the big day. Catch up with the story so far on the Procurious Blog.

“On the seventh day of Christmas, my true love gave to me…seven swans-a-swimming.”

Black swans are always unexpected, and defy explanation. Seeing two black swans together is highly unlikely. However, seeing seven together all at once? Well, you better hope that you don’t.

Of course, I’m not talking about the bird that you might see in your local park. The Black Swan I’m thinking of is a term coined by Nassim Nicholas Taleb for an event that is both surprising, and has a major impact.

So, if we can’t predict when these events will happen, how can we stop them? This is where sustainability, social value, and procurement come in.

Thinking the Unthinkable

Earlier this year, Nik Gowing spoke extensively about the concept of ‘Thinking the Unthinkable‘ at the Big Ideas Summit. The idea behind this was that current leaders weren’t able to deal with cataclysmic events – either through a lack of skills, or outright denial.

Little did Nik know that when he used President Trump as an example of an unpredictable event, he was actually predicting the future! Nor could he have known that 2016 could provide even greater volatility than 2014, the year Nik and his co-author looked at for these so-called Black Swans.

It’s easy to argue that, without the right skills, these events are impossible to handle. If you then add in the fact that we can’t predict them, even with all the technology available to us, then what can we do?

Swimming with the Swans

Given that Black Swan events can be just about anything, procurement needs to look at its impact on everything to do its bit. And one way to do this, is to be conscious of its impact on the wider society.

Sustainability and sustainable procurement are concepts that are getting increasing focus in the global profession. Organisations have begun to realise that sustainability can build supply chain competitive advantage. Employee engagement is key, but the vast majority of people want to engage if it means a brighter future.

The environment is certainly a major consideration in potential future Black Swan events. And, from management of resources, to responsibility for global supply chains, procurement will play a major role.

Procurement Gets Social

Of course, sustainability is just one aspect of procurement’s future. The profession is taking increasing interest in social value, and working with social enterprises.

And why should procurement be working with these organisations? Well, they give back to the community, and have a positive impact on the community, and the environment. There are also social organisations working hard to ensure that people have proper access to good, healthy food.

And those of us looking to get more meaning in our procurement careers could do worse than looking to work with social enterprises. Career Coach Charlie Wigglesworth, Director of Business and Enterprise, Social Enterprise UK, discussed this at length earlier in the year.

If your conscience has been pricked, then there is plenty you can do to help. If we pull together as a profession, then we can ensure procurement is better equipped to deal with unexpected events.

Or, you never know, we might even be able to stop them happening in the first place. Then the only swans we need to think about would be the ones we see at the local pond. And that would be good for the future, wouldn’t it?

Negotiation – it’s just one of the key skills procurement professionals need to drive value. But do you go for milking your supplier? Or getting something from the wider herd? Get the lowdown on Day 8.

Not Worth The Money – Will Entrepreneurs Avoid Business in Britain?

The Great British Pound is in trouble again this week and it’s making budding entrepreneurs think twice about their business plans.

Talk of a Hard-Brexit Sparks Global Concern

The pound plummeted to a 31-year low last week sparking global concern. The crash followed Prime Minister Theresa May’s announcement on Sunday 2nd October, which revealed a firm timeline for triggering Article 50 and the beginning of Brexit. Extra fuel was added to the, already well-stoked, fire when the media reported that she would opt for a complete break from Europe- a “hard brexit”. Reports  already suggest that a “hard brexit” could result in a loss of 70,000 jobs and cost £10bn in tax receipts.

With the pound sitting at $1.27 against the US dollar, chancellor Philip Hammond scuttled to New York with the hope of reassuring America’s biggest banks about the consequences of Brexit. He will try to convince the Wall Street powerbrokers that London will maintain its position as the world’s leading financial centre once the break from the EU is complete.

The pound is also falling against the euro this week, hitting a five-year low and continuing to escalate concerns.

Weak Pound Triggers Rise in UK Services Sector Prices

The dropping value of the pound is already affecting the UK services sector as input prices rose to a three and a half year high in September 2016.

David Noble, group CEO, CIPS, said: “Firms raised their prices in response, to counteract increased costs for fuel, food and elevated wage bills and as the weaker pound had an effect.”

Companies demonstrated their concerns at the ongoing uncertainty over Brexit implications through their reluctance to forge ahead with confidence.

“It’s clear that the pace of expansion has cooled since the first half of the year, reflecting widespread concern about the potential future impact of Brexit”, David commented.

Is Brexit Scaring Off Entrepreneurs?

The aftermath of Britain’s Brexit referendum back in June 2016 saw a strong display of optimism from many entrepreneurs. Indeed, a survey conducted by the Financial Times confirmed that the majority of founders and investors had confidence in London retaining its status as Europe’s biggest center for start-ups. But, is there a change in the wind?

Diana Paredes, CEO & Co-founder at Suade Labs and passionate entrepreneur spoke with Business Insider last week about the effects Brexit will have on entrepreneurship.

She questions why anyone would opt to start a business in the UK given the current economic climate. Operating in London adds a premium in terms of housing and talent and people often see the many business opportunities on offer as a justifiable compromise for quality of life. However, with the future so uncertain, is it worth the risk and sacrifice?

Existing organisations might also be keen to relocate their bases to elsewhere in Europe where it is cheaper to operate, less isolated and they can continue to be regarded as a European company and not simply a British one. 

