Tag Archives: technology solutions

Delivery Failure Notification: Your Spend Analysis Tools Could Not Deliver On Their Promise Of Good Data

When spend analysis solutions have failed to solve the problem they were designed to fix, they leave their users wanting more. But there are always ways to salvage your investment….

At a high level, companies utilising spend analysis solutions are leveraging spend data for the purpose of gaining visibility into cost reduction, performance improvement, supply risk, compliance, and other value generation opportunities. Simply put, spend analysis, and the resulting spend visibility, are considered “table stakes” for any procurement organisation. No procurement function can make a claim to world-class status or even average performance if it lacks this entry-level capability. It should be the first and last step of the strategic sourcing process that both identifies the opportunity and measures the organisation’s achievement thereof.

While these solutions have existed for decades, many companies that utilise them continue to suffer from poor procurement data, if not downright unusable data. They are undone by noncompliance, data entry errors, fragmentation of data across multiple systems and general poor data discipline.

Many of these solutions encompass complex organisational schemas such as UNSPSC, which was designed for other purposes and applies a categorisation structure that reflects the way supply markets are organised. Furthermore, general ledger (GL) codes are simply not a trustworthy substitute for a true procurement and sourcing taxonomy, and were designed for people who write the checks.

Certainly some companies must have great procurement data, because so much money has been spent on these systems specially intended to solve this challenge. But in cases where those technologies fail to deliver on the promise of good data, they are typically suffering from a host of data issues due to:

  1. Accounting-oriented data not aligned with procurement categorisation
  1. Maverick and unmanaged spend not captured in the solution
  1. Poor input discipline, or procurement-related data being entered by non-procurement resources

When these solutions have failed to solve the problem they were designed to fix, they leave their users wanting more. User adoption is low and many find that additional data manipulation is required, with many organisations dedicating internal resources to spend analytics, despite paying at third party to perform this for them. These tools are often clunky and difficult to use and fail to deliver the key insights procurement professionals need to drive value and impact the bottom line.

The market is calling for an end to this systemic problem impacting most procurement functions. After all, having access to quality data will always ensure procurement a seat at the table. Organisations should be able to rely on solution providers to provide them at a minimum with:

  • Highly accurate categorisation
  • Actionable, data-driven, procurement-focused insights
  • Fingertip access to ‘good” or even “great” data through a simple, easy to use interface

If you find you are not experiencing this with your solution provider, there are still ways to salvage your investment. Identify the desired changes and develop strategies with your vendor to overcome the visibility challenges. They should be ready and willing to restructure the underlying data/taxonomy to ensure you reap the benefits of the solution you implemented. Today, procurement professionals should be focusing on the strategic aspect of their roles and elevate beyond the frustrating and tactical world of data manipulation.

Continue reading Delivery Failure Notification: Your Spend Analysis Tools Could Not Deliver On Their Promise Of Good Data

6 Things To Consider Before You Buy Any Procurement Technology

Thinking of investing in some of the latest procurement technology? If you haven’t consulted market trends, got a third opinion and done all of your research, you might want to pull on the reins!

Buying procurement technology these days is a complicated business.

With ever more niche vendors entering the market and established providers offering increasingly sophisticated solutions, differentiating on face value alone can be as clear as mud. However, given that your decision will have an enterprise-wide impact, it’s crucial that you assess your options and make the most informed decision possible.

1. Separating Fact from Fiction

Of course, you will have the product marketing collateral from each provider such as datasheets and solution overviews.

However, you need to be aware of how much is marketing ‘fluff’ and how much is an accurate reflection of the solution’s capabilities.

To do this, you can turn to customer case studies and testimonials to understand what their experience of implementing and using the solution has been like. But remember, even that source of information comes with its own challenges and shortcomings. If the case study focuses on the customer’s functional use of the product, it may not offer you an accurate view of customer service levels or product performance, which are of course key considerations in making your decision.

This is where third party research and validation comes into play.

2. Look at market trends

Where do you go and how do you choose your sources of information?

The entire technology market is well served with analysts reporting trends, competencies and guidance on the good, the bad and the ugly of the industry. In searching for technology vendors that meet your requirements, this certainly helps sort the “wheat from the chaff”.

That said, the technology market is quite unique in that it experiences a rapid advance in product capabilities. With competition driving innovation, product sets evolve quickly and when you’re looking at R&D in technology sphere, one year is a long time. This means that its essential to ensure that the information you’re using, and basing your decision upon is up-to-date and reflective of the latest capabilities within the market.

3. Consult The Magic Quadrant

One of the world’s largest, most respected analyst organisations for technology research is Gartner. Each year or so, they produce the Magic Quadrant which is a culmination of research in a specific market, giving individuals a broad view of the relative positions of the market’s competitors. The Gartner Magic Quadrant research provides a graphical competitive positioning of four types of technology providers in fast-growing markets; Leaders, Visionaries, Niche Players and Challengers.

They produce this research for a range of technology sectors, including procurement sourcing applications, and it is a well-trusted source of information for assessing your options when you go to market.

Access the Latest Gartner Magic Quadrant for Strategic Sourcing Application Suites.

4. Make sure you’re using up-to-date analysis

Given the considerations around the pace of advancements in the eProcurement sector,  it is all the more important to ensure that you’re using the most current information available. In addition, because of the time between each report release, you’ll find that vendors that have been in a Leaders quadrant can fall from grace into lower quadrants/waves.

This is because to remain in the Leader segment is dependent on a vendor’s investment in product functionality and features, as well as their business vision to meet the needs and demands of the procurement marketplace. Customer satisfaction and referencing is also taken into consideration for the research, meaning a strong Leader position is indicative of a satisfied customer base.

5. Get a third (Party) opinion

There are a number of consulting and analyst organisations who conduct independent research of the technology space in order to provide a clearer, qualitative segmentation of the marketplace. By supplementing the information supplied by providers with this third party research, you can validate performance and delivery to build a more objective view of the market place. To get you started, here is a short list of publishers that you can turn to for information:

  • Spend Matters Network
    This leading network of procurement websites is a great source of current procurement insight. Their commentary and reporting examines the latest news, techniques, “secret” tools of the trade, technology, and its impact. Most of the content is free to access, but there is a Spend Matters Pro membership that will give you access to exclusive research and content.
  • Procurement Leaders Network
    Procurement Leaders™ is a global membership network, serving senior procurement and supply chain executives from major worldwide corporations, providing independent procurement intelligence, professional development and peer-to-peer networking. It has a broad range of research into various sectors, but you do need to be a member to access most of the content.
  • Supply Management
    Supply Management is the official publication of the Chartered Institute of Procurement & Supply and features the latest news, view and analysis for procurement and supply chain professionals worldwide. The website provides daily news and opinion and exclusive content, in addition to access to more than 15,000 articles.

6. Do your research

As the marketplace for procurement software and technology continues to grow, it can become a confusing place for those looking to choose a solution; you’ve niche providers who offer specific pieces of software and more established leaders offering integrated full-suite solutions. Each promises to deliver the most effective, powerful solution but how much of that is bluster and how much is grounded in truth? By all means utilise the product marketing information that a vendor provides, but scrutinise it too. Is what they say true?

Ensuring you conduct thorough third-party research and refer to existing customer testimonials is key to finding the answer to that question and key to you selecting the best solution for your organisation.

This article was written by Dan Quinn, SVP Jaggaer MENA.


Join JAGGAER In Munich next month for REV 2018 – two action-packed days, filled with the latest in eProcurement innovations, trends, and strategies designed to help you accelerate your spend management digital transformation.

Hear how your peers are leveraging highly engineered technology to deliver strategic procurement value to their organisations.

Spaces are limited so secure your place today and check out the incredible speaker line-up.

Everything You Need To Know About Bitcoin In One Super Infographic

 The precise workings of Bitcoin are still a mystery to many but here’s everything you need to know about the rise of the digital currency. 

 

Bitcoin is a digital currency which uses peer-to-peer technology. It doesn’t require a bank for making online transactions worldwide and is also known as the first cryptocurrency that does not use central repositories. As such, it’s classified as a decentralised currency by the U.S. treasury.

The currency was first introduced in 2008 to a cryptographic mailing list. On 9th January 2009, the first version (1.0) of Bitcoin was released and on 12th January, the first transaction took place.

Presently, Bitcoin prices are climbing and there’s a whole host of significant, and widespread, clients. Pennsylvania was the first state in U.S. to  accept Bitcoins back in 2013.

UK bank, Barclays, have revealed that they will be the first to facilitate  users in making charitable donations using the currency outside their system.

Total Processing has created an infographic to explain The Rise and Rise of Bitcoin since 2008.

Toby Dean works on behalf of Total Processing in content creation and marketing. He creates engaging graphics and content that help businesses stand out from the crowd. Over the past seven years has worked with dozens of SME’s in both an agency and freelance capacity.

Are Procurement Professionals Stuck in the Stone Age? – Part II

Is procurement losing ground by having antiquated, “stone-age” technology solutions? Why are B2B solutions struggling to keep up?

This article was originally published on Market Dojo.

In the second article in this series (you can read the first part here), Anya McKenna, of Market Dojo, and Ed Cross, of Odesma, ponder why B2B software remains stuck in the past, while B2C software is moving forwards in leaps and bounds, providing users with the experience they want.