If you’re an entrepreneur, what are your thoughts? Is the dropping value of the pound enough to make you run a mile from UK business? Let us know in the comments below.

Find out what else has been happening in the world of procurement and supply this week…

Samsung in Trouble Again

  • It’s been a month since Samsung recalled its new flagship phone, the Galaxy Note 7, following several cases of it exploding and injuring customers.
  • The company have been issuing replacement devices to customers who bought Galaxy Note 7 phones.
  • However, a Samsung recently started smoking uncontrollably on a flight before takeoff, forcing the cabin crew to evacuate the plane. This could lead to a second recall and a disastrous outcome for Samsung.
  • Google announced its Pixel smartphone this week and could be well placed to steal a whole host of disappointed Samsung’s customers.

Read More at Business Insider

Uber’s Self-Driving Cars

  • Uber’s self-driving car pilot program may want to fasten its seat belts after the bumpy beginning it has reportedly gotten off to.
  • The cars have reportedly gotten into accidents and ignored traffic signs during testing in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
  • Whilst it is still very early days for self-driving cars, it’s believed that they are, ultimately, inevitable given the overall, enticing end-game which should see the cars combatting road deaths.

Read more at Tech Radar

Supply Chain Leaders Pressured to Embrace Climate Change

  • Business for Social Responsibility (BSR) meets next month in New York with the current cri de Coeur being “bold climate action”.
  • Analysts have observed that multinationals must raise their ambitions by investing in climate finance, transition to renewable energy, and find more innovative was of ensuring resilient supply chains.
  • As well as encouraging change in organisational culture to embrace clean energy and other climate solutions, BSR insist that supply chain managers join Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) managers in becoming .intrapreneurs.
  • Supply chain managers can – and must – play a major leadership role in addressing the alarming consequences of aberrant global weather conditions.

Read more at Supply Chain 24/7

Drones Tested for Emergency Cell Service

  • Verizon Communications is testing the deployment of large-scale drones to provide mobile connectivity in emergency situations when the land-based cellular network has been damaged.
  • The drone which is being flown by American Aerospace Technologies, is nothing like the small, quad copter devices flown by amateurs at home. With a 17-foot wingspan, Verizon’s drone more resembles the types of unmanned aircraft used in the military.
  • Data gathered in Thursday’s trial will be shared with the FAA in order to help craft future rules regarding drones, Verizon said.

Read more at Fortune

Is it Worth Fighting for Sustainable Procurement?

Why procurement professionals must drive supplier innovation in order to keep up the fight for a sustainable planet.

As a procurement professional it can sometimes be a little bit challenging to keep up the motivation to pursue a more sustainable planet. News headlines and science reports reflect a world which is developing in the wrong direction.

Oceans are becoming more acidic, with devastating results on coral and connected ecosystems. The air in major cities is full of high levels of dangerous particulates. Crop-growing regions for key commodities are shifting. Sea levels are rising.

At the end of the day, is there still hope for you, me and the planet? In this article I will put focus on some of the positive signs we can see. Let me be clear – it is still worth fighting for sustainable procurement, the planet and the generations to come.

Greater Transparency

Transparency is growing. It’s harder and harder to hide malfeasance. Carbon emissions are disclosed. Everyone is online everywhere, and we have easy access to information, and the ability to pictures of something that we dislike at any given time of the day. And if you fail, even as a company, the public will collectively judge and give the verdict.

Even in procurement we are working with tools, like the Ecovadis sustainability rating system, where the performance of the suppliers is evaluated. Not only for the sake of performance, but also because we want companies to change. To create impact driven approaches.

Regulators and Heroes Show the Way

It is obvious that the more transparent we get, the more the regulators act. More and more companies and public actors disclose their behaviour, and this leads to actions amongst regulators who create climate treaties, introduce carbon taxation, or hand down regulations to markets.

Investors have even started incorporating sustainability and ESG risk into their calculations on where to invest their money.

Heroes are among us. Alongside the great minds in science, many individual policy-makers, business leaders, farmers and consumers are making millions of decisions and taking small steps, every day, to reduce their impact or improve the planet.

The vast majority of people want to take care of their world, and science and the media are providing the tools and knowledge to help them do so. Lights are being turned off. Public transport systems are being built and used. Less food is being wasted. Each of us wants to be a hero.

Fostering Innovation and Collaboration

Innovation matters. Enormous investments are being made. These efforts, many of which are being driven by the best minds in academic and business labs, will without a doubt deliver solutions to many of our environmental challenges. It’s a question of when, not if.

Collaboration is happening. Competitors are talking to each other and to policy-makers around how to share best practices to reduce costs and improve efficiencies. Solutions to global sustainability problems are too big for any one country or company to solve.

Integrating Sustainable Supplier Innovation

We should not forget that a company’s ability to build close partnerships with innovative suppliers is directly correlated with the firms successful innovation performance. Companies which include their suppliers in the innovation process seem to financially outperform their peers that do not.

It is a fact that 90 per cent of companies do not include their suppliers in their innovation processes. 69.9 per cent of corporate revenue is directed towards externalised, supplier driven cost. Suppliers should be viewed as an extension of the company and, as such, they should be incentivised, coached, sanctioned and rewarded to help achieve corporate objectives.

The message is clear: we need to keep fighting for sustainable procurement, the planet, and the generations to come. We can make a start by integrating suppliers closer to the innovation processes.