The question is why big B2B software solution providers have not changed and emulated B2C? We would postulate the following reasons:

  1. Customer demand or acceptance.
  2. Drive for consulting revenues by providers.
  3. Decision makers equate complicated to valuable.
  4. Industry  Research organisations are in the pocket of those who pay and report as such.
  5. Existing suppliers balance sheets stifle innovation or change due to the impact on profit of asset write downs.
  6. Big business inherently do not trust small innovative start ups / CIOs don’t get fired for selecting the old guard.
  7. B2C companies are not interested in selling to the B2B customer base.

In order to fully understand this, we need to look at each of these points in more detail:

  1. Customer demand or acceptance.

Interestingly there does not appear to be a huge clamour amongst B2B customers to secure simpler, easier systems.

Take SAP or Oracle for example. They continue to dominate their sector (SAP acquired Ariba for $4.3 billion), and continue to thrive, making little effort to simplify and re-invent with ease of use at the heart of their solutions.

Whereas, in the B2C arena, there is no choice for the providers. Millions of users’ voices are being heard, and all leading solutions, from Amazon to AirBnB, are simple and easy to use. Perhaps the imperative to change amongst B2B players is just not being voiced by action.

  1. Drive for consulting revenues by providers.

The prevailing model for providers is to maximise revenue (after all they answer to shareholders), and they have predominantly built models that support this goal. They do this by securing licence annuity, and augment this with implementation, training, consultancy and delivery services.

Take a leading and long established eSourcing provider for example. They provide a complicated and unintuitive, but effective, solution for e-Sourcing, which they support with a very large consultancy practice (600 professional staff delivering revenues of greater than €70 million).

Though figures are not available we might hypothesise that at least 50 per cent of the revenues are consulting and support related. Clearly it is not in any legacy B2B providers interests to simplify the user interface, due to the resulting loss of support revenues.

  1. Decision makers equate complicated to valuable.

Is it human nature in business to expect business solutions to be inherently complicated?

Look at Jive, a sort of Facebook for business. Whereas Facebook is really easy to navigate and personally manage intuitively, Jive is not.

Given Facebook came first, and Jive built a similar tool, albeit for a closed company environment, is it that those that selected it, measured its value in terms of its complexity?

  1. Industry Research organisations are in the pocket of those who pay and report as such.

A rather contentious point perhaps, but when looking at Gartner’s report on the e-Sourcing market a few years ago, they had only just added a 7th criteria to their analysis: Ease of Use.

Gartner had historically focused on functional components – i.e. spend analysis, contract management, etc. (making up 4 of 7 criteria) – alongside technology platform and business services.

Additionally the analysis of providers generally only lent itself to the bigger or more established players. The 2013 report included fewer than 30 suppliers, with the leaders in their opinion being the likes of IBM, BravoSolution, Ariba, GEP, and SAP.

Very few emerging and new players are included. This may be due to time constraints, but clearly is at the detriment of newer, and easier to use, solutions.

  1. Existing suppliers’ balance sheets stifle innovation, or change due to the impact on profit of asset write downs.

It is a fact of business that the balance sheet plays a large part in driving companies’ behaviour, especially if they have many millions of $/£ intangible asset value.

SAP had Intangible Assets of €25.6 billion on revenues of €17.6 billion in 2014. A write down in an asset, results in an equal write down in profits. Institutional shareholders typically take fright (and flight) at write-downs. Therefore re-inventing the hegemony of existing solutions, requires a potentially significant investment and potentially a write down in previous investments – this is not something the neither executive nor board will countenance.

Is it therefore a surprise that existing solutions lack innovation in the user interface, which may well require re-programming in a newer language?

  1. Big businesses inherently do not trust small, innovative start ups; CIOs don’t get fired for selecting the old guard.

When was the last time the CIO of a large corporate suggested taking a risk? Corporate behaviour is typically risk averse. It is much safer to select a proven provider such as IBM or SAP, than take an opportunity to shake the tree.

This therefore precludes newer, start-up technologies that will deliver often much more cost effective, easier to use solutions. Coupa are making real inroads here, but few others are.

  1. B2C companies are not interested in selling to the B2B customer base.

The question is why don’t Amazon, or Tesco for that matter, move into the B2B space? They provide a huge range of products that businesses use. Yet they generally haven’t, other than grudgingly, thought to move into the B2B market – it is not part of their strategy.

However, we understand this is changing at Amazon! They believe their market is the consumer, not business, possibly because they are much simpler to deal with, pay immediately and do not add massive administrative, process and management burdens (i.e. contracts, risk questionnaires, etc.), which corporates do add as a matter of process.

But will this change? We postulate it is slowly shifting, with B2C principles slowly coming into the B2B World. In our follow up we will discuss this shift in some detail.

Market Dojo and Odesma have partnered to combine their intuitive eSourcing software and expertise in offering business advisory services to offer clients a winning procurement solution